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ISSUE 334 SCANDINAVIAN DESIGN

L THE

INK

THE SWEDISH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE FOR THE UK FEBRUARY 2017

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The LINK ABOUT

The Swedish Chamber of Commerce was founded in 1906 and is a not for profit membership organisation aimed at promoting the exchange of ideas and experiences, networking and trade between Sweden and the United Kingdom. Today, the Chamber is one of the largest foreign Chambers in the UK, with approximately 450 Member companies. It is also one of the most active Chambers, hosting approximately 60 events per year.

S C C

P A T R O N S

EDITORS OF THE LINK

JOHANNA BJARSCH FOLLIN INVESTOR SCHOLAR BJARSCH@SCC.ORG.UK

FANNY SILTBERG ANDERS WALL SCHOLAR SILTBERG@SCC.ORG.UK

NOT A MEMBER YET? Visit www.scc.org.uk or contact the Secretariat on +44 (0)20 7224 8001/ email info@scc.org.uk

MIKAEL ANGESJO ASSISTANT DIRECTOR ANGESJO@SCC.ORG.UK ULLA NILSSON MANAGING DIRECTOR NILSSON@SCC.ORG.UK

EBBA WIBERG EVENTS MANAGER WIBERG@SCC.ORG.UK

REBECCA MARTIN COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER MARTIN@SCC.ORG.UK

ELIN HAMMENFORS LUND UNIVERSITY SCHOLAR HAMMENFORS@SCC.ORG.UK

PETER MCNAMEE ACCOUNTANT MCNAMEE@SCC.ORG.UK

EMILIA SWIECICKA INTERN SWIECICKA@SCC.ORG.UK

STEFAN WESTMAN STENA LINE SCHOLAR WESTMAN@SCC.ORG.UK

LOUISE HÃ…KANSSON INTERN HAKANSSON@SCC.ORG.UK

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CONTENTS THE LINK • ISSUE 334 • FEBRUARY 2017 SCANDINAVIAN DESIGN

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A LEGACY OF SWEDISH MODERN - The Story of Svenskt Tenn Feature

THE JOY TO BE VINDICATED Feature

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THE LIFE OF NORDIC DESIGNERS - Inspirations and Challenges Feature

SCANDINAVIAN DESIGN - A Matter of Mindset Feature

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A JEWELLER’S WISH Feature

BANKS NEED TO BE MORE SUSTAINABLE Editorial

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NOTHERN CELEBRATIONS ON THE SOUTH BANK Feature

OUT WITH THE OLD, IN WITH THE NEW Feature

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GOING IT ALONE, TOGETHER Member Entrepreneur

FINTECH, EDUCATION AND LOGISTICS Member Highlights

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YP PAGES

BEING A YP OUTSIDE OF LONDON YP Feature

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48 SCC PAST EVENTS Event Photos

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We serve clients who choose to live and do business outside the Nordic region Our private banking colleagues in London have been meeting with entrepreneurs, financial professionals, families and individuals who have different kind of requirements to inform them of important questions that need to be addressed in this challenging world. If you would like to find out how we can help you with many UK related queries regarding mortgages, investments, savings and day-to-day cross border planning, feel free to contact our Private Banking office in Luxembourg at +352 43 88 71 or contact our colleagues in the UK. Thorsten Söderhielm thorsten.soderhielm@nordea.com +44 20 7726 9232

Christian A. Hvamstad, christian.hvamstad@nordea.com +44 20 7726 9230

This financial promotion is made by Nordea Bank S.A. which is based in Luxembourg and passported into the UK to provide cross-border services, although most of our investment services are carried on from Luxembourg. Nordea Bank S.A. is authorised by the Commission de Surveillance de Secteur Financier (CSSF) in Luxembourg and is subject to limited regulation by the Financial Conduct Authority. Details about the extent of our regulation by the Financial Conduct Authority are available from us on request. As a consequence, certain of the rules made under the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 for the protection of retail clients in the UK will not apply (although there are rules in place for the protection of retail clients in Luxembourg). The Financial Services Compensation Scheme will not be available with regards to any investment business we carry on for you.

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The LINK THE CHAMBER

Staffan Gadd 1934 - 2017

Former

SCC

Chairman

(1994-1996)

Staffan Gadd passed away on the 11th January at the age of 82 after an extended period of ill health. Gadd was a Member of the SCC Council for forty years. During the 1970s and 80s Gadd was the most well-known Swede in London banking circles. When he was appointed the CEO of the distinguished British merchant bank Samuel Montagu in 1980, the Daily Mail greeted the announcement with the headline “By Gadd, he has made it”. Soon he was also chosen as the bank’s

after an eventful 2016, a whole new year is before us, with endless possibilities and many chances to come together and learn from each other. This year, being able to meet up and share our expertise within our respective fields, will perhaps be more important than ever before.

D

ear

Members,

this angle into consideration and we will be monitoring the situation closely, providing you with expert analysis. If you feel that your company may be able to contribute, please do not hesitate to contact me or our Communications Manager Rebecca Martin at the Secretariat.

chairman, making him one of the most influential people in London’s banking community. After completing studies at the Stockholm International Business School (Handels), Gadd began his career at the Federation of

Swedish

Industries

(Svenska

Despite the uncertainty of our ‘interesting times’, I think it is imperative to concentrate on the positives and be grateful that 2016 gave us many opportunities to come together to engage, network, discover and connect - the guiding words of the Swedish Chamber for the UK. That is when we are at our best and can achieve great things together - like raising over £5,000 to fight homelessness, through your generous donations and raffle ticket purchases at our Annual Christmas Luncheon.

Industriförbundet) in 1959. He soon

In this Link, we celebrate the legacy of Scandinavian design, new and old, represented within the network and outside of it. The strength of the Chamber network truly lays in each and every one of Whatever happens, we can assure you its Members. Let us continue to utilise this that the Chamber will continue to promote and make 2017 a productive and positive trade and business prospects between the year for us all. two countries to the very best of our ability. We intend to stay on top of any With best wishes, impact the new political and financial developments will have on the network. This determination will be reflected in everything we do over 2017. Hence, we ULLA NILSSON, MANAGING DIRECTOR SWEDISH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE FOR will regularly be featuring Brexit related THE UK content on our website, all events will take

Under Gadd’s leadership, the bank grew,

By now, I think it is safe to say that we are indeed living in ‘interesting times’, for better and for worse. 2016 left many questions that may or may not be answered in the following months. Needless to say, the topic on everyone’s lips this year will be Brexit and what challenges and opportunities that the impending start of proceedings will entail. What will happen to the UK and the single market? What kinds of trade deals can be put in place in time for a British exit from the EU? Will sterling become more stable? Can Theresa May and her government guide a boisterous Brexit ship on the right course?

FRO N T PAG E: FRO M THE ‘ PL A N E T S ’ C O L L E C T I O N , C RYSTA L A RT BY L E N A B E RG ST R ÖM W EBSI TE: HTTP: / / W W W. LE N A B E RG ST RO M. S E

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made a name for himself, something that didn’t go unnoticed by the Wallenberg family. In 1961 he was wooed over to the Skandinaviska Enskilda Banken (SEB) and was quickly posted to New York to learn the inner workings of a bank. After two years, he was tasked with starting up the bank’s activity in London. After changing banking laws made this possible, the new Scandinavian Bank (a consortium bank where SEB was the majority shareholder) opened in 1969.

opening branches in other countries. In June 1980, Gadd left to take up a position with merchant bank Samuel Montagu, as the first ever foreign CEO at one of the traditional British accepting houses. After three years Gadd left to start his own investment bank JS Gadd & Cie with subsidiaries in Sweden and Switzerland, where he remained until retirement. PIA HELENA ORMEROD FORMER MD OF THE SWEDISH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE FOR THE UK (1994-1999)

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A LEGACY OF

SWEDISH MODERN T H E

S T O R Y

O F

F a n n y

T E N N

S i l t b e r g

Book end, Lion, Svenskt Tenn

W o r d s :

S V E N S K T

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T

he story of Svenskt Tenn is a long and winding one, as colourful as a Josef Frank pattern and as rich in inspiration DQGHĎŞRUWDVWKHPRVWĂ€QHO\FUDIWHG SHZWHUOLRQ,WEHJLQVLQVPDOO +MRLQWKHPLGGOHRI6ZHGHQDQG winds its way through Vienna and Paris, via the United States, to 6WUDQGYlJHQ$LQ6WRFNKROP7KH LQWHULRUGHVLJQVKRSKDVEHFRPHD GHVWLQDWLRQRISLOJULPDJHIRUVRPH DQGWKHGHĂ€QLWLRQRIFODVVLFWDVWH IRUPDQ\7KH/,1.PHWXSZLWK 6YHQVNW7HQQWRĂ€QGRXWZKDW KDVNHSWWKHPDWWKHKHDUWRIWKH Swedish design scene for over 90 years.

It’s 1975 and Estrid Ericson is getting older. Not necessarily more tired, but older. The 81-year old designer and entrepreneur is trying to figure out what to do with her beloved company and life’s work, Svenskt Tenn. By now, the small pewter workshop that she started in 1924 has grown into a colourful flagship store on Strandvägen in Stockholm. The large and loyal clientele can’t get enough of the handcrafted pewter decorations and interior creations, not to mention Josef Frank’s exquisite furniture designs and colourful patterns. Svenskt Tenn has already become somewhat of an institution, the front runner of “Swedish Modernâ€?, and Ericson is determined to keep it that way. But she has no children, and Josef Frank, her lifelong collaborator, had passed away a couple of years earlier with no one left behind to carry on his craft. As luck would have it, the solution came in the form of Kjell and Märta Beijer’s Foundation. At the end of 1975, Ericson sold the company to the Foundation on one condition; that they would strive to carry on the company’s legacy forever.

Forty years later, Thommy Bindefeld, the current Marketing Director at Svenskt Tenn, describes this as one of the defining moments in the company’s history. “When Ericson sold the company to the Foundation, that was the best thing she could do for the future of Svenskt Tenn,� he tells The LINK. Today, Svenskt Tenn is a flourishing company, firmly established on the Swedish interior design scene. The fact that the owner is a foundation enables Bindefeld and his colleagues to take the company into the future at a pace that preserves the legacy Ericson was so keen on keeping. “There is no private owner wanting to make a profit out of the foundation and its aim is to secure the company for the future. Of course we need money to run it, but everything that we earn on top of that goes to research in medicine and ecology via the foundation,� Bindefeld explains. In the last 20 years, those earnings have not been disappointing. During that time, almost 150 million SEK has been

raised to the Beijer Institute of Research via Svenskt Tenn. And so, what started as an entrepreneurial notion in the 1920s, will now benefit generations to come.

H I S T O R Y Estrid Ericson was born in Öregrund in 1894 and grew up in Hjo, a small town outside of SkÜvde. In the late 1910s, she moved to Stockholm to study to become an art teacher at what is today Konstfack (University College of Arts, Craft and Design). But Ericson’s ambitions went further than that and in 1924 she started a small pewter workshop together with her friend Nils Fougstedt. Using a small inheritance from her father, the partners could set up shop shortly thereafter and at the end of the year, the Svenskt Tenn store opened its doors to customers for the first time. According to the RÜhsska Museum in Gothenburg, who specializes in Swedish craft history, the timing couldn’t have been better. The design ideals at the time were rapidly shifting towards more pragmatic and strict aesthetics. As a result, pewter saw a revival as a material since it was

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The LINK FEATURE seen as a more “honest” alternative to electroplated nickel silver, which had been popular until this point. The success of the shop was instant, and quickly recognised internationally. At the International Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts in Paris in 1925, Ericson and Fougstedt were awarded a gold medal for their designs. The prize led to further opportunities back home and soon, Svenskt Tenn could expand and hire more designers. It was the starting point of the long-lasting tradition of tying skilled craftsmen to the company. A little over five years after its inception, Svenskt Tenn had gone from a two-man pewter workshop, to an interior design shop with 35 employees. In 1927, Svenskt Tenn had outgrown its initial premises and the shop was moved to its now famous address; Strandvägen 5A.

