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Slices of Sydney

a taste of our villages


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Slices of Sydney makes up a ten course experiential meal, a degustation. Taste the distinct flavours of each village. A bus, train and cycle network crisscrosses the city, and so the order in which your courses are served is up to you. Be it the design-skewed sheen of Surry Hills; the indie scent of Newtown; the modern tribalism relished in Redfern or the nonstop liberal heat of Kings Cross, each village will encourage you to find a new dimension only discoverable through experience.

“Sydney is a city of villages. Each community radiates a unique essence. Taste the culture and take away a slice of Sydney.� Clover Moore MP, Lord Mayor of Sydney


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Calendar of major events MAY–AUGUST

Sydney Writers’ Festival swf.org.au

Events & Festivals to watch for while in Sydney

Sydney Film Festival sff.org.au

JANUARY–APRIL

Art & About cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/artandabout

Sydney Festival sydneyfestival.org.au Sydney Chinese New Year Festival cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/CNY Sydney Gay & Lesbian Mardi Gras mardigras.org.au Tropfest tropfest.com

Vivid Sydney vividsydney.com SEPTEMBER–DECEMBER

Sydney Children’s Festival sydneychildrensfestival.com

Biennale biennaleofsydney.com.au Crave Sydney International Food Festival cravesydney.com Sydney Fringe Festival thesydneyfringe.com.au Sydney Christmas & New Year Celebrations cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/Christmas cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/nye


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Getting around town P ublic T ransp o rt

B icycling

Trains, buses and ferries are all interconnected, so you can hop between villages speedily. Sydney’s villages are well serviced by public transport – trains, buses or both – and the inner city also has Light Rail and Monorail systems. Multi-trip bus tickets are available from most newsagencies, convenience stores and kiosks around the city. Look for retailers displaying MyZone or PrePay signage. Most bus trips require a PrePay ticket. For more information, call the free Transport Infoline on 131 500 or visit 131500.com.

Major connecting routes now consider the modern cyclist. Visit cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/cycling for more information including route maps. You can also hire bikes to explore the city independently or with a tour.

T a x is

Taxis are available when the yellow light is on and change over time is at 3pm, and 3am, when flagging one down is a little trickier. There are a range of taxi companies operating in Sydney.

S h o pping T imes

Most shops, department stores and shopping centres are open from around 10am–5pm Monday to Saturday and increasingly on Sunday. Late night shopping usually occurs on Thursday evenings, with many stores and shopping centres open until 9 or 10pm. Occasionally some shops will be closed on Mondays. I n an E mergency

Dial 000 for 24-hour emergency services (fire, police and ambulance) from any telephone. Police assistance line: 131 444.


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BRETT WHITELEY STUDIO

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Surry Hills

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The original home to Sydney’s rag trade, Surry Hills has evolved into a premier design village of crisp artisan concepts. Swells of coffee complement the woody designs of contemporary furniture and natural furnishings. The craft-based networks of Surry Hills constantly participate in Sydney’s cultural evolution with a gentle eye on the global future of design.


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Stride with fervour & dress without rules w o rd o n t h e street S U RRY H IL L S

• Cycleway on Bourke street • The price of real estate • Got a dolla?


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T ypical L O C A L

DEFINING EXPERIENCE

Poking around in village shops for a piece of contemporary furniture, lining up outside a restaurant that takes no bookings and dominating iPod wars at the pub.

Typically atypical, Surry Hills locals are a motley cast of young professionals, creative types and radiant originals from post-war migrations of Greek and Italian people. With a median age of 32, this diverse suburb attracts animated humans who stride with fervour, dress without rules and have forged a very good work/play balance. They are third generation shoemakers, eco shop owners, twenty something graphic designers and Kylie Kwong.

