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SCHOOL SCENE A Special Supplement to the Sullivan County Democrat

A look at activities in the Roscoe Central School District

SECTION R • MARCH, 2018 • CALLICOON, NY


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Ellen Memorial Health Care & Rehabilitation Center

Honesdale, Pennsylvania

SULLIVAN COUNTY DEMOCRAT

MARCH, 2018

At Ellen Memorial, our highest priority is to provide individualized

resident-centered care. Our 128 bed family-owned, one-story facility is located in Honesdale, less than one mile from the local hospital. Ellen Memorial has been serving the community since 1976 and has been dedicated to providing our residents with a home-like atmosphere. We are seeking high school students for entry level positions as well as student volunteers.

We specialize in providing both short-term and long term care focused in the following areas: • Skilled Nursing Care • Rehabilitation Services • Alzheimer’s/Dementia Memory Care • Hospice Care • Respite Stays

Announcing

NEWLY REMODELED PRIVATE REHAB SUITES

Honesdale High School senior, Hannah Burlein is an active volunteer who provides pet therapy to the residents with her rabbit.

23 Ellen Memorial Lane, Honesdale, Pennsylvania

ellenmemorialhcc.com

email: frontdesk@ellenmemorial.com

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(570) 253-5690


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‘Reaching out for knowledge feels good’

Roscoe students get jump on college careers STORY AND PHOTO BY KATHY DALY

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oscoe senior Dan Clancy wants to teach physical education someday and hopes to start his studies in September at SUNY Brockport. Amazingly, Clancy will do so without the need for most of his general requirement courses, in effect, shortening his college career by one year. “I've already taken college courses in pre-calculus, calculus, trig, Spanish, English composition, speech, government, psychology and sociology,” Clancy said. “I will start in as a college sophomore.” Roscoe is the smallest school district in Sullivan County, but it's one of those in

Best Wishes to the Roscoe School Staff & Students. Especially, Pamela Carpenter, Robert & Emma Buck and Tyler Carpenter Nancy Buck Sullivan County Treasurer

School Scene A Look at Activities in the Roscoe School District Published by

Catskill-Delaware Publications, Inc. Publishers of the

(845) 887-5200 Callicoon, NY 12723 March 6, 2018 • Vol. CXXVII, No. 76

Publisher: Co- Editors: Editorial Assistants: Advertising Director: Advertising Coordinator: Advertising Representatives: Special Sections Coordinator: Business Manager: Business Department: Telemarketing Coordinator: Monticello Office Manager: Classified Manager: Production Associates: Circulation & Distribution:

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Carmel Lambe oversees the work of Dan Clancy, who is college bound.

Fred W. Stabbert III Joseph Abraham and Matt Shortall Willow Baum, Margaret Bruetsch, Kathy Daley, Rich Klein, Richard Ross, Patricio Robayo, Jeanne Sager, Ed Townsend, Mike Vreeland Liz Tucker Lillian Ferber Barbara Matos, Lainie Yennie Susan Panella Susan Owens Patricia Biedinger Michelle Reynolds Margaret Bruetsch Janet Will Ruth Huggler, Rosalie Mycka, Elizabeth Finnegan, Petra Duffy, Nyssa Calkin, Claire Humbert, Peter Melnick Linda Davis, Kohloa Zaitsha, Billy Smith, Phil Grisafe


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the forefront of supplying on-site college courses that serve students well. Kids not only accrue transferable college credits from SUNY Sullivan, Hudson Valley Community College, SUNY Cobleskill and Tompkins Cortland Community College, but they experience the vast difference between high school and college academics. “I give them the work and then they go do it and bring it back – no excuses,� said teacher Pam Carpenter, who leads college classes in algebra, precalculus and calculus. “They have to step up to the responsibility of a college class, which is more rigorous.� College classes in high school tend to be faster paced than regular high school courses, and the work is more abstract. Students must summon initiative and self-discipline. They must prepare to work much more independently than before. They need to be motivated. Criteria for admittance to Roscoe's college classes includes scoring well on Regents exams and enjoying a strong grade point average in the subject area. As for the teachers, they need a degree in the subject area in order to qualify to teach SUNY Sullivan courses. They use the college's syllabus and textbook and undergo periodic obser-

vations by college staff members. Right now, students in Carmel Lambe's college English comp class are working on eight to 10-page argument essays that are researchedbased. Their topics include increasing the minimum wage to $15; determining what causes opioid addiction; and how to contain fraternity hazing. In public speaking, students will deliver a digital media presentation and speech on a particular topic. The teachers pointed out that the benefits of college classes on the high school campus range from saving money (the student families must pay for the college-level course, but at a much-reduced rate from the college on-site class) to exploring academic interests while still in high school. “When kids get to Calculus,� said Carpenter, “they understand that there are real world applications. They can see how algebra is used for something significant and concrete. They see how algebra, trigonometry and geometry can come together, how you put all the pieces together.� “It's rewarding to know that when they graduate, they are prepared to be successful,� adds Lambe. Student Dan Clancy emphasizes the value of digging deep into learning. “I enjoy being pushed farther,� said Clancy. “Reaching out for knowledge myself definitely feels good.�

College Classes offered at Roscoe: Math teacher Pam Carpenter instructs college classes in algebra, pre-calculus and calculus.

