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Kingston Roads and Utilities Infrastructure Program 2008 – 2010


A

s the 2010 construction season comes to a close, Utilities Kingston and the City of Kingston are successfully completing an unprecedented three-year roads and utilities capital infrastructure program. Subsequent to budget approval and through a combined and co-operative effort from Utilities Kingston, the City of Kingston Engineering Department, and the Department of Public Works, the initiative delivered road and utilities infrastructure improvements throughout the entire amalgamated City of Kingston with greatly enhanced efficiency. The program met its goals of completing all roads and utilities projects on time, on budget, while providing excellent customer service, and was able to effectively apply additional funding opportunities throughout the three-year

period to accomplish upgrades not initially included in the original plan. The efficiency of the program satisfied and exceeded expectations of even its most ardent supporters, due to clear lines of communication between departments and stakeholders and careful consideration of potential projects. “Our submission was very detailed and we asked for approval not only page 1

in principle but for an approved budget to proceed,” stated Jim Keech, President and CEO of Utilities Kingston. In the autumn of 2007, Utilities Kingston and the City’s Department of Engineering, which falls under Mr. Keech’s supervision, together approached Kingston City Council with an ambitious plan – an unprecedented municipal proposal designed to complete a defined grouping of roads and utilities infrastructure projects for the next three years. The unique and detailed program was designed to chart the course for infrastructure renewal and expansion in the City of Kingston with partnerships, vision, and achievements in a manner never before attempted by this municipality. Success required both approval of the Kingston Road and Utilities Infrastructure Program and final budget approval for 2008, 2009, and 2010. Although traditionally a multi-year approved capital infrastructure budget is extremely rare, on 18 December 2007, the Council of the Corporation of the City of Kingston enacted ByLaw 2008-25, authorizing the capital budget for the next three fiscal years, ushering in a new era of asset


planning, and continuing the City’s proud history of innovation and leadership at all levels. The long-range concept required a major revision in municipal budgeting which typically allocates funds on an annual basis, however incorporating three years and several municipal entities working in harmony delivered superior results. Staging civil infrastructure upgrades in a ­d eliberate manner while working closely with all stakeholders was the key to success. Many other elements were critical including communications with contractor groups, external agencies, and impacted residents, retailers, and community groups. At the end of the program, the City of ­K ingston and Utilities Kingston invested more than $120 million ($90 million in the initial City approved budget plus an additional $30 million in provincial grants) in 213 road segment and utility projects.

An ad hoc taskforce consisting of representatives from Utilities Kingston, the City’s Engineering Department, and Public Works chose streets targeted for capital budget expenditures utilizing A Criteria for Road Selection (See ­Appendix B for the full document). “We recognize there are a lot of roads and utilities requiring attention throughout the city,” noted Mark VanBuren, Director of Engineering, Public Works Services. “We made objective decisions to prioritize projects based on engineering principles as opposed to subjective criteria.” While detailed condition assessment objectivity is paramount, Mr. VanBuren ­readily acknowledges other factors such as the City’s promotion

See Appendix A for a complete listing, encapsulated as follows: ✓✓ 136 infrastructure projects including water and gas mains, road reconstruction, surface treatment, resurfacing, microsurfacing, widening, and traffic calming ✓✓ 31 new and reconstructed sidewalks ✓✓ 26 sidewalk access ramps ✓✓ 15 new or upgraded traffic signals ✓✓ 5 bridge reconstructions (the La Salle Causeway, although a vital river crossing link, is owned by Public Works and Government Services Canada and is not included in the program) From 2008 to the end of 2010, the three-year program addressed: ✓✓ 21 kilometres of road work including 8 kilometres of reconstructed road surfaces and 13 kilometres of road overlays and surface treatments ✓✓ 11 kilometres of new and rebuilt sidewalks page 2

✓✓ Completion of improvements to Division Street between John Counter Boulevard and Highway 401 ✓✓ Development of a detailed design for the John Counter Boulevard Project, which includes widening the road to four lanes and a grade separation at the CN line ✓✓ Continuation of the trunk sewer remediation program, including cleaning and repair of major sewers to restore capacity and eliminate infiltration into sewers which is a primary cause of combined sewer overflows ✓✓ System separation work at the Earl Street catchment area designed to reduce combined sewer overflows ✓✓ Sewer investigation and rehabilitation to resolve sewer back ups and basement flooding in the Strathcona Park, Palace Road, Runnymede, and Queen Mary Road drainage areas


of active forms of transportation including cycling and walking facilities have formed a prominent part of the three-year plan. In addition, traffic calming projects have become an important part of the plan as the City works towards addressing the issues of speeding traffic and short-cutting through residential neighbourhoods. “Transparency in the decision-making process and the continual message City and Utilities Kingston staff are focused on maximizing the taxpayer and rate payer investment in municipal infrastructure is key to having council and the public endorsing multi-year plans,” emphasises Mr. VanBuren. One of the many challenges arose from finding an appropriate combination of projects – with the ultimate goal to combine road reconstruction with sewer and watermain upgrades, thus achieving maximum benefits for a neighbourhood with one contract. Wherever possible, as in the case with the Willingdon area and Princess Street reconstruction, combined sewers were separated, new watermains installed, and the entire roads rebuilt as a shared effort between Utilities Kingston and the City’s Engineering Department.

Prior to adopting a multi-year plan, the Engineering Department and Utilities Kingston planned contracts based on their individual needs, making all reasonable attempts to combine efforts whenever possible, but with a year-to-year budget process and a limited construction season well underway prior to fiscal approval, this was virtually impossible to co-ordinate. “It made it difficult to focus our efforts efficiently,” said Damon Wells, Director, Public Works Department. “When Jim Keech became responsible for Public Works and Engineering, in addition to his duties as president and CEO of Utilities Kingston, he was able to bring the two engineering groups – Utilities Kingston and the City – together.” Mr. VanBuren concurs, “Mr. Keech was able to bring together all of the groups involved in the planning, design, construction, operation, and maintenance of road and utilities infrastructure.” “We now have monthly meetings to discuss issues and opportunities,” continued Mr. Wells. “We have input into capital planning and we’re able to pass on what we’ve identified as needs on a regular basis due to this solid line of communication.” The three-year program and the resulting commu­ nication between municipal entities delivered significant benefits. “Once Public Works knows where the work is being done, we can plan our maintenance both in terms of location and substance. As well, since both of our supervisors come from the private sector with years of experience in road and asphalt technologies,

Kingston Roads and Utilities Infrastructure Program 2008 - 2010


engineering can avail themselves of a high degree of practical in-house expertise in these areas.” Mr. Wells stresses the importance of Utilities Kingston, Engineering, and Public Works coordinating the planning of projects. “Working together reduces maintenance costs,” he explained. “In 2006, we needed “We live in a harsh climate, so there are to mitigate a problem in challenges…” the downtown Mark Campbell, City of core. We were Kingston Construction constantly Manager, Engineering patching Department Princess Street between Division and Bagot and in the winter, the ploughs would peel it off. We knew the Downtown Action Plan was in the works and the next two blocks should be reconstructed within a few years so we recommended resurfacing from Division to Bagot, which freed up Public Works time and resources for other areas.” Kingston’s downtown core is undeniably historic. While restoring the dome on City Hall a few years ago, Nick Mather of Roof Tile Management, an international firm specializing in heritage restoration, named Kingston one of the top four most interesting heritage cities in Ontario, comparing it with Ottawa, the old city of York, and London. Often the quaintness of history is lost on those charged with maintaining old streets. “Two blocks on Brock Street were at the point where we could no longer maintain them,” continued Mr. Wells. “The surface was coming off in huge chunks making patching almost impossible. There were no clear lines between patches. The chunks were the size of a desktop.” Knowing it would be quite some time before the Downtown Action Plan could address this issue and utility work was only scheduled for farther up Brock Street, Public Works recom­ mended resurfacing these two blocks aswell to page 4

