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A Century Cornell University of Cooperative Service Extension Sullivan County

A Special Section of the

Sullivan County Democrat May 2014


100 YEARS

of nourishing ideas, education and innovation. Congratulations Cornell Cooperative Extension of Sullivan County! We are a proud partner and look forward to what the next century brings.

A Century of Service A publication of the Sullivan County Democrat May 16, 2014 • Vol. CXIII • No. 95 Publisher Senior Editor Editor Sports Editor Editorial Assistant Design and Layout Director of Marketing Display Advertising Director Advertising Sales Advertising Coordinator Advertising Design Business Manager Production

SullivanRenaissance.org 845-295-2445 /SullivanRenaissance

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2 CORNELL UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION 100TH ANNIVERSARY

Fred Stabbert III Dan Hust Frank Rizzo Ken Cohen John Conway Rosalie Mycka Laura Stabbert Liz Tucker Cecilia Lamy, Barbara Matos Sandy Schrader Petra Duffy Sue Owens Ruth Hugler, Tracy Swendsen, Elizabeth Finnegan, Nyssa Calkin Distribution Bill Holmes

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CORNELL UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION 100TH ANNIVERSARY 3


For all that he’s gained, Earl Myers gives back to Cornell Earl Myers looks like a farmer – stout of build, firm of

everything from pest control to cattle health to flower cultivation. Of particular value was CCE’s training in how to smartly operate a small business – a crucial skill for farmers of both yesterday and today. What he learned made him successful – and also very busy, yet that proved no obstacle for CCE’s educational efforts. “If you had a problem, they’d come out to the farm and help you with it,” he said. Nevertheless, you could find Earl at the Liberty headquarters often

handshake, with a face that’s obviously endured every element nature could toss against it. At 73, he’s spent a lifetime living off the land, and the Jeffersonville native’s knowledge and experience are well-regarded throughout Sullivan County’s ag community. He’s spreading that knowledge around, thanks to his role as a board member with Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) in Liberty. It represents a full circle “The enthusiasm is coming back,...People in his life. are concerned about where their food is “My first experience coming from.” [with CCE] was when I enough, as he served on various was 16,” he recalled. “It was a meetcommittees. ing they had on the quality of hay. A Yet it was just two years ago that neighbor had invited me.” he finally decided to join the board Earl Wilde was executive director itself, becoming a director and one of CCE back then, and the younger of the Extension’s most familiar Earl quickly realized how valuable faces. Extension’s skilled staff could be to He’s delighted to help a new genhis budding dairy farm ambitions. eration discover agriculture, even if “If you only learned one thing at it’s not in the struggling dairy indusone meeting, you were ahead for try (though milk prices have imthe day,” he affirmed. proved for farmers in the past few By 19, he was a dues-paying months, he said). member (as were his parents before “Youth programs are really emphahim), and by 21, he was running his sized,” the former 4-H’er explained, own dairy farm on – where else? – “because that’s the future of ag.” Earl Myers Road. He spent the next five decades utiAnd the latest technologies, including a brand new greenhouse lizing Cornell to keep up to date on 4 CORNELL UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION 100TH ANNIVERSARY

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STORY AND PHOTO BY DAN HUST

just erected at CCE, are part of that effort. Earl – who still helps his daughter and son-in-law, Dawn and Pete Erlwein, on the family farm – is gratified to see people asking him and fellow Extension members and staff about niche farming, be it in meat, dairy, vegetable or the increasingly popular organic. “The enthusiasm is coming back,” he remarked. “There’s a renewed interest in all sorts of areas. People are concerned about where their food is coming from.” And CCE’s staff of paid and volunteer experts stands ready to help. “The staff is young and energetic, and they have a lot of expertise,” Earl nodded. “They are the people who make this outfit run.” 2014

He ticks off a slew of offerings, from classes on canning vegetables to business strategy and marketing. It’s not just about traditional agriculture anymore, and Earl encourages everyone – yes, everyone – to discover how diversified Cornell Cooperative Extension has become. “I think everybody could join and definitely get their money’s worth out of it,” he affirmed. After more than 50 years’ involvement, no one knows that better than Earl. Earl Myers has been a member of Cornell Cooperative Extension Sullivan County almost as long as he’s been a farmer. His experience with the local office spans more than half the Extension’s century of existence – and he remains a vital member.