K N OW N F O R

S U RRY H IL L S

• Art and design talent • Rag trade roots • Surry Hills Markets – first Saturday of every month • Beer gardens • Cheap steak nights • Niche cuisines and fusions • Community veggie gardens • Dog friendly atmosphere


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U rban L egend

S U RRY H IL L S

In 1985 expressionist Brett Whiteley built a studio and private dwelling in an old T-shirt factory on Raper Street. The chaos and atmosphere have been preserved as a free museum. The entrance is tucked in an alley and marked by a tiny version of ‘Almost Once’, a sculpture featuring two redhead matchsticks.


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A letterbox replica of the church and former home of eccentric artist Madame Lash on Cleveland Street taste

Freshly baked organic spelt sourdough SMELL

The smell of fresh coffees and paninis in the air Do

Pedal down Bourke Street cycleway with a basket full of produce Watc h

Dog/owner lookalikes B uy

Ironic knitted sweaters from second hand shops A fter D ark

Buzzing on Crown and Bourke Streets, and Cleveland between Elizabeth and Crown S U RRY H IL L S


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Paddington is bound by a love of heritage homes, leafy residential streets and flagship designer boutiques. Rows of chalky pastel terraces house Sydney’s emerging and established sartorial scene. In Paddington artisans make chocolate and underwear by hand and have style that transcends seasonal fashions.

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CENTENNIAL PA R K


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Sophisticated class with considered quirks w o rd o n t h e street paddingt on

• “Is that an Akira?” • Yummy mummies • 40km speed limit on back streets


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T ypical l o cal

Paddington locals are a sophisticated class with considered quirks. They are business minded innovators in art and fashion and young families who eat well, dress well and are proud of the heritage of their village. DEFINING EXPERIENCE

Walking to the tailor and completing the outfit at the shoemaker and milliner across the street. K N OW N F O R

• Paddington Markets – Saturdays • Boutique shopping • L  aunch pad for emerging fashion talent • A  rt galleries • T  he Royal Hotel, the oldest in the village • O  ne of the earliest settled areas of Sydney

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U R B AN L E G E ND

Ex-convict entrepreneur and gin distiller Robert Cooper named Paddington after a London borough and built Juniper Hall in the early 1820s, Paddington’s oldest home.

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Paddington Markets, Sydney’s longest running community market, started in 1973 as a meeting ground for a handful of artists and designers to mingle, sell their wares and discuss the Vietnam War. Since then it has evolved into a thriving weekend market and a platform for an impressive cast of Australian design talent including Lisa Ho and Dinosaur Designs.


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The sunken water garden at architectural urban park Paddington Reservoir Gardens taste

Hand-made chocolate bits on William Street smell

The recycled tissue paper around your latest purchase Do

Browse through racks of emerging fashion talent at Paddington Markets Watc h

An arthouse film at Chauvel Cinema B uy

A bespoke accessory from a flagship designer store A fter D ark paddingt on

Pubs and venues on Oxford St near South Dowling St (Three Saints Square)


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LEGEND

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On King Street you can dine on cuisine from any nation, listen to music of any genre, dress in the style of any decade and hold anyone’s hand you like. Find vegan foods, indie music, street art and retro fashion circuits within this warm cluster of worker’s cottages, warehouse bookshops, record stores and independent retailers. Newtown is a contemporary bohemia where dreamers and lovers wander between salty pub bistros, laneway festivals and fruity street performances.


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Friendly free thinkers who work outside the system w o rd o n t h e street

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• It’s impossible to park • King Street traffic • Pub renovations • Where all the squatters went


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DEFINING EXPERIENCE

A sneeze in a dusty bookshop, an in-store gig in a record shop and a local art show. kn o w n f o r

• Buzzing local pride • Wide variety of food options • Distinct subcultures • Unpretentious • Broad cultural appeal • Pop-up Newtown Markets • Newtown Festival–November • The Sydney Fringe Festival – September T ypical l o cal

Credit for mural: I Have A Dream, Andrew Aiken and Juilee Pryor, 1991

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Newtown locals are friendly free thinkers who work outside the system. Their customised realities and independent businesses afford them great happiness. The bulk of Newtown’s 14000 residents are well educated, live in share housing but have a loyalty to Newtown and may never leave. They are students, professionals, screen printers, healers and guitarists who are friendly and like to participate in free eco street festivals.