provide a better surface and eliminate wasted maintenance. “This is why it so important to have not only a multi-year plan, but also an approved multi-year budget. We know what each department is planning, we can work with or plan around each other, and we can tell people what’s happening. It’s not only important to be able to recognize callers’ concerns about poor road conditions but also to be able to tell them when their road may be resurfaced or rebuilt. The ability to communicate our plans beyond the current construction season means so much to our customers and our staff. It gives them answers to their concerns and some peace of mind.” Long range planning means all stakeholders can provide valuable input into engineering, scheduling, and priorities, and as Mr. Wells noted, often the most basic approach combined


with a multi-year plan first three-year can result in surprising program a solid and “Early tenders receive the efficiencies. “We were successful but basic sending three men out best prices, the best people, beginning. “Hopefully to Lee Road three times the next step is to get and the best planning.” a week to fix potholes. It a five-year plan, and Doug Haight, General Manager, was incredibly inefficient eventually work up to Taggart Construction but the road needed a 10-year plan with constant maintenance. multi-year budget With the three-year plan, we identified approvals for each term of council. With and shared the problem, scheduled it for that, we can tailor the capital plan for reconstruction, and instead of patching everyone because it forces excellent potholes, we removed the asphalt and communication and forces and provides simply graded it every few weeks because for very long range capital planning; we knew a permanent solution was only without it, we can’t plan ahead, we can’t be a few months away. It allowed us to target as efficient in spending, and we can’t coour resources in other areas. The benefit ordinate projects and maintenance.” goes beyond any single department – While Engineering, Public Works, and the more efficiently money is spent in Utilities Kingston strived to combine Public Works, the more available for road efforts for several years prior to the reconstruction and utilities.” three-year plan, working year-to-year There are myriad benefits of a multisignificantly limited the best of intentions. year plan, and Mr. Wells considers the “Each department had its list of priorities, but we were always waiting for budget approval,” explained Mr. VanBuren. “By the time each department had approval, we weren’t able to properly co-ordinate each project, so we’d reconstruct a road just to have Utilities Kingston install new sewer lines a few years later, or Public Works would expend resources repairing a city street and we’d rebuild it the next year. It was obviously frustrating to residents and commuters, and not the most efficient utilization of our capital budget.” With a multi-year plan approved and budgeted, Public Works was able to focus on roads and streets not slated for reconstruction, particularly in Kingston’s suburban area. “Many roads and streets with low speeds and low traffic volumes are also very old and in need of repair, but due to traffic volumes they may not meet Kingston Roads and Utilities Infrastructure Program 2008 - 2010


macadam or tar and chip and with smaller dollar amounts invested we can treat and improve substantial sections.” The importance of the multiyear plan was immediately apparent, despite the realities of the situation. “We’re always going to have a first year of a program, where we are waiting for approvals, whether it covers three or five or ten years,” explained Mark Campbell, Construction Manager for the City of Kingston. “As soon as we have budgeting authorization, we can mobilize shovel-ready projects and we can begin the design, engineering, and tendering process for the remainder of the program term.”

engineering criteria, or they may not have underground service needs from Utilities Kingston’s perspective,” continued Mr. Wells. “Public Works can provide improved maintenance Both contractors and city staff agree – a multito these types of roads and streets because the year program is critical to the success of municipal multi-year program has provided efficiencies infrastructure project management, due in part to allowing us to reallocate our resources. a fiscal year ending in December, budget approval Engineering was able to resurface several roads in announcements coming well into the new year, rural areas that were constant and equal importance on problems for us and we were the vagaries of the Canadian “With a three-year able to put our resources into climate. program we spend some suburban area streets “We typically seek approval less time on administration requiring extra attention. We for $1.5 to $2 million each found our efficiency improved because we are able year for resurfacing, which is a with each year of the program to tender two or vital part of our road network and efficiencies realized efforts. With a year-to-year three larger contracts elsewhere allowed us to budget, we get approval in rather than six or seven respond to maintenance and April and then begin the repair requests and concerns smaller contracts...” tendering process. By then, from residents and ward many contractors have already Mark Campbell councillors for areas not on committed to the season’s engineering’s radar.” workload and we’re in a position of expecting them to respond to our tenders. We may not be “Surface treatment is an important element of getting the best value for our money because we’re our program,” concurred Mr. VanBuren. “Rural late out of the gate,” continued Mr. Campbell. roads are a significant percentage of our road network and were given considerable weight in our project selection. Typical treatment is page 6

Doug Haight, general manager of Taggart Construction’s Kingston office concurs. “The


we can offer greater efficiency. We lose cost efficiency by not getting the tenders early.” Using the Princess Street contract as an example, Mr. Haight stated, “We knew we had to wait until the frost came out in late March or early April, but we were able to plan the previous November.”

three-year plan lets contractors have an approximation of pending work volume. The Kingston Construction Association (KCA) has encouraged Utilities Kingston, Public Works, and the Engineering Department for years to call tenders early.”

For city officials and contractors, planning is paramount to success.

Mr. Haight described his company’s response to a tender. “We bid electronically with a computerized estimating package. The average municipal tender takes an in-house estimator A respected civil over a week to go “Tenders issued earlier contractor, Taggart over every item in the second and third Construction responds to in the job. If the many civil ­infrastructure contract calls for years of a three-year tenders and Mr. Haight is an 1,000 metres of program receive better active director of the KCA’s watermain, we pricing because we can civil infrastructure group. count every bend, “Each contractor has a limit offer greater efficiency. connector, tee, on the amount of work we nut, and bolt. We lose cost efficiency can handle,” he said. “We’re There may be by not getting aggressive in our pricing 150 items in the the tenders early.” early in the season but as specifications and we get busier, our bid prices we do this for every Doug Haight increase because we have to single one of them, spend more time arranging including granular, asphalt, watermains, additional resources and scheduling storm sewers, and sanitary sewers. becomes difficult. Early tenders receive the After the estimator completes the best prices, the best people, and the best itemization, Mr. Haight spends at least planning.” half a day quantifying the production Mr. Haight further notes with the threeschedule, staffing, and equipment. “A year program Utilities Kingston and the typical municipal tender ties up $4,000 to City’s Engineering Department “can issue $5,000 on average, and we’ll often respond tenders earlier in the second and third to four or five tenders each week during years and receive better pricing because the construction season.” Kingston Roads and Utilities Infrastructure Program 2008 - 2010


Again, using the Princess Street contract as has 50 employees with an annual payroll of $25 an example, Mr. Haight explained the added million. It’s a union shop, and whenever possible, investment required for a Request for Proposal they like to source work locally. “We live here, we (RFP). “Princess Street was the first RFP called shop here, and as a company, we want to work by the City or Utilities Kingston for straight road close to home because it’s more efficient. If we reconstruction work, and work more than 40 km from the it was appropriate given office, we pay each employee an “There’s a comfort factor the specific applications additional $45 per day, so there knowing there is good work for this contract. We is a huge incentive to work in flow ahead. It helps with had to understand the Kingston.” requirements and they resource allocation, from Mr. Haight acknowledged were covered quite well. the expertise necessary in staffing to specialty training The Princess Street RFP acquiring a significant portion to equipment acquisitions let the contractor have of infrastructure stimulus funds. for our member firms.” creative input on the job. “Kingston did very well with That said, responding Harry Sullivan, Executive Director, the program. The engineering to an RFP increases our Kingston Construction Association staff and leadership have a investment by about good handle on what they’re 500 per cent over a tender call, or in this case, doing and always seem to be prepared with probably $25,000.” Taggart Construction, due shovel-ready projects for stimulus dollars. This to other commitments, eventually decided to is a very progressive administration for getting not respond to the RFP, but respects the process infrastructure projects engineered, funded, and and acknowledges the three-year plan assisted completed and a three- or four-year roads and in the decision. utilities program is a necessity to make everyone’s “It lets everyone plan ahead, including contractors and the engineering staff. In the past, they wouldn’t com­mit resources to a project because they didn’t have budget approval and therefore when approvals arrived, design and engineering staff had to rush to get documents and plans in place. Typically, based on a year-to-year approval process, tenders weren’t called until the end of May or June and by then we’ve lost a lot of the construction season. Contractors are committed to other work, and the efficiency is lost.” Praising the City of Kingston for its preparedness, Mr. Haight stresses the importance of the three-year program and its economic impact on contractors. His branch of the family-run Taggart Construction page 8

life workable. Technology, too, often requires a longer lead time. “Our surface treatment road work should be completed by mid-August in this climate,” explained Mr. Campbell. “It requires dry heat and