Most of our craftsmen have worked with Svenskt Tenn for generations. Many are third or second generation craftsmen that work with us and their fathers or grandfathers worked directly with Josef Frank”.

In the 1930s, Ericson reached out to the man who was to become the most influential and productive collaborator to Svenskt Tenn of all time. Josef Frank was an Austrian architect and designer who had caught her attention early on. Once he started working with Svenskt Tenn, its offerings widened to not only cover pewter, but furniture and whole interior settings too. Frank moved to Sweden in 1933 together with his Swedish wife. His contribution in terms of furniture designs, patterns and lamp constructions makes up a huge part of Svenskt Tenn’s offering to this day, and his name is closely connected to the brand. Not least in the form of his colourful and intense patterns, which many associate with his name. Throughout his time with Svenskt Tenn, he produced nearly 200 unique

patterns, and to Bindefeld, these are somewhat of a treasure to have in the archive. He is amazed by how timeless Frank’s designs are, and how it is hard to tell if they were designed in the 30s or last year. His own personal favourite, is the print “Miracle”. “It is one of Josef Frank’s best prints. I think that was his own opinion as well because he has said somewhere that it was miracle that he could repeat the pattern so seamlessly. He had an extremely architectural way of doing the repeat, how the print runs. When you look at Miracle, you can’t see where the repeat begins or where it ends - he has done it in such a subtle way,” Bindefeld explains. Together, Frank and Ericson steered the company with a strong sense of integrity for decades. Today, if you buy something at Svenskt Tenn, it is practically guaranteed that you will return home with something generally perceived as being of a classic taste. That correlation however, hasn’t always been a given. Röhsska Museum explains that it is quite extraordinary how two people who often broke the norms around them, became the precept for good taste. In their creations, they were often at odds with the prevailing design ideals. Between the 1930s and 1950s for example, functionalism dominated the Swedish design scene. Practicality was of the essence and any abundant decoration or extravagances in interior design were to be avoided. Frank and Ericson on the other hand, had a more individualistic and emotional view of the home. And so, colourful patterns were mixed with classic furniture, cheap artefacts from Ericson’s many travels were mixed with precious materials and the interior setup was allowed to carry meanings, moods and tell stories. In 1958, Frank coined the expression “accidentism”. He meant that the city, the house and the home should indeed be carefully planned, but look almost as if they came to be by accident. This ideal shines through in everything that Svenskt Tenn does and at the time, it was a sore point for the establishment.

W H A T A D I F F E R E N C E A D E C A D E M A K E S After having sold the company, Estrid still played an active part in it for many years, but passed on the title of CEO

to Ann Wall in 1979. Wall had studied graphic design and marketing and under her leadership, the company entered a new era. The company took on a contemporary form and slowly but surely, the business grew to new heights. Because for all the fame and good reputation the company had at the time, it still didn’t show much profit. Through new collaborations and strategies, Wall eventually turned the bottom line from red to black. “Ann Wall put on exhibitions, she collaborated with new contemporary designers and she relaunched and launched designs that Josef Frank had done that had not been in production earlier. She gave the company a fresh start,” Bindefeld explains. He goes on to explain how Svenskt Tenn today has taken the best from the two different styles of leadership and continue to build on the heritage of both. It is a balance between maintaining the historical part from Estrid Ericson and her strong sense of entrepreneurship, while still maintaining the level of business mindedness that Ann Wall brought to the company. He calls it a commercial cultural institution. “We have both culture and heritage. We manage an important part of Swedish design history but we are also commercial, so we always balance between being cultural and contemporary and between historical and contemporary. Because if we would only be historical and cultural we might as well be a museum,” he says.

M A I N T A I N I N G L E G A C Y

A

The connection between Svenskt Tenn and the Swedish craft scene has always been strong. The lion’s share of Svenskt Tenn’s current product offering is designed and produced in Sweden by small companies dealing with glass and pewter manufacturing, carpentry and weaving. To say that Svenskt Tenn and their suppliers go way back, would almost be an understatement. “Most of them have worked with Svenskt Tenn for generations. Many are third or second generation craftsmen that work with us and their fathers or grandfathers worked directly with Josef Frank. Or with Ericson of course,” Bindefeld tells The LINK.

8 Manhattan, Pattern design Josef Frank

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The LINK FEATURE

We talk about locally produced food. This is locally produced design”.

To Bindefeld, encouraging and supporting Swedish craftsmen and women, is important. To him, it is a sad state of affairs that a lot of the Swedish craft skill that used to exist, has already been lost. He sees Svenskt Tenn as a counter weight to that trend. “We try as hard as we can to support our suppliers and to give them orders in order for them to exist for their next generation. Some of them have next generation working, but it is a hard climate to be in,” he says. In addition to collaborating with local craftsmen, Svenskt Tenn also tries to promote the Swedish craft scene in other ways, says Bindefeld. A couple of months ago, they put on a big exhibition in the store, showing the visitors five different craft workshops live in action. Together, they make up a quarter of Svenskt Tenn’s entire production.

Assorted pillows, Svenskt Tenn

“We talk about locally produced food. This is locally produced design and I think the interest for that is growing. I think that the generation who is interested in locally produced food is also interested in locally produced design. The aim with this exhibition is

Between 28 January to 7 May 2017, the Fashion and Textile Museum in London is hosting the exhibition Josef Frank Patterns-Furniture-Painting. The exhibition is a showcase of Frank’s life and work and was originally curated by Millesgården in Stockholm. The LINK met curator Dennis Nothdruft to learn more about the exhibition.

also for people to realise that there is a craft tradition in Sweden at all,” says Bindefeld. When asked to summarise the essence of Svenskt Tenn, Bindefeld describes it as a multi faceted diamond. It is a nod to the many factors that he believes have kept the company going for so long; its strong ties to the Swedish craft scene, the fruitful collaboration between Estrid Ericsson and Josef Frank, and the continuous partnerships with contemporary designers. It has proven to be a hotbed for long term success, ensuring that the products never feel outdated. And for the foreseeable future, changing location will not be an option either. Bindefeld is certain that having one shop as the only outlet, is part of Svenskt Tenn’s charm. “We have no plans to open anywhere else. Some time ago, a magazine wrote that the best thing about Svenskt Tenn is that you have to make a pilgrimage to Stockholm to see it. That’s a good way to put it. We are a diamond but we like to keep things small and secret as well.” Perhaps not the most well hidden of gems, but a diamond none the less, Svenskt Tenn has managed to build an institution around the subtle balance between being timeless and contemporary all at the same time.

TELL US ABOUT THE EXHIBITION, WHAT DOES IT ENTAIL?

The exhibition features the textile designs of Josef Frank and also a selection of watercolour paintings by Frank that many have never been seen until this exhibition. Alongside the patterns designed by Frank, there are rugs and furniture. Frank stopped designing textiles by the early 1950s, which is when he began to paint. HOW HAS IT BEEN RECEIVED IN SWEDEN?

The exhibition was an enormous success at Millesgården, and has been extremely popular with the visitors of the exhibition. WHAT MAKES IT SPECIAL?

This is, as far as we can tell, the first exhibition in the UK devoted to Frank’s pattern design. Frank’s work radiates positivity and optimism. As many of his most successful designs were created during World War II, this makes the work even more so. IS IT ONLY FABRIC PATTERNS THAT WILL BE SHOWCASED IN THE EXHIBITION?

No, the exhibition will feature his watercolour paintings – including landscapes, varieties of still life, and dream houses – and also rugs, furniture and early textiles from Austria. IF SOMEONE COULD ONLY VISIT ONE EXHIBITION THIS YEAR, WHY SHOULD THEY CHOOSE THIS ONE?

This is one show that will put you in a good mood! You will leave energised and eager for more colour in your life.

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TheJoy to be WORDS: JOHANNA BJARSCH FOLLIN

A young woman is standing alone in the middle of New York City, with a heavy portfolio in her hands filled with designs and patterns. The woman is Joy Zandén, on her way to fulfil her dream. But she is still blissfully unaware of the difficulties she is about to encounter, walking up and down the streets of Manhattan to meet advertisers and printing companies. Little did she know that she would have to wait until the age of 94 before she finally had her breakthrough. Her designs have now come to life in a collection of wallpaper from long ago. Joy Zandén was 60 years ahead of her time. Now she is bang on the money.

Signatur - Särö white, Sandberg Wallpaper, designed by Joy Zandén

Taking the boat from Sweden to New York in the 1950s to display her designs required courage, a courage that was slowly replaced by disappointment as one printing company after another turned the young miss Zandén down. Despite relatively positive feedback on her designs, Joy didn’t manage to sell a single one. New York was a failure. Filled with disappointment she took her portfolio back to Sweden. “I just gave up. Instead I moved to Stockholm to be a mother,” Joy tells the LINK. She gave up designing and started working in the shop at Moderna Museet in Stockholm, a job she loved. It was an eventful time at the museum, and even though she was not performing and designing any art herself, she was surrounded by it. When she retired, Joy moved back to Särö on the west coast of Sweden, where she had spent most of her childhood.

Fast-forward almost 50 years, to 1995. Joy’s daughter Jessica Zandén is paying a visit to her mother at Särö when she stumbles upon her mother’s old patterns in the basement. Amazed by her mother’s talent, Jessica starts contacting design and printing companies in order to give the patterns the recognition they deserve. Yet again, the designs are turned down and put back on the shelf. It would require a third effort, and the right context, for the world to appreciate Joy’s patterns and bring them to life. THIRD TIME’S A CHARM Fast-forward again, to a Saturday afternoon in Gothenburg, Sweden approximately one year ago. The city centre is, as every Saturday, filled with shopping enthusiasts. It’s a busy day at Engelska Tapetmagasinet, a wallpaper shop, and there is a long queue curled around the shop. Determined to have someone with an eye for design take a look at Joy’s patterns, Jessica stands in the long line of wallpaper shoppers, and when it’s her turn, she shows the patterns to the cashier. Instead of stressing over a woman wanting to show designs in the middle of the Saturday shopping rush, the woman behind the counter takes her time to browse through every design. Impressed by the beautiful and expressive patterns, she refers Jessica to Sandberg Wallpaper. Many designers contact Sandberg Wallpaper and want to exhibit their designs, hoping for a final breakthrough and artistic affirmation. But the phone call from Jessica was different. She was persistent, and insisted on a meeting.

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“I can’t explain why, but I had a feeling that this would be different, that there was a reason why Jessica was so eager to drive for several hours to our factory in Ulricehamn, in the middle of nowhere just to display her mother’s work. Today, I am very happy I trusted that gut feeling and arranged a meeting,” Sandberg’s Hanna Wendelbo tells the LINK. Jessica arrived with a bundle of designs in the same brown mailing paper it had been wrapped in when Joy was turned down in New York. But this time when the rustling paper uncovered Joy’s designs, the reaction was different. “A treasure appeared before my eyes as one breath-taking design after another was brought out from the package. It was a design treasure that had been hidden for 60 years and almost forgotten, hadn’t it been for the persistence of one daughter to give her mother vindication,” Wendelbo says.