CORNELL UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION 100TH ANNIVERSARY 5


Cornell Cooperative From the Beginning It is indisputable that 1914 was one of the most

Extension services in New York had actually begun in Broome County in 1911, but following the federal legislation expansion was immediate, and by 1918 every rural county in the state except two were served. Initially, local representatives were called Farm Bureau, Home Bureau and 4-H Club agents. This remained the case until 1956. As early as 1917, the program was recognized as “one of the largest and best contributions to rural growth and betterment and the closest tie between science and practice that has yet been brought about.” Of course, in those years agriculture was still among the leading economic drivers in Sullivan County. While the number of farms in the county had

significant years in Sullivan County’s history, and not just because the first steamship passed through the Panama Canal or because a world war had broken out in Europe. In June of that year, the Hotel Wawonda in Liberty, the largest and grandest of all the hotels in the county at the time, burned to the ground. This final demise of the great resort was eerily symbolic of the impending collapse of the Silver Age, a period of prolonged prosperity based on tourism that had begun around 1890. Coincidentally, earlier that same year a small family of eastern European immigrants had paid $750 for a dilapidated farmhouse in Ferndale called the In 1919 Ella Zurbrick urged Sullivan County Longbrook, and had started housewives “to get as soon as possible, running to farm there. They also enwater with a sink, a wash machine, a bread mixer, a tertained nine boarders that pressure cooker, a fireless cooker, a vacuum cleaner summer, grossing $81. and a screened porch.” From those humble beginnings, the Grossinger resort empire, which would become among steadily declined since reaching a peak the most famous in the world, had of nearly 4,400 in 1880, there were still begun. more than 3,800 operating at the time, Perhaps most significantly, what mostly engaged in dairy or poultry would eventually become known as farming. At first only a tiny percentage the Cornell Cooperative Extension proof the farms joined the Farm Bureau, gram was established as part of a fedbut that percentage grew steadily over eral program designed to apply the next several years. university knowledge and resources to Early Farm Bureau agents in Sullivan address community need. The federal County included James A. Richardson, program, enabled by the Smith-Lever H.P. Smith and Charles Wille. In addiAct, helped to connect the research tion, there was a Special Assistant conducted at various land grant univerCounty Agent for Jewish Farmers in sities across the country—such as Corsome of those early years, with Pincus nell in New York—with each state’s Schereschevsky being the first. farmers. Schereschevsky split his time between 6 CORNELL UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION 100TH ANNIVERSARY

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BY JOHN CONWAY Sullivan, Ulster and Rensselaer Counties, where the largest concentration of Jewish farmers was found. When Charles Wille took over as the Sullivan County agent, he learned to speak Yiddish so that he could better communicate with the estimated 1400 Jewish farmers in the county. In 1916, the Sullivan County Farm Bureau joined the ranks of those counties publishing a Farm News on a regular basis. These local publications were considered essential “in keeping the membership in close touch with the work and in disseminating important agricultural facts and news.” As it did throughout the state, membership in the Home Bureau in Sullivan County grew at a slower rate than that in the Farm Bureau. The earliest Home Bureau or Home Demonstration agents in Sullivan County included Ella Zurbrick. In a 1919 article she urged Sullivan County housewives “to get as soon as possible, running water with a sink, a wash machine, a bread mixer, a pressure cooker, a fireless cooker, a vacuum cleaner and a screened porch.” By the time Rosamond Adams was appointed the county’s Home

Bureau Manager in October of 1919, there were about 250 members in the county. During those early years, the Home Bureau’s work mainly involved five areas of home economics: foods and nutrition, clothing, thrift, civics, and community enterprise. Community enterprise activities included the development of rest rooms, food centers and community centers. In those years, the local Home Bureau supplemented its revenues by managing the food concessions at the annual Sullivan County Fair, which was a considerable undertaking. In 1953, the Farm Bureau and Cooperative Extension were legally separated from one another, and in 1956 the County Extension Service Association replaced the Farm and Home Bureaus. Of course, by that time the role of county agents had shifted dramatically, as technology and lifestyles continued to change. The demand for land for development drove its market value above its value for farming and there were fewer and fewer farms throughout the state as a result. By 1940, there were just 2,778 farms in Sullivan County, averaging in size about 90 CONTINUED ON PAGE 8