“Virtually all of our road projects over the last three years were done by members of the Kingston Construction Association, with the exception of specific surface treatments contracted to Ottawa-area contractors.” Mark VanBuren, Director of Engineering, City of Kingston traffic to properly settle and cure, to drive the granular into the emulsion to create a better road that will last longer. Generally asphalt plants don’t open until mid-May so construction typically has to start six weeks prior, meaning we need contractors on-site by the first of April. With the old system, we’d have to wait for budget approval in April and May, overwhelm the designers and engineers with demands to create plans and documents, call a tender, and hopefully have it going by midsummer.” Weather is an issue at both shoulder seasons, requiring careful monitoring of conditions. “We look for oppor­ tunities, and get projects out early, but we have to be realistic,” continued Mr. Campbell. “We are limited by frost, freezing, and the availability and application of asphalt, which must be laid when the temperature is above freezing and rising, with

no standing water. Whenever we work on a water or sewer utility, we have to divert it above ground, so again, low temperatures are a factor.” Once again, the three-year program helped with the ability to schedule projects less impacted by weather – sidewalk upgrades or construction – around these questionable periods because funding was approved.

The multi-year plan enabled city staff to group more individual projects under fewer contracts, while lowering resource consumption. “Typically sidewalk repair and reconstruction is tendered as a package but under the program we were able to increase the size of the contract and issue a second contract due to additional available funding,” said Mr. Campbell. “Prior to this term of council, we normally invest about $200,000 in sidewalk work each year but with the support of this council we’ve spent almost $1 million per year under the program. Due to aggressive pricing from the contractors, realized because we had projects out for tender much earlier in the second and third year, we had a significant budget surplus and were able to add and complete several additional projects.”

Kingston Roads and Utilities Infrastructure Program 2008 - 2010

“With a threeyear program we spent less time on administration because we were able to tender two or three larger


contracts rather than six or seven smaller projects,” continued Mr. Campbell. “We group by technology and weight it with geographical data. Kingston essentially has five major east-west routes in the urban area – Highway 401, Princess Street, TaylorKidd Boulevard/John Counter Boulevard, Bath Road, and Front Road - and when we can confirm scheduling over a number of years, we can phase projects and attempt to minimize impacts to crosscity traffic on all of them at the same time.” An unanticipated benefit of the multi-year program is the ability to work closely with external entities to co-ordinate infrastructure upgrades. In a city known for its large institutions - Queen’s University, Canadian Forces Base Kingston, and the Royal Military College of Canada choreography is paramount, as is co-ordinating with Bell Canada, Union Gas, Via Rail, CN Railway, Cogeco, and Hydro One. Canada’s busiest trade route skirts the top of Kingston, and the Ministry of Transportation (MTO) Eastern Region is committed to widening Highway 401 to six lanes, which means upgrading interchanges as well. “The MTO is currently “We group by working on the technology and Division StreetHighway 401 weight it with interchange geographical data.” which involves Mark Campbell shaving the steep hill on Division north of the 401 to comply with sight line requirements. Although it’s an MTO project, it’s on a main north-south route and a good example of how we can schedule work on other north-south routes or highway access corridors to minimize impact on drivers,” said Mr. Campbell. “When working with an approved multi-year budget, so we can take the lead on advising them of our proposed projects and start a dialogue about their plans year-by-year. We sense a certain degree of respect and appre­ciation from external groups because we have this multi-year approved page 10

and budgeted plan. We’re able to interact with them, understand their projects, and co-ordinate much more frequently to manage traffic flow.” A multi-year plan addresses all of these concerns. “Designers can work all winter after initial approval, adding value throughout the entire year without subjecting them to the peaks and valleys between budget approvals and construction season. They are very engaged in this program, and it allows us to keep as much work in-house as possible. With a multi-year plan, we can complete pre-engineering, permits, and tendering earlier and contractors can plan their season long before it starts. We can award tenders for spring starts in January and February and achieve greater efficiency, which results in the possibility of budget savings which allow us to do more projects without additional fund allocation.” Harry Sullivan, executive director of the Kingston Construction Association (KCA) stressed


the benefits of clear turn to another member lines of communication for help.” “A multi-year program and a long-term The spirit of cois the only way we can approved infrastructure operation has led to achieve immediate and program. “There’s a respect outside the necessary benefits from comfort factor for the ranks of the KCA. civil and infrastructure our construction projects.” “There is a mutual groups knowing there’s Chris Phippen, Utilities Engineer, trust evident between good work flow ahead. Utilities Kingston, Technical Services It helps with resource the Engineering allocation, from Department, and staffing to specialty the KCA,” continued Mr. Sullivan. “We training to equipment acquisition. The meet every quarter with the City of multi-year program helps our members Kingston and Utilities Kingston to discuss tremendously.” pending projects and we pass along this The 400 member firms of the KCA employ more than 3,800 people. There are 20 contracting firms in the civil and infrastructure group, and the collective

works of these companies has literally grown the City of Kingston. “Our members are all members of the community and engaged with Kingston’s future,” said Mr. Sullivan. “As the region grows, the companies grow too. There is a lot of risk and responsibility and consequently, through their historic association with each other and the KCA, there is a lot of mutual support. If one of our contractors needs a piece of equipment, they’ll most likely first

information to our members. They’re able to anticipate when tenders will be released.” In conversations with representatives from other municipalities, Mr. Sullivan discussed the three-year program and found it unique to Kingston, as are the lines of communication. “Often other municipalities wonder if there is capacity in the work­force to meet their needs. The communication between Utilities Kingston, the Engineering Department, and the KCA is equally unique and mutually bene­ ficial. With a three-year approved program, the City can stage its projects with confidence our members will accommodate their needs, and our contractors know they’ll receive exceptionally well prepared tenders and documents and their bids will be treated with genuine respect and professionalism.” Mr. Sullivan praised the vision of staff at Utilities Kingston and the City’s Engineering Department. “This is a

Kingston Roads and Utilities Infrastructure Program 2008 - 2010


very organized group who has helped build a great relationship with KCA based on mutual respect. They excel at communicating their needs and plans, enacting programs to move forward efficiently, fast-track and consume funding responsibly, and allocate resources within their departments which helps our members do the same.” Of equal value was inherent flexibility in the program and the ability of engineering and utilities management to capitalize on it. “After committing to an unprecedented number of roads and utilities projects in a brand new format, they were able to maintain flexibility by incorporating new opportunities into the program,” continued Mr. Sullivan. “Utilities Kingston and the Engineering Department accomplished additional projects over the last 15 months they probably didn’t have allocated until the next three-year program. They know where to look and they submit wellprepared funding requests through such avenues as the federal Infrastructure Stimulus Fund and the provincial Economic Action Plan.” While many of the projects engineered and completed under the three-year program are high profile and visually appealing, perhaps one of the most widely beneficial undertakings remains invisible to the thousands of Kingston residents whose quality of life it improved.

