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APRIL, 1945

Vol. LXVI. No. 1.


April, 1945

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EDITORIAL The whole world has been watching with bated breath the mighty onrush of the latest Russian offensive. In this campaign Russia has shown the world what she really is—the most powerful force in the modern world—a force which is not only now deciding the issue of this gigantic struggle, but one which will also dictate the ensuing peace. On the other hand, let it be known that no single one of the Allies could have won this war without the help of the others, and Russia has only reached her present position of power with the help of Great Britain and the U.S.A. This predominance of Russian power can only be received with mixed feelings outside the domains of the U.S.S.R. People are naturally suspicious of anything new and are inclined to view it with distrust. Socialism, although by no means a new form of government, has never before received as much support as it has in Russia. It is a new way of life to most of us, it brings new ideas to the fore and entails many changes which at first sight appear despicable; but if we were to overcome our prejudices against it and our hereditary tradition, we should see underneath the sheep's clothing just the sort of life for which the world has been looking so long, and which now, more than ever, it needs. Under the stress and strain of war, all countries are compelled to revert to a form of Socialism in which private enterprise has to give way to what are considered the more pressing needs of war. But why should the needs of war be more pressing than the needs of peace? Statesmen are inclined to think of peace as an interlude between wars, instead of war as an interruption of the peaceful advancement of the State. This peaceful advancement of the State must be regular and not haphazard; it must be planned and carried out by public bodies, themselves responsible to the people; and, above all, it must be free from any form of private enterprise or laissez-faire. This mode of life can be applied to all forms of society. Planning must be organised just as thoroughly in peace as in war. We plan on a vast scale the destruction of our neighbours, but do, relatively speaking, very little to lighten the burden of our fellow-countrymen and help them to live decent lives, which, when all is said and done, is the reason why we are here at all. A visitor from Mars, reading the history of the world, would not fail to get the impression that the sole aim and purpose of our existence on this planet was to destroy as many of our brethren as possible, in as short a time as possible—an end to which we strive, not only in mass slaughters called wars, but also in our policy of sitting back and letting things take their own course during the years of peace, when we should be building up our society, and making the world a place where human beings can live in happiness and comfort, without having to turn their attention to the manufacture of some even more diabolical invention for the destruction of their fellow-beings. When this war has been brought to a successful conclusion, the world will have to be rebuilt and reorganised on completely different lines. This reconstruction and reorganisation must be carried out by the people for the people, that is by public bodies who are striving for the social betterment of their fellow-countrymen, and who have no thought of private gain. This means that there will have to be a change in the outlook of men, there will have to be men who are willing to work for others, without thinking of what they themselves are going to lose or gain; and, furthermore, this change of outlook will have to apply to every single man in the world. It is easier to destroy than to build up, and a few men who are out to serve their own ends can undo the very best efforts of those who are striving for the common good. There must be blood, sweat and tears to the shedding of which every man, woman and child must contribute.


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SCHOOL NOTES SAL VETE. ALDRIDGE, H. A. R. P. Junior House. Lower IV. BEVAN, J. B. P. Junior House, Middle IV. Member of Choir. CROSSLE, J. L. Junior House, Lower IV. SCOTT, J. R. Grange, Shell A. WARREN, J. D. W. Glen, Upper IV, VALETE. FISHER, D. H. B. (ma.) (1942), Glen. Matriculation. 1st XV 1944-45. Athletic Team

1944,

SOMERVILLE-LARGE, B. P. (mi.) (1941). Grange. Matriculation, J.C.T. XV 1941-42. Colours

1942, 2nd XV 1943-44. 1st XV 1944-45. Colours 1945, Boxing Colours 1944, Sometime Member of Choir. WEBB, T. W. (mi.) (1942). Stackallan. Matriculation. J.C.T. XV 1942-43-44, Colours 1943.