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U rban L egend

Music has always been at the heart and soul of Newtown. In 1923 words and music to “Newtown is an Old Town (that I love)” were published by A.F. Lenertz (best known for the lyrics “I Love Aeroplane Jelly”). In the 1980s John Kennedy celebrated local landmarks and characters with his single “On King St I’m A King” and The Whitlams promote the local music scene with their hit “Blow Up the Pokies”. More recently John Jacobs created the Wheelie Bin Sound System. You can now make your own by placing a car stereo in a 600L wheelie bin or on the back of a bicycle. Among Newtown’s notable residents are Murray Cook, of the children’s performing group The Wiggles, and Mary Reibey (1777–1855) a pioneering entrepreneur whose portrait graces the $20 note.

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The giant ‘I Have a Dream’ mural featuring Martin Luther King and the Aboriginal flag on King Street that was originally sponsored by local philanthropist Tony Spanos taste

The cuisine of any nation in the atlas SMELL

The local pride Do

Spot the distinctions between Newtown tribes from a King Street café Watc h

A cult film at a retro restaurant, or a busker B uy

A camel skin lamp A fter D ark

Find high energy, low lit hotspots anywhere, anytime ne wt ow n


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LEGEND

Train Station Free Wi-fi Cycleway Parks What’s Hot

Kings Cross and Darlinghurst are gracious old places that have seen many faces. Towering art deco structures, former adult shops and tattoo parlours now foster a young art and dining scene. This densely populated landscape is radically authentic, story laden and stays awake all night. The hills and valleys of its urban cartography parallel the high lives and low times of its alternative history.


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Harmonious edit of gen Y’s, young couples, queer communities and eccentrics W o rd o n t h e street

• “Oversexed, overpaid and over here” • “Is that a man or a woman?” • “You find this ugly, I find it lovely” • “Why she’s practically naked”


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T ypical l o cal

While aesthetically driven the people of Kings Cross and Darlinghurst are open to difference. The harmonious edit of gen Y’s, young couples, queer communities and eccentrics are openminded go-getters whose cosmopolitan lives are forced to overlap in the most populated slice of Sydney. D efining E x perience

Hopping between bars on Burton Street before a caffeine hit at a 24-hour coffeehouse.

K N OW N F O R

darling hurst & kings cr o ss

• Mardi Gras – March • Kings Cross Organic Markets – Saturdays • Sydney Sustainable Markets, Taylor Square – Saturdays • Carlotta, a transgender showgirl, who was the inspiration for the film Priscilla Queen of the Desert. • Tropicana Cafe, birthplace of the Tropfest Short Film Festival • Sydney’s red light district


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URBAN LEGEND

In 1927 a pistol license law with heavy jail terms saw Darlinghurst gangs arm themselves with razors. Darlinghurst’s notorious ‘razor gangs’ were fronted by heavyweight and brothel Madame, Matilda ‘Tilly’ Devine and documented in the book Razor by Larry Writer. Australian writer Henry Lawson penned the poem ‘One Hundred and Three’ in a sandstone cellblock of Darlinghurst Gaol. The site where he was held for drunkenness and non-payment of alimony is now open to students and the public as the National Art School. darling hurst & kings cr o ss


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S ee

The brass plates in Macleay Street sidewalks that tell stories of the area’s electric past taste

Vietnamese rolls or gourmet burgers SMELL

The high turn over of coffee beans keeping the place awake Do

Sample Sydney’s young small bar scene Watc h

The Wayside Chapel come alive with community activists and eccentrics with curious pets A local revision of the cosmopolitan cocktail A fter D ark

Alive on Burton Street, Victoria Street, Liverpool Street, Bayswater Road and Oxford Street

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B uy


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Potts Point Woolloomooloo

ELIZABETH BAY HOUSE

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Cycleway

Potts Point and Woolloomooloo swoon you with their old and new architecture and melange of Italian delis, Japanese sake bars, New Yorkstyle cafes and wharf restaurants. This refined edit of notable food and drink sensations maintains a reputation as Sydney’s cosmopolitan quarter for modern urbanites.