In 1956, the Harbourfront Trunk Interceptor Sewer was installed to capture 23 combined sewers draining directly into Lake Ontario, as was the norm of the day. It was part of a larger project which included the construction of Kingston’s first wastewater treatment plant five kilometres east of the Cataraqui River. Now known as Ravensview, it also underwent a $106 million expansion and upgrade concurrent to but not part of the roads and utilities program. From 1956 to 2004, the trunk line was forgotten – it worked, sewage was flowing from the catchment area to Ravensview, and there were many other priorities to address. For many years, Kingston, as with most other modern cities with municipal utilities, experienced occasional combined sewer surcharges resulting in overflows to the lake during periods of heavy rain. Combined sewage overflows (CSO) are often the result of the lesser of two evils – either the system overflows or backs up into basements. This is something Utilities Kingston takes very seriously, and is why it has invested millions into separating sanitary and storm sewers and increasing treatment capacity. CSOs are mitigated by proper eavestrough and sump pump drainage, and reported diligently to authorities. Still, they happen - although with rapidly decreasing regularity in Kingston.

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The 2004 examination of the Harbourfront Trunk Interceptor Sewer provided not only answers but oppor­ tunity. Using a floating sonar camera, investigation showed the 60-year-old sewer was structurally in good shape but had lost more than 50 per cent of its capacity due to accumulated sand and sediment. The trunk line runs from Kingston Penitentiary to the River Street pumping station and services the entire downtown core and the old city, plus a significant amount of newer neighbourhoods and developments. Recovering the lost capacity represented a tremendous opportunity. The challenge of achieving benefits ­during a one-year project was over­ whelming. “We knew we needed to clean the trunk line first and then make repairs to joints, and we needed to maintain operations during most of this work,” explained Chris Phippen, an engineer with Utilities Kingston’s Technical Services. Existing domestic technology dictated a full diversion of the system during the cleaning and repair process. A diversion is an above ground temporary sewer

snaking its way through neighbourhoods along the 3.1 kilometre route of the trunk line for months at a time, at a cost of up to $100,000 per week – just for the diversion, for several summers in a row, with mixed results. To satisfy Ministry of the Environment recommendations, the diversion would have to be designed to allow flow to immediately return to the trunk sewer in the event of a breach or pump failure, and this just wasn’t a sensible approach considering the length of the trunk line and its location. “If we clean upstream, it makes matters worse when the flow hits the debris field downstream, so it was paramount to have the entire trunk line cleaned at once. We don’t have the option of taking the line out of operation and we have no redundancies for the interceptor. We needed technology which allowed for ongoing operation during the cleaning process.” Mr. Phippen found his company – in Texas. Utilities Kingston entered into an open-ended and flexible RFP renewable each year based on meritorious performance. “The Texas company was the

Kingston Roads and Utilities Infrastructure Program 2008 - 2010


only contractor with equipment and expertise to clean the trunk line in one season while the sewer remained operational,” said Mr. Phippen. “It was an innovative approach and the first time the technology was deployed in Canada. We had delegations visit from many Canadian municipalities.” In the first season, using 600 horse­power specialized pressure washers, the contractor cleaned the entire 1.2 metre diameter trunk line along its 3.1 kilometre length, using nodig technology. At the end of the season, more than 850 tonnes of debris (dry-weight) were removed. Very little of the debris was organic; most was sand, gravel, construction debris, small boulders, and a bicycle. “We restored a whack of capacity,” simplified Mr. Phippen. Most of the Harbourfront Trunk Interceptor Sewer is below the level of Lake Ontario, and further examination showed many of the joints required repair. One breach “was like a fire hose; we were slowly draining and treating Lake Ontario.” Repairs were then scheduled and completed over a two-year period, working carefully around tourist seasons, and designing one kilometre diversions as required because while the contractor could clean the sewers while operational, repairs required a drastic reduction in flow. “We simply could not have accomplished this without a three-year plan,” stressed Mr. Phippen. “A major portion of the expense involved transporting the equipment and expertise from Texas and the economies of scale over several years with a committed contractor agreeing to a flexible RFP made it possible. I don’t know how we could have achieved such effective and immediate benefits working on year-to-year budget approval. We have returned to full capacity with a very solid trunk line servicing the City of Kingston. page 14

We were able to do this because we could assure a contractor in great demand three years of approved and budgeted work.” Similarly, Chantal Chiddle, also an engineer with Utilities Kingston Technical Services, found success elusive on a waterline relining project outside of the three-year plan. Only one company in Ontario – Fer-Pal – specializes in this field and is booked well in advance. With the three-year plan, once again Utilities Kingston was able to enter into a flexible contract renewable based on performance. “Many of Kingston’s watermains require repair sooner than later,” said Mr. Phippen. “Fer-Pal is hard to get and its no-dig technology is crucial to our plans.” First, corks are robotically inserted into the customer’s line leading from the watermain. Next, a liner similar in appearance to a large fire hose is saturated with two-part epoxy then pulled through an existing watermain and inflated into place with hot water. A robotic drill then senses the corks and removes them, and a new secure watermain is once again servicing customers. “Instead of ripping up streets, we have a desksized access point every 100 metres,” explained Mr. Phippen. “If we wait for budget approval year-to-year, we’re going to be waiting a long time for the contractor; if we can commit to $1 million of


watermain relining each of three years, we get their attention, great pricing, and a solid commitment.” Again, Mr. Phippen who, like his colleagues spends his days choreographing large and ­intricate projects, sums up the necessity of an ­innovative utilities and roads program. “A multi-year program is the only way we can achieve immediate and necessary benefits from our construction projects making a difference to the residents of this city.” Looking forward, senior members of Utilities Kingston and the City of Kingston Engineering Department speak of on­ going plans awaiting funding and budget approval, and recognized 2011 will be the first year again, but design and e­ngi­­neering staff are ready. They have identified high priority projects for 2011 and beyond awaiting budget approval. In the longer term there are plans to expand John Counter Boulevard to four lanes and include a grade separation at the CN tracks. It is already on the books awaiting funding

and ties in with the third crossing of the Cataraqui River which will provide another east-west route, illustrating the importance of obtaining council’s approval for the next multi-year plan. Utilities Kingston President and CEO Jim Keech concurs. “We achieved significant success, created great efficiencies, and communicated well internally and externally with the threeyear plan and now we need to look forward again and build upon this accomplishment. We need to continue to expand and build these lines of communication with all stakeholders as we look at ways to improve the next multi-year plan. Success and efficiencies quantified early in the program showed the necessity of renewing a multiyear plan and we have been very focused on this effort for the past nine months.” At the end of the first multi-year road and utilities infrastructure program in Kingston’s municipal history, those involved in its inception remain impressed and often surprised by the benefits. They speak of quantifiable results, fiscal gains through aggressive pricing, immediate benefits, and efficiencies spanning departments, projects, external entities, and the infrastructure projects designed and completed to improve the quality of life for residents of the City of Kingston.

Kingston Roads and Utilities Infrastructure Program 2008 - 2010


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BUDGET and Additional Funding UTILITIES KINGSTON Gas Water Sewer TOTAL

2008 2009 2010 Budget $2,300,000 $2,100,000 $2,100,000 $6,500,000 $15,700,000 $18,800,000 $14,000,000 $48,500,000 $9,300,000 $10,900,000 $14,800,000 $35,000,000 $27,300,000 $31,800,000 $30,900,000 $90,000,000