2nd XV 1943, 1st XV 1944-45. Colours 1945, Leinster Schools' Trials 1944. Athletic Team 1944. Sometime Member of Choir. TENISON, P. J. (1942). Grange. Shell A. Earl of Meath Art Prize 1944. Committee Natural History Society 1942-45. Sometime Member of Choir, We Congratulate: R. Blackburn on being appointed Senior Prefect. P. C. L. Cosgrave on being appointed Second Prefect. G. C. N. Pratt on being appointed a School Prefect, The 1st Hockey XI on winning the Leinster Schools' Cup. We also would like to congratulate Blackrock College on winning the Leinster Senior Schools' Rugby Cup and, whilst doing so, can only regret that we were unable to play any Rugby Cup matches, owing to illness, The 1st XV deserves every congratulation on the results of its matches played last term, when they defeated Portora, Wesley, St. Mary's, Terenure, and forced a draw with Blackrock. A Memorial Tablet has been erected in Cloisters in memory of Major B. Guinness, an Old Columban who was a most generous friend and benefactor of the College. It occupies the space next to the Cloister door, and is the same size as the other memorial tablets to Henry Cole Bowen, W. Dargaville Carr and Frederick William Pennefather. The new tablet bears the Coat of Arms of the Guinness family with the following inscription: AMDG Atque in Piam Memoriam Ernesti Guinness 1865-1933 Erga Hoc Collegium Insignis Pietate Viri Qui Spem Suam In Deo Posuit Munificentia Sua Spes Nostras Esse Ratas Jussit


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On Wednesday, 31st January, the Tablet was dedicated by His Grace the Archbishop of Dublin, in the presence of members of the Guinness family, at Evensong. The Archbishop gave a short address in Chapel, after which the school processed into Cloisters, where the Dedication took place.

OLD COLUMBAN NOTES These are now all published separately in the OLD COLUMBAN SOCIETY SUPPLEMENT a copy of which is issued with each copy of The Columban

The Farm The time is fast approaching when the farm will be able to dispense with the taking of outside lands. At present, somewhat under fifty acres of land belonging to neighbours are taken by us. This has been necessary owing to the poor quality, when it was bought, of the land actually owned by the College. Hard, patient and expensive work on hedging, ditching, draining and manuring should soon begin to show its value in increased productivity. There will be first crop hay this year, for the first'time, on our land. It will be in the Seven-acre field immediately up the hill from the Hurley field, This is the first field to go through a complete rotation. The fulfilment of this process means more feeding produced on our own land for our own beasts than formerly, and less dependence on outside sources of supply. There is an excellent band of workers which has done good work this term, laying a wild hedge and spreading manure in the drills, which now fill the five and a half acres of the Back Lawn; and a rota of boys has attended to the mixing of the balanced ration for feeding the dairy cows. We have been shorter-handed than formerly, but our workers have done well. Most of the ploughing was done before the hard frosts, and we are still well abreast of the work as I write, E.L.M.

Gramophone Society The Gramophone Society, which began informally last term, has now been definitely established. We have nearly 20 members who have, in the two terms, heard the 3rd, 4th, 5th and 7th symphonies of Beethoven, Rachmaninoff's 2nd Concerto, as well as smaller works. We hope to include Beethoven's Emperor" Concerto in a concert before the end of term. At present we depend upon records lent by members. By buying records from subscriptions, we hope to accumulate a library of records. Donations to this end are always welcome. T. R. T.


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Literary Society On Saturday, 24th February, a meeting was held in the drawing-room under the auspices of the Literary and Debating Societies. We were addressed by Mr. H. Townsend on India, a subject on which he is indeed well qualified to speak, having been there forty years. He described his journey to India and then gave us an outline of its Geography, Climate and Population. He described the great contrasts of that populous land, the distressing poverty and low cultural level of the majority of the people, and explained the troubles resulting from religious divisions. He related some humorous anecdotes from his own experiences, and then went on to give us a very clear account of India's history and the present political situation, He stressed the difficulties of governing and also of feeding the Indians. A "Question Time" followed, in which he answered our questions in a capable manner.

Debating Society President: P. C. L. COSGRAVE.

Hon. Secretary: R. A. L. STRINGER. Committee: R. BLACKBURN, H. S. H, JENNINGS, G. C. N. PRATT.