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Young professionals, subtle vagrants and sophisticated baby boomers sit side by side W o rd o n t h e street

• The tourists • Wagyu and the wharf • Pie and peas at Harry’s • “There’s Russell.”


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T ypical l o cal

K N OW N F O R

Young professionals, subtle vagrants and sophisticated baby boomers sit side by side at local bus stops. They operate in private circles, are polite and keep to themselves. Restaurateurs, playwrights, art directors and doctors muse over their strong views on wine while couples shop for their friend’s children’s toys.

• Sydney’s piece of New York • Cosmopolitan atmosphere • The restaurants along the wharf • Embarkation Park • Harry’s Café de Wheels

DEFINING EXPERIENCE

Coffee at the Parisian end of Macleay Street under oak trees and a wander down eclectic Challis Street.

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URBAN LEGEND

An elegant construction of the 1830s, Elizabeth Bay house complete with elegant oval saloon, sky-lit dome and curving staircase was used as a squat by artists, writers and poets between 1928 and 1935. po tts p oint & Wo o ll oo moo l oo

In a city where most lived in houses, in the early 1920s the residents of Potts Point lived in tiny flats or bed sits. The impetus for much of the precinct’s apartment building drew from the decline of the young male population in World War 1 and legacy of young women, who needed proximity to the city to work.


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Look up at the Art Deco buildings to find slices of Paris and New York taste

Raw Hiramasa kingfish carpaccio dishes at luxe alfresco dining spots SMELL

Egyptian dukkah on Hunter Valley Labna cheese Do

The sharp incline of McElhone stairway that runs from Woolloomooloo to Victoria Street The harbour between breaststrokes at Andrew Boy Charlton pool B uy

A designer toy for a friend’s baby A fter D ark

Hot on Macleay, Challis Avenue and Finger Wharf

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Watc h


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Glebe is a feast of fresh air in verdant parklands, expansive water vistas, and eclectic shopping. The vitality and openness of its student population support the seemingly endless gathering of second hand bookshops, new age outlets, ethnic eateries, recycled fashion boutiques and Saturday markets on Glebe Point Road.

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Locals sleep well with the karmic assurance that they cleaned up after their healthy dog W o rd o n t h e street

• Free WiFi at Foley Park wireless house • Budget meals and beds • “Dinner, movie and gelato?” GL EB E


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T ypical l o cal

Regardless of their profession as heritage architects, academics, baristas or nurses, Glebe dwellers love to walk. They are fun drinkers and talkers who sleep well with the karmic assurance that they cleaned up after their healthy dog that morning. DEFINING EXPERIENCE

Picking up some literature from one of the many bookstores and reading the afternoon away at a cafe. K N OW N F O R

• Value for money meals • G  lebe Markets – Saturday • Abundance of bookshops • Victorian architecture • Glebe Foreshore Walk • G  lebe Street Fair–November • Chatty cafes & lively pubs • A  lternative health and well being GL EB E


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URBAN LEGEND

The Sydney United Friendly Society Dispensary opened in January 1909. The health professionals of this voluntary initiative dispensed ointments, gargles, leeches, camel hair, poppy heads and chamomile flowers in the bottles and jars of patients. Two tables commemorate this precursor of modern health funds at 33 Glebe Point Road. Glebe Point Road’s tram system was active until the 1950s and originally the main transport line to connect an abattoir with the city.

GL EB E

Going to the pictures had an added dimension at The Glebe Moving Picture Show in 1910. Proprietor and Methodist, John ‘Jack’ Law staged boxing exhibitions and vaudeville acts by ‘Reckless Reggie’ before films at the 84 Glebe Point Road site. You can still catch a movie at Broadway.