CITY OF KINGSTON ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 2008 2009 2010 Budget Traffic management general $782,000 $500,000 $700,000 $1,982,000 Traffic calming measures $280,000 $82,000 $84,000 $446,000 Engineering Capital Program – $1,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 $10,000,000 unallocated Bridges and culverts $1,200,000 $1,260,000 $1,900,000 $4,360,000 City/CN Right of way management $0 $100,000 $110,000 $210,000 Downtown revitalization $800,000 $1,000,000 $1,600,000 $3,400,000 Infrastructure design $0 $100,000 $100,000 $200,000 Overlay/surface treatment $1,800,000 $1,890,000 $2,000,000 $5,690,000 Reconstruction (including storm $4,200,000 $4,410,000 $4,800,000 $13,410,000 sewer and street lighting) Shoreline protection $850,000 $250,000 $260,000 $1,360,000 Sidewalks and pararamps $900,000 $945,000 $990,000 $2,835,000 (new and reconstruction) Storm systems improvement $150,000 $158,000 $170,000 $478,000 (right of way) Street lighting $50,000 $53,000 $56,000 $159,000 County roads (amalgamation $650,000 $650,000 $650,000 $1,950,000 agreement) City wide intersection and $130,000 $130,000 $130,000 $390,000 corridor improvements Total $12,792,000 $15,528,000 $18,550,000 $46,870,000 CITY OF KINGSTON ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT ADDITIONS FOR 2010 BUDGET 2010 Budget Sidewalks and Pararamps (new and reconstruction) $1,000,000 $1,000,000 Street lighting $300,000 $300,000 Total $1,300,000 $1,300,000 In addition to approved budgets, Utilities Kingston and the City of Kingston received a grant from the Province of Ontario under the Municipal Infrastructure Investment Initiative (MIII) for the City of Kingston’s combined sewer separation and road rehabilitation project in the Earl Street area of $7,682,000 ($4.2 million to the City of Kingston and $3.482 million to Utilities Kingston). The Province also provided one-time funding to Kingston of $2,333,251 for municipal road and bridge infrastructure. The Infrastructure Stimulus Fund assisted with a number of projects in the water master plan including reservoirs, booster stations, and trunk watermains with a grant of $22 million ($11 million from the province, $11 million from the federal government, and $11 million in matching funds from the City of Kingston). Kingston Roads and Utilities Infrastructure Program 2008 - 2010

page 17


PROJECT SNAP SHOT – The Princess Street Reconstruction The Princess Street Reconstruction, from façade to façade, included: ✓✓ ✓✓ ✓✓ ✓✓ ✓✓ ✓✓ ✓✓ ✓✓ ✓✓ ✓✓

200 metres of sanitary sewers 250 meters of storm sewer 340 metres of watermain 4,600 square metres of asphalt 2,100 square meters 600 metres granite curb 200 square metres of granite pavers 9 planters 10 trees 7 benches

✓✓

✓✓

✓✓

Pre-Project Studies included: ✓✓ Environmental review by City staff ✓✓ Archeological Stage 1 for project area including ground-penetrating radar (GPR) investigation in archaeological sensitive areas (i.e. old shoreline) and on site monitoring throughout the project by licensed archeologist ✓✓ MOE certificate of approval (standard for all projects of this nature) ✓✓ As part of the RFP the contractor conducted pre-construction test holes and investigation to minimize conflicts during construction ✓✓ Utilities Kingston conducted an inspection of area water and gas valves to ensure in good working order Unique Project Considerations: ✓✓ Located in the heart of downtown Kingston, Princess Street is a vibrant commercial area and the challenge of this complete building face to building face reconstruction was to retain unimpeded access to businesses as all sidewalks, asphalt, underground utilities, lighting, and streetscape was reconstructed in a two-month period. ✓✓ ➢Princess Street is part of the original core of the old city of Kingston, and its existing infrastructure reflected this civil legacy. Before installing new water, sewer,

page 18

✓✓

✓✓

and utilities, the contractor had to first remove the stone box combined sewer. Finishing touches such as benches, planters, trees, granite pavers, and curbs were included A streetprint product - asphalt impressed with a plastic product to resemble pavers was utilized to enhance the crosswalks A very positive relationship between the contractor, the City, and Utilities Kingston was maintained through a partnering workshop, and a value engineering workshop. The contractor was allowed to assume a leadership role in public relations with the affected businesses by providing area businesses with updates. A community liaison initiative with the City, the contractor, and the merchants allowed a mutual understanding of the need to assist in managing deliveries, garbage removal, and pedestrian and vehicular traffic, while adhering to the construction schedule under strict timelines without compromising safety. Regular communications and meetings with Downtown Kingston enabled rapid dissemination of the information. The contractor also provided signage to enable public to access businesses and on-site staff provided assistance to public in accessing commercial establishments and the general area. The City provided public relations personnel to co-ordinate with the contractor. The project was completed on time and on budget and unencumbered access to the area was restored by the end of June 2010. Success was measured in many ways, but it was achieved because the project was tendered early and all stakeholders committed to internal and external lines of communication.

Kingston Roads and Utilities Infrastructure Program 2008 - 2010


PROJECT SNAP SHOT – Willingdon and Area Reconstruction ✓✓ Willingdon, Union, MacDonnell, Hill, Hillcroft and Traymoor ✓✓ $7.6 million received from the Municipal Infrastructure Investment Initiative used for separating sewers in this area. The funding enabled the City and Utilities Kingston to include full reconstruction of sewers in the Charles/Rideau/Cataraqui streets area in its schedule ✓✓ Reconstruction of sewer, watermain, and roads on Willingdon, Union, MacDonnell, Hill, Hillcroft, and Traymoor including: • 2,193 metres of sanitary sewers • 2,125 metres of watermain • 1,835 metres of storm sewer • 3,800 cubic metres of rock excavation • 13,645 cubic metres of earth excavation • 21,810 square metres of asphalt pavement • 5,470 square metres of concrete sidewalk • 1,420 metres of concrete curb

• Utilities Kingston conducted an inspection of area water and gas valves to ensure in good working order Unique Items • M  uch larger project than was typically issued by the City ( at least the size of two projects) • Two year construction period • Willingdon a significant project from a Utilities Kingston perspective because more than 90 per cent of the sewers in the old city area are combined. Separating them individually without a direct connection for sanitary sewers to the trunk line and for storm sewers to a treatment cell and outfall doesn’t add benefit immediately. Willingdon achieved separation with appropriate flow to the proper treatment sites

Pre-Project Studies • MOE certificate of approval (standard for all projects of this nature)

page 19


PROJECT SNAP SHOT –

History ✓✓ Originally installed in 1956 as part of Kingston’s efforts to intercept 23 combined sewers draining directly into Lake Ontario ✓✓ Harbourfront Trunk Interceptor Sewer runs 3.1 km along the waterfront, mostly below the level of Lake Ontario, from Kingston Penitentiary to the River Street Pumping Station ✓✓ Built at the same time as what is now known as the Ravensview Wastewater Treatment Plant. ✓✓ The trunk line had not been inspected since its initial construction in 1956 until six years ago in 2004 ✓✓ Inspectors using a floating sonar camera determined the sewer was structurally in good shape, however more than 50 per cent of its capacity was lost due to accumulated sediment and debris. ✓✓ Utilities Kingston determined piecemeal cleaning would be ineffective and a longerterm approach was necessary to properly restore hydraulic capacity. Project particulars and challenges ✓✓ As one of Kingston’s major sewer line installations, maintaining operations of this trunk line was imperative, with a minimum of diversion, which are expensive, inconvenient, and more susceptible to risk. ✓✓ Utilities Kingston identified three segments to the remediation – cleaning during the first year, followed by two years of joint repair. Only one company responded with acceptable technology allowing full operation of the trunk line during the cleaning phase, which would last an entire season. Diversions were necessary only during repairs, which required significant reductions in flow.

