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25 have, w e fear, not yet entirely forgotten their slaveholding habits ;* what w o n d e r , t h e n , if the black sometimes imitates t h e m in t h i n k i n g work disgraceful, a n d if he does not forget h o w hateful it w a s w h e n it was w h i p p e d out of h i m . A g a i n , t h e n e g r o does not, a n y more t h a n the I r i s h or D o r s e t s h i r e labourer, g i v e good w o r k for bad p a y ; a n d there is no virtue in a tropical sun which should induce m e n to give continuous a n d efficient l a b o u r with w a g e s at a shilling a d a y , t a n d with provisions m o r e h i g h l y taxed t h a n ours under t h e corn laws. W h i l e , therefore, w e do n o t d e n y , b u t rather m o s t deeply deplore, the deficient i n d u s t r y of m a n y of the emancipated negroes, we yet do assert t h a t this deficient industry is n o t so m u c h the cause as t h e effect of colonial distress ; and t h a t even w h e r e it is its cause, it is itself in g r e a t measure caused n o t by emancipation b u t b y slavery, or b y t h e mistakes a n d m i s c o n d u c t of those w h o could not forget t h a t they h a d been slave-owners. I n t r u t h , if w e c o m e to a n a l y z e this oft repeated c o m p l a i n t of idleness, we shall find t h a t it p r e t t y generally reduces itself to t h e n o t u n n a t u r a l reluctance of the w o r k m a n to w o r k on plantations for a master, w h e n m u c h better p a y could be g o t b y toiling on provision g r o u n d s for himself. A fair analysis of t h e evidence given b y t h e planters themselves before L o r d G e o r g e B e n t i n c k ' s C o m m i t t e e , w o u l d , we are convinced, confirm the following n o t e w o r t h y r e m a r k in Sir C . G r e y ' s D e s p a t c h of D e c e m b e r 31st, 1 8 5 1 . After a l l u d i n g to the " d e m o r a l i z i n g effect " w h i c h great pestilences h a v e in J a m a i c a , as well as e v e r y w h e r e else, a n d s a y i n g t h a t " w h e n n e a r l y t h e w h o l e inhabitants of h a m l e t s are d e s t r o y e d , " (as w a s t h e case in t h e cholera of t h a t y e a r , ) " i t m u s t necessarily h a v e a g r e a t effect for some t i m e in m a k i n g t h e s u r v i v i n g labourers of t h e district, less settled and s t e a d y , " he a d d s , " i t is unjust to m a k e a general i m p u t a t i o n against t h e m of laziness ; for a l t h o u g h , in c o m m o n w i t h the i n h a b i t a n t s of all w a r m climates, t h e y feel m o r e t h a n those of cold ones a l i k i n g for repose, and a sense of enjoyment in it, there are few races of m e n w h o w i l l Work h a r d e r or m o r e perseveringly w h e n they a r e sure of g e t t i n g for themselves the whole produce of their labour. I t is quite t r u e , h o w ever, t h a t t h e y r e g a r d it as fair, and almost meritorious, to get as m u c h as possible from their e m p l o y e r s , and to d o as little as possible for them in return ; n o t h i n g will k e e p t h e m to t h e j o u r n e y - w o r k of t h e master, if the cultivation of their o w n g r o u n d , or indeed their p r i v a t e interest of a n y sort, d r a w s t h e m a w a y . " * See Mr. Bigelow, cap. viii. ; and also Lord Elgin's Despatch, May 6, 1846. + Sir J. Pakington's speech in Parliament, December 9, 1852 ; Mr. Bigelow, cap. xiii.

British philanthropy and Jamaica distress. Reprinted from the «  Westminter Review »  

Ouvrage patrimonial de la Bibliothèque numérique Manioc. Service commun de la documentation, Université des Antilles et de la Guyane. Ville...

British philanthropy and Jamaica distress. Reprinted from the «  Westminter Review »  

Ouvrage patrimonial de la Bibliothèque numérique Manioc. Service commun de la documentation, Université des Antilles et de la Guyane. Ville...

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