Weissmann’s Century Farm in Callicoon Center


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7

acres each, and by the time The Temporary State Commission to Study the Catskills released its final report, entitled The Future of the Catskills, in April of 1975, there were only a few more farms in the entire six county Catskill region than there had once been in Sullivan County alone. At the time agent Earle A. Wilde came to work in Sullivan County, he had already served as County Agent in St. Lawrence, Rensselaer and Otsego Counties, and he had witnessed this ongoing evolution of duties first hand. Gerald Skoda became the Sullivan County Cooperative Extension Executive Director in 1968, having previously worked as a County Agricultural Agent in Delaware and Madison Counties. By the time he retired in 1998, his work involved business management, marketing and economic development as much as anything else. Skoda obtained

grants for studying duck and turkey production and conducted workshops on poultry production, but his day to day duties were considerably different from those performed by the county’s first agent, James A. Richardson. Currently, Cornell Cooperative Extension provides resources to every county in the state, as well as to the five boroughs of New York City. Services are provided in six broad program areas, including agriculture and horticulture, family well being, 4-H youth development, community and economic vitality, environment and natural resources, and nutrition, food safety and health. The agency’s mission now describes its pursuit of economic vitality, ecological sustainability and social well-being. By consistently demonstrating flexibility, adaptability, and a willingness to reinvent itself, Cornell Cooperative Extension has managed to remain relevant in spite of a rapidly changing world.

Happy Anniversary

100 years!

Options for All Ages: Career Building ~ College Prep ~ Online Courses ~ ESOL Instruction ~ HS Equivalency Diplomas

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Timeline Cornell Cooperative Extension Sullivan County origins come from a series of unique partnerships with Cornell University and state, local and federal government with strong advocacy from families and businesses in agriculture. In the early days, CCE, then known as Farm Bureau, helped farmers address the major agricultural concerns of the day. With the adoption of the Morrill Land Grant Act signed by President Abraham Lincoln, Cornell University was founded in 1865 as New York State’s land grant university.

1913 The New York State legislature passed the first act supporting Cooperative Extension work with a financial appropriation to help support county associations, which were and still are, unique to New York State. The act provided funding and designated the responsibility for Supervising Cooperative Extension programs to Cornell University, later in conjunction with local volunteer boards of directors and committees. 1914 The United States Congress passed the Smith Lever Act, supporting the Cooperative Extension in each state to extend teaching and research to the people in their home communities. Through the Sullivan County Farm Bureau, Cooperative Extension programming began in Sullivan County.

1938 The first 4-H Agent started. 1951 The local partnership was strengthened by County Law, 224 which officially establishes an extension in each county of the state and designates county funds to support local extension associations. It further gives decision-making responsibilities to a board of directors and overall supervision and direction of extension programming to Cornell University.

1955 The Farm Bureau and the County Extension Service Association became separate entities. Farm Bureau was more involved in state and national legislative concerns. Extension Service, as a public supported organization, could not directly influence legislation. The New York State Legislature enacted legislation, changing the name of the county organization to County Extension Service Association. 1987 With the support of the Sullivan County Board of Supervisors, the CCE Board of Directors and many contributions from the community, the Gerald J. Skoda Education Center opened in Liberty. 2014 The Cooperative Extension of Sullivan County celebrates 100 years of continuous education programming in Sullivan County.

1915 One Agricultural Agent began disseminating Cornell research information to Sullivan County farms. 1917 A Home Economist was added. 2014

CORNELL UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION 100TH ANNIVERSARY 9


845-482-3802 495 Hessinger-Lare Rd., Jeffersonville, NY 12748

222 Hessinger-Lare Rd., Youngsville, NY 12791 Jill Welsh • 845-482-4686 www.oakridgefarminc.com

Funded by Sullivan County Rural Health Network

Congratulations to Cornell Cooperative Extension

Wurtsboro

Gieger Dairy Farm

FMNP Market: Jul. 3rd, Aug. 7th and Sept. 4th Community Church of Wurtsboro, 134 Sullivan St., Wurtsboro, NY 12790

Stefan and Cindy Gieger and Family 30 Likel Rd, Jeffersonville, NY 12748

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meet the staff Patricia Claiborne Interim Executive Director pdc5@cornell.edu