A meeting of the Society was held on January 27th, the motion being: "In the opinion of this house, Russia is a greater menace to world peace than America." Dr. S. J. Willis was in the chair, The Chaplain, proposing the motion, considered the Russians the greater menace because, since they were now approaching the zenith of their power, they would start the inevitable decay, and through their wide influence in Europe, drag that continent with them. America, on the other hand, in a harmless commercial way, would outlast Russia. Mr. Le Clerc, opposing, said that it was harmless trading that caused imperialism and the resultant capitalist slavery. The Russian co-operative spirit would not endanger world peace. Mr. P. Hannon, for the motion, thought that the Communist International ideal, still held by Russia, would lead to war, Mr. Blackburn, for the opposition, said that by superior arms and resources, Russia, after the war, would be the power to maintain any balance, and also the best able to lead a federation of States. He considered that America, as a military power, was a failure, The President, speaking from the house, drew a distinction between Communism and Socialism, and said that the co-operative Socialism of Russia would come to benefit the world. Mr. Orr feared that Russia would swamp the world commercially. Mr. B. P. Somerville-Large mentioned the danger of strife between Britain and Russia in the matter of aid to the Chinese Communists. Messrs. Jennings, Ticher, J. H. Stewart, Pratt, Metchette, Hodges and Bond also spoke. Owing to the lateness of the hour the speakers did not reply and the voting was taken. Nobody was in favour of the motion, and only a small proportion of the house in opposition. This was the best attended and most successful meeting for some years. On 10th February there were three motions before the house, Mr. R. C. Le Clerc was in the chair. The first motion was: "That the Queen of Hearts was justified in saying 'Off with his head.' " The Hon. Secretary gave in his defence the case of the Cheshire Cat which, since it had no body, its head could not be removed, and so no harm was done. The President, opposing, deplored the "sentence first—verdict afterwards" complex, and feared for individual liberty. Mr. White, speaking from the house, said that such threats, without intention of execution, tended to undermine authority. Rev. F. A. Evelyn considered the cat godlike and above law. Mr. Sealy also spoke. The motion was put to the house and lost.


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The second motion was: "This house approves of the sentiment, 'I do like a little bit of butter to my bread.'" Mr. Jennings made an amusing speech for the proposition, and doubted his opponents' sincerity in opposing the motion. Mr. Ogle, opposing, considered the sentiment one of the Tory Party who, hating experiment, would not try the alternative to butter— marmalade. Mr. Sealy, from the house, thought the meeting was divided between the Coarse, i.e., the base and greedy, and the Intellectual and Aristocratic, who opposed the motion. The President and Mr. Evelyn also spoke. The motion was carried. The third motion was: "In the opinion of this house, the Red Queen's order 'Speak when you're spoken to' was absurd.' Mr. Pratt was of the opinion that without speech one could not make love, without which the world would not go round; Mr. Sealy, opposing, said that this statement was made in Looking-Glass Land where all things were inverted, thus making what appeared to be absurd, really ensible. Mr. White, from the house, said: "Speech is silver, silence is golden," and that most speeches were superfluous, including, possibly, his own, The President, Mr. D. Hannon and Mr. Blackburn also spoke. The motion was put to the vote and carried. The motion on 3rd March was: "That this house approves of the decline in power of Great Britain." Dr. S. J. Willis was in the chair. Mr. Sealy, proposing, said that a weakening Britain would help Irish trade and encourage Irish nationalism, Mr. Le Clerc, for the opposition. favoured Britain because of her virtues, and wondered what would become of the Chinese and other backward peoples without the Public School boys, and what would happen if Russia or the U.S.A. were to take over leadership, for neither of these countries had Public Schools, Mr. R. Johnston, seconding the motion, also confined his views to Ireland, and said that Britain had acquired the art of making mistakes—a fact which could not be held in her favour. Mr. Pratt, for the opposition, thought there would have to be a dominating power, and that Great Britain would fill this post best on account of her great tradition and experience, Russia being a dictatorship, and the U.S.A. the "land of selfishness." The President, from the house, spoke at some length about Russia, whom he welcomed, but was glad of Britain as a check to her greatness. The Hon. Secretary wished to point out that tradition is not the best thing for an empire to rule by, since it hinders the progress of civilisation.. Mr. Ticher and Mr. Ogle also spoke. When the opposer and proposer had replied, the motion was put to the house and lost. The Chairman, summing up, said that Britain's greatness lay, not in her power and economics, but in her literature, which would have its influence in the future, just as the literature and culture of the Greeks influenced the world after the passing of the Greek civilisation.