page 20

✓✓ The general contractor brought in a company from Texas under the authority of an open-ended performance based RFP. It was an innovative approach and the first time this equipment and technology was deployed in Canada. ✓✓ Several municipalities sent delegations to Kingston to witness the procedure. ✓✓ In the first year, the entire 3.1 km length of 1.2 m sewer was completely cleaned, removing a dry-weight equivalent of more than 850 tonnes of debris, including construction materials, gravel, sand, sediment, street garbage, and a bicycle. ✓✓ Joint repair consumed the following two years, and the trunk line was diverted in one kilometre sections. At one joint, water infiltration was significant. “Since the trunk line is mostly below lake level, we were slowly draining and treating Lake Ontario,” said Utilities Engineer Chris Phippen. “Water was flowing in like a fire hose.” Necessity of multi-year budget approval ✓✓ The three year budget allowed Utilities Kingston to enter into an open-ended multi-year flexible RFP renewable based on performance and cancellable at the end of each component. With committed funding for three years, Utilities Kingston was able to stage the remediation to achieve beneficial results at the close of each portion of the RFP. ✓✓ Three years of stable funding delivered three years of excellent work as renewals were contractually linked to meritorious performance and the terms of the RFP protected Utilities Kingston’s interests while encouraging excellent delivery of services. ✓✓ Three-year plan allowed Utilities Kingston to plan around the downtown tourist season which brings increased traffic to the targeted area. ✓✓ Economies of scale for the three year program were necessary for the efficiency

Kingston Roads and Utilities Infrastructure Program 2008 - 2010


Harbourfront Trunk Interceptor Sewer Remediation

of this project. Only with an openended three year commitment could Utilities Kingston, through the general contractor, bring in the only company in North America to clean the sewers while operational and effect repairs over the next two years. ✓✓ A major portion of the expense involved transporting specialty equipment and expertise from Texas, which would have been prohibitive on a year to year basis. ✓✓ Without the specialty equipment, cleaning could only be performed with a complete diversion of the sewer, at a cost of up to $100,000 per week, major inconvenience to neighbourhoods, and considerable environmental risk. Diverting for cleaning would have exponentially increased the cost. ✓✓ Imperative to clean the sewer completely

at one time, while operational. “If we clean only a section upstream, then it creates undesirable actions once the flow hits the uncleaned section,” said Mr. Phippen. “Cleaning downstream first is not logical as the sediment from upstream would just redeposit in the freshly cleaned pipe. We had to clean it all at once for maximum benefit and we could only do this with the three year plan.” ✓✓ Little value in doing the remediation piecemeal and incredible value in doing this all at once, and this was only possible due to a multi-year budget and program.

page 21


APPENDIX A

THREE-YEAR UTILITIES AND ROAD INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS STREET

FROM TO

WORK

Abdo Road

Castell Road

Watermain

Abbey Dawn Road

Albert Street

Audrey Street

Barrack Street

Barrie Street

Bath Road

Bath Road

Battersea Road

Battersea Road

Bayridge Dr.

Bayridge Dr.

Bayridge Dr.

Byron Crescent

Bishop Street

Benson Street

Brock Street

Brock Street

Bur Brook Road

Castell Road

Casterton Avenue

Cataraqui Street

Cataraqui Woods

Centenial Drive

Charles Street

Churchill Crescent

Clergy Street East

Cole Hill Road

Conacher Dr.

Creekford Road

College Street

Highway 2

Mack Street

Floyd Avenue

Ontario Street

William Street

Coronation Blvd.

Centennial Dr.

Aragon Road

Thompson Crescent

Coverdale Dr.

Lincoln Dr.

Sierra Avenue

Norman Rogers Dr.

Front Road

Division Street

Division Street

Division Street

Perth Road

McEwen Dr.

Norman Rogers Dr.

Bagot Street

West of Gardiners Rd.

Taylor-Kidd Blvd.

Patrick Street

College Street South

Earl Street

Bur Brook Road

Sutherland Dr.

Bayridge Dr.

Hill Street

South to end

Middle Road

South of Princess St.

Jesse Cres.

Wellington Street

Princess Street

170m W of Sycamore

Armstrong Road

Unity Road

River Ridge Road

Acadia Dr.

Cataraqui Woods Dr.

Creekford Road

Norman Rogers Dr.

Crescent Dr.

Markers Crescent

Alfred Street

Clergy Street East

Cole Hill Road

Days Road

South leg of Dedrick

The Cataraqui River

East of Clyde Court

Princess Street

Rideau Street

College Street North

Princess Street

Unity Road

Sutherland Dr.

Cloggs Road

Johnson Street

Kingston Roads and Utilities Infrastructure Program 2008 - 2010

Surface treatment

Reconstruction

Resurfacing

Resurfacing

Reconstruction

YEAR 2010

2010

2010

2008

2008

2010

Watermain

2010

Resurfacing

2009

Road widening for bike lanes 2011

Resurfacing

Watermain

Watermain

Watermain

Watermain/Gas

Watermain

Gas

Reconstruction

Reconstruction

Resurfacing

Watermain

Watermain

Reconstruction

2009

2010

2010

2010

2010

2008

2008

2009

2009

2009

2010

2010

2010

Road widening for bike lanes 2010

Road widening for bike lanes 2010

Reconstruction

Reconstruction

Reconstruction

Resurfacing

Watermain

Watermain

Reconstruction

2010

2008 - 2009 2008

2009

2010

2010

2008 - 2009

page 23


THREE-YEAR UTILITIES AND ROAD INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS STREET

FROM TO

WORK

Crescent Dr.

Crerar Blvd.

Montgomery Blvd.

Watermain

2008

County Road 2

Highway 15

East end of CFB

Watermain

2008

Division Street

Warne Crescent

County Road 2 Dalton Avenue Dalton Avenue Earl Street

Farleigh Street Flanigan Road Floyd Avenue Front Road

Gordon Street Gore Road

Gore Road

Harpell Road

Hartman Street

Herchmer Crescent Hill Street

Holland Crescent Hillcroft Dr. Highway 15 Highway 2

Homeward Avenue James Street

Jesse Crescent Johnson Street Jorene Dr.

Kepler Road Keys Street

King Street East King Street East Kirkwood Road page 24

Gabion Wall Division Street University Street MacClement Dr. Kepler Road

Sunnyside Road

Beeman Avenue Lakeshore Blvd. Easterly Bend Easterly Bend Highway #38

Sunnyside Road Byron Crescent

MacDonnell Street Casterton Avenue Union Street Highway 2

Treasure Island Bath Road

Montreal Street

Mildred Street Sir John A. Macdonald Redden Street

Sydenham Road Point Crescent Queen Street

Princess Street Castell Road

Cattail Place

Division Street

Southwood Dr.

Sydenham Road Audey Street Bayridge Dr.

Northerly to end Northerly to end Northerly to end South limit East end

Byron Crescent College Street

Casterton Avenue

Northerly to Circle Main Street City Limits

MacClement Dr. Patrick Street

East end Portsmouth Avenue Lakeshore Blvd. Babcock Road

Sunny Acres Road Place D’Armes Brock Street

South to end

Reinforced Slope Gas

Resurfacing

Reconstruction Watermain

Surface Treatment Resurfacing Watermain Watermain

Surface Treatment Surface Treatment Surface Treatment Surface Treatment Gas

YEAR 2008 2009 2009

2011

2009/2010 2009 2008 2010 2008 2008 2010 2009 2009 2010

Reconstruction

2009/2010

Reconstruction

2009

Watermain

Microsurfacing Microsurfacing

2010 2010 2010

Resurfacing/Watermain 2009-2010 Reconstruction

2009

Watermain

2009

Resurfacing Reconstruction Surface Treatment Watermain

Resurfacing

Reconstruction Watermain

2009 2008 2008 2008 2010 2010 2010


THREE-YEAR UTILITIES AND ROAD INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS STREET

FROM TO

WORK

Lakeland Point Dr.

All

Watermain

2008

Lakeview Avenue

Henderson Blvd.

Watermain

2008

Lakeshore Blvd.

Lakeview Avenue Lee Road

Latimer Road

MacClement Dr. MacClement Dr.

MacDonnell Street Mack Street

Maple Ridge Dr. McEwen Dr.

Morenze Crescent

Meadowcrest Blvd. Midland Avenue Mildred Street

Montreal Street Mowat Avenue Nelson Street

Norman Rogers Dr. Norman Rogers Dr. Patterson Road Perth Road

Place D’Armes Princess Street Princess Street Princess Street Princess Street

Purdy’s Mill Road Rideau Street

Rigney Street

Crear Blvd.