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The elaborate facades and tessellated tile paths of matchbox terraces and stone gatehouses on Glebe’s architecture walk taste

The cuisine of three different continents in a single day SMELL

Spring and Autumn engulf the lush landscape Do

Spot the original Glebe café that boasts 28 years of bad manors (sic) Watc h

Bottle brush sway in waterside breeze from one of Jubilee Park’s picnic sheds B uy

A recommended Australian non-fiction release from an independent bookseller A fter D ark

Recline with wine in nooks on Glebe Point Road GL EB E


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Free Wi-fi Cycleway Parks What’s Hot

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Redfern and Waterloo combine their Aboriginal roots and working class history with modern tribalism. The unvarnished, industrial atmosphere of these neighbouring pockets has lured contemporary art circles, vintage/retro furniture restorers and slow food aficionados. The nostalgic flavour of this village is deep with respect for what has gone before.

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Redfern & w aterl oo

Active lovers of change and reflect Australia’s multi-ethnic population W o rd o n t h e street

• The Block • What produce is in season • “Redfern falls asleep early”


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T ypical L O C A L

Redfern and Waterloo people are active lovers of change and reflect Australia’s multi-ethnic population. They operate with a DIY mentality and loyalty to the local economy, the original landowners the Cadigal people and you, if your ear is open. DEFINING EXPERIENCE

Dealing direct with the farmer on a Saturday morning market spree before roaming the galleries with a Dandelion tea.

K N OW N F O R

Credit for mural: Pemulwuy Park Mural, James Simon and Danny Eastwood, 1995

Redfern & w aterl oo

• Danks Street • L  ocal football team The Rabbitohs • Eveleigh Farmer’s Market
 • R  edfern Community Markets in Redfern Park
 • C  ontemporary, retro and vintage furniture


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U rban L egend

The Redfern Municipal Electric Light Station built in 1891 was Sydney’s first supplier of electricity. In an era of dull gas street lamps, Redfern boasted electric versions and was literally the brightest place in Sydney. This power site was adaptively reused as the Rolling Stone Magazine headquarters and now houses antique dealer Martyn Cook.

Redfern & w aterl oo


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Handmade crafts from local makers at the Eveleigh Artisans Market at Carriageworks – first Sunday of every month taste

Bacon and egg rolls and purple carrots fresh from the farm at weekend farmers’ markets smell

Change in the air Do

Scamper between contemporary art exhibitions on George, Regent and Danks Streets Watc h

The Rabbitohs train in Redfern Park oval B uy

A fter D ark

Find the hidden eateries scattered throughout

Redfern & w aterl oo

An iconic retro piece of furniture from the line up on Regent Street and Redfern Street


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Walsh Bay Millers Point Just past the great grey bridge, the heritage piers and charming backstreets of Walsh Bay resound with a world-class cultural rhythm. This art precinct of open-air sculpture galleries, modern theatre productions and dance initiatives is the heart of Sydney’s performing arts scene.

LEGEND

Sculpture Walk Parks What’s Hot


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wals h bay & millers point

Ecoenthusiasts... ‘Greening the Wharf’ W o rd o n t h e street

• Where to have post theatre drinks • Bump into Cate • Catching a daytime matinee • Solar panels on the wharf


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T ypical l o cal

The locals of Walsh Bay are eco-enthusiasts who practice what they preach by ‘Greening the Wharf’. Advertising, media and arts businesses are attracted to the village’s creative edge. D efining E x perience

Walking the wharves with eyes wide open. • Sydney Writers’ Festival–May • Sydney Theatre Company • Sydney Dance Company • Bangarra Dance Theatre • Harbourside dining • Sandstone, cobblestone & wharves • Sculpture walk • Biennale

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K N OW N F O R


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URBAN LEGEND

The two storey Federation Free Style wharves and their associated shore sheds were built to modernise and manage Sydney’s waterfront after the outbreak of the Bubonic Plague in January 1900: the foreshore was awash with rubbish and rats. After a dormant period from the 60s to the 80s, the wharves were renovated to house star associations like Sydney Theatre Company and Bangarra Dance Theatre–Australia’s only national Aboriginal performing arts company.