2014

Bonnie Lewis Caregiver & Senior Resource Coordinator/ Educator bjl25@cornell.edu Michelle Lipari Agriculture/ 4-H Educator & Greenhouse Coordinator mml249@cornell.edu

Tracey Argent Office & Personnel Manager ta18@cornell.edu

Melinda Meddaugh Agriculture & Natural Resources Leader/ County Ag Planner mm2592@cornell.edu

SueAnn Boyd Eat Smart NY Nutrition Supervising Educator srb46@cornell.edu

Nancy Pierro Administrative Assistant nvp8@cornell.edu

Susan Dollard Master Gardener Coordinator / Educator smd243@cornell.edu

Nicole Slevin Science & Technology Educator/ Communications Director nas96@cornell.edu

Erica Ferber Eat Smart NY Nutrition Educator elf55@cornell.edu

Tara VanHorn Finance & Grants Administrator tav9@cornell.edu

Maria Grimaldi EaT Kitchen Project Coordinator/ Nutrition Educator mal395@cornell.edu

Sean Welsh Youth & Family Leader/ Energy Educator sw288@cornell.edu

Marylin Jones 4-H Youth Development Educator mlr34@cornell.edu

John Wilcox Grounds & Facilities Manager jhw15@cornell.edu

CORNELL UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION 100TH ANNIVERSARY 1 1


board of directors & committees Cornell Cooperative Extension Sullivan County Board of Directors meet on the fourth Tuesday of every other month at 7 pm. Board Personnel & Finance Committee meets on the fourth Tuesday of every month at 5:30 pm. Program Committee meets on the third Tuesday of every month at 7:00 pm. All meetings are open to the public and held at the CCE Gerald J. Skoda Extension Education Center on 64 FerndaleLoomis Road in Liberty.

Board of Directors • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Christopher Gozza Joan Howard, President Earl Myers, Vice President Glenn Pontier, Secretary Donna Willi, Treasurer Dawn Boyes Sonja Hedlund Steven Mogel Ed Moran Louisa Parker Pamela Rourke Mike Sakell Janet Threshman Pedro “Pete” Tweed Legislative Rep. Kathleen "Kitty" Vetter

Saunderskill Farms FA R M M A R K E T & GREENHOUSE

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

Dawn Boyes Karen Coombe Amy Erlwein Sonya Hedlund April Kackos Kathy Kreiter John Lang Jennifer Mall Ed Moran Earl Myers Malek Rabadi Diana Weiner Evelyn Weissmann

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Program Advisory Committee

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Catskill Mountainkeeper is an advocate for farms and farmers.

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We work to provide resources and support for producers and consumers (that’s all of us ...you know, cause everyone has to eat).

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CORNELL UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION 100TH ANNIVERSARY 1 3


If you build it, it will grow Constructing an inexpensive, easy-tobuild greenhouse could revolutionize agriculture in Sullivan County. For less than $10,000 anyone can erect a greenhouse capable of growing vegetables, herbs, and flowers – all year long. Cornell Cooperative Extension Sullivan County (CCESC) actively sought a partnership with Sullivan County BOCES to engage students in the construction and operation of such a greenhouse. With the guidance of

BOCES natural resources teacher Sam Rogers, the greenhouse is being integrated into the curriculum for the students to learn hands-on agriculture/horticulture techniques. This involves the planning, growth, and harvesting of plant materials with integrated lessons on pest management, disease control and best management practices. CCESC will also use the greenhouse as a teaching tool, to hold workshops and classes through the Master Gardeners and other agriculture pro-

grams. Sullivan Renaissance, which helped fund this project, is the first group to store plants in the facility until they can be planted around the county for beautification projects. A high tunnel will be constructed onsite as a follow up component to this project. Using a greenhouse on this scale to develop hands-on activities is a powerful learning tool that actively engages students and the public in agriculture. There is no limit on curricula or lessons available to be learned. Far left: Sullivan BOCES students prepare CCE grounds for greenhouse in early winter. Left: John Wilcox, CCE grounds manager, helps install some structural components of greenhouse. Below: BOCES & CCE worked together to fasten protective covering on greenhouse. Right: A fully functional CCE greenhouse harbors Sullivan Renaissance plants.

