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SULLIVAN COUNTY

A special section of the

August 18, 2017 • Callicoon, N.Y. • Section S


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SCHHEDULE YOURR CHILD ’S SPOORTS & SCHOOOL PHYSIC ALLS TODAY!

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What’s a balanced diet for kids?

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dren should enjoy at least five to six ounces each day, with one ounce of beef, poultry or fish equaling one serving. But kids and parents can also choose servings of ½ cup of cooked beans, one egg, a tablespoon of peanut butter or ½ ounce of nuts. In the grains, bread and cereal category, children need six to seven ounces per day, and one half of that amount should be grains such as brown rice, barley or quinoa. One slice of whole-grain bread comprises one ounce, as does one-half cup of cooked cereal or pasta or one cup of dry cereal. In the fruit and vegetable department, children should consume one and a half cups to two cups per day of fruit, and two and a half to three cups per day of veggies. Choosing different colored fruits enhances maximum vitamin intake, said Dr. Lazaroff. For example, oranges, grapefruits and strawberries are packed with Vitamin C, while dark CONTINUED ON PAGE 5S

KATHY DALEY | DEMOCRAT

Children need nourishment from real food like fruit, vegetables and protein in order to do well in the classrom.

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BY KATHY DALEY ood eating helps children grow, flourish and build energy for both study and play. “Kids need five or six servings of food each day,” notes Dr. Florence Lazaroff, a pediatrician with Crystal Run Healthcare in Rock Hill. “They need breakfast, lunch and dinner, and two snacks in between. Those might be fresh fruit, cheese, whole grain crackers, milk, raw veggies, 100 percent fruit juice, peanut butter or yogurt.” Choosing proper foods from the five food groups is critical to building healthy bodies and minds. Milk and dairy products comprise the first group, with three eightounce servings needed each day for kids’ health. Lazaroff said milk should be low-fat, and the dairy requirements can also be met by including natural cheese (½ ounce equals one serving) in the diet, or processed cheese (two ounces equals one serving). From the protein food group, chil-


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green and yellow fruits (pineapple, honeydews, avocados and kiwis) supply vitamin A. Other options are one cup of 100 percent fruit juice (juice intake should be limited to the one cup) or ½ cup of dried fruit. Vegetables also need to offer Vitamin C (broccoli and tomatoes) and Vitamin A (spinach, sweet potatoes, corn and squash). Parents can mix and match a cup of cooked veggies, a cup of raw veggies or two cups of raw leafy greens as daily options. Finally, fats are needed for brain development, particularly in very young children. For school-age kids, only 25 percent of the daily intake of calories should consist of fats. The American Heart Association recommends that children should consume fats coming mostly from sources of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, such as fish, nuts and vegetable oils. Lazaroff said five to six teaspoons is the limit for butter, margarine, mayonnaise, salad dressing or sour cream. One of the most powerful ways to

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Dr. Florence Lazaroff of Crystal Run Healthcare says children need to eat five or six times each day, and that nutrition comes first.

JEFFERSONVILLE ANIMAL HOSPITAL

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encourage lifelong healthy eating is simple: get kids learning in the kitchen. “Involving children with meal preparation at home trains them to make healthy choices when they are not at home,” says Lazaroff. In Sullivan County, food distributor of Boar's Head delicatessan products Sal Scancarello stresses that the respected company offers many heart-healthy, gluten-free products for families. “Healthy eating for children is crucial,” said Scancarello, who delivers to some 125 outlets in the county and serves as chairman of the Sullivan County Chamber of Commerce board of directors. “None of our products have artificial colors or flavors. There is no MSG, fillers, by-products or trans fats.” The most recent addition to the local Boar's Head-consuming family? It's the federally-funded Delaware Valley Job Corps in Callicoon, where food service manager Steve Peck decided to go healthy, said Scancarello.