Natural History Society In general, the Society's progress in the last two terms—from September on—has been satisfactory. Before dealing with our activities of this term, it would be well to give a shortened report on the Michaelmas term, as the actual report for that term did not appear in THE COLUMBAN,

Making a general survey of the position in September, it was obvious that there was a lot to be done. Among other things, Society expeditions and meetings would have to be arranged regularly, the Club-house repaired, the Garden reduced to some order and the Journal produced. Largely owing to the assistance of Mr. Mallalieu, however, considerable repairs were carried out in the Club-house, which was approaching a dangerous state. Evening meetings during the term were successful, talks being given on respective occasions by two members of the Dublin Naturalists' Field Club: Dr. Beirne on a branch of Entomology, and Captain Mason on "Bird Territory." These meetings, besides others among ourselves, had a good attendance.


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This term, at the time of going to press, matters in other respects have improved considerably. The Society has held three field meetings, at the North Bull, the Natural History Museum, Dublin, and the West Pier, Dun Laoghaire. On our visit to the museum we were lucky to meet Mr. Stelfox, who conducted the tour. Although we have been short of opportunities for our evening meetings this term, we have already had a Debate, a Questions Meeting (similar to the Brains Trust ") and a talk on the Ice Age by Mr. J. P. Haughton, also a most obliging member of the Dublin Naturalists' Field Club. The Journal is, fortunately, not dead, and contributions are already being prepared for this term's issue. The Botanical survey, which was started last summer, is also awaking after the winter months, and we hope that many members of the Society will become keen on this and on another survey, which we hope to start soon, on the local lepidoptera. Although we are, on the whole, a Society of rather junior members, the numbers are very encouraging, and we have great hopes for the future, J.L.D.

Music At the end of last term a performance was given in chapel of about one half of Handel's Samson, The composer himself regarded this oratorio as being at least as great as Messiah; and if this is not the common judgment to-day, the work is surely worthy of more performance than the few excerpts which are generally sung from it. With the help of some transposition of key to suit our tenors, and thanks to the very excellent organ accompaniment by Mr. Boucher, we got through some of the most difficult choruses with fair success. Great praise is due to the soloists, all boys, who sang all the choruses as well as their own very difficult songs, especially Packham (ma.) who, as Samson, gave a very good lead to the whole of this most dramatic oratorio. We are hoping to give a recital of organ and choral music on the last night of this term; the choral pieces will be Tudor motets, and both plain and extended chorales. T.A.G.

Printing Club As usual, there was no Roll Call printed this term, so the beginning of the term was somewhat slack. There were the usual orders for Notepaper Headings, Visiting Cards, etc. About 2,000 postcards were printed for the College, and the Fellows' Agenda notices were printed again. We much regret the loss of our Secretary, C. M. Biggs, who left at the end of last term. His post has been filled by J. W. Gann. A new fount of lOpt. type was bought last term, and next term's Roll Call is being set up in this. It is more modern than 11 Pt., in which it used to be set up. "Why Not" has just arrived, and we hope to get on with that. We regret to say that there will probably be no caricatures, owing to the indisposition of the Art Editor. Our financial position is excellent as are also our paper stocks, D. W.


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Radio Club The Club has gone one better this term, in that one of the members has designed and built a radio for one of the masters. This wireless has a performance quite up to the standard set by any commercial receiver of its type, and the quality of reproduction leaves nothing to be desired. We have also erected aerials for two masters, and we were honoured by the precentor's patronage when his set was in need of repair. Our short-wave experimenting has proved successful. We have, on more than one occasion, listened to transmissions as far afield as Australia and Pearl Harbour, in spite of jamming by Japanese stations. J.K.A.

Aero Club Two of our more energetic members have valiantly endeavoured to prevent our reputation from being let down, by engaging themselves in the manufacture of two gliders. These are of the usual Berkley" type, which has become so popular in the Club of late. Will some member please do something original? Might we suggest a flying wing glider? The shortage of elastic for the motive power in planes has, on more than one occasion, driven us to the extreme of petrol-driven aircraft. But, alas, those days are over, for gone are our pioneers in that line. J.K.A.

Valentines Wh- N-t. It is to be noted that when any part of this paper appears dull, there is a design in it,—Steele. Mr. L-w-s. But what is past my help, is past my care.—Beaumont and Fletcher. J-nn-ngs. A man of infinite-resource-and-sagacity. —Kfpling. Mr. M-ll-l---. It is an ancient mariner. —Coleridge. Mr. Wh-t-. Life is just one damned thing after another,—Hubbard. C-11-g- M--l. I smell a device.—Shakespeare. St-w-rt (ma.). A melancholy sheep that bleats and bleats.—Wordsworth. Dr. W-11-s. I'm always at a loss to know how much to believe of my own stories. —Irving. C-11-g- B-11s. Oh, what a difference bells can make in a man's life, —Recent Radio Talk, Ch--r. And fill'd the air with barbarous dissonnance. —Milton. -ldr-dg- Bros. Two little tom-tits were tweeting.—Hall.