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Local sandstone in watering holes like Hero of Waterloo, a gathering spot for the 1840s Garrison Troops of colonial days taste

A gourmet sandwich on a striped deck chair overlooking the harbour SMELL

The harbour breeze Do

Find Brett Whiteley’s towering Black Totem II and Jimmie Durham’s head-turning Still Life With Stone and Car on the sculpture walk Watc h

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Tapas and watch the sun sink A fter D ark

Wonder at the flexibility of contemporary dancers

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The boats draw patterns in the harbour from a pier restaurant


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wentwor park

SYDNEY FISH MARKET


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P OW E R H O U S E MUSEUM

Pyrmont Ultimo

st

st fig

w

r is

h iam ill

ha r

y st enr

IAN THORPE AQ UAT I C CENTRE

e st

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To UTS & TAFE LEGEND

Light Rail

Pyrmont’s industrial history unravels as you survey the panorama of wharves, woolstores, factories and golden sandstone under foot. This peninsular of casinos, fish markets, museums and imax movie theatres overlooks the ultramarine harbour and is home to a smooth dress up dining scene.

Monorail Cycleway Parks What’s Hot

0

400m 5 mins walk


54

Locals live simple high lives in flats, units or apartments, and journey to full time jobs...by foot, bus or boat pyrm o nt & ultim o

W o rd o n t h e street

• Times are changing
 • Award-winning Pirrama Park • Out for breakfast lunch and dinner


55

T ypical l o cal

K N OW N F O R

Locals live simple high lives in flats, units or apartments, and journey to full time jobs as managers, administrators and professionals by foot, bus or boat. In their late twenties to early fifties, the majority understand the need to rebalance the relationship of man and machine in a new age of diminishing resources.

• Pyrmont Festival –May • Growers Market at Pyrmont Bay Park–Saturdays • A  ustralian National Maritime Museum • Sydney Fish Market • Star City Casino • Lyric Theatre

DEFINING EXPERIENCE

An extended brunch and string of coffees at a creative outdoor eatery on Jones Bay Wharf.

pyrm o nt & ultim o


56

urban legend

Pyrmont was purchased by John Macarthur for a gallon of rum. Pyrmont’s ‘yellowblock’ sandstone lies under foot and was used in building iconic Sydney buildings such as Sydney Town Hall on George Street and The Art Gallery of NSW. The quarries from which they were extracted were known locally as ‘Paradise’, ‘Purgatory’ and ‘Hellhole’, in recognition of the difficulty of working the stone.

pyrm o nt & ultim o


57

S ee

A science or design exhibition at The Powerhouse Museum taste

Oysters and champagne at the Sydney Fish Market SMELL

The yellowblock sandstone under foot at Union Square Do

Roll the dice at Star City Watc h

The uproar of wholesale fish auctions at 7am, a cool spectator sport An oriental rug Watc h

Dog/owner lookalikes.

B uy

A fter D ark A fter D ark

A musical Lyricon Theatre Ironic knitted sweatersat the Buzzing Crown Street, from second hand Bourke near Oxford shops. and Cleveland between Elizabeth & Crown.