14 CORNELL UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION 100TH ANNIVERSARY

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If you build it, it will grow Constructing an inexpensive, easy-tobuild greenhouse could revolutionize agriculture in Sullivan County. For less than $10,000 anyone can erect a greenhouse capable of growing vegetables, herbs, and flowers – all year long. Cornell Cooperative Extension Sullivan County (CCESC) actively sought a partnership with Sullivan County BOCES to engage students in the construction and operation of such a greenhouse. With the guidance of

BOCES natural resources teacher Sam Rogers, the greenhouse is being integrated into the curriculum for the students to learn hands-on agriculture/horticulture techniques. This involves the planning, growth, and harvesting of plant materials with integrated lessons on pest management, disease control and best management practices. CCESC will also use the greenhouse as a teaching tool, to hold workshops and classes through the Master Gardeners and other agriculture pro-

grams. Sullivan Renaissance, which helped fund this project, is the first group to store plants in the facility until they can be planted around the county for beautification projects. A high tunnel will be constructed onsite as a follow up component to this project. Using a greenhouse on this scale to develop hands-on activities is a powerful learning tool that actively engages students and the public in agriculture. There is no limit on curricula or lessons available to be learned. Far left: Sullivan BOCES students prepare CCE grounds for greenhouse in early winter. Left: John Wilcox, CCE grounds manager, helps install some structural components of greenhouse. Below: BOCES & CCE worked together to fasten protective covering on greenhouse. Right: A fully functional CCE greenhouse harbors Sullivan Renaissance plants.

14 CORNELL UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION 100TH ANNIVERSARY

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Sunflower Health the Food Store

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CORNELL UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION 100TH ANNIVERSARY 1 7


Two New Scholarships Available All Sullivan County High School graduating seniors are eligable to apply for the following: • The Earle and Elizabeth Wilde-Cornell Cooperative Extension Sullivan County Scholarship Fund • The Skoda Family Scholarship-Cornell Cooperative Extension Sullivan County Fund

The Earle and Elizabeth Wilde – CCESC Scholarship is open to graduating high school seniors from the Sullivan County area who plan to continue their education in an agricultural related field at either the State University of New York College of Agriculture and Technology at Cobleskill or Morrisville. The Skoda Family Scholarship – CCESC will be given to a Sullivan County graduating high school senior who plans to attend Delaware Valley College in Doylestown, PA and major in agriculture. Orange County graduating high school students who plan to attend Delaware Valley College in Doylestown, PA and major in agriculture may also apply with the understanding that preference will be given to graduating high school students in Sul-

livan County. If there are no applications from Sullivan County graduating high students who plan to major in agriculture in any year, then the scholarship may be awarded to any resident of Sullivan County (with any major) who plans to attend Delaware Valley College in Doylestown, PA. If there are no graduating high school students in Orange or Sullivan County who fit the criteria, then the scholarship may be awarded to a currently enrolled Delaware Valley College student from Sullivan County majoring in agriculture. The Earle and Elizabeth Wilde-CCESC Scholarship Fund and the Skoda Family Scholarship at CCESC are facilitated through the Community Foundation of Orange and Sullivan, a 501(c)(3) public charity that was created to help individuals, organizations, and businesses establish charitable endowment funds to benefit their community. To make a contribution to this scholarship fund, please contact the Community Foundation, Karen VanHouten Minogue, at (845) 769-9393, email to karen@cfoc-ny.org, or visit www.cfoc-ny.org.

A Calendar of Things to Come 5/7 5/7 5/15 5/15 5/16 5/20 5/20 5/27 5/31 6/4 6/11 6/15 6/17 6/26 6/29 7/10

Recipes for Success Final Session Free Gardening Seminar Because We Care: Connect with Health Care Providers Growing Older with Pets Treasures on Turtle Trail Save Energy Save Dollars Community Beetle Busters Training Brain Health & Nutrition Master Gardener Plant Sale Free Gardening Seminar Caring for Someone with Alzheimer’s Wasp Watchers Citizen Science Training Caregiver Spring Retreat Hyper Tufa Workshop Upper Delaware BioBlitz Elder Law Forum