Contemporaries We acknowledge with thanks the receipt of the following contemporaries: Radleian, lenalmond Chronicle, Bryanston Saga, Arinachian, Campbellian Newtown Review, C.A.I.


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The Summer House in the Wood Have you ever sat in a summer house of ruin, hidden by trees from sacrilegious eyes, gazing downwards upon our city? What thoughts were yours as you sat there? As I sat there alone my mind wandered back through the mist of years and I thought of two other young people laughing and wooing where I was now musing. She was a dark, slim Irish girl—of whom Moore has well sung; he a young English boy, of slight physique but generous in his affection for the freedom of his fellowmen; an affection great as was his love for her. He left her, to die. I could not love thee, dear, so much Loved I not honour more," Well might he have uttered these words. He fell a martyr for the liberty, not of Ireland alone, but of the countless ever-striving millions. He was one of those marked down in every generation to remind us of the continual danger of losing liberty, whose worth we can never fully know, until we have lost it. Thus he is linked in this struggle with the thousands of young men who are now fighting for freedom. This young couple of whom I write—Robert Emmet and Sarah Curran—are but symbolical of the will of the world's youth to win a happier and a freer world. P. O'H.

Thoughts of the Sea The sea, the sea, the open sea, The waves, the waters all so free, The gulls with snowy plumage gliding. The laden ships the deep seas riding, A battered raft on the black rocks crashing, Inky waves the white cliffs lashing. Oh for the seas, the turbulent seas Where never a moment are the waters at ease, Sudden storms with majestic fury Add to the waters mystic glory, Tearing the rocks between the lulls Or driving the wild and screaming gulls. Oh lovely waters, blue and gold, Hidden caves with joys untold, Glassy pools with gossamer weeds, Purple sands where the conger feeds: These are the shores and the open sea Where my thoughts would ever be. P.J.T.


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Trinity Term, 1945 1st May TERM BEGINS. 2nd May Lecture by the Very Reverend A. S. Duncan-Jones, D.D., Dean of Chichester. 6th May 5th Sunday after Easter. Rogation Sunday. The Rt, Rev. B. C. Hodges, D.D., Lord Bishop of Limerick. 9th May 1st XI v, Wesley College (Home). J.C,T. v. Terenure College (Away). 10th May Ascension Day. 12th May 1st XI v. King's Hospital (Home). J.C.T. v. St. Andrew's College (Home). 13th May Sunday after Ascension. 16th May 2nd XI v. King's Hospital (Away). Leps. v. Aravon (Away), 19th May Confirmation 11.30 a.m. by His Grace the Archbishop of Dublin, D.D. 1st XV v. St. Andrew's (Away), Cup Match, J.C.T. v. Wesley College (Away). 20th May Whit Sunday. LONG LEAVE. Whit Monday. 21st May Ember Day. 1st XI v. King's Hospital (Away). J.C.T. v. King's Hospital 23rd May (Home), Cup Match. 25th May Ember Day. 26th May Ember Day. 27th May Trinity Sunday. Archdeacon Lonsdale Ragg, D.D., Archdeacon of Gibraltar. 30th May 1st XI v. Blackrock College (Home). 2nd June 1st XI v. Masonic School (Home). J.C.T. v. Belvedere College (Away). 1st Sunday after Trinity. Rev. R. L. Wrathall, C.R. 3rd June 6th June 1st XI v. High School (Away). J.C.T. v. Masonic School (Away), 9th June St. Golumba's Day. 1St XI v. Old Columbans (Home), 10th June 2nd Sunday after Trinity. LONG LEAVE. 11th June St. Barnabas, A.M. 12th June Leaving and intermediate Certificate Examinations begin. 16th June 2nd XI v. Masonic School (Home). 17th June 3rd Sunday after Trinity. The Rt. Rev. J. P. Phair, D.D., Lord Bishop of Ossory. 19th June Leaving and Intermediate Certificate Examinations end. 20th June J.C.T. v. Kingstown Grammar School (Home). 24th June Nativity of St. John the Baptist. 4th Sunday after Trinity. LONG LEAVE. 29th June St. Peter, A.M. 5th Sunday after Trinity. Rev. C. G. Pearson, Chaplain of the Grosvenor Chapel, 1st July London. 6th Sunday after Trinity. LONG LEAVE. The Rt. Rev. Cohn Dunlop, D.D., Lord 8th July Bishop of Jarrow. 1st XI v. Portora Royal School (Away). 10th July 1st XI v. St. Andrew's College (Home). J.C.T. v. St. Andrew's College (Away). 11th July School Certificate Examination begins. 13th July Leps. v, Aravon (Home). 14th July 7th Sunday after Trinity. 15th July 22nd July 8th Sunday after Trinity. St. James, A.M. 25th July TERM ENDS. 26th July