Dr. Richard L. Schwalb Dr. Moria L. Norris Office Hours by Appointment Mon-Fri 8:30-5pm Sat 9am-12pm 89 Schoolhouse Road Jeffersonville, NY 12748

Back to School A Parents’ Guide Published by

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Cattskills k l n County’s

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A Sullivan County Democrat publication September, 2016

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FALL SPPORRTRTS GUUIDEE  FO OTBALL  SOCCE R  CROSS-C OU NTRY  TENNI S  VO LLEYBALL PR EVI EWS  C HEER LEAD IN G COACH E S S C HED ULE S TEAM PH OTO S

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Tourism takes off in 2015; growing in 2016 page 3

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Make reservations early for Annual Partnership Dinner page 5 Jacob Billig earns Distinguished Service Award page 8 August home sales up dramatically for Sullivan County page 9 Merger expands Rouis & Co. services and industry expertise pages 10 & 11 Local projects underscore investor confidence in Sullivan page 12 Local funeral direc ctor earns Leade errship Academy degree page 14 Lovallo, PE joins JHA page 16 Grow your Neversink business by joining the chamber page 17 Of a lifetime of achievements, Phil Vallone a takes most pride in “getting kids to and from school safely.� Rolling V Bus Corps, the Vallones’ flagship company in the region, serves some 4,500 school children throughout Sullivan and Ulster County for 37 years.

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A Look at Actiivvities in the Wayne Highlands School District Sponsorred e by

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Sullivan County Volunteer Firefighters Association

A special section of the

SCHOOL L

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FIREME EN’S PA ARADE

Hosted by Rock Hill Fire Department D Saturday, September 17 @ 2pm

A special section of the SULLIV VA AN COUNTY DEMOCRAT Section F • Callicoon, NY • September 9, 2016

A Special

2 0 1 6

INSIDE:

Stor y and Photos by Willow Baum usiness owner and community leader Phil Vallone will be honored with the Sullivan County Partnership’s Walter A. Rhulen Award during its 22nd Annual Meeting October 6 in Rock Hill. “W We are delighted to recognize the Vallones’ contributions to our region,� said Marc Baez, President of the Sullivan County Partnership for Economic Development. “Every time the Partnership or Chamber asks for anything, Phil and (partner and spouse) Donna are always there,� said Baez of the Brooklyn and Queens-born duo whom in their youth spent summers on opposite mountains near Roscoe where they met. The Rhulen Award, presented annually, recognizes lifetime achievement by an individual for business excellence, community commitment and service to humanity. Investment and expansion of the Vallones’ flagship company in the region, Rolling V Bus Corp., and their willingness to take risks on new ventures, are “traits Walter (Rhulen) stood for,� said Baez. For more than 50 years Rolling V Bus Corp. has provided regional school bus services, charter coach and taxi transportation services. Of decades of achievements, Phil Vallone still takes most pride in “getting kids to and from school safely.� Some 4,500 school children, in fact, throughout Sullivan and Ulster County. “The Valloness have bee en n here awhile, and have made a differen nce, esspeccially in Roscoe,� said Baez. When Roscoe vied d for the $25,000 first prize in 2011 as the Ultimate Fishing Town o from the Wo orld Fishing Network

Please see VALLONE, page 5E

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Sullivan County Dem mocrat

September 9 • Callicoon, NY • Section F


SULLIVAN COUNTY DEMOCRAT

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Is your child ready to go back-to-school? BY DR. STUART TASHMAN, MD s we approach the conclusion of summer, kids of all ages start thinking about (maybe dreading) going back to school. The lazy days of summer will soon be replaced by schedules, after school activities and homework. The beginning of the school year is an opportunity for every student to start fresh with friends, teachers and classes. You can help your child be at their best. Along with the excitement of seeing old friends, making new ones and entering a new grade can also come uncertainty, anxiety and general nervousness about the first day of school. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has some very useful tips to help your child get ready. If your child seems nervous, remind them that there are probably a lot of students who are uneasy. Helping them to understand that their feelings are common, at any age, will help make them be as comfortable as possible.