7/22 8/7 9/14

Master Food Preserver Certification Caregiver College Bethel Woods Harvest Festival Cornell Day 9/27 Care in the Last Days of Life 10/15 Senior Safety Day Others TBA: 4-H Robotics 4-H Nature Detectives Pesticide Certification Vet Science Centennial Hike-A-Thon Old Fashioned Chicken BBQ Centennial Gala Annual Meeting Livestock Showmanship Class

For times and locations of these courses and events please call us at 845-292-6180 18 CORNELL UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION 100TH ANNIVERSARY

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Fallsburg, NY

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Congratulations The Sullivan County Cooperative Extension Service on 100 years of outstanding service

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Congratulations to the Sullivan County Cooperative Extension Service on 100 years of commitment to agriculture. We are proud to be your partners at the Grahamsville Little World’s Fair

Come visit the

“NEW” Grahamsville Little World’s Fair August 15, 16 and 17 Featuring our new ride company:

DREAMLAND AMUSEMENTS, offering a new lineup of rides, games and other attractions. With a special CAR LOAD NIGHT for rides on Thursday, August 14 from 5:00 – 9:00pm Car loads of up to 8 people will be admitted for unlimited rides for ONLY $25 per car load (certain food and merchandise vendors will also be open Thursday evening)

The main fair begins FRIDAY, AUGUST 15 AT 9:00AM, with FREE RIDES between 11:00am and noon to kick off the 135th annual fair. Come see the NEW RIDES, LIVE ENTERTAINMENT including the Tommy Steele Band, the Roller Cats and Thunder Ridge. There will also be LIVE PERFORMANCES by Myles Mancuso, Bill Wilcox Magic and the Delaware Valley Birds of Prey program.

Come see - or better yet enter your own arts and crafts, horticultural, culinary or livestock exhibits.

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BRING THE FAMILY to see an old-fashioned country fair with attractions for all ages. For more information visit our website grahamsvillefair.com

2014

CORNELL UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION 100TH ANNIVERSARY 2 1


Going Forward For 100 years, Cornell Cooperative Extension Sullivan County (CCESC) has shared evidence-based knowledge with the community through its monthly newsletters. Since 1914 the Extension Service has provided innovative practices based on research from Cornell University. To celebrate its centennial year in 2014, CCESC has kicked off

Newsletters shown on these pages ranging from 1916 through 1990, point out how far we’ve come and how involved we’ve been. a campaign to raise funds that will make it possible to transform its Liberty center and grounds into a modern learning and teaching classroom exhibiting the latest technologies in sustainable systems and programs. Highlights include: • The new Entrepreneurial & Teaching (EaT) Kitchen on site to be used by local farmers, chefs, valueadded producers, and business owners; • Development of forest land as a demonstration area for maple production and woodlot management; • Endowed scholarships for local youth pursuing agricultural careers at local universities; • Geo-thermal, solar and other sustainable energy systems to operate and serve as an example in the education center; and • Innovative programming to include all corners and constituents in the county in this 21st century university education. Looking ahead, CCESC will introduce bold, new programs in agriculture, natural re

22 CORNELL UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION 100TH ANNIVERSARY

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sources, science, technology, engineering and math, nutrition, health, care-giving, energy and sustainability, and youth, family and community development. Yet Extension will never move past its roots,

2014

as it brings the community “back to basics” with programs that help residents become more self-sustainable through home food preservation, backyard agriculture, gardening and small business education. CCESC’s highly trained team of professionals has direct access to Cornell University resources as it collaborates with many organizations that serve Sullivan County and the surrounding region. It is a mission of “Supporting Strong & Vibrant New York Communities.” Cornell Cooperative Extension Sullivan County’s Newsletter – which has had several titles over the years – offers pertinent educational artiCORNELL UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION 100TH ANNIVERSARY 2 3


CONTINUED FR0M PAGE 23

cles, recipes, photos and upcoming program information. In order to receive the newsletter via email or through the mail, the public can contact the CCESC office to enroll in 2014’s Extension Connection News for a nominal donation. Along with several fundraising events and opportunities in celebration of its 100 year anniversary, a unique “Centennial Issue” will be delivered to all enrollees.