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Centenary Building Fund The following subscriptions are gratefully acknowledged by the Committee: Amount acknowledged in THE COLUMBAN of December, 1944 ... Warden and Mrs. Sowby (95th instal,, total £97 5s,) ... ... Warden and Mrs. Sowby (96th instal., total £97 15s.) ... ... Major-General Sir C. W. Gwynn, K.C.B., D.S.O. (10th instal,, total £10) Warden and Mrs. Sowby (97th instal., total £98 5s.) ... ... Warden and Mrs. Sowby (98th instal,, total £98 15s,) ... ... Captain D. R. Fitzpatrick ... ... ... ... ...

... £1,974 14 0 ... 10 0 ... 10 0 ... 1 0 0 ... 10 0 ... 10 0 ... 1 0 0 £1,978 14 0

Masterman Library The Librarian acknowledges with thanks the following gifts of books: Presented by Mr. N. H. Lush: "Constance Markievicz," by Sean O'Faoláin, Presented by The Warden: "The Columban Annual," 1931-8. Presented by The Reverend B. A. Brandon (O.C.): "The Myths of Greece and Rome," by H. A. Guerber. Presented by The Reverend R. B. C. Browne: "Straight Thinking in War-Time," by R. H. Thornless, Presented by Mr. Keith Eason: "A Dictionary of RAF. Slang," by Eric Partridge.

FOOTBALL Chicken Pox shortened our fixture list slightly last term. But a fast side used its speed and stamina in attack to such purpose that High School, Terenure College, St. Mary's, Portora and Wesley were all defeated, and Blackrock played to a draw (a try all). Our only defeats were at the hands of King's Hospital and Belvedere. We played King's Hospital with a side disorganised through injuries to key players, with a side tired from a very hard match tvo days earlier. Few will forget the excitement of the Belvedere game; when 18 points down, S.C.C. scored four tries in the last ten minutes. Such a record made the school look forward to meeting Newbridge in the Cup. Alas, snow and frost was followed by mumps, and we could not accept Newbridge's very sporting offer—more cases of mumps compelled us to scratch. This was even more disappointing, as a week earlier the side put up a grand fight against a heavy and strong Trinity A, to be beaten, somewhat unluckily, 11-3 in College Park, The side took the necessary withdrawal from the Cup patiently, which is what one would expect from those who had the spirit to make hard training and concentrated practice so profitable and enjoyable for all concerned. Instead of interesting comment on the final matches of the season, it is only possible to write about snow, frost, mumps and disappointment and to restrain speculation about what a very fast, hard-working side, with an enormous fight and unity about all its games, might have done. The 2nd XV's activities were also curtailed. As last term, the 2nd XV helped willingly and vigorously in making the 1st XV strong. Many will remember tired shoulders and weary