A

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Dr. Stuart Tashman

Try to find another child in the neighborhood that your student can walk to school with or ride on the bus. That will help them feel more confident and start off in a positive way. If it’s a new school, attend any available

orientations and take an opportunity to tour the school before the first day. This will help alleviate some jitters about where they are going on the first day. If you feel it is needed, drive your child (or walk) to school and pick them up on the first day. One of the rites of passage on the first day of school is a new backpack! There are so many choices available for your child to be able to express their style and personality. This is always a big deal with my kids and I have watched them choose many different shapes and styles over the years. Let your child express themselves but also protect them by following a few guidelines from the AAP. Choose a backpack with wide, padded shoulder straps and a padded back and be sure to pack light. Adjust the pack so that the bottom sits at the waist for proper weight distribution. Pack heavier items closest to the center of the back and keep the other compartments organized so they are

not carrying extra items. The backpack should never weigh more than 10 to 20 percent of your child's body weight. Always use both shoulder straps to again keep the weight distributed properly. If your school allows (check with your school district before purchasing), consider a rolling backpack. However, remember that rolling backpacks still must be carried up stairs, they may be difficult to roll in snow, and they may not fit in some lockers. As Dr. Seuss said “You’re off to great places, today is your day, your mountain is waiting, so get on your way!” Each new school year offers new opportunities and challenges for children of all ages. Help your child be the best they can be. Stuart Tashman, MD Board certified Pediatrician Dr. Tashman has been a pedictrician in the Hudson Valley for over 15 years. He currently sees patients in his Wurtsboro office, located at 2930 Route 209. He can be reached at 845-888-2200.

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Ever y day in 9 locations in Nor thern Orrange and Sullivan Counties over 300 Club kids have a safe place to go af ter school. When they’re with us they get help ous snack. They learn about livingg a p with their homework and a nutritio healthy lifestyle. They par ticipate in community ser vice initiatives. Your good hear ts and generosity help sustain the work we do to keep our kids safe, feel suppor ted, and work hard to become good citizens.

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Jeff Bank rewarding students through new program BY JOSEPH ABRAHAM

J

eff Bank recently introduced a new program, “Get Paid for ‘A’s,’”which will reward students between grades 6-12 who receive an A.

“This is a terrific program that combines and incents education and saving,” Jeff Bank President/CEO George Kinne said. “We hope that many students take advantage of the program and we are pleased to encourage students to learn more about the benefits of saving for their future. It’s a small way to give back to our community.” To be eligible to participate in this program: • Students must be enrolled in any grade between 6th and 12th. • Student must be an owner of a high school checking, Student Saver or NYUTMA account. • Student will receive $1 for every “A”* or equivalent received, up to $5 per quarter and $20 per year, which must be deposited into any of the above listed Jeff Bank accounts.

DEMOCRAT FILE PHOTO

Jeff Bank has started a new program to reward students who earn A’s.

• Student must submit a copy of their report card at the end of each quarter or up to 30 days after the school year has ended to their local

branch. Report cards from previous school years will not be accepted. * An “A” is equivalent to any grade average between 90-100 on a 100

points scale, a 5 on a 1-5 scale, etc. If you are unsure, ask a Jeff Bank representative.

SUNY Sullivan building new outdoor rec area for students

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

SUNY Sullivan recently began construction on a new outdoor athletic/recreational area for students on campus to enjoy. It will feature two college regulation basketball courts, a regulation sand volleyball court, a large full service pavilion with a kitchen when completed, and a recreation area for yard games such as horseshoes and cornhole.