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Through Sullivan Community College (taught by Roscoe teachers): English Composition 1, Fundamentals of Speech, College Algebra & Trigonometry, Pre-Calculus, Analytical Geometry and Calculus 1, American Government, Macroeconomics, Spanish Language and Culture 1

Tompkins Cortland Community College in Dryden, NY (via distance learning): Pre-Calculus, Calculus 1


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SULLIVAN COUNTY DEMOCRAT

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Youngest kids take on diversity, respect and getting over getting mad Through reading, play and modeling respectful social behaviors, teacher Brenda Dahlman squires her pre-kindergarten students through their early educational experiences at Roscoe Central School. Here, she reads a book with Melany DeVantier and Camryn Geigher.

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hat's the deal with brown eggs and white eggs? After all, they're the same on the

inside. Bingo! That's just the point being made to the youngest students at Roscoe School by pre-kindergarten teacher Brenda Dahlman as she teaches about diversity and difference.

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STORY AND PHOTO BY KATHY DALEY

“It's okay to be different,” says Dahlman. “Everybody is unique in their own way.” Pre-kindergarten is a critically important school year for the youngest among us. Cognitive skills are nurtured through hands-on activities that challenge students to observe, be curious, and ask questions, said Dahlman. Speaking skills are advanced in the “language rich” environment. But pre-k is also a time for starting to develop the social and emotional skills that students will employ throughout their lives. “How to solve problems, work together, learning to share, to communicate, learning about feelings – it all goes on every day,” said

Dahlman. In the adult world, acquiring these skills is termed “social and emotional wellness.” Social wellbeing is the ability to establish and maintain positive relationships with family, friends and co-workers. Emotional wellness is the ability to understand our own selves and to cope with life's challenges. Educational research has recognized social-emotional wellness as a key factor in student success – studies show that students with higher social-emotional skills have better attention abilities and fewer learning problems. Generally, they are more successful in academic and workplace settings. Dahlman noted that pre-k stu-


SULLIVAN COUNTY DEMOCRAT

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“More than 20 Years of Inspiring Our Next Generation of Teachers and Strengthening Classrooms and Communities through Mentorship and Scholarship”©

Founded in 1994 by Dr. Bettye H. Perkins, President & CEO, TSTT is a unique school based mentoring program that recruits and mentors culturally diverse and economically challenged high school students who are interested in pursuing a career in teaching, provides financial assistance for students to attend college, and places them as teachers and leaders who will inspire and strengthen their communities.

845-295-4032 • www.tstt.org • laura.burrell@scboces.org 6 Wierk Avenue, Liberty, NY 12754

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Inquire about the TSTT program and benefits. Call or email to schedule a meeting with the TSTT team & consider partnership opportunities at your school!

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breath, say what the problem is and tell how you are feeling,” she said. For instance, a child might say “I'm upset. I just wanted to share with him, and he took my block.” Dahlman encourages a quiet time to regroup and calm down if a child is upset or angry. He or she can crawl into their “cubby,” which is a cozy, individual space in the classroom, or can get comfortable in a chair at the classroom's reading center. “Sometimes, they just need a chance to collect their thoughts,” she said. Focusing on self control, waiting your turn, and sharing are, after all, new concepts to many children. At home, they are most likely not in a group of kids, so dealing with frustration and solving conflicts are new ideas. But, said Dahlman, they learn. And they are fun. “They are so curious,” she said with a grin. “And they are just a ball of energy, each of them.

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dents learn how to identify what others are feeling based on their facial expressions and body language. In lessons on “if and then,” that is, cause and effect, children see a little boy smiling, and they realize that a smile shows he's happy. They look at a little girl crying, and that she dropped her ice cream, and understand why she is sad. Slowly, through fun games and role-playing, the children gain a better sense of their own and other people’s emotions, perspectives and behaviors. During a special time, Dahlman focuses specifically on problem solving, feelings and stress. That takes place once each week in her classroom, as it does throughout the pre-k through sixth grade classrooms, by means of the PATHS program (Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies). PATHS is a specific curriculum for promoting social and emotional competency in schools. Through PATHS, “students learn to stop when stressed, take a deep

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Dynamic learning environment accessible to kids night and day STORY AND PHOTOS BY KATHY DALEY

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“There are also increased opportunities for us as teachers to become facilitators rather than lecturers,” said Lucas. His seventh grade class in American History are working on a unit on the American Revolution, constructing a timeline on the presentation program Google Slides detailing the events and people involved in the battles. The work will then be submitted to Schoology. The student account is synchronized to the file storage and synchronization service Google Drive. Both teachers noted that Roscoe students benefit from the luxury of comprehensive computer labs; distance learning whereby classes or lectures are conducted over the Internet; and easy accessibility to chrome books, which are the laptops that run Google's Chrome operating system. In the end, technology is increasingly part of student lives. “No matter what career they're interested in, technology and computer-based testing is used,” said Pantilieris. “And,” added Lucas, “These are the type of tools they will use. The platform is similar to Blackboard on the collegiate level. The kids are fine. They grew up in this world.” “For us, it allows for greater interactivity,” said Lucas. “You want to make sure what you are teaching is meaningful. Having something like this gives me so many more resources.”