INSPIRATION Joy grew up in a creative family in Paris. Her mother was a sculptress and her father a painter and composer, and with the closest family friends being renowned artists, her childhood was characterised by creativity, art and design. The summers were spent in Särö on the west coast of Sweden, an environment that further influenced her creative streak. Born to be an artist, she was given a brush and just started to paint. It began with a small dot, or a leaf, and then it grew. The creativity was flowing, and she never planned beforehand what to paint. Nature and fairy tales, figurative and non-figurative expressions from her childhood came to life on the paper.

“I am utterly overwhelmed. After all these years, trends have changed and the patterns are now appealing to people today,” she tells the LINK.

Hella, picturing a meadow of clovers, is named after Joy’s stepmother Helen Lyon. Just before marrying Joy’s father, Helen had found a four-leafed clover the symbol of luck. It was a very happy marriage, and according to Joy, Hella wallpaper would suit in a bedroom. (The LINK did not ask why.) Fredsfåglar, birds of peace, was originally designed to adorn the interior of Svenska Amerikalinien, a ferry going from Gothenburg to North America during the 20th century. BETTER LATE THAN NEVER As amazing as it seems that the designs of these four women came to life more than 60 years after their initial creation, there are reasons why it took so long. Signatur contains colourful wallpaper. Back in the 1950s, technical challenges made it difficult to print more than a few colours, which might have implicated the expression of the patterns. Also, life has improved over the last decades. At the time when these women were active, childcare was the responsibility of the mother of the family. This left little time for designing and pursuing a career that demands a great belief in oneself and one’s designs.

Joy’s portfolio contained the authentic and untouched patterns from the visit to New York during the 50s, the golden age of Scandinavian design. At Sandberg, the experts had noted a trend among consumers to return to the 50s style but the company had yet to incorporate such designs in their offering. Joy’s patterns had exactly the history and post-war Scandinavian style they were looking for, and the encounter was the start of the search for a whole new wallpaper collection. The collection is now complete and contains patterns and designs from four female designers; Joy Zandén, Dagmar Lodén, Ylva Källström-Eklund, and Lillo Wikstrand. They were all working within the field in one way or another during the golden age of Scandinavian design, and the patterns are collected from embroidery, children’s books, textile print and original paintings and sketches. Joy is the only designer still alive to experience the appreciation of the playful, imaginary and colourful wallpaper collection that was named Signatur.

Särö, the beloved place where Joy spent her childhood summers, came to name one of the wallpapers. Flowers and leaves, influenced by the flora on land and at sea decorates this pattern, which is Jessica’s favourite.

“Seaweed flowing in the sea, flowers on a meadow swinging in in the wind and midsummer poles,” Joy adds. Clearly her designs are the Swedish summer seen through the eyes of a child. Looking at her patterns, one can see that the Särö’s closeness to sea and forest have inspired her patterns. Birds, leaves and flowers appearing to grow wildly and freely characterise the three designs that are included in the collection Signatur and now printed as wallpaper.

When speaking to Joy, it becomes obvious that she lost her confidence with the disappointment in New York. Jessica wanted to give it back to her, which is the main reason she spent many years and considerable effort to make sure her mother’s prints came into being. “Most of all I wanted my mother to have the recognition she deserves for her artistic talent. But I also wanted to give everyone the chance to see these designs. The imaginative patterns bring happiness to the observer, and now anyone can enjoy this as the patterns

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A treasure appeared before my eyes as one breath-taking design after another was brought out from the package. It was a design treasure that had been hidden for 60 years and almost forgotten, hadn’t it been for the persistence of one daughter to give her mother vindication.

Hanna Wendelbo, Sandberg Wallpaper

Never give up on your dreams, never. There is no such thing as failure. Change your mindset – this was not your time. It is never too late and you are never too old to do anything,” Jessica says. It’s true as the saying goes, it’s better late than never. Joy’s designs and her fantastic road to fame have been featured in Swedish interior magazines Residence and Elle Decorations, and Vogue Australia appointed her wallpaper Särö as one of the best trends and products from the 2016 London Design Festival,

Finally, and at long last, Joy Zandén got her artistic vindication. She just had to wait 60 years for the world to be ready for it. Sä

lue

The success with Sandberg encouraged Jessica to continue spreading Joy’s designs. She has started the company Joy Zandén AB to share her mother’s designs on everyday-life products. The patterns are not only available as wallpaper, but also printed on serving trays and shopping bags. In one way, she is happy that her mother didn’t succeed in New York, because the response the Zandéns have received is beyond what they both could have dreamt of. When Jessica found her mother’s old designs in the basement, Joy wanted to throw them

where the wallpaper bringing Joy’s designs to life were launched by Jessica and Sandberg Wallpaper.

rk B Da

away as “they were not of any artistic or design value”. This taught them both an important lesson, and Jessica has an important message to send out to anyone with aspiring dreams.

come to life in colourful wallpaper. Sandberg has done a fantastic job in colouring, which really give the patterns the expression they deserve,” she tells the LINK.

Left: Fredsfåglar Grey Right: Hella Grey

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The LINK EVENT TO LOOK OUT FOR

21

FEBRUARY WELCOME TO THE UK 2017

(Are you still) Welcome to the UK 2017 Series: Social and Culture Date: 21 february Time: 16:00 - 19:30 Price: FREE Venue: Stockholm Chamber of Commerce, Brunnsgatan 2, Stockholm

For the 10th year in a row, Welcome to the UK returns to Stockholm. This is THE event for any individual or company looking to learn more about potential business expansion to the UK. The event offers advice and experience as well as invaluable networking opportunities. It is also an event suitable for companies with experience of working with companies relocating to the UK, or who has expanded to the UK themselves and can share their experiences with companies looking to do the same. Welcome!

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what is..

Scandinavian Design? WORDS: JOHANNA BJARSCH FOLLIN

SCANDINAVIAN DESIGN REFERS TO THE DESIGN MOVEMENT THAT

AND INTERIOR, BUT RATHER THE MENTALITY THAT GOVERNS

EMERGED IN DENMARK, SWEDEN AND NORWAY IN THE 1950S.

THE EXPRESSION WE SEE AS TYPICALLY SCANDINAVIAN -

MODERNISM

* AND INCLUSIVENESS CAME TO DEFINE THE POST-

MINIMALISTIC, NATURAL, INSPIRED BY NATURE, CLEAN AND PURE.

WW2 ERA, REUNITING A BROKEN EUROPE, BUT APART FROM ITS

THIS MENTALITY CAN BE FOUND IN ALL CREATIVE EXPRESSIONS

IMPORTANCE ON THE INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS AGENDA, THESE

AND

CONCEPTS AND THE IDEAS THEY REPRESENT ALSO CAME TO

ARCHITECTURE, AND FOOD - SCANDINAVIAN FASHION BRANDS

CHARACTERISE THE SCANDINAVIAN DESIGN MOVEMENT.

ARE FAMOUS FOR THEIR EXCLUSIVE MATERIALS AND SIMPLE

CONTEXTS;

FASHION,

FURNITURE,

DECORATION,

LINES, SCANDINAVIAN FURNITURE THE LIKE, AND SCANDINAVIAN SCANDINAVIAN DESIGN HAS COME TO BE RENOWNED FOR ITS

CUISINE IS CHARACTERISED BY PURE FLAVOURS FINELY PREPARED

UNIQUE CHARACTER, BUT WHAT WE USUALLY CHARACTERISE

WITH EXCLUSIVE AND UNIQUE SCANDINAVIAN DELICACIES.

AS SCANDINAVIAN IS NOT NECESSARILY LIMITED TO DESIGN

Main Characteristics

Materials

Trends

The saying “less is more” was most likely first spoken by a Scandinavian. The Scandinavian expression is simplistic and minimalistic, unadorned and stylish influenced by the history of the countries in the north, industrialised relatively late and thus maintaining a penchant for traditional crafts. The tradition of craftsmanship and the cold climate has also affected the functionality prevalent in most Scandinavian design; Scandinavian fashion is made out of natural materials aimed for withstanding harsher weather conditions.

The materials are natural, such as wood, different stone materials, metals, glass and leather. The great respect for nature from the Vikings up north has resulted in an appreciation for the materials as they are, oftentimes used untreated and kept well visible. Wood in all forms and of all kinds is by far the most important and most used material in Scandinavian design, and has come to be one of its main characteristic features.

As in all creative and design contexts, there are and always will be trends even though the main guiding mentality of Scandinavian design remains the same. Scandinavian design and Scandinavia in general has gained popularity the last couple years, within all areas where the mentality is applicable. One trend to spot in the gained popularity is that countries with a similar mentality as Scandinavia; English-speaking countries, the northern part of Europe, Japan and South Korea, tend to favour the Scandinavian expression.

Scandinavian interior design is characterised by large, spacious rooms with white walls, bare and untreated wooden floors, yet with a cosy and homely feeling. The light and space is a contrast to the dark winters in Scandinavia. The light interiors may be a reason why home is so important to Scandinavians; it is a safe and warm place in an environment with rough climate and long winters.

Colours Nothing bold, nothing brave - black, white and everything in between. The natural brown of leather and wood, grey scale, neutral colours and earthy tones are predominant. If any colour is added, it is most likely dirty pastels with a tone of grey that goes well with the grey, black and white. Roughly generalised, Scandinavian people do not wish to stand out from the crowd, a trait which is deeply rooted in the Scandinavian culture. Could this be the reason why Scandinavian design in all regards is dominated by neutral colours, a safe choice?

For the design movement itself, sustainability has become increasingly incorporated into the mentality and design. Using sustainably sourced materials and having long-term thinking when it comes to design is an obvious statement and in many aspects synonymous with the Scandinavian brand.

* Modernism

Modernism is above all a collection of ideas and a way of thinking, but when talking about modernism in relation to design it has also came to represent a style. The avant garde of the modernist heydays dreamed of a world of social equality, free from conflict, and these values characterise modernist thinking - a rejection of the past and a wish and desire for the new and innovative. Modernist design favour functionality with no ornaments, as opposed to what had dominated the design sphere pre-modernism, and clarity and simplicity that combined with functionality symbolised equality.

Sources: Nordic Design Collective: www.nordicdesigncollective.co.uk Victoria and Albert Museum: www.vam.ac.uk

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POSES1 AND POSES3, TORIL BAEKMARK

The LINK FEATURE

T H E

L I F E

O F

N O R D I C

D E S I G N E R S

INSPIRATION CHALLENGES

&

Scandinavian Design has a unique feeling and expression and has long since been trendy outside the Nordics. At London Design Fair, held at Truman Brewery in East London in September 2016, Sweden and Scandinavia were well represented. The Swedish Pavilion, organised by the Embassy of Sweden, was one of the great attractions of the fair, exhibiting a number of Swedish designer brands. WORDS: JOHANNA BJARSCH FOLLIN

Nordic Design Collective, a marketplace for Nordic designers, had their own showcase and pop-up store at the fair with designs made by smaller and less well-known Nordic designers. Apart from just showcasing the products, available to buy on the day, Nordic Design Collective also held a Supertalk themed ‘The Life of Nordic Designers - Inspiration and Challenges’. This featured Nordic designers talking about just that; what are the inspirations and challenges with being a designer today. The LINK spoke to Maria Richardsson, CEO at Nordic Design Collective, to get a brief of this Supertalk; what drives development within Nordic design at the moment, and what is life like for independent designers in the region? INSPIRATION “A large majority of Scandinavian designers get their inspiration from nature and their immediate surroundings, something that becomes obvious when looking at designs, patterns and choice of material. Nature seems to be important for Scandinavians, which, when you think about, it comes naturally as the environment and the climate, the cold and the dark up in the Nordics has resulted in that a great respect and appreciation for nature is deeply rooted in our culture,” Richardsson tells the LINK Scandinavian design is easily identifiable, certain characteristics and traits that seem to be inherited through culture and history - but for a Scandinavian it is not easy to pinpoint what others perceive as typically Scandinavian. So which concepts and events in the history of the Nordics has resulted in the mentality that guides the Scandinavian design line?