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Back to school eye health ‘The use of computers, tablets and smartphones is increasing at a tremendous rate. Overuse of devices can cause headaches, eye strain, blur and fatigue.’ to move along a printed page or follow a moving object. Eye teaming-the ability of the eyes to work together to judge distances and depth. Visual processing- the ability of the eyes to see words/numbers and then for the brain to organize the information. Some signs that may indicate a vision problem include eye rubbing, blinking, headaches, short attention span, closing one eye, tilting the head,

avoiding reading, holding the book very close, losing one’s place, seeing double or an eye that turns in or out. Are school screenings adequate to detect a vision problem in your child? Although school screenings are an invaluable service offered by our school nurses, they can sometimes miss a vision problem. Vision problems are more complex then not being able to read a chart on a wall. As children progress in school, the work gets harder and the print gets smaller. Ensure that your child has all the resources necessary for a successful school year. What about electronic devices? The use of computers, tablets and smartphones is increasing at a tremendous rate. Overuse of devices can cause headaches, eye strain, blur and fatigue. The American Optometric Association has made several recommendations for safe use of electronic devices for school aged children. Preschool

and kindergarten age children should spend no more than two hours a day on a device. It is also recommended that the font size be enlarged to decrease the chance of visual strain. Elementary age children should be instructed to use their devices for shorter periods of time – no more than 20 minutes at a time. Remind children to hold all devices at least half an arm’s length away. Middle and High School age children use computers and devices both at home and school. Position computers at least 20 inches away. Follow the 20-20-20 rule – look 20 feet away for 20 seconds every 20 minutes. Avoid using a smart phone or device at least a half hour before bed and look out for signs of overuse as indicated above. Dr. Lisa Dowling is an Optometrist in private practice for 17 years in Honesdale, PA. Her practice, Dowling Family Eye Care, will be joining Northeastern Eye Institute in September.

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BY DR. LISA DOWLING With summer coming to an end, parents are getting their children ready for the school year with new clothes, sneakers, backpacks and supplies. Shouldn’t we get their eyes ready for school too? Annual eye examinations are recommended for all school age children. Uncorrected vision problems can lead to academic, athletic and social barriers. Early detection of a vision problem ensures your child the best opportunity to develop a healthy visual system. An Optometrist or Ophthalmologist is best qualified to determine if your child may have a vision problem. Vision problems include difficulty with: Visual acuity- the ability to read letters/numbers/words at distance and near. Eye focusing- the ability of the eyes to quickly and accurately change focus at different distances. Eye tracking- the ability of the eyes


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What you need to know about going back to school ELDRED

sungerleider@fallsburgcsd.net Grades: Pre-K-12 Registration: By appointment, call 434-6800, ext.1222 Starting date: Wednesday, Sept 6 Hours: High School: 8:05 a.m. to 2:52 p.m., Elementary School: 9:05 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Contact information: Eldred Junior-Senior High School, 600 Route 55, P.O. Box 249, Eldred, NY 12732; 4561100; fax: 557-0690 George Ross Mackenzie Elementary School, 1045 Proctor Road, P.O. Box 249, Glen Spey, NY 12737; 456-1100; fax: 856-8579 Website: http://eldred.k12.ny.us Superintendent: Robert Dufour, dufourr@eldred.k12.ny.us Grades: Pre-K-12 Registration: By appointment; call 456-1100 ext. 5180 Starting date: Wednesday, Sept 6 Hours: High School: 7:30 a.m. – 2:05 p.m.; Elementary School; 8:25 a.m. – 3 p.m. FALLSBURG Contact information: Fallsburg CONTRIBUTED PHOTO BY DEBBIE MOLUSKY Junior Senior High School, 115 Brickman Road, Fallsburg, NY 12733; 434- Sullivan West High School Counselor Maureen Casey-Bryant checking students’ schedules. 6800; fax: 434-0168 Benjamin Cosor Elementary NY 12733; 434-4110; fax: 434-0871 Superintendent: Ivan Katz; superSchool, 15 Old Falls Road, Fallsburg, Website: www.fallsburgcsd.net intendent’s secretary’s email:

HANCOCK Contact information: High School, 67 Education Lane, Hancock, NY 13783; Elementary School, 201 Wildcat Drive, Hancock, NY 13783; (607) 637-2511, Fax: (607) 637-2512 Website: www.hancock.stier.org Superintendent: Terrance Dougherty, TDougherty@hancock.stier.org Grades: Pre-K-12 Registration: Packets can be picked up at the school from 7:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monday through Friday through the month of August. Starting date: Wednesday, Sept 6 Hours: 8 a.m. – 2:32 p.m.