pyrm o nt & ultim o

B uy


58

CHINESE GARDEN

harbour st

N

liverpo ol

st

WO R L D S Q UA R E C H I NATOW N

t rs p ie

H AY M A R K E T L I B R A RY

hay st MARKET CITY AND PA D DY ’ S M A R K E T S

pitt st

GOLDEN TREE

hay st C A P I TO L T H E AT R E

y st qua

ac ce ss

pitt st

thom as s t

y st qua rd imo ult

campb ell st capitol square

ra ilw ay

H AY M A R K E T

geor ge st

e riv gd lin dar

PA D DY ’ S MARKET

george st

sussex st

dixon st

harbour st

E N T E RTA I N M E N T CENTRE

goulb urn st

ed dy av

central station

B E L M O R E PA R K


castlereag h st

elizabet h st

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elizabeth st

Haymarket Chinatown

th or tw n we

av

LEGEND

Light Rail Monorail

Everyday in Chinatown is a multi-Asian taste carnival. Opium dens and gambling lairs precede the modern microcosm of tea merchants, dumpling houses, neon food courts and Oriental food galleries. Follow your nose through this inner city labyrinth for exciting new tastes.

Train Station Pedestrian Street Parks What’s Hot Free Wi-fi

400m

0 5 mins walk


60

Blending tradition with modern techniques h aymarket & C H IN A T OWN

W o rd o n t h e street

• International news 
 • The exchange rate • ‘Irrashaimase’ (typical greeting at traditional Japanese restaurants that means ‘welcome’)


61

T ypical l o cal

DEFINING EXPERIENCE

A Sunday morning spent selecting individual morsels from Yum Cha bamboo baskets on Dixon Street.

K N OW N F O R

• Markets • Entertainment Centre • Capitol Theatre • Open late
 • High intensity social scene  he Metro Light Rail network • T  sian Australian • A installation artwork

h aymarket & C H IN A T OWN

Haymarket and Chinatown residents are resettled expatriates, international students and cosmopolitan business people who seek the buzz of Sydney’s inner ring. They believe in blending tradition with modern techniques and the custom of coming together for meal time.




62

URBAN LEGEND

Above the hustle and bustle of today’s Dixon Street lie the remnants of a mysterious and sometimes dark past of long-gone opium dens and gambling halls. Yum cha is a Cantonese term, which literally means, “drink tea” and is closely associated with dim sum, a wide range of small dishes. The link has roots on the ancient Silk Road where teahouses were established to rest travellers. After tea was found to be a digestion aid, snacks were added to the menu. Originating with the Cantonese in southern China, the culinary art and respite of yum cha has transformed into a loud and colourful dining experience. h aymarket & C H IN A T OWN


63

S ee

Wicker steamers full of plump dumplings taste

Roast Peking duck with plum sauce SMELL

Multiple cuisines at once Do

Wander the rainbow isles of Paddy’s Markets, a trinket and fresh produce emporium Watc h

Avid fans line up outside a holein-the-wall dealer of miniature custard puffs baked fresh 12pm to 9pm on Dixon Street A rare natural curative from a wall of Chinese herbs A fter D ark

Squeeze your way through the Friday night market on Dixon Street mall

h aymarket & C H IN A T OWN

B uy


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Useful Resources Information about events, entertainment, shopping, eating & local highlights whatson.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au

cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/barani

urbanwalkabout.com

love2010.com.au

concreteplayground.com.au

thesydneyfringe.com.au

timeoutsydney.com.au

pucc.com.au

twothousand.com.au

haymarketchamber.org.au

smh.com.au

chinatown.com.au

abc.net.au/sydney

kingscrossonline.com.au

fbiradio.com

newtownprecinct.com.au

2ser.com

paddingtonsydney.com.au

dailytelegraph.com.au

walshbaysydney.com.au

cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/ aboutsydney

facebook.com/redfernwaterloo

sydney.com

ssbchamber.com.au

eventssydney.com

sydneycycleways.net

glebe.com.au


Published and produced by Urban Walkabout on behalf of City of Sydney Design and illustration by Boccalatte Copyright 2011 City of Sydney Editorial Enquiries: City of Sydney Marketing T: 9265 9333 Email: council@cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au Photography by Helen White


Slices of Sydney

Glebe

Surry Hills

• Value for money meals • Glebe Markets – Saturday • Abundance of bookshops • Victorian architecture • Glebe Foreshore Walk • Glebe Street Fair–November • Chatty cafes & lively pubs • Alternative health and well being