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The LINK FEATURE “Folkhemmet, the Swedish welfare state that dominated the political agenda in the mid-20th century, has imposed the importance of equality in the mindset and culture of people. Going further back to the peasant society, there was a strong tradition of craftsmanship as the Nordics became industrialised relatively late. As one had to make their own furniture, the Nordic tradition has resulted in a functional and simple style, simply because the design had to be simple to be easily manufactured and should be available to anyone,“ Richardsson tells the LINK. It appears that cultural history and traditions, but in some sense also politics, inspire and influence design and art forms. CHALLENGES The labour market for designers has changed in the last decades; production companies work with freelancers instead of having hired designers, which is why becoming an entrepreneur within design has become increasingly common. Being a sole entrepreneur and designer, there are many sides of the business you must run by yourself, and finding the balance between running the business; administration, marketing, sales, and having the time to be creative in between is challenging to many designers. However, becoming an entrepreneur does not solve the struggle of surviving on the creative business, Richardsson says.

of being an entrepreneur, to spur and encourage the creative design industry in the Nordics. SUSTAINABILITY Besides inspiration and challenges facing Nordic designers today, the Supertalk also brought up thoughts on current trends in the design world. Sustainability has been a hot topic in the design sphere for quite some time now, especially in the Nordic countries which are all at the forefront of sustainability in most its aspects. Nordic designers are no exception, product designers emphasise creating products with a long-term thinking and that are sustainable.

Maria Richardsson Founder and CEO Nordic Design Collective

Sustainable design can mean a number of things, and Richardsson points out that most designers today already have a sustainable mindset. For Nordic Designers, already very sustainability aware, the choice to work with sustainable sourced materials in an environmentally friendly production, is already the obvious choice. Today, the focus has shifted more towards using ethically sustainable materials and being socially engaged in communities affected by your production.

“Oftentimes design, what you are actually good at, is what you do least, and many designers have no business experience which makes it difficult to make a living as a designer today,“ she tells the LINK.

Another, relatively new aspect of sustainable design is to have a long-term and sustainable thinking when it comes to the actual design. Working with high quality materials and timeless and classic designs for a prolonged lifetime is an upcoming trend in the design sphere, as well as designing multipurpose products. Many designers take an active stand against consumerism, and design products that are aimed to last, and that are easy to combine with other products and furniture.

Entrepreneurship has given designers more control and power over their own creating, but four years ago, Richardsson recognised that arts and design education does not include entrepreneurship and knowledge in how to run a business in their curriculum. She started Nordic Design Collective with the mission to help these designers with the business-side

“I have seen an increased awareness among designers in that their work in some sense support the consumer society, something they do not want to be part of, and hence being sustainable not only in the choice of materials but in all aspects of the design, is one of the strongest trends we see on the Nordic design scene right now,” Richardsson says.

Nordic Design Collective is more than just an online shop with beautifully designed products. It is a marketplace, passionate about supporting independent designers from the Nordic region and helping them to reach out with their designs to a larger audience. While designers are passionate about designing but usually have no interest and most importantly no education in sales and marketing and how to reach out to clients, Nordic Design Collective exist to assist designers with the business-side so that designers can focus on what they are good at - designing. Besides helping individual designers to spread their products via the online shop, Nordic Design Collective also emphasise shining a light on the designer behind the product, showing their passion and dedication for design and telling the background and history of the person and product to further add value to their uniquely crafted designed products. Read more about Nordic Design Collective and visit the webshop: w w w. n o r d i c d e s i g n c o l l e c t i ve . c o . u k

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the NEXT GENERATION SCANIA

PREMIUM REDEFINED 18-19 SAS AD + Event TLOF.indd 6

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The LINK PREVIOUS EVENTS The LINK EVENT TO LOOK OUT FOR

21 05 21

MAY WALPURGIS BALL

Walpurgis Ball Series: Social and Culture Date: 05 May Time: 19:30 - midnight Price: £150 for Members, Company Table for 10 £1800 Venue: Claridge’s Hotel, Brook St., London, W1K 4HR

Traditionally a feast to ward off winter and evil spirits, the Walpurgis Ball seeks to celebrate the arrival of spring. Last year we welcomed the Eurovision winner Måns Zelmerlöv. It is with great pleasure that we welcome yet another Swedish artist to be announced shortly. Welcome to a beautiful evening full of dancing, music and spring feelings!

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When talking about Scandinavian design, parallels are almost always drawn to minimalism, open spaces, and graphic design that is clean, bordering on sterile - the sensation of a Northern winter wind interpreted through colour and form. But as it turns out, there is more to Scandinavian design than meets the eye. The LINK met up with White Arkitekter to talk about how designing with a Nordic touch is not only a style, but a whole way of thinking.

SC A N D I N AV I A N D ES I G N

- A MAT TER OF MINDSET

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In Sweden, White Arkitekter is one of the biggest architect firms on the market, with 12 offices across Sweden, Oslo and Copenhagen in Scandinavia - as well as the London Studio, and projects from Malmö in the South, to Kiruna in the North, where they play a key role in the relocation of the entire city. Since 2007, the firm has been increasingly active in the UK and last year, they opened their first office outside of Scandinavia in London. The project briefs haven’t been slow to come in and Linda Thiel, Partner in the firm and Head of the London Office, explains how this very intense year has taught her just as much about what it means to be a Swedish architect, as it has about navigating the British system.

they are used to working according to a different kind of system.”

Urban planning in Sweden is heavily influenced by the fact that the local municipality is often the landowner. As a consequence, most planning processes start with a general strategy for the area as a whole and investors, property developers and construction enterprises don’t enter the picture until a later stage.

“We are strong proponents of the belief that, if you have open, well designed spaces where you have considered the materials, green spaces, and created a setting where people would want to move around in, then you automatically create a safe environment. The design is the foundation of whether or not you want to stay in a place or run away from it”, Thiel argues.

“Thanks to the fact that municipalities own so much land, we have been able to focus a lot on the common spaces back home. In the Swedish system, there is a consensus in what we aim to achieve when planning a new place, as well as regeneration areas. Well designed apartment buildings with amenity space, shared parking and recycling spaces come quite naturally to us. These principles date back a long way in the Swedish tradition of residential urban design,“ Thiel tells The LINK. The British system on the other hand, is rather the opposite. Municipalities often own very little land, making private landowners more active agents on the market. In this way, conflicts of interest sometimes arise between the need to maximise the value of a single property, and developing its surrounding area, which might be owned by numerous other landowners. According to Thiel, this is where the Scandinavian approach can be an opportunity to take on a more collaborative process. “What I have seen since we started our first projects in the UK, is that we can come in as a bit of an outsider and say ‘Would you maybe consider this Scandinavian way of approaching the project?’. It opens doors that perhaps British architects struggle with, since

Thiel often comes back to one thing in particular; the public spaces. And it seems to be between the buildings, rather than in them, that the Scandinavian approach can come into its own. For White, a holistic approach is key to designing a successful neighbourhood that will last for future generations. She argues that sometimes, the actual buildings are secondary when it comes to planning. If you manage to plan for active streets, a good street space and houses that meet the surroundings in a good way, the potential for a successful area is much greater.

A good example is one of their most recent projects, the redevelopment of St Augustine´s Church and its surrounding neighbourhood. The Diocese of London (DoL) has appointed White Arkitekter to redevelop and unlock opportunities on one of its key sites, located at the heart of the Grahame Park Regeneration Scheme, Colindale, in the London Borough of Barnet. White Arkitekter are responsible for designing a mixed-use redevelopment church and vicarage, as well as its adjacent housing. The area is socially vulnerable and to White, using the momentum of a redevelopment project is essential in order to reconnect the community. In winning the project brief, the Scandinavian approach to common space, was a crucial factor. “We were offered the project largely because of our Scandinavian value based architecture and emphasis on dialogue and how people come together in spaces and places. And not least because our proposal focused heavily on the public realm and how to share it, building a community around the project.” Thiel explains. Thiel goes on to explain how some of the other proposals for the garden square outside of the church, instead of being public, became private. To White Arkitekter, that contradicted the

whole idea of the project. “The garden has to be public, because in order for the church to be able to build its congregation and be a safe actor in this area, it has to be an open space for everyone to be in. It is absolutely crucial”. In that sense, the architecture goes beyond mere aesthetics, and becomes a form of social force. Thiel explains how the way that socially vulnerable areas are designed play a part in their demise. She explains that, by using only concrete, fences, and rationalising away green areas, trees, or anything that feels precious really, the incentive to be in and take care of an area is taken away. “In cases like this, only those strong enough to claim the street will own it, instead of it belonging to the whole community,” she says. In its essence, the idea of making beautiful surroundings in order to promote an equally beautiful society around it, is not new, nor very controversial. But as is so often the case, reality differs from theory. Thiel is aware that focusing on the common spaces is often easier said than done. A common counter argument she often faces is high cost. Not only for the initial completion, but for the continuous maintenance as well. In areas where the local municipalities are already struggling and property developers don’t see it as an attractive investment, this way of thinking can often fall short. In the end, it comes down to being humble and adapt to the situation. In that respect, the Swedish approach of compromising has proven to be the most successful. White is not aiming to completely take over the UK market, but rather focus on the groups that are interested in their way of doing work. “Of course we won’t be working with every property developer in the UK, it is more about finding those who in some way are interested in what we do. We feel there is a huge potential now, to become a springboard not only for people at our own company, but for many other Swedish actors as well,” Thiel says. The future for the British public realm in other words, is looking bright.

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The LINK FEATURE

A JEWELLER’S DREAM Or how jewellery could change the world’s post-Brexit outlook on Britons WORDS: JOHANNA BJARSCH FOLLIN

BREXIT

W H AT I S T H E R E L AT I O N S H I P B E T W E E N J E W E L L E RY A N D I N T E R N AT I O N A L A F FA I R S ? 2016 was a year when most of us started questioning the future of international relations and collaboration, with the Brexit Referendum among the main reasons. If a ring can symbolise promises of mutual love, respect and support in a marriage, could jewellery help strengthening all kinds of relationships, and help maintaining a good relation going forward? If you ask Keith Gordon at Ashwell Jewellery Ltd, he is convinced that jewellery can be a token of inclusion and love between the United Kingdom and the rest of the world. This is a jeweller’s wish; his hopes and fears in the aftermath of Brexit. There once was a jeweller who lived in a small village on the English countryside with his wife and son. The jeweller, Keith Gordon by name, had worked with jewellery all his life, and together with his wife he ran a local workshop. Gordon, a man always looking for a new challenge

and new horizons was bored with the status quo, and when the son left for university, he decided to take his wife on a trip to Copenhagen, a trip that came to change their lives significantly. As they passed jewellery store after jewellery store, Gordon and his wife realised that his newest collection had a similar design to most of the jewellery displayed in the shop windows. Gordon’s style has always been simple and clean, and during that stroll along the streets of Copenhagen it became obvious to them that the new range had a very Scandinavian feel to it. Standing on a windy shopping street, Gordon knew what his new challenge was going to be he wanted to create a market and expand to sell his jewellery in Scandinavia. He named his collection ‘Nordic Bubbles’ as a tribute to the challenge. Several years and several trips later, Gordon and his wife have visited numerous places and cities in Scandinavia. The trips

are just as much about finding inspiration for the collection as it is about immersing themselves in the Scandinavian atmosphere they both have fallen in love with. The Scandinavian culture and the people made an impression on Gordon during that first visit in Copenhagen. It was love at first sight.