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CONTRIBUTED PHOTO BY DEBBIE MOLUSKY

Mrs. Weyant, social studies teacher at Sullivan West High School, with students Brandon Decker and Jared Davis, who are attending the Global Regents “boot camp” prep class for the August Regents.

LIBERTY Contact information: 115 Buckley St., Liberty, NY 12754; 292-6990; fax: 292-1164 Liberty High School, 125 Buckley St., Liberty, NY 12754; 292-5400, ext 2000; fax: 292-7262 Liberty Middle School, 145 Buckley St., Liberty, NY 12754; 292-5400, ext 2300; fax: 292-5691 Liberty Elementary School, 201 N. Main Street, Liberty, NY 12754; 2925400, ext 2030; fax: 295-9201 Interim Superintendent: Carol Napolitano Website: www.libertyk12.org Email: Visit website for directory Grades: Pre-K-12 Starting date: Monday, September 11

Hours: Central Administration 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.; High School: 8 a.m. – 2:57 p.m.; Middle School: 8 a.m. – 2:57 p.m.; Elementary School: 7:45 a.m. – 2:35 p.m. LIVINGSTON MANOR Contact information: Central School, 29 School St., P.O. Box 947, Livingston Manor, NY 12758; 4394400; fax: 439-4717 Superintendent: John Evans Website: www.lmcs.k12.ny.us Grades: Pre-K-12 Registration: Begins August 22, parents should fill out a registration packet from the guidance office before scheduling an appointment. Starting date: Thursday, Sept 7 Hours: 8 a.m. to 2:45 p.m.

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CONTRIBUTED PHOTO BY DEBBIE MOLUSKY

Sullivan West High School’s Hilda Monfredo opens teachers’ supplies.


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CONTRIBUTED PHOTO BY DEBBIE MOLUSKY

Alan Wingert (left) and Ed Hanslmaier are on hall-cleaning duty at Sullivan West High School.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO BY DEBBIE MOLUSKY

Laurie Henry of the Sullivan West High School Main Office, is working on a variety of projects getting ready for the new year.

MONTICELLO Contact information: Superintendent’s Office, 237 Forestburgh Road,

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Website: www.monticelloschools.net Email: visit website for directory Grades: K-12 Registration: 37 Breakey Avenue Monticello, NY 12701. Call district registrar and schedule appointment, 794-0128, ext 78910 or visit: 845-7940128, ext. 78905 or visit: www.monticelloschools.net/registrar/index.cfm Starting date: Thursday, Sept 7 Hours: High School: 7:26 a.m.-2:03 p.m.; Middle School: 7:34 a.m.-2:03 p.m.; Rutherford School: 9:15 a.m.-3:23 p.m.; Cooke School: 9:15 a.m.-3:23 p.m.; Chase School: 9:15 a.m.-3:23 p.m.