Science teacher Taso Pantilieris and students Aaron Steele and Dalton Powell agree that the software application Schoology has transformed their classwork.

Growing Through Grief

August 24, 25 & 26, 2018 Camp is held at the YMCA of Sullivan County

A FREE day-camp full of healing activities for children ages 5 to 17 grieving the death of a loved one that has occurred within the last two years. Through play, art, music, and activities, it is a safe place of acceptance, understanding and grief education. For more info call Bereavement Director Kim Warner 845-561-6111 x 117 Deadline Aug. 10, 2018 55228

cience teacher Taso Pantilieris and cohort Michael Lucas, who teaches social studies, no longer have to lug bags of student work home to review and grade. The learning system called Schoology has ended all that. “It's a one-stop shop for all the resources needed for a classroom,” notes Lucas, who teaches social studies from grade 7 through 12. Through their account, students can access Schoology from any computer or mobile device with Internet access, at any time of the day or night, in addition to working in the classroom. Schoology allows teachers to create an online learning environment to support classroom teaching and enhances communication between teachers and students. Teachers can post course content, provide resources for students, and review assignments. They can “conduct” a lesson online with real-time student participation. “Notes, quizzes, labs completed, assessments done – it's all there,” notes Lucas. “Students submit their assignments and teachers can highlight them and insert comments in the margin.” “I don't have to try to squeeze my comments into (looseleaf ) margins and carry five bags of material back and forth from school,” adds Pantilieris, who teaches 712 science. And, said Pantilieris, since the students grew up on technology, they seem to be more apt to actually read the teacher's notes on their work. Last year was the first year of implementation, and Pantilieris notes that he’s less than comfortable using technology in the classroom. “I was a slow convert,” he said. But Schoology has allowed him to embrace digital teaching and learning. “It allows me to provide the kids with instant feedback (on a lesson),” he said. “Everything is in the moment.” Schoology fosters both the ability to work with other people to complete a shared goal, and ownership of one's own learning, said the teachers.

Camp Chrysalis is a partnership between: The YMCA of SC * Hospice of Orange & Sullivan Bethel Woods Center for the Arts


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In school and on the athletic field, creating stronger kids STORY AND PHOTOS BY KATHY DALEY

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oday's kids are notably more sedentary than other generations. Then comes gym class and sports, where they are expected to perform quick bursts of energy that are hugely different from the rest of their stationary lives. “Injuries can be catastrophic,” said Michael Hill, Roscoe science teacher and coach of football, basketball and baseball. “One of our biggest tenets is to get kids in shape.” Enter Functional Strength Training (FST), which is huge in adult gyms

everywhere and newly introduced at Roscoe. “Instead of working on one isolated muscle, it's a whole muscle approach,” said physical education teacher Tom Atwell. “It engages different muscles and it strengthens joints.” FST also increases both the body's flexibility and the all-important cardiovascular endurance. For example, Atwell explained that when a football player is blocking on the field, he is not just pushing with his arms, “but needs power in his legs and in his core.” FST works on that.

Roscoe Physical Education teacher Tom Atwell is elated with three new pieces of exercise equipment that work on the whole body.

“It's a whole body practice,” said Hill. “It's like walking and chewing gym at the same time.” In phys ed class, Atwell is starting FST with the younger children and will build up to the high school. Students work on exercises like the fairly well known lunge or the plank, which is similar to a push-up but for the arms held at 90 degree angles. Both engage various muscles along with the body's core, which is the midsection. Added to the FST exercises this year are three new pieces of specialized FST equipment: two power racks and a dumbbell rack that are seeing significant use. “This is a good change,” said senior Noah Steele, who worked on one of the machines. Steele serves on the school football, basketball and baseball teams. “This will help us work out more efficiently, working on every muscle in the body, not just our arms.” Coach Hill agrees. “What we do explosively and quickCheered on by teacher and coach Mike Hill, Camille Hondromaras tries out “the sloth” posture which works on the muscles in the chest and ly, we do with deficiency, and then back, arm muscles, grip of hands, stomach and side muscle obliques. there's the 'OW!”


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TR AN NSPORTIN NG THE MO M ST PRECIOUS CARGO O Each year, Rolling V drivers are responsible for o the safe transpor tation of more than 7,00 00 school children. Please remember to drive carrefully – it could be your child on a bus nearrby!

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‘Celebrating 126 Yeears of Community Journalism’ Journalism

Roscoe School Scene 2018  

With a small student population and a dedicated staff, Roscoe Central School is the kind of close-knit, one-on-one place we love to feature...

Roscoe School Scene 2018  

With a small student population and a dedicated staff, Roscoe Central School is the kind of close-knit, one-on-one place we love to feature...

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