NORDIC BUBBLE BRACELET

“I think you have moments that you know will come to have an impact on your life. When you first meet your future husband or wife there is a chemistry, you know

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The LINK FEATURE

"

Brexit makes me want to send out a message to the world that we still want to be part of the international community. KEITH GORDON

that person will mean a lot to you. It may sound silly, but I felt the same when I visited Scandinavia the first time,” he tells the LINK. The decision to expand to Scandinavia was not only based on their simple jewellery design, but also because of that chemistry. The couple liked the Scandinavian culture and the Scandinavian people, and Gordon emphasises that the desire to create a relationship with this place and these people drove that goal and challenge. 2016 came to change the challenge Gordon had set up for the expansion to Scandinavia. It's now not only about expanding to Scandinavia to hopefully sell a few pieces of jewellery and get to enjoy the countries in the north. No, 2016 and Brexit gave the challenge a whole new meaning and importance for Gordon, and he admits that Brexit in a bizarre way has changed his dreams for the future. “One year ago, my desire to expand to Scandinavia was purely about developing the market and making a business. Brexit changed that, Brexit makes me want to send out a message to the world that we still want to be part of the international community,” he says. Gordon fears that the United Kingdom is sending out the wrong message to the world as they voted to leave the EU. This fear is now the main driver for the expansion to Scandinavia; he wants to show that not everyone in the UK wants to leave the community, that there is still a large part who wants to be included and who are inclusive. His quest to create

friendship through jewellery is completely genuine. “Design is infinite and I hope the relationships created through it will be too. Whenever I design something, an engagement ring for example, I hope that the relationship it symbolises will last for a long time. The art of jewellery is that it is a product that engages, a product that

flattery. Going back to the stone age, a cave man found a stone on the ground and gave to his beloved to show affection. It seems like jewellery is eternal, a small link that symbolises something big; a desire to create a relationship. “Through jewellery we can create friendships, and I hope that my jewellery can be that link between the UK and the rest of the world. Jewellery is love and friendship objectified - I haven’t yet made a piece of jewellery that made anyone unhappy, at least not that I know of,” Gordon says.

TRANQUILITY RING

cross nationalities and religion, and that is engaging. I think jewellery can play a massive part in connecting people and making them more inclusive,” Gordon tells the LINK. Some may dismiss Gordon’s ideas, but it is advisable to pause and reconsider. Anyone who knows their ancient history can see that Gordon might be onto something. “Consider the old power structures of ancient Egypt; on top were the Pharaohs, followed by the clergy and then jewellers. Jewellers had an important role in their society and I hope that my little spot on humanity could be that I, a simple jeweller reached out to touch others and create relationships through my art,” Gordon tells the LINK.

Despite the prevailing despair if the aftermath of the Brexit Referendum, Gordon has a positive outlook on the future. “I think the world will change again. The younger generation, the smarter generation, is more educated and more inclusive. They have no prejudice; they don’t judge people by the colour of their skin or their sexual orientation. This inclusiveness is important, and it gives me faith to know that this generation will lead us in the future,” he tells the LINK. Jewellery may not save lives, and a jeweller cannot and should not expect to change the world. But Gordon hopes that his jewellery can be a token for showing the world that there are parts of the UK still inclusive. He cannot save the world, but he has an important message to send out - we still care about this relationship.

Jewellery might be the oldest form of

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The LINK EDITORIAL

BANKS NEED TO BE MORE SUSTAINABLE KLAS EKLUND, SENIOR ECONOMIST AT SEB, SHARE HIS VIEWS ON THE COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGES OF SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

S

ustainability has become a buzz word in the financial sector. But it is not only a word. Sustainable is reshaping business models, generating new products and services, affects recruitment, remuneration and management structures. So this is a genuine and far-reaching change. There are two main reasons why this is happening now. First: The financial crisis in 2007-08 triggered a deep recession in many countries. Unemployment soared, first in manufacturing, then in the public sector as states cut spending to tackle budget deficits. Income inequality increased. And the financial sector – in particular American investment banks – was seen as the culprit. That label is visible in politics, media – even in popular culture; “The Big Short”, “The Wolf of Wall Street”. The main movie villain these days is the banker… Secondly: New temperature records show that the planet is heating up. As a result, politicians and decision makers have scrambled to make statements, declarations and agreements which taken together will have a profound impact on the financial sector. In Paris last year, a record number of leaders took a decision to stop global warming, and their agreement has since been ratified by the

EU, the US, China, India and scores of other countries. Both these factors are of great importance. Public and media distrust means the financial sector has to work hard to regain confidence. Many banks need to improve governance, tighten codes of conduct, make remuneration less short-sighted etc. Global warming and political decisions to curb temperature will likewise drive changes in lending, investing and new products. The investments needed on a global scale to transform the energy sector – from fossil fuels to renewables – are huge. At the same time, hundreds of millions of peasants in India, China and other populous emerging economies are moving from the countryside into the cities – creating need for housing, infrastructure, waste management, fresh water etc. The investments undertaken for this urbanisation will create a capital stock which will be with us for decades. This necessitates that investments are made with a long-term, sustainable view. And then, of course, there is the need for reforestation, cleaning up toxic rivers and remediation of environmentally damaged land. Thus, the need for investment in “green” energy and infrastructure runs into trillions of dollars, world-wide. There is no way the public sector can scrape together

such sums. They will have to be furnished by the private sector and be allocated by banks and other financial institutions, via bank lending and through the capital market. Consequently, sustainable banking has climbed high on the agenda. The G20 now have Green finance as one of their top priorities. The G7 countries have stated they will not extract all fossil minerals in the ground. This has lead Mark Carney, Governor of Bank of England, to warn that failure to assess such “stranded assets” correctly could cause a systemic crisis in global finance.

Sustainability is no longer an external restriction, it is part of core business. Scores of manufacturing companies are now investing in energy efficiency and moving out of fossil fuels. As they do this, it is obvious that also the financial sector must become more responsible and more sustainable. Not only because of external pressure – the need to transform energy and infrastructure – but also because even bankers are human beings, who want to work in companies that we are proud of. As a result, we see more and more banks reshaping their business models, becoming more long-term, launching

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The LINK EDITORIAL new “green” products and services, monitoring and reporting their actions in a transparent way. Sure, some of it may be “greenwashing”, but I am sure most banks are serious about their commitment. The term “sustainability” is very broad and includes several different aspects of banking. The most common terminology speaks about three dimensions: Environmental, Social and Governance, or ESG in our lingo. Environmental is obvious: reduce your own emissions, but also make sure your core business – lending, investing etc – contribute to improved environmental conditions. Governance is equally obvious: be transparent, long-term and responsible, compliant with regulations, laws and mores. For banks, consultants and law firms, one conclusion is that tax advice to clients must be made for business reasons; that advice which is given solely to evade taxes is not acceptable. Social commitment may mean many different things, depending on what kind of business you run and in what environment. But health and competence of the employees is of course crucial, as well as initiatives to support the social structure in the company’s neighbourhood: local sports teams, initiatives to fight drugs among youngsters, support to local entrepreneurs etc. In emerging markets, social commitment often means support to local schools, improving sanitation and building water closets, as well as decent working conditions, gender equality and a form No to child labour. The point is that sustainability includes many actions and strategies, in all parts of business. The new “Sustainable Development Goals” of the UN can be seen as a global strategy for sustainable growth and eradication of poverty. All companies, in all sectors, will eventually have to align their actions to this global standard. Gradually, the task is evolving, from creating a “strategy for sustainability” to building a “sustainable strategy” for the business as a whole. The difference may sound esoteric, but actually, it is of great importance. Sustainability is no longer an external restriction, it is part of core business. Actually, in the long run, it ought to be so natural, so self-evident, that we cease talking about “sustainability” as such, since it’s such a no-brainer that it is part of core business. So what does sustainability look like in practice? Let me give you a few concrete examples from my own bank, SEB. SEB

is the only Nordic bank included in Dow Jones Sustainability Index, and we have pursued this challenge for several years. We do it both to make a positive impact and because we believe it will have a positive long-term impact on our bottom line. We still have many improvements to make, but here is a little sample of what we do: We support young and local entrepreneurs, from the very first attempts to create business cases in high school and on to leading rapidly-growing companies. We actively try to influence them to write sustainable business plans, we arrange competitions and award prizes. In this way we nudge young entrepreneurs – while gaining new corporate clients.

Now we must become good also at analysing WKH¹QDQFLDOHIIHFWV of climate change, regulatory change, environmental policy and technical change.”

SEB invests in micro funds to promote small-scale entrepreneurship in emerging markets. This is a way to gain yield from an alternative asset class while at the same time supporting literally thousands of aspiring entrepreneurs and thereby stimulate growth and transformation in poor societies. Our Investment management not only excludes a number of non-sustainable companies and sectors from being part of our funds, but also actively seeks to include companies and sectors which have a positive impact. This selection is increasingly taking place via computer algorithms which, so far, have managed to both increase yield and improve environmental impact. SEB is one of the founding fathers of the Green bond, which makes it possible to fund environmentally sound projects via the capital market. The market for green bonds is still small, compared to the total global bond market, but it is growing rapidly and will continue to do so, now that both China and India face huge investments in urbanisation, infrastructure and renewable energy. SEB International Private Banking is, driven by client demand as well as desire from their employees, developing a framework for how to discuss and advice clients

on sustainable investments and Impact investing. They have also developed sustainable or impact portfolios with a multi-asset approach. For them, the key is to align investments with the customers’ own values. While the palette of green products and services have been expanding – and will continue to do so – there are several challenges ahead. As regards green bonds, the likely rapid growth of the markets also entails a risk of green-wash. Several projects may want to dress up in green and call their funding green, even if that is not correct. Therefore, emissions of green bonds should take place within a more distinct framework, where “green” is defined, vetted by second opinions and monitored in a transparent way. For a bank, deposits, credits and lending make up the bread and butter of business. Here, we see clear changes coming. Financial regulators are starting to demand measurements of the impact – environmental and social – of credit portfolios. At the same time, depositors, both private clients and institutions, want to make sure their deposits are not used in an unsustainable way, like financing investments in coal mining or nuclear weapons. All this means that banks and other financial institutions must put great efforts into measuring and monitoring their credits and fund management – just about all activities. Previously, we have been good at financial analysis. Now we must become good also at analyzing the financial effects of climate change, regulatory change, environmental policy and technical change. In one sense, this is what we always have done when new sectors and raid technical change has created new business and driven “creative destruction”, as Joseph Schumpeter called it. But now we need to hone those skills in a new setting, as external pressures, employees, media, technical change all entail a need for rapidly increasing knowledge about environment, climate change, energy and human rights. Those banks who are able to meet this challenge will come out winners. The rest are losers. Klas Eklund is the Senior Economist of SEB and Adjunct professor of Economics at the University of Lund. Recently, much of his work has focused on the economics of climate change and he has published a book on this topic.