SULLIVAN WEST Contact info: District Office, 33 Schoolhouse Road, Jeffersonville NY; PO Box 308, Jeffersonville, NY 12748; 845-482-4610 Ext.3000; Fax 845-4823022 Sullivan West High School, 6604 State Route 52, P.O. Box 309, Lake

Huntington, NY 12752; 845-932-8401, Ext. 1100; Fax: 845-932-8425 Sullivan West Elementary School, 33 Schoolhouse Road, P.O. Box 308, Jeffersonville, NY 12748; 845-4824610, Ext. 2158; Fax: 845-482-9883 Superintendent: Nancy Hackett, 845-482-4610 Ext. 3000 Website: www.swcsd.org Grades: Sullivan West High School, 7-12; Sullivan West Elementary, PreK-6 Registration: All registration is conducted in the Office of the Data Specialist at District Central Offices in the Elementary School (845-482-4610 ext. 3006) Starting Date: Tuesday, Sept 5, 2017 Hours: Sullivan West High School: 7:35 a.m. to 2:22 p.m. Sullivan West Elementary School: 8:45 a.m. to 3:27 p.m., subject to change.

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ROSCOE Contact information: 6 Academy St., P.O. Box 429, Roscoe, NY 12776; (607)-498-4126; fax: (607)-498-6015 Superintendent: John Evans Website: www.roscoe.k12.ny.us Grades: Pre-K-12 Registration: Registration packets can be picked up at the school from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Thursday Starting date: Thursday, Sept 7 Hours: 7:35 a.m. -2:35 p.m.

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Shop Like a Genius 19733

AUGUST, 2017

Back-to-School School Supplies Art Supplies Computers Multifunction Printers Sales & Service CONTRIBUTED PHOTO BY DEBBIE MOLUSKY

Custodian Reed Scott is preparing the hallway floors for the upcoming school year at Sullivan West High School in Lake Huntington.

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TRI-VALLEY Contact information: Tri-Valley Elementary School, 34 Moore Hill Road, Grahamsville, NY 12740; 9852296; fax: 985-0046 Tri-Valley Secondary School, 34 Moore Hill Road, Grahamsville, NY 12740; 985-2296; fax: 985-7903 Superintendent Tom Palmer, 9852296, ext 5102, tompalmer@trivalleycsd.org Website: www.trivalleycsd.org Grades: Pre-K-12 Registration: Call for appointment, 985-2296, ext 5500 Starting date: Monday, Sept 11 Hours: 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. WAYNE HIGHLANDS Contact information: Central Office, 474 Grove Street, Honesdale, Pa. 18431; (570) 253-4661; Fax: (570) 253-9409 Honesdale High School, 459 Terrace Street, Honesdale, Pa. 18431; (570) 253-2046; Fax: (570) 253-1502 Wayne Highlands Middle School, 482 Grove Street, Honesdale, Pa.18431; (570) 253-5900; Fax: (570) 253-5359

Lakeside Elementary School, 129 Lakeside Drive, Honesdale, Pa. 18431; (570) 253-6820; Fax: (570) 253-6826 Damascus Area Elementary School, 174 High School Road, Damascus, Pa. 18415; (570) 224-4114; Fax: (570) 2244997 Preston Area Elementary School, 1493 Crosstown Highway, Lakewood, Pa. 18439; (570) 798-2516; Fax: (570) 798-2677 Stourbridge Primary Center, 123 ABD Drive, Honesdale, Pa. 18431; (570) 253-3010; Fax: (570) 253-3236 Website: www.waynehighlands.org Email: Visit website for directory Administration: District Superintendent Gregory Frigoletto; Assistant Superintendent Timothy Morgan Grades: Honesdale High School (Grades 9-12), the Wayne Highlands Middle School (Grades 6-8), the Preston School (Grades K-8), the Damascus School (Grades K-8), the Stourbridge Primary Center (Grades K-2), and the Lakeside School (Grades 3-5). Start date: Monday, August 28 Hours: Approximately 8 a.m.-3 p.m.

AUGUST, 2017

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO BY DEBBIE MOLUSKY

Anthony Durkin, math teacher at Sullivan West High School, checks his mailbox for important information.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO BY DEBBIE MOLUSKY

Amy Favre (left), poses with daughter Sydney before she takes her senior class picture for the Sullivan West High School Class of 2018.

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Sullivan West High School student Eric McBride and math teacher Amy Hellerer take a break from the geometry Regents â&#x20AC;&#x153;boot campâ&#x20AC;? prep class for the August Regents.