Entrepreneurial and CCESC and Liberty Community Development Corporation (CDC), with support from Sullivan Renaissance, are developing an entrepreneurial food, nutrition education, and training center in Liberty. The main purpose of the EaT Kitchen is to provide training and access to infrastructure for small-scale food entrepreneurs with a goal of enabling them to scale up to larger facilities and production levels. The kitchen and classroom will serve as an educational center to provide cooking, food preservation, nutrition education, and small-scale food business instruction. The range of topics will include: basic and advanced cooking skills; healthier eating on a budget; growing, using, and preserving food from the garden; food safety for residential and

commercial cooks; and starting a successful small-scale food business. The community kitchen allows CCESC to offer new programs and build on existing initiatives. It also provides an opportunity to forge new partnerships in the community. The kitchen allows the CDC to offer space to the community and entrepreneurs for classes and activities that improve the quality of life for Sullivan County residents through improved nutrition, access to healthy, local foods, and expanded economic opportunity. The EaT kitchen will be fully certified by the health department and provide a place for the athome baker, food preserver, and small scale caterer to try their hand at the industry and get their business off to a strong start. Food entrepreneurship

24 CORNELL UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION 100TH ANNIVERSARY

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The public is encouraged to join in the celebration by attending events, volunteering, donating equipment/supplies/talent, and sponsoring at one of the special centennial levels listed below. Cooperative $199 Centennial $100 Garnet $250 Blue Ribbon $500 Millennial $1,000

Gold Diamond Platinum Excelsior

$2,500 $5,000 $10,000 $10,000 & Upward

Connect with CCESC on Facebook/ccesullivan or /ccecentennialcampaign, Twitter @ccesullivan, and on the web at www.sullivancce.org for more information.

Teaching (EaT) Kitchen is a growing area of interest for county residents due to the proximity to high-value markets in the New York metro area, the influx of summer visitors to the Catskills region, and the growing interest in local foods. Small scale food entrepreneurship and adding value to agricultural products has been identified as a key strategy by the Sullivan County Legislature’s Agricultural Advisory Board. Applications are being accepted from prospective outside users of the kitchen. A special program series, Recipes for Success, is being offered to assist individuals who wish to start a value-added food production business. This program is being offered in cooperation with the Liberty Community Development Corporation. Other programs planned for the kitchen this summer include: the Master Food Preservation Training, cooking with children, and better nutrition for seniors. The workshops will focus 2014

on healthy eating, using locally produced ingredients sourced from the CCE Edible Garden, Master Gardener Herb Garden and greenhouses, as well as area farms.

CORNELL UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION 100TH ANNIVERSARY 2 5


The man on the street says: Jerry Skoda

Roger Brucher

“What Cornell Cooperative Extension does is give local people access to research based information. Everything Cornell recommends is proven by research and that’s the big advantage. Also, the programs change as times change. Years ago poultry was very big but lately there has been a lot of interest in sustainable agriculture, like vegetable farming. CCE is a unique program where local committees decide program efforts and request backstopping and specialist assistance from Cornell University.”

“The extension office does what we also do at Fosterdale Equipment Support agriculture. Through their programs and education offerings they improve our quality of life. “I think John W. Gardner sums it up best, ‘All too often we are giving young people cut flowers when we should be teaching them to grow their own plants.’”

Jerry Skoda Woodbourne Farmer Former Executive Director of CCE in Sullivan County

Roger Brucher Co-Owner Fosterdale Equipment

A Unique Montessori School

CARING, QUALITY CHIROPRACTIC CARE (845) 292-3455 In a warm, comfortable atmosphere 10 Hanofee Dr., Liberty, NY

DR. JORGE R. DELGADO

13212

Backed by 24 Years of Experience

Board Certified Chiropractic Neurologist

Preschool to Sixth Grade Full Academic, Enrichment & Outdoor Education Programs Foreign Language, Peter and Marsha Comstock, Directors Art & Music 428 Hollow Road, 85 Acre Campus Glen Spey, NY 12737 25 minutes from 845.856.6359 Port Jervis and Monticello

www.homesteadschool.com 17105

Brown Farms

Horse Hay & Mulch Hay

26 CORNELL UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION 100TH ANNIVERSARY

845-482-4665

16732

17066

118 Old Taylor Road Jeffersonville, NY 12748

2014


17128

2014

CORNELL UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION 100TH ANNIVERSARY 2 7


28 CORNELL UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION 100TH ANNIVERSARY

2014


Cornell Cooperative Extension Sullivan County 100th