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A WELL-DESERVED OPPORTUNITY E XCLUSIVE VOLVO XC60 OFFER

You joined the Swedish Chamber of Commerce to get more from something that matters to you. Buy the XC60 D4 AWD SE Lux Nav Geartronic, with its premium performance and handling, and we’ll return your commitment with an exclusive saving. CALL THE VOLVO CAR BUSINESS CENTRE ON 03333 204 147 OR VISIT YOUR LOCAL DEALER XC60 D4 AWD SE Lux Nav Geartronic, Metallic Paint Personal Contract Purchase Representative Example* 24 monthly payments £299.00 Customer deposit £7,068.50 Finance deposit contribution £2,000.00 On the road price £39,442.00 Member savings £ 6,247.40 Revised on the road price £33,194.60 Total amount of credit £24,126.10 Interest charges £0.00 Total amount payable £33,194.60 Duration of agreement (months) 25 Fixed rate of interest (per annum) 0% Optional final payment £16,950.00 Mileage per annum 10,000 Excess mileage charge 14.90p per mile Representative APR 0% Available with 3 years’ complementary servicing when purchased on Volvo Advantage Personal Contract Purchase.

Fuel consumption and CO2 figures for the XC60 D4 SE Lux Nav Geartronic in MPG (I/100 km): Urban: 42.2 (6.7), Extra Urban: 55.4 (5.1), Combined: 49.6 (5.7). CO2 emissions 137g/km. MPG figures are obtained from laboratory testing intended for comparisons between vehicles and may not reflect real driving results. *Finance subject to status. Retail sales only. Subject to availability at participating dealers only on vehicles registered by 31st March 2017. At the end of the agreement there are 3 options: (i) Part exchange the vehicle, (ii) Pay the Optional Final Payment to own the vehicle or (iii) Return the vehicle. Further charges may be made subject to the condition or mileage of the vehicle. Terms and conditions apply. Applicants must be 18 or over. Guarantee/Indemnity may be required. Volvo Car Credit, RH1 1SR. The service offer is only applicable when purchasing on Volvo Advantage Personal Contract Purchase on vehicles ordered between 1st January 2017 and 31st March 2017. Services must be carried out at a Volvo Authorised Repairer. Retail offer only. Excludes fleet operators and business users. See volvocars.co.uk for full terms and conditions.

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The LINK UPCOMING EVENTS

09

FEBRUARY

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

FINTECH & THE MAKING OF A CASHLESS SOCIETY Welcome to an evening looking at the making of a cashless society. Together with FinTech companies and financial institutions as well as retailers and other stakeholders, we aim to explore why cities like Stockholm and Helsinki are both breeding fintech solutions by the minute whilst slowly becoming closer to being completely cashless. Time: 18.00 - 21.00 Venue: London and Partners, 2 More London Riverside, London, SE1 2RR Price: £20 for Members

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FEBRUARY SOCIAL AND CULTURE

(ARE YOU STILL) WELCOME TO THE UK 2017 THE event for any individual or company looking to learn more about potential business expansion to the UK, offering advice and experience as well as invaluable networking opportunities. It is also suitable for companies who has expanded to the UK themselves and can share their experiences with companies looking to do the same. Welcome! Time: 16.00 - 19.30 Venue: Stockholm Chamber of Commerce, Brunnsgatan 2, Stockholm Price: Free

01

MARCH

SOCIAL AND CULTURE

NORDIC BUSINESS FORUM 2017 NATION BRANDING - DEAD OR ALIVE? Organised by the Nordic Chambers of Commerce in the UK, this event has brought together senior business people to celebrate Anglo-Nordic business for years. This time, we investigate whether the strength of the Nordic Brand in the UK is as strong as many argue, or whether it is merely a myth. Kindly sponsored by Scandinavian Airlines. Time: 18.00-21.00 Venue: Southbank Centre, Belvedere Road, Lambeth, London, SE1 8XX Price: £36 for Members, £54 for Non-Members

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MARCH SOCIAL AND CULTURE

LINK-UP DRINKS AT AQUAVIT Don’t miss Link-Up Drinks when it becomes Aquavit London’s turn to host! The recently opened, Nordic morning-to-midnight dining experience situated in the re-developed St James’s Market in central London invites the SCC members for a fabulous evening of networking in true Nordic style. Time: 18.30-21.00 Venue: St James’s Market, 1 Carlton Street, London, SW1Y 4QQ Price: Free for Members, £40 for Non-Members

05

MAY SOCIAL AND CULTURE

WALPURGIS BALL 2017 The Walpurgis Ball was introduced to the SCC event calendar in 2013. Traditionally a feast to ward off winter and evil spirits, the Walpurgis Ball seeks to celebrate the arrival of spring. The SCC has the pleasure of welcoming you to a spectacular night at one of London’s most prominent hotels. Time: 19.30-midnight Venue: Claridge’s Hotel, Brook St., London, W1K 4HR Price: £150 for Members, Company Table for 10 £1800

SIGN UP AT WWW.SCC.ORG.UK

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Photgraphy: Morley von Sternberg

Photgraphy: Malin Johansson

The LINK MEMBER HIGHLIGHTS

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Photgraphy: Per Olov Jansson

The LINK FEATURE

Northern Celebrations on the South Bank IN 2017, A CELEBRATION OF NORDIC ART AND CULTURE WILL TAKE PLACE IN THE CITY OF LONDON. IN A SPECTACULAR FESTIVAL LASTING FOR A FULL YEAR, NORDIC ARTISTS AND COMPANIES BRING THEIR CULTURE TO LONDON AND THE WORLD-RENOWNED SOUTHBANK CENTRE. WORDS: LOVISA BERGSTRÖM & GUSTAV OLSSON

The story behind the Nordic Matters Festival begun with a firm belief in the power of the arts to portrait the world and leave us with a changed perception. As the Nordic region continues to attract many in the UK, the Southbank Centre wanted to explore this further and share the Nordic values with audiences in the UK. “The Nordic region is a great and growing obsession for many in the UK. We wanted to delve a little deeper by exploring the full range of Nordic arts and culture throughout 2017, instead of a single festival of a shorter period. The Nordic Council of Ministers are generously helping to make this possible and Nordic Matters is one of the largest cultural partnerships of its kind,” co-programmers for the centre, Ted Hodgkinson and Tamsin Ace tell The LINK. The Nordic Matters programming will be embedded in Southbank Centre’s regular festivals throughout the year, ranging from familiar faces such as the Moomins and Lego to the hidden voices of the smaller Nordic nations such as Greenland and the Faroe islands. “We also want to nuance the idea of a

‘Nordic utopia’, by placing the innovations and artistic creations in their proper context,” says Ace and Hodgkinson. The theme PLAY will make up a central part of the programme, focusing on young people through encouraging their inherent curiosity and creativity. “There’s a great belief in the importance of play in childhood and beyond in the Nordics, which leads to world class education and innovations in the arts, technology and more.” Among other highlights there will be the Imagine Children’s Festival, a dream event for the young builders with enough bricks to build a whole city and hosted by LEGO, a Swedish Baby Rave and the UK debut of Finnish dinosaur heavy metal band Hevisaurus. The festival will focus on two other key elements, namely sustainability and gender equality. “We have identified these as areas that will teach us a lot about the region, while also being realistic about the challenges they still present,“ the co-programmers continue.

Other highlights to look out for during the year is bestselling author Neil Gaiman’s launch of his retelling of Norse mythology, comedian and performer Sandi Toksvig who brings a Nordic spin to Southbank Centre’s WOW-Women of the World festival and Festival of Love that will feature a much-anticipated sauna.

For more information about the festival, visit www.southbankcentre.co.uk

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The LINK FEATURE

SPRING 2017 Soothing Harmony and Tropical Heat as the Five Elements Inspire

WORDS: ALICE RUSSELL, H&M HENNES & MAURITZ UK & IRELAND

W

ith trees budding outside, it’s time for a refresh inside. And at H&M Home it’s indeed back to nature this spring as inspiration comes from the five elements -- air, spirit, fire, earth and water. A tropical world of warm colours and vibrant prints is accompanied by a universe of understated beauty with natural materials and neutral tones of dusty pink.

“Exoticism and harmony are the two major trends this season. A key influence is the tropical; a hot trend bursting with colour and expression. And we still see a big trend around wellbeing and calm, and decorate with a philosophical touch influenced by Japanese and Scandinavian style”, says Evelina Kravaev Söderberg, Head of Design at H&M HOME.

HARMONY THE COLOURS: Warm arm neutrals, dusty dust pinks and greens are a key trend. Tone one on tone combinations and nuances are also import important this season. For a eel, dress the entire room in the same tones modern feel, -- like pink, greyy or blue -- to create an atmosphere of y harmony. THE MA ures and str MATERIALS: Textures structures are key ural as tactility takes centre stage. Materials are natural ood, glass and basket e in focus. Surfaces with wood, basketweave are matte, te, with ceramics and mat matte glass. Perforated surfaces aces also enter the scene. he graphic e xpression is delicate THE SYMBOLS: The expression with airy y prints. Shapes are rounded. THE MOOD: The he atmosphere is serene and peaceful he impression is as air and spirit set the tone. The minimalist yyet soft, t, with a hint of luxury. luxur

EXOTICISM THE COLOURS: Colours are vibrant with warm yellows, exotic greens and a wide range of blues as fire, earth and water set the tone for this spring. Blue is the new green. THE MATERIALS: Crafted influences continue this season as authenticity continues to be important. Weaved baskets are essential and come in various shapes and colours. THE SYMBOLS: Birds and exotic leaves are key and add a playful touch to the tropical theme. THE MOOD: The atmosphere is exotic, warm and vibrant.

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The LINK FEATURE EVELINA’S FAVOURITES “I have many, like the blue patterned cushion covers, the playful candle holder in the shape of a bird and the weaved baskets.”

Spring Inspo at its Best!

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The LINK ADVERTORIAL

Why all great companies come to London and the UK Did you know?

Things to remember

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About Oury Clark  )DPLO\UXQEXVLQHVVHVWDEOLVKHGLQ  $EURDGDQGKLJKOHYHORILQWHUGLVFLSOLQDU\ SURIHVVLRQDOVNLOOV  &RRUGLQDWLRQLQFUHDVHVVSHHGDQGHI¿FLHQF\ DQGGHFUHDVHVFRVW  6SHFLDOLVWVLQRYHUVHDVFRPSDQLHVHVWDEOLVKLQJ LQWKH8.IRU\HDUV  2I¿FHVLQ&HQWUDO/RQGRQDQGEHVLGH/RQGRQ +HDWKURZ$LUSRUW

Get in touch Emma Crowley Emma.Crowley@ouryclark.com Tel: +44(0)1753 55 1111

Gabi Olson-Welsh Gabi.Olson-Welsh@ocsolicitors.com Tel: +44(0)20 7067 4300

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17/01/2017 12:50:36


GOING IT ALONE, TOGETHER Have you ever heard the saying that if you want to start a company, don’t wait for the right time, just go for it? Two people who took those words to heart are Cate Högdahl and Nelson Ruiz-Acal. Continue reading to get to know the couple who met at university and went straight on to found an internationally successful design agency together. It was during their final year as industrial design students in Madrid that Cate and Nelson noticed they complemented each other well when working on projects together. Straight after finishing their studies, they bought a small house in Sweden and spent the winter renovating it. Högdahl describes it as a “make or break” experience both as a couple and as design partners. “It was a fantastic experience. Luckily we not only survived it, but started Cate & Nelson Design Studio as an outcome,” she tells The LINK. Cate & Nelson is a multidisciplinary design studio working in a variety of sectors including furniture, lighting, product, interior and creative direction. With offices in Sweden, Spain and UK. Cate & Nelson create products and interiors to offer something over and above expectations. According to Cate Högdahl, the duo draw their inspiration from an ongoing design dialogue, and through observation of daily life situations and needs that arise from product requirements, materials and spaces they utilise. When asked if mixing business with pleasure and starting a company with a friend or a partner makes things difficult, Högdahl describes how it isn’t so much the relationship that you have that matters, but how you communicate with each other. “Nelson and I don’t really think that it makes a big difference if you are friends from the beginning or not, as long as

An exclusive look at Cate&Nelson’s new range of watches - designed with a Scandinavian feel.

you are able to have an open and honest dialogue between the two of you and work towards the same goals,” she says. The house renovation took place in 2006 and after that, the company grew quickly. “Our first goal was to work with most Swedish furniture manufacturers and be able to find our designs in various interiors. We then went on to open up an office in London and Spain and work on wider types of projects internationally,” Högdahl explains. This would turn out to be an integral success factor for the company’s future, and Högdahl believes that they have gained a lot from using a continental approach from the outset. “It makes us able to analyse each project from a wider spectrum. Our designs are distinguished by the studio’s broad range of skills, sustainability, honesty, high functionality and continental approach,” she explains. Ten years after the company’s inception, the collaboration is still going strong and Cate & Nelson have exciting ventures in the pipeline. The LINK are proud to reveal the first sneak peek of the design duo’s latest project. This month, Cate & Nelson will launch a range of watches under their own brand, Cate & Nelson Watches. Högdahl explains that in developing the range, she and her partner spent a lot of time creating a Scandinavian integrity in the design.