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legs. Webb (mm.), Smith (mi.), Wilson, Allen and Erskine, among others, should have gained experience which will help next year's 1st XV. The J.C.T. was an unlucky team. It played a bare half-dozen matches, was unable to make the trip to Kilkenny and had to play its second Cup match with a depleted side. But it was a satisfactory team. It began the season as an enthusiastic but unskilled rabble and developed into a well-knit team. In the first round of the Junior Cup against Presentation College, Glasthule, they played delightful rugby, the forwards heeling quickly from tight and loose, and the backs bringing off some grand passing movements. Admittedly, the opposition was weak, and the team, perhaps, played a trifle above itself. But luck did not last. In the second round against Wesley they had to play without Shaw and Ridgway, and Townshend and Anderson—though they played—were not fighting fit. Consequently, they never really got going, and were beaten 14-0. In the Michaelmas Term they beat King's Hospital and High School, and lost to Blackrock and Belvedere. The team, and especially their captain Townshend, are to be commended for the enthusiasm with which they trained and practised throughout the season. THE FIRST FIFTEEN F. 0. FURNEY. A cool, plucky full-back who covers lack of pace by clever anticipation. A difficult man to pass, his stopping of forward rushes is accurate and without hesitation. He also served the side well as fly-half on occasions. H. S. H. JENNINGS. Strong and fast, runs with calculated determination. A sound defensive player, quick to use opponents' mistakes, G. B. PURCE. Has improved enormously since last season. Has a good eye for an opening; through further experience, he is likely to develop into a dangerous attacking centre. D. C. L. JAMESON. Has served the side in an energetic unorthodox manner at serum-half, fly-half, and centre; played in Schools' Trials at centre and wing. An untiring player who spares neither himself nor opponents. Deserves credit for adapting himself to the varying needs of the side. Originally a wing-forward. J. M. KINGSMILL-MOORE, Has almost changed from one who runs with a ball into a footballer. Two tries this year showed-'splendid disregard for himself and would-be tacklers. Defence has improved. Has the strength and speed to develop into a consistently dangerous wing. P. C. SOMERVILLE-LARGE. Injury and sickness kept him out of the game for some weeks. Made up for lost time by steady practice and training. Clever and plucky player, with a shrewd eye for an opening. I. A. KNIGHTON-SMITH (Capt.). Determined and skilful player, led the side well through his unsparingly used abilities. Quick and resourceful in both attack and defence. Deserves sympathy on account of his own injuries and the illness in school which deprived him of the chance of leading the side in its most important matches, D. F. FURNEY. Fast, strong, intelligent forward, always near the ball. Tackles and handles well. His steady play always influenced the pack. T. H. GOOD. Hooks well, and should improve with experience. For a hooker, he gets through a lot of work in the loose, Has done much to keep front row low in the serum. J. D. C. FAULKNER. Sound worker, inexhaustible, a rentless tackler, vigorous in attack. It is a loss to school football that he was not here for the whole season,


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G. B. FAIRBROTHER. A hard-working forward with stamina to stay the heaviest going. Eager footwork in the loose, J. D. NELSON. Big, heavy, always on the ball. Gets through an enormous amount of work in a game. Good at line-out and in loose serums. Fast, tireless, good at line-out, handles well, plays with zest and skill. A polished forward; tackling needs more precision.

T. W. \VEBB.

B. P. SOMERVILLE-LARGE. Quick to use slips by the opposition. A splendid dribbler, good hands; enjoys rough and tumble as much as the rest of pack, despite lack of weight. Led the pack well, held it together by forceful play rather than by a spate of conversation. His abandon did much to keep the pack a lively unit, terrifying to mild opponents and a match for others.

R. BLACKBURN.

Fast, handles well, not easy to tackle; will be a very useful wing-forward when his tackling becomes as sound as his handling. Kept out of the game by recurrence of a former injury. Now quite fit,

B. T. BUTLER.

Hard training and effort improved his play greatly. Fast, energetic, lasts the hardest game to the final minute.

C. H. BLOOD-SMYTH.

HOCKEY The following matches were played this term: FEBRUARY 10th J.C.T. v, Avoca (1st round of Cup). Lost 6-2. FEBRUARY 14th 1st XI v, Trinity. Won 3-1. MARCH 3rd 1st XI v. Trinity. Lost 2-I. MARCH 10th 1st XI v, Pembroke Wanderers. Won 7-5. MARCH 20th 1st XI v. King's Hospital (Final of Cup). Won 2-0,

All these matches were played away. That record of matches is a fair summary of a fantastic season which began with snow, continued with mumps and other ailments, and ended in triumph with the winning of the Senior Cup for the second year in succession. Quarantine for mumps involved the cancellation of all fixtures against other schools, and the fact that the Cup matches were played was due to the good sportsmanship of Avoca and King's Hospital, who were prepared to play our full teams on the neutral ground of Londonbridge Road, We got into the final of the Senior Cup by a tight-rope walk over Mountjoy who, after agreeing to play a team of ours consisting of players who had all had mumps, were themselves compelled to scratch, because they developed German measles. The scarcity of matches, coupled with the fact that medical reasons prevented us from ever fielding a full team, made the building up of the 1st XI impossible. It is not possible even to say with certainty what the shape of the team would have been in ideal conditions, but its still experimental shape at the end of term is as follows: * J. H. T. Gahan; E. T. Butler, G. R. Brewitt; F. 0. Furney, * W. L. R. Packham, H, D. Barron; * D. C. L. Jameson, * I. A. Knighton-Smith (Captain), * P. C. Somerville-Large, G. A. Edgill, * A. T. de S. Bradshaw, Colours for the season were awarded to these, those marked * being old colours from last year. Extra colours were awarded to D. N. C. O'Morchoe, who played in every match, including the final as right-half, and whose steadiness was a considerable asset to the side. In the final, Barron and Butler were unable to play, Barron's place being taken by O'Morchoe, and Butler's by W. W. Wilson, who played left-half, Furney playing as a back.


April, 1945

THE COLUMBAN

15

Under these circumstances it is all the more remarkable that we won the Cup, largely because our team combined better than their opponents'; but it would have been a miracle if our team-play had been more than relatively good, and a considerable measure of our success is due to the pluck and determination of all and the possession of some clever players. KnightonSmith, whose injuries had prevented him from leading the team in any previous match,played a real captain's game on this occasion, both in attack and defence: he scored both our goals. Other players who deserve special mention are Packham, who throughout the season was invaluable at centre-half, his sense of position and control of the ball being admirable; Gahan, whose pluck and judgment in goal won him high and deserved praise and, perhaps, won us the Cup; Jameson, whose skill and energy counterbalanced his tendency to stray out of position and to hold on to the ball too long—after many changes of position, he ended as a most effective and almost orthodox left-wing; Edgill, who was changed from a half to a forward and in both positions showed much promise; and Brewitt, a stalwart, steady, and hard-hitting back, Knighton-Smith, Gahan, and Edgill are to be congratulated on being chosen to play for the Leinster Schools XI; Packham would almost certainly have been chosen but for his misfortune in not having had mumps. Of the J.C.T. little can be said. They had even less chance than the 1st XI of becoming a team. The eleven boys, who after hardly any practice this term (because of snow), faced a good Avoca side, played a plucky game and were by no means badly beaten, the best players being Bradshaw (Captain), Furney, and Butler, all of whom played also on the 1St XI, There is, apart from them, little talent in the younger half of the School, but there are a few promising players.

Athletics During this term an attempt was made to start a "Cross-Country Running " team. Unfortunately, owing to the fact that so many people were playing Rugby and Hockey, we were unable to train sufficiently. It is hoped that during next term much more interest will be taken in Long Distance running. The Warden has shown a very kindly interest, and has offered to assist in our training.


Chapel Account, 1944 EXPENDITURE

RECEIPTS £ s. d. Jan. 1. Balance in Hand

...

...

...

29 15 4

£

DONATIONS:

Hilary Term Trinity Term Michaelmas Term

... ... ...

... ... ...

10

5

0

29 9 0 20 11 0

Bible Reading Fellowship Subs. 1 0 6

£ s. d.

Mansion House Coal Fund 6

0

0

... 1

5

0

Irish Clergy Sons Educa... 2 tion ... ...

0

0

R.N. Lifeboat Institution 2

2

0

Irish Times War Distress ... 5 Fund ... ...

5

0

Dublin Hospital Sunday ... 5 Fund ...

0

0

Dublin University Mission ... 1 Chota Nagpur

5

0

... 1 10

0

2

0

0

...

... 1

1

0

Whitechurch Parish

... 2

0

0

Earl Haig's Fund

... 3

5

Preacher's Expenses

... 2

0 —3213 2 0

...

8

6

15

6

A.P,C.K, New Psalters, Hymn Books, etc. ...24 11

0

Bible Reading Fellowship 2 12

3

General Chapel Expenses 4 10

3

Mount Street Club CHAPEL COLLECTIONS:

s. d.

Grenville Street Club Diocesan Funds A.P,C.K. ...

Chapel Music

...

4

6 Sets Hymn Board Nos.

... ...

... ...

13

2

1

0

Balance in Hand 31/12/44 17 16

0

Postages, etc. Bank Charges

1

58 £91 1 8 1

9

0

8

£91 1 8

The Columban, April 1945  

School magazine

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