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Monticello trap shooting team gearing up for second season BY JOSEPH ABRAHAM

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CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

From the left, last year’s Team MVP Jacob Puzio, who graduated in May and was recognized by the New York State Clay Target League as one of the top 25 shooters in the state, Tommy Downey (assistant coach), Jay Mendels (head coach), Rob Keesler (school coach).

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ast year, one of the newest school clubs, the Monticello High School Trap Team, made waves across the county and state, with excellent student participation and even some accolades along the way. “Now that we are entering our second season, we are looking forward to seeing our student athletes continue to advance their skill level and their enjoyment of the sport,” Head Coach Jay Mendels said. “The opportunity provided by the Monticello Central School District, along with the Sullivan County Conservation Club, means that these students will learn a sport that they can participate in for a lifetime. While some of our students are also involved in other sports, there are many who found this to be

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CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

From the left are Dylan Price, Jake Kelly, Joseph Stant, Michael Buscemi and Nicholas Stackhouse as they shoot clay at a recent practice.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;As with all sports, safety is paramount, and the league requires that it be taken seriously.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Jay Mendels Monticello Trap Shooting Coach|

your gun clean and gun safety.â&#x20AC;? Another returning Monticello student, Jake Kelly, noted he had started trap shooting a year before the team was formed, and said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of fun. I improved my form, how to follow through and become a better shooter.â&#x20AC;? For those interested in joining, the team welcomes all who can commit to being there for matches. This is open to students aged 12 and older, and in grades 6-12. Parent involvement is welcomed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As with all sports, safety is paramount, and the league requires that it be taken seriously,â&#x20AC;? Mendels said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;

Every practice and match begins with a review of basic firearm safety rules. These are important guidelines that will stay with these students for a lifetime.â&#x20AC;? While Monticello is the first, and currently the only, trap team in the area, the sport is not new to New York State, who already had a league, the New York State High School Clay Target League. While traditionally a spring sport, the state league is hoping to expand this year by adding a fall season to the calendar. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The support of our school and community has been overwhelming, and donations to this past year's program meant that most of the students' out-of-pocket expenses for participating were covered,â&#x20AC;? Mendels said. â&#x20AC;&#x153; We look forward to continuing to provide this opportunity, and welcome other districts to reach out to us for information on getting started as well.â&#x20AC;? If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a student, parent or local school employee interested in learning more about trap shooting, email Jay at monticellotrapteam@gmail. com.

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the one school activity that they wanted to take part in.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Part of the appeal is that it's a sport that anyone can get involved with,â&#x20AC;? Mendels adds. â&#x20AC;&#x153; Unlike many other school sports, trap shooting is truly equal opportunity - it doesn't matter if you are big or small, boy or girl, handicapped or not. Everyone has the ability to participate, and everyone does. There are no try-outs, cuts, or benchwarmers - everyone on the team gets to shoot in every match. It is our hope that more local teams follow our lead, but even if they don't, the New York State Clay Target League is state-wide. Scores are emailed each week and we get to compete against other teams all across the state while staying at our home field. For personal growth, we track averages and encourage the athletes to set individual goals and to help achieve team goals.â&#x20AC;? One of the returning team members, Adrian Velasco, had never tried trap shooting before joining the team last season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was really fun and a good experience,â&#x20AC;? Velasco said. He added that he learned, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The importance of keeping


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Our Goal is Zero. :H·YHFRPHDORQJZD\LQJHWWLQJNLGVFRYHUHGDQGJLYLQJWKHP a healthy start in life - with regular checkups, dental and eye care, immunizations, and a doctor who knows their name. But today, there are still more than 100,000 children in New York State who do not have health insurance â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or the care they need to grow up happy, healthy, and strong. ,W·VDWURXEOLQJVWDWLVWLFWKDWZHFDQFKDQJH

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