“These are watches developed with the design aware customer in mind, and the Scandinavian feel is an important focal point. For example, the wristband is created by Tärnsjö Läder, which is an artisan leather tannery in Sweden,” she says. The official launch will take place at Stockholm Design Week in February. The experience of embarking on the journey to become entrepreneurs has been challenging at times, but very rewarding, according to Högdahl. “Having worked with many different types of companies within different sectors you realise that design is a very good asset in any kind of company. Either if it´s a company targeting design aware customers or a company that at first sight might not be connected to design at all,” she explains. These experiences have also allowed Cate & Nelson to realise where their strengths lie, and what it is that has kept them competitive for over a decade. “ We would definitely say that by partnering up with us, you get a design studio that not only has a wide international network and access to different cultures, providers and resources. At the same time, you get the advantages of the detailed and personal relationship of a smaller company,” Högdahl tells The LINK.

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CATE AND NELSON ON ENTREPRENEURSHIP

The LINK MEMBER ENTREPRENEUR

WHAT IS ENTREPRENEURSHIP TO YOU?

For us it is about finding new business opportunities, work together with interesting partners and achieve common goals. CAN ANYONE BECOME AN ENTREPRENEUR?

Yes, if you are willing to work hard, experiment and expect failures as a part of your way to success. DO YOU HAVE ANY ADVICE FOR YOUNG ENTREPRENEURS OUT THERE WHO WISH TO BREAK THROUGH WITH THEIR IDEAS?

Get a good strategy and be surrounded by good people.

Cate & Nelson on Social Media: WEB

http://www.catenelson.com cateandnelson

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@cateandnelson

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The LINK MEMBER HIGHLIGHTS

BUY NOW, PAY LATER: THE REVOLUTION OF ONLINE COMMERCE WORDS: ELIN HAMMENFORS

Arcadia Group – One of the largest fashion retailers in the United Kingdom, with brands such as Topshop, Miss Selfridge, Burton Menswear, Wallis and Dorothy Perkins. Klarna – the Swedish fintech company that has revolutionised the way people shop and sell online. Together they are streamlining retail financing through the new Buy Now, Pay Later service developed by Klarna, which delivers seamless financing solutions for online and mobile shoppers. Consumers can now bypass timeconsuming forms requiring information ranging from occupation to number of pets (OK, maybe not pets) to complete their credit application. Klarna saves time by separating the buying from the paying and pre-authorises customers in real time when the order is placed. Customers deemed eligible for credit will then be able to buy the product and choose to pay later, interest free for up to 90 days. Klarna recently conducted a study showing that 67% of UK shoppers have abandoned a basket online due to long and complex checkouts and the lack of flexible payment options. “Retailers need to offer a simple, hasslefree browsing and buying experience that integrates seamlessly into their

customers’ lives,” says Luke Griffiths, UK General Manager of Klarna. Arcadia Group is a popular online retailer with total worldwide digital sales increasing by 23.9% in 2015, so the results from the Buy Now Pay Later service will be exciting to see to say the least. Unlike other financing options Buy Now, Pay Later improves the user experience by offering instant access to credit without redirecting customers away from the online store, allowing the retailer to maintain their own look-and-feel throughout the checkout process. Klarna also ensures legal compliance across all markets – making it easy for online retailers to expand into new markets. The collaboration with Arcadia Group is just another milestone for one of Europe’s fastest growing companies and the leading European payments provider. Klarna has expanded from 30 employees in 2007 to 1,400 co-workers today. Klarna’s business has also developed from supplying invoice services to Klarna Checkout, which enables users to shop smoothly without unnecessary registration. Hence, they are steadily getting closer to reaching their goal: to become the world’s favourite way to buy.

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The LINK MEMBER HIGHLIGHTS

OXFORD FIRST UK UNIVERSITY TO TOP GLOBAL RANKINGS WORDS: ELIN HAMMENFORS

SCC Member Oxford University becomes the first University in the United Kingdom to top the international league tables, according to recent rankings from Times Higher Education (THE). Oxford University was scored as the best performer for clinical, pre-clinical and health studies. “It is a great result for the UK higher education sector and cements its position as one of the greatest university nations in the world,“ said THE editor Phil Baty in a statement when the rankings were made public in September. However, Baty added that this sector was under threat due to the Brexit vote. This may prove significant for Oxford, as 12% of research funding has so far been received from the European Research Council. The university is also concerned about losing staff since many EU national academics, so far funded by the EU, are considering moving to other EU universities where they feel more confident of receiving continuous funding. Wendy Piatt, director-general of the UK’s elite Russell Group of Universities, is also very aware that their rivals, mainly from Asian institutions, are “snapping at their heels”.

“If we want to continue our success and stave off growing competition, the UK must show that its doors are open to the very best and brightest academics and students from anywhere in the world,” Piatt told The Financial Times. Not only does Oxford produce excellent academics, but it can also a slew of successful politicians. Theresa May, Clement Attlee, Edward Heath and Tony Blair all share the experience of living at 10 Downing Street but they have also, at different times, roamed the colleges of Oxford University as fresh faced freshers. More specifically, 27 out of 54 British heads of government have been educated at Oxford. The runner-up Cambridge, can only account for half that number with 14 PMs. So, why are these dreamy spires such a hothouse for spearhead politicians? Many claim that the Oxford debating society might be the answer. Not only do debaters learn how to defend their arguments but also make contacts essential for a political career. Not all Prime Ministers have studied Politics, Philosophy and Economics (PPE) at Oxford, but just being in an environment where they get the chance to develop their network seems to be the determining factor for a future on the political scene. More so, many of these men are alumni from the

prestigious Eton College, a boarding school for boys going back to the 1400s. “Oxford presents every opportunity for political exchange and competition; the political parties are very active in their student equivalents,” Lord Michael Heseltine, a Conservative party dignitary and once deputy president of the Oxford debating society, said in an interview with the BBC in October. “There are hugely impressive opportunities for undergraduates to meet people at the top of their tree, and that includes household names in the world of politics,” he told the BBC. The runners up for this year’s top spot were California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and Stanford University. However Phil Baty stressed that their statistics show China is very much the emerging player. The THE rankings took into consideration five performance indicators: teaching, the number of academic citations, international reach, and knowledge transfer to industry and research by volume, income and reputation. They are also dividing the faculties in 8 subject rankings, where Oxford University made the top five in seven of the eight rankings – better than any other institution in the world.

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The LINK YOUNG PROFESSIONALS

Dear YP Members, After a rather eventful 2016, a new year is finally here, bringing new experiences, new acquaintances and new goals. We would like to begin with thanking you for a fantastic autumn, it was lovely to see so many of you at our events. A special thanks to those of you who came along to our Christmas Dinner and helped make it the magical evening it turned out to be. But let’s not dwell on the past, we have exciting news for this year. We can barely contain our excitement over our new partnership with the hugely successful Swedish party concept Out of Office After Work. Making the genius move to transform your average after work drink into a whole club experience, OOOAW have created crazy parties throughout Sweden and Scandinavia for years, and finally it is London’s turn. Come along this February for an after work session out of the ordinary! If you fancy something on the slightly more focused side, we can warmly recommend our Company Visits this spring. At the moment of writing some details remain unconfirmed but head over to our Facebook page for updated info. Last but not least, in April it’s time for this year’s edition of the Entrepreneurship Forum, where three successful entrepreneurs come to share their stories on the highs and lows of going it alone. Don’t miss this exclusive opportunity to pick the brains of some of the brightest people in the trade! With hopes of seeing you soon. All the best, Johanna Bjarsch-Follin

Elin Hammenfors

Stefan Westman

Mentorship Programme Gathering I 4 OCT

Fanny Siltberg

In October, the eight Mentorship pairs in the SCC Mentorship Programme met up for the first time at SEB’s offices in the City of London. After a brief and insightful welcome speech by Sir Roger Gifford, the inspiring evening continued with a keynote speech from leadership coach Mr Ray King and some valuable quality time for the mentors and mentees.

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The LINK YOUNG PROFESSIONALS

Management Forum 20 OCT

After Work at Mr Fogg’s Tavern 27 OCT

In October, it was time for YP’s annual Management Forum. Håkan Winberg and Anna Gudmundsson made two impressive keynote speakers, sharing their insights and experiences of everything from re-starting startups to managing global corporations.

It was a bit of a squeeze, but a great night nontheless at this wonderfully quirky drinking den in the middle of Covent Garden. Familiar faces and some new ones met up to have a relaxing after work drink and try one of London’s more talked about pubs. Thanks Mr. Fogg for having us!

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The LINK YOUNG PROFESSIONALS

Cocktail Club at Tonteria 18 NOV

Company Visit at HSBC 21 NOV

It started with a delicious Margherita Slush, expertly produced by Tonteria’s bartenders, then things got slightly blurrier. A great night out with lots of dancing and hours that flew by in the blink of an eye. Rumour has it some lucky Members even spotted Tonteria’s mythical Tequila Train pass by..

In the most iconic sky scraper of Canary Wharf, a group of YP Members gathered for a case workshop kindly hosted by HSBC. Together with M&A experts at HSBC, Members looked into one of the most talked about Mergers in recent history, namely the one between Holcim and Lafarge in 2015. A challenging, insightful and fun evening!

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The LINK YOUNG PROFESSIONALS

YP Annual Christmas Dinner & Party

All we want for Christmas.. is to re-live this night again and again. Nearly one hundred YP Members came together for an evening of snaps song singing, Swedish Christmas food, surprises from Santa and dancing until the small hours. Big thanks to Radisson Blu Portman Square and Cuckoo Club for providing perfect settings for the evening.

More photos available on our Facebook page: Young Professionals of the Swedish Chamber

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The LINK YP UPCOMING EVENTS

Upcoming Events CALENDAR SPRING 2017

The Spring season 2017 is upon us, and below is a sneak peek on the Young Professionals events. As always, we organise business events and social events every month, and if that doesn’t satisfy your London thirst, why not try our Guest list Service?

25 January

3 February

Spring Season Kick-off

Young Professionals

Bring your friends and colleagues as we kick off the event season with a cocktail or two at a Little Yellow Door in Notting Hill. If you have been looking to introduce a friend to YP, this is the perfect event to bring them to.

As proud partners of Out of Office After Work, we bring you a straight-from-work clubbing experience with a VIP area only for Young Professionals. This concept is wildly popular in Sweden, and now it is finally our turn. Welcome!

13 February

3 March

Mentorship Programme Gathering II

Young Professionals

The second meeting for our mentors and mentees will take place at Trowers & Hamlins’ offices, with Karin Telenius from Tuff Leadership Training as keynote speaker.