Jorene Dr.

Redden Street

Lakeshore Blvd.

Babcock Road

Sydenham Road

Homeward Avenue Homeward Avenue Union Street

Frontenac Street

MacClement Dr. Bath Road

Conacher Dr.

Henderson Blvd.

Cataraqui Woods Sunnyside Road Charles Street

Churchill Street

Concession Street Roden Street Roden Street

Battersea Road Highway 401

Ontario Street

King Street East Bagot Street

Ambassador Hotel Anderson Dr.

Purdy’s Court Raglan Road

John Counter Blvd.

North end

the west limit City Limits

Maple Ridge Dr. Maple Ridge Dr. Earl Street

Alfred Street Bath Road

Castell Road

Conacher Dr. North end

Northern Limit Jesse Crescent

75 m N of James Forsythe Avenue Fifth Avenue

YEAR

Watermain

2010

Watermain

2008

Surface Treatment Resurfacing

2009 2010

Watermain

2009/2010

Reconstruction

2009/2010

Resurfacing

Reconstruction

2009/2010 2010

Watermain/Resurfacing

2009

Watermain

2010

Watermain

2010

Watermain

2008

Resurfacing

2010

Resurfacing

2008

Reconstruction

2009

Reconstruction

2010

Gas

2010

Sir John A. Macdonald Gas Van Order Dr.

Gas/Water

McAdoo’s Lane

Gas

Mount Chesney Road Wellington Street East end

Division Street

Sydenham Road At intersection

Northerly to the end At intersection

North end of Road

Kingston Roads and Utilities Infrastructure Program 2008 - 2010

2009 2010

Surface Treatment

2009 2010

Resurfacing

2008

Reconstruction Resurfacing Watermain

2010 2008

2009/2010

Intersection Improvements

2010

Traffic Calming

2009

Surface Treatment Watermain

2009 2010 page 25


THREE-YEAR UTILITIES AND ROAD INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS STREET

FROM TO

WORK

Roden Street

Norman Rogers Dr.

Johnson Street

Gas/Water

2009/2010

Southwood Dr.

Homeward Avenue

Maple Ridge Dr.

Watermain/Resurfacing

2009/2010

Spooner Road

Perth Road

To east end

Surface Treatment

Seabrook Road

Southwood Dr. Sunny Acres Road Sunnyside Road

Taylor-Kidd Blvd

Taylor-Kidd Blvd. Taylor-Kidd Blvd. Theresa Crescent Traymoor Street Union Street Unity Road

University Avenue Van Order Dr. Van Order Dr. Van Order Dr.

Warne Crescent

Willingdon Avenue

Willingdon Avenue Windsor Street

Woodbine Road

Woodburn Road

page 26

Boundary Bend

Fairleigh Street Front Road West end

Princess Street

Highway 15

Homeward Avenue Dale Street

Sydenham Road Gardiners Road

Progress Avenue Old Colony Road Kirkpatrick Street

North end

MacDonnell Street

Livingston Street

Kensington Avenue

Livingston Street

Collins Creek Brock Street

Princess Street

Metcalfe Avenue

Norman Rogers Dr.

Metcalfe Avenue East end

Dalton Avenue Union Street Earl Street Jorene Dr.

Collins Bay Road Highway 15

Norman Rogers Dr. Highway 38

Northwest end Johnson Street Hill Street

Lakeview Avenue Bayridge Dr. City Limits

Treatment

Watermain Watermain

Surface Treatment Resurfacing

Left turn lane Left turn lane Watermain

Reconstruction

Reconstruction

Raise road/resurface Reconstruction Gas

Watermain

Surface Treatment Gas

Reconstruction Reconstruction Watermain

Traffic Calming

Surface Treatment

YEAR 2011

2010 2008 2010 2009 2009 2010 2010 2010

2009/2010 2009/2010 2008 2009 2009 2010 2008 2008

2009/2010 2010 2008 2009 2010


UTILITIES KINGSTON FACILITY PROJECTS LOCATION

SERVICE

Weller and Division

Gas

Elliot and Division

Regulator Station

Gas

Division and Dalton

Regulator Station

Gas

City Gate

Regulator Station

Gas

O’Connor Drive

Station Upgrades

Water

O’Connor Drive

Water Reservoir

Water

Cana

Water Booster Station

Water

Ravensview

DESCRIPTION

Water Treatment Plant

Sewer

Sewage Treatment Plant

YEAR 2008

2008

2009

2008

2010

2010

2008

2009

CONSTRUCTION OF NEW SIDEWALKS STREET

SIDE

FROM TO

Bath Road

North

Tanner Drive

Bath Road South Bath Road

South

Centennial Drive

West

Blackburn Mews Glengarry Road Gore Road

Henderson Boulevard INVISTA Centre Fortune Crescent INVISTA Centre Gardiners Road

Main St. (Barriefield)

East

North

South

North

Gardiners Road

2008

West 300m

2010

Gardiners Road

East of Canatara Court

2010

Waterloo Drive

Davis Drive S.

2008

Sir John A. Macdonald Blvd. Taylor-Kidd Blvd. Portsmouth Avenue Grenadier Drive

Roosevelt Drive

North end

Westmoreland Road Rose Abbey Drive Glen Castle Road

2008 2008

East

Fortune Crescent North

Fortune Crescent South

2008

East

James Street

Regent Street

Johnson Street

Taylor Kidd Blvd.

North

Gardiners Road

160m E of Bexley Gate

Union Street

2008

Easterly along frontage

King Street West

Taylor-Kidd Blvd.

2009

Gardiners Road

East

Taylor-Kidd Blvd.

2010

South

Portsmouth Avenue Tanner Drive

YEAR

East

North

South

South

Bath Road

Bayridge Drive

Progress Avenue Gardiner Street

Kingston Roads and Utilities Infrastructure Program 2008 - 2010

Northerly 100m Milford Drive

Old Colony Road

West Campus Lane

2009/2010 2010

2009

2010

2010

2010

2010

page 27


RECONSTRUCTION OF SIDEWALKS STREET

SIDE

FROM TO

YEAR

Albert Street

West

Queen’s Crescent

Union Street

2010

Bath Road

North

Collins Bay Road

Easterly 201m

2010

Basswood Place Brant Avenue Brant Avenue Castell Road

College Street Ellice Street Ellice Street Front Road

Helen Street

Hillendale Avenue McEwen Drive Phillip Street

Pinewood Crescent Pinewood Place Pinewood Place Pinewood Place

Prince Charles Drive Princess Street Princess Street

Queen Mary Road

Robert Wallace Drive Union Street Vine Street

Weller Avenue Weller Avenue Weller Avenue

Wellington Street Westdale Ave

Whiteoak Crescent page 28

East East

West

South East

North

South North East East

West

South East East

South East

South South North East

West

North West

South South South West East

South

Cedarwood Drive Oak Street Oak Street

McEwen Drive

Carruthers Avenue Vine Street

Division Street

Welbourne Avenue 30m s. Park Street Phillip Street Castell Road

Portsmouth Avenue Cedarwood Drive Cedarwood Drive All

South Leg

Highgate Park Drive MacDonnell Street MacDonnell Street Notch Hill Road Johnson Street Albert Street Ellice Street

Baker Street

Butler Street Ford Street

Johnson Street Franklin Place

Pinewood Crescent

N. Leg Basswood Place Ruskin Street

Northerly 312m Days Road

Northerly 145m Westerly 69m Easterly 77m

Chelsea Road

Southerly 48m Princess Street

Northerly 152m

Gilmour Avenue Northerly 187m South leg All

Cedarwood Drive Westerly 261m Westerly 110m Tower Street

110m east of Old Oak Road N. Leg Richardson Drive Alfred Street

Raglan Road Ford Street

Wiley Street

Wilson Street

Clarence Street Southerly 55m Easterly 106m

2010 2008 2008 2010 2008 2008 2008 2010 2008 2009 2010 2009 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2009 2009 2010 2009 2010 2008 2008 2008 2008 2009 2008 2010


CONCRETE SIDEWALK ACCESS RAMPS 2010 LOCATION

QUADRANT

Taylor Kidd Boulevard at Gardiners Road

Northeast

Collingwood Street at Johnson Street

Southwest

Alwington Place at King Street West

Northeast

CONCRETE SIDEWALK ACCESS RAMPS 2009 LOCATION Brock Street at Wellington Street

QUADRANT Northeast

Brock Street at Wellington Street

Southwest

Chapman Street at Queen Street

Northeast

Chapman Street at Queen Street

Clergy Street at Ordnance Street

Northwest Southeast

Clergy Street at Ordnance Street

Southwest

Rideau Street at Ordnance Street

Northeast

Wellington Street at Clarence Street

Northeast

Queen Street north of Montreal Street Victoria Street at Johnson Street Yonge Street at King Street

East

Northeast Southeast

CONCRETE SIDEWALK ACCESS RAMPS 2008 LOCATION Brock Street at Montreal Street

QUADRANT Westerly

Ellice Street at Main Street

Southwest

Ellice Street at Vine Street

Northeast

Ellice Street at Main Street

Northwest

King Street at Clarence Street

Southwest

Main Street at Raglan Road

Northwest

Main Street at Raglan Road

Norman Rogers Drive at Moore School Princess Street at Albert Street

Southwest Crossing

Northeast

Princess Street at Albert Street

Northwest

Sir John A Macdonald at Bath

Northwest

Princess Street at Chatham Street

Kingston Roads and Utilities Infrastructure Program 2008 - 2010

Northwest

page 29


NEW AND UPGRADED TRAFFIC SIGNALS LOCATION Bayridge Drive at Hudson Drive

WORK Upgrade

YEAR 2008

New Signals

2008

Bayridge Drive at Lincoln Drive

New Signals

Coverdale Drive at Stoneridge Drive

New Signals

Centennial Drive at Waterloo Drive Division Street and Weller Avenue

2008

New Signals

2010

New Signals

Gardiners Road, between O’Connor Drive and Norris Court

New Signals

Highway 15 at Biscayne Avenue

Montreal Street at Charles Street

Princess Street at King Street East

Princess Street at Ontario Street

Sir John A. Macdonald Blvd. and Johnson Street

Taylor Kidd Boulevard at Old Colony Road

Wellington Street at Johnson Street

2009

Upgrade

Division Street and First Capital Place

Gardiners Road north of Golden Mile Road

2010

New Signals Rebuild

Rebuild

Rebuild

2008 2010

2008

2010

2010

2010

Rebuild

2009

New Signals

2010

New Signals

2010

BRIDGE WORK LOCATION Burbrook Road at Jackson Mills Road (culvert)

La Salle Causeway (Public Works and Government Services Canada)

YEAR 2010

N/A

Princess Street at Collins Creek

2009/2010

Unity Road at Glenvale Creek

2009/2010

Seabrook at City limit (culvert)

Woodbine Road at Collins Creek

Also in 2010 at various locations: Barrier improvements, annual cleaning and maintenance and bi-annual inspections

page 30

2010 2010 2010


APPENDIX B: Three-year roads budget – criteria for selection

Arising from the budget presentations on November 28th, several questions were raised regarding the process utilized to establish the selection of streets that are targeted for capital budget expenditures. Streets identified for activity undergo a careful evaluation and analysis prior to selection to ensure that limited financial resources are utilized in the most efficient and effective manner. Relative to the infrastructure, industry wide standards/criteria are employed in the evaluation. Decisions regarding the selection of streets are reached after careful evaluation undertaken by qualified engineers with expertise in evaluating the appropriate infrastructure type. The following is a summary of the information used in evaluating the infrastructure warranting capital expenditure:

ROADS 1. A detailed roads condition survey was performed by IMS (Infrastructure Management Services) in 2005 which forms the basis for evaluation. 2. Data captured is imported into a pavement management system (Cartegragh) and used to evaluate road segments against 12 condition categories (i.e. alligator and longitudinal cracking, vehicle ride, pot holes and rutting) 3. An overall condition index (OCI) score is calculated for each road segment. 4. Project/road selection is based on OCI and road classification with emphasis placed on higher road classifications including arterial and collector roads due to higher traffic volumes. 5. Project/road selection is also based on maintaining a target split between road reconstruction and overlay program. This recognizes that an asphalt overlay of a road is an important step in maximizing the service life a road before full reconstruction is required.

SEWERS 1.

Currently 12-14 Km of sewers undergo closed circuit television work (CCTV ) each year. Sanitary sewers are then evaluated by staff certified by the ‘North American Association of Pipeline Inspectors’ in the sewer condition classification rating methodology. This condition rating method provides an internationally accepted rating scheme for classifying the sewer condition based on type, length and location of cracks, condition of joints, degree of deflection in pipes, crushed sewers etc. Sewers achieving the worst scoring are prioritized for construction activity.

2.

 ewers are also evaluated on their potential for complete sewer separation. Recognizing that S sewer separation in any given drainage area is a multi year endeavour, sewers located in drainage areas that have potential for complete near term removal of storm water from the sanitary system are ranked higher due to the immediate benefit derived. This enables a greater return on the investment by reducing both the frequency and volume of combined sewer overflows.

Kingston Roads and Utilities Infrastructure Program 2008 - 2010

page 31


WATER 1.

Operations records are reviewed each year relative to break history on watermains. Those watermains with frequent repair activity are prioritized for replacement.

2.

Operations records are reviewed for trends in serviceability complaints. This would include issues around low water pressure, discolouration of water etc. This information contributes in determining water main replacement or rehabilitation activity.

3.

Other factors which contribute to the evaluation are age of infrastructure and undersized infrastructure (by today’s standard)

4.

An estimation of the ability of the watermains to withstand other related construction activity. Watermains will be scheduled for replacement if the integrity of the main will be compromised by other proposed construction activity.

GAS 1.

Operations records are reviewed each year relative to leak detection surveys on gas mains. Those gas mains with frequent repair activity are prioritized for replacement.

2.

Operations records are reviewed for trends in serviceability complaints. This information contributes in determining gas main replacement or rehabilitation.

3.

The age of the gas mains is also a factor in determining replacement.

All of the forgoing elements become part of the overall evaluation in selecting streets warranting infrastructure replacement, rehabilitation, or renewal. In some cases the selected streets represent a confluence of criteria whereby all categories are present. In other cases streets may have high rankings in one or more of the criteria but lesser scores in others (i.e. high sewer ranking but lower road surface ranking). The infrastructure still requires action but the relative rankings within each infrastructure class may differ. It is important to note that the criteria should not be considered mutually exclusive of each other. In the aforementioned example, a street with a high sewer ranking but lower road surface ranking typically requires replacement or rehabilitation of the road surface if the sewers are replaced. The selection of streets is undertaken against the back drop of financial and personnel resources available to complete the project work program. Although criteria are employed to identify streets/projects the current condition of the asset (road surface, sewer pipe) determines the nature of the activity. For example total failure of a sewer pipe or road would dictate total replacement while linear cracks in pipes would suggest sewer relining. Therefore various techniques are utilized depending on the current condition of the asset.

page 32


Prepared for:

Jim Keech, President & CEO, Utilities Kingston, 85 Lappans Lane, PO Box 790, Kingston, ON K7L 4X7

Written by:

Catherine Stutt, alwayswrite@xplornet.ca Layout by:

SchellĂŠ Holmes, www.the-holmestead.com Photo credit for Princess Street construction photos:

Paul Wash, www.photosavedigital.com December 2010


Utilities Kingston Infrastructure Report_2010  

Report on 3-year infrastructure project by Utilities Kingston. Report date Dec 2010.

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