• Art and design talent • Rag trade roots • Surry Hills Markets – first Saturday of every month • Beer gardens • Cheap steak nights • Niche cuisines and fusions • Community veggie gardens • Dog friendly atmosphere

Pyrmont Ultimo • Pyrmont Festival –May • Growers Market at Pyrmont Bay Park–Saturdays • Australian National Maritime Museum • Sydney Fish Market • Star City Casino • Lyric Theatre

Newtown

• Buzzing local pride • Wide variety of food options • Distinct subcultures • Unpretentious • Broad cultural appeal • Pop-up Newtown Markets • Newtown Festival– November • The Sydney Fringe Festival – September

Paddington • Paddington Markets – Saturdays • Boutique shopping • Launch pad for emerging fashion talent • Art galleries • The Royal Hotel, the oldest in the village • One of the earliest settled areas of Sydney

• Sydney’s piece of New York • Cosmopolitan atmosphere • The restaurants along the wharf • Embarkation Park • Harry’s Café de Wheels

Haymarket Chinatown

Redfern Waterloo

A T ast e o f Our V i l l ag e s

Walsh Bay Millers Point

• Sydney Writers’ Festival–May • Sydney Theatre Company • Sydney Dance Company • Bangarra Dance Theatre • Harbourside dining • Sandstone, cobblestone & wharves • Sculpture walk • Biennale

Potts Point Woolloomooloo

• Danks Street • Local football team The Rabbitohs • Eveleigh Farmer’s Market
 • Redfern Community Markets in Redfern Park
 • Contemporary, retro and vintage furniture

Darlinghurst Kings Cross • Mardi Gras–March • Kings Cross Organic Markets – Saturdays • Sydney Sustainable Markets, Taylor Square – Saturdays • Carlotta, a transgender showgirl, who was the inspiration for the film Priscilla Queen of the Desert. • Tropicana Cafe, birthplace of the Tropfest Short Film Festival • Sydney’s red light district

• Markets • Entertainment Centre • Capitol Theatre • Open late
 • High intensity social scene • The Metro Light Rail network • Asian Australian installation artwork


The Rocks

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wling st

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mo or e moore park

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1.5 km–3 km east of the City Centre Walking time ~ 20–25 mins Glebe (page 34)

3 km west of the City Centre Walking time ~ 40 mins

ll

W a l sh B a y / M i l l e r s P o i n t (page 46)

1 km north-west of the City Centre Walking time ~ 20 mins Pyrmont/Ultimo (page 52)

2 km west of the City Centre Walking time ~ 20 mins

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d er

bota

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3–4 km south of the City Centre Walking time ~ 40 mins south do

Redfern Waterloo

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mcevoy st

Haymarket/Chinatown (page 58)

1.5km south of the City Centre Walking time ~ 20 mins

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v

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Potts Point/Woolloomooloo (page 28)

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rd city

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ng st

st

bourke st

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Monorail Light Rail

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D a r l i n g h u r s t / K i n g s C r o ss (page 22)

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baptist st

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redfern park

4 km south-west of the City Centre Walking time ~ 40 mins

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Redfern/Waterloo (page 40)

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Train Station

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Newtown

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3 km east of the City Centre Walking time ~ 40 mins

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1–2 km east of the City Centre Walking time ~ 25–30 mins

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Paddington (page 10)

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prince alfred park

clevel

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flinders

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elizabeth st

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Sydney University

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parramatta rd

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1 km south-east of the City Centre Walking time ~ 40 mins

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Kings Cross Darlinghurst

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Surry Hills (page 4) craigend st

burton st

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crown

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macle

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victoria st

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Glebe

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Pyrmont Ultimo

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hyde park

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Darling Harbour

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royal botanical gardens

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Walsh Bay Millers Point

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Village Locator

ro a dw ay

Sydney Opera House

Parks Water

o’dea av

Transport hotline Phone 131500 or 131500.com.au


Slices of Sydney