Just in time for a full recovery after February’s edition of OOOAW, it is time for the next big night out. Join us at Out of Office After Work for on of the most eventful after work drinks you will have this year.

Out of Office AW

Out of Office AW

GOING OUT THIS WEEKEND?

YP GUEST LIST SERVICE AS A YP MEMBER YOU GET EXCLUSIVE ACCESS TO OUR GUEST LIST SERVICE, GIVING YOU COMPLIMENTARY ENTRANCE TO SOME OF LONDON’S MOST POPULAR CLUBS

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The LINK YP FEATURE

BEING A YOUNG PROFESSIONAL OUTSIDE OF LONDON THE UNITED KINGDOM, a diverse country to say the least, is home to a large Swedish population. The number of Swedes living on these rainy islands is estimated to approximately 100.000, and London is VDLGWREHWKHĂ€IWKELJJHVW6ZHGLVKFLW\LQWHUPVRI number of Swedish citizens. Many long to live and ZRUNLQWKHĂ€QDQFLDOFDSLWDORIWKHZRUOGDQGWKHUH DUHPDQ\EHQHĂ€WVRIFKRRVLQJ/RQGRQWRSXUVXHDQ international career. The English language may be

one of the reasons London is a popular destination for expats; and for Swedes in particular, the culture, and perhaps also the vicinity to the motherland, may play an additional role in why we all have ended up here. Nevertheless, moving to the UK to pursue one’s career does not have to be synonymous to moving to London. The LINK has talked to Frida Lager, a Swedish Young Professional who has moved to the UK to work outside The Old Smoke.

H O W D I D YO U E N D U P I N B I R M I N G H A M ? My home firm, Advokatfirman Delphi, is one of Gowling WLG´s closest partner firms in Sweden. Both firms were interested in creating a secondment program in order to further develop their professional relationship and give their associates the opportunity to be able to work abroad and gain knowledge within another jurisdiction. As part of the secondment program, I was offered to work at the Birmingham office. W H AT I S T H E S O C I A L L I F E L I K E I N B I R M I N G H A M ? There is a very good social life outside of work, and one of the things I very much enjoy doing in my spare time is to go bouldering/climbing at the Birmingham Bouldering Centre in the Jewellery Quarter. There is also a big cultural scene in Birmingham so I have spent a fair bit of time going to gigs, plays and art exhibitions. Birmingham as a city has lots of interesting things to offer. It is always a challenge getting to know new people in a new city so I would definitely recommend joining a sport society or similar in order to meet people outside of work. FAV O U R I T E S P O T ? The Jewellery Quarter in Birmingham, it’s very picturesque and has a great urban vibe. W H AT D O YO U T H I N K A R E T H E G R E AT E S T A D VA N TA G E S W I T H N OT B E I N G B AS E D I N LO N D O N ? Since the city is smaller, it is easier and more convenient to see more of what the city has to offer. It has also allowed me to meet and socialise with people and build some really good friendships. Another advantage is that Birmingham has a central location, which has allowed me to easily visit and experience other parts of England. Last week, I took a short train journey to Manchester to see a Premier League game, for example. Birmingham and the surrounding area has a great deal of history and many interesting places to see, but without the high property prices of London and the need to catch a tube everywhere. All in all, I have been able to explore a part of the UK which I may never have ventured to otherwise. W H AT A D V I C E W O U L D YO U G I V E T O S O M E O N E C H O O S I N G BETWEEN WORKING IN A BIGGER CITY AND A SMALLER? I don’t think one necessarily has to focus so much on the city itself, but on the job and the opportunity it brings for you. Every city has different things to offer, and even though a larger city may have more options and social activities, the experiences you get from it will most likely be memorable due to the people you meet and who you choose to surround yourself with. Since London is a larger city, it is a bit more international compared to other cities within the UK. This means that it might be a bit easier for those who are new to the city to meet people with the same nationality or other international workers, in order to socialise and to exchange experiences. But a smaller city might come with the advantage of introducing you to the domestic community and lifestyle a bit quicker. There will always be pros and cons with living in a smaller city compared to a large city. As long as you are open minded, friendly and outgoing you will always have a great time and gain lots of experience.

NAME: Frida Lager CITY: Birmingham OCCUPATION: Visiting Lawyer at Gowling WLG, seconded from Advokatfirman Delphi in Stockholm

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Svenska Ingeniörs Sällskapet i Storbritannien utlyser stipendium till en svensk ingeniör för studier i Storbritannien Svenska Ingeniörs Sällskapet i Storbritannien (SIS) erbjuder ett stipendium till en ung, motiverad och driven svensk ingeniör, som planerar eller redan studerar i Storbritannien på en doktorand eller på magisternivå (PhD eller Masters). Svenska Ingeniörs sällskapet SIS bildades 1924 för svenska ingeniörer aktiva i Storbritannien. SIS har sedan bildandet delat ut stipendium för att möjliggöra studier och forskning för svenska ingeniörer på brittiska instutioner, inom alla ingeniörsområden inklusive kemi, el, mekanik, arkitektur, data, geologi, medicin och miljöteknik. Stipendiet SIS stipendium för 2017 är på £5000 (fem tusen pund). Ansökan Din ansökan skickas till Per Olof Emanuelsson på chairman@swedishengineers.org.uk, och skall vara SIS tillhanda senast 17 april 2017. Ansökan skall inkludera CV samt namn på det Universitet / Institution i Storbritannien där sökanden studerar eller kommer att studera vid. www.swedishengineers.org.uk

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The LINK MEMBER HIGHLIGHTS

Member Offer: GO Sport Travel WANT TO BE PART OF THE ACTION? VISIT THE UK’S TOP FOOTBALL DESTINATIONS AND WATCH THE PREMIER LEAGUE 2016/2017 WITH OFFERS FROM MEMBERS GO SPORT TRAVEL.

Contact membership@scc.org.uk www.scc.org.uk/members

Find this and many other offers in the Members Section of the SCC website. The service is available to everyone within your company or organisation. For Member login details see your membership card or contact membership@scc.org.uk

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The LINK PREVIOUS EVENTS 02 DECEMBER | ANNUAL CHRISTMAS LUNCHEON AT THE LANDMARK, LONDON The Swedish Chamber celebrated Christmas with flair in the fantastic company of 500 luncheon guests at The Landmark Hotel in Marylebone. Featuring a beautiful Lucia performance, a fantastic Swedish Christmas lunch and a nerve tingling raffle draw, the luncheon will remain a fond memory for a long time ahead.

Andrew Rowlands (Handelsbanken)

Christina Liljestrรถm (British Swedish Chamber of Commerce)

Stefan Hedenstrรถm, Michael Persson (Swedish Church)

Claes Jacobsson (Scania GB)

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The LINK PREVIOUS EVENTS

SCC Chairman Beatrice Engstrรถm-Bondy

Toastmaster Henrik Brandin

Phil Knight (SEB)

Jon Croney (Handelsbanken)

Kreab guests singing along to the many traditional songs

Maria Sundell (Clyde & Co), and Oscar Wimshurst (World First UK)

Carol singers entertained during the afternoon

Kreab guests and hosts toasting

SCC Members ThinkersLive provided the entertainment

xxxxx

Beautiful Lucia performance courtesy of the students from The Swedish School in London

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The LINK PREVIOUS EVENTS

Frederick Killander (Urb-it), Peter Stovall (Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer)

One lucky winner in the raffle draw, Carolina Carlsson (Cassandra Oil)

Carl-Henrik Svanberg (BP), Mikael Persson (Swedish Church)

DFDS Seaways’ table

Stanley Johnson, author and environmentalist

SCC Staff performing Pomp and Circumstance as per tradition

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The LINK PREVIOUS EVENTS 13 DEC | BREAKFAST WITH GÖRAN PERSSON

14 DEC | END OF SEASON LINK-UP DRINKS

The Chamber celebrated Lucia with a twist, listening to former prime minister of Sweden, Göran Persson, share his thoughts on the current state of world politics and what opportunities and challenges are ahead.

The final Link Up of the season took place at the Aurora Borealis Exhibition at 54 The Gallery in Mayfair. Two Swedish artists were exhibiting their collaborative work while new and existing Members of the Chamber got to know each other over nibbles and glögg.

Anders Olsson (Cassandra Oil), David Zaudy (Cove Investment Patners)

Gabriel Möllerberg (Goldman Sachs) and Erik Zsiga (JKL AB)

Jens Christiansen (Scandinavian Tobacco Group)

Göran Persson talked about the future of the EU, the emerging markets in India and Africa, as well as Donald Trump’s coming presidency

Robert Whelan (Emerse), Pernilla Ramslov (NOX Consulting)

Anna Gudmundsson (Fitbug Ltd)

There is always time for an impromptu sing-song

Discussion with Göran Persson (JKL AB)

Elin Hammenfors (SCC), Stella Faber (Business Sweden)

Will Hammond and Stuart Baillie (IBISWorld Ltd)

Richard Thompson (Executive Clothing Ltd)

Artists in action: Richard von Hofsten and Charlotte Rosenberg Bosten

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The LINK NEW MEMBERS

3gamma

Dragon Shepherd

3gamma provides independent technology strategy consulting and IT advisory services.

Dragon Shepherd is a London/Spain based boutique executive search consultancy providing recruitment solutions into Fintech and Industry 4.0 in the UK, Germany, Scandinavia and Spain.

We work with our clients to accelerate growth, reduce cost and cut time to market by reimagining technology. We help our clients explore new information technologies, transform existing, and seize the opportunities of the digital age. Founded in 2008, our clients are of all sizes and are among the leaders in industries like financial services, publishing, retail, healthcare and manufacturing. They have come to value us for our knowledge, independence and pragmatic approach. Please contact Ben today; be part of our insight distribution; attend an event; or discuss your technology challenges in more depth. Mr Ben Wales

Managing Director

+44(0)203 743 6104

ben.wales@3gamma.com

3gamma UK Ltd www.3gamma.com

We work in high added value industries like the automotive and aerospace industry, and financial technology sector with a diverse range of clients. Our clients trust our viewpoint and approach in selecting the right candidates for them. Our approach is professional in exploring every avenue leaving no stone unturned helping us fulfil our client’s requirements. Our passion, drive and continuous success in placing high calibre candidates helps us win repeated business from relationships we have built up over many years.

Ms Cristina Bartra

Co-Founder

+34(0) 717 194 5378

cbartra@dragonshepherd.com

Dragon Shepherd SL www.dragonshepherd.com

CaribSwede Ltd & Across the Sea B2B Filial

Exclusive Tailoring

CaribSwede works with helping business in Sweden to Export to the UK and Globally, but also UK business that want to enter Sweden, via our Swedish branch Across The Sea B2B filial. CaribSwede is established in both Sweden and in the UK as Export and Importer of Food & Drinks. We work closely with the producers we are representing and believe in genuine produce, and share the passion of natural, origin and craft.

Since 2002, Richard Thompson’s Exclusive Tailoring has been a leading made-to-measure and bespoke tailoring house for affluent men in London, creating clean-cut, stylish suits for work and play. Clients include business extraordinaire Lord Sugar and internationally renowned musician Ronan Keating. Whether it’s a casual two-piece suit for the office or a formal ensemble for a black-tie event you’re after, Exclusive Tailoring has you covered.

The produce we represent is everything from Wild Meat from the Swedish Forests to Welsh Craft Ale. Welcome to taste!

Find out more at exclusivetailoring.co.uk or book your appointment by emailing info@exclusivetailoring.co.uk

Ms Anna Coipell

Mr Richard Thompson

Tