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31 religious one, there followed a not u n n a t u r a l reaction, a n d t h e h a b i t s of heathenism and slavery in some m e a s u r e r e g a i n e d their h o l d . Again, the different missionary societies, h e a r i n g of t h e prosperity of the negroes, a n d e n c o u r a g e d by t h e e x t r a o r d i n a r y s u m s raised b y them for religious purposes i m m e d i a t e l y after e m a n c i p a t i o n , w i t h d r e w p e c u n i a r y aid j u s t a t t h e very t i m e w h e n , o w i n g to this reaction, a n d to t h e effects of the S u g a r B i l l , the blacks w e r e both less willing a n d less able to replace it : a n d thus the s u p p l y of preachers a n d teachers w a s diminished with the d e m a n d , w h e n , on t h e c o n t r a r y , t h e s u p p l y o u g h t to h a v e been increased, in order to m a i n t a i n t h e d e m a n d . We are glad, h o w e v e r , to learn t h a t b o t h c h u r c h a n d school a t t e n d a n c e is now again on t h e increase ; a n d the recent intelligence w e h a v e been able to gain from missionaries, gives us g r o u n d to believe t h a t t h e progress in civilization, t h o u g h less s h o w y t h a n it h a s been, is m o r e s o u n d , a n d , in reality, n o t less hopeful. A v e r y fair idea of t h e position a n d prospects of t h e negroes m a y be gathered from the three w o r k s a t the head of o u r paper, all of t h e m t h e records of observations m a d e d u r i n g t h e late years of fiscal depression ; one b e i n g the careful a n d detailed j o u r n a l * of two m e m b e r s of the A n t i - S l a v e r y S o c i e t y — Q u a k e r philanthropists, it is t r u e , b u t gentlemen whose position and character m a k e it impossible to d o u b t their statements of fact ; a n o t h e r , an impartial résumé chiefly of the m o r a l and religious condition of the island in 1 8 4 9 , b y a Scotch clergym a n ;+ a n d the t h i r d , a series of vivid and instructive sketches, b y a s h r e w d n e w s p a p e r editor from t h e States.++ W a n t of space compels us to refrain from g i v i n g o u r readers t h e analysis of these observations w h i c h w e h a d intended : we can only state t h e general i m p r e s s i o n left o n o u r m i n d s n o t o n l y b y t h e m , b u t b y a m u l t i t u d e of other evidence, m u c h of it official. H e a t h e n customs a n d superstitions a r e n o t y e t rooted o u t of J a m a i c a ; the sensuality of slavery l u r k s a m o n g its black population : in t h a t respect their m o r a l s t a n d a r d is still low, m u c h lower t h a n t h a t of t h e I r i s h p e a s a n t , — w e wish w e could be sure t h a t it w a s m u c h l o w e r t h a n t h a t of t h e E n g l i s h labourer. C r i m e is said to be frequent, and yet, if we c o m p a r e t h e criminal statistics of E n g l a n d w i t h those of J a m a i c a , this c h a r g e , even if t r u e , is one w h i c h it ill becomes E n g * "The British West Indies in 1850," by John Candler and G. W. Alexander, (Anti-Slavery Reporter, February, March, and April, 1851.) + "Jamaica : its State and Prospects." By the Rev. David King. Glasgow. 1850. + "Jamaica in 1850." By John Bigelow.

British philanthropy and Jamaica distress. Reprinted from the «  Westminter Review »  

Ouvrage patrimonial de la Bibliothèque numérique Manioc. Service commun de la documentation, Université des Antilles et de la Guyane. Ville...

British philanthropy and Jamaica distress. Reprinted from the «  Westminter Review »  

Ouvrage patrimonial de la Bibliothèque numérique Manioc. Service commun de la documentation, Université des Antilles et de la Guyane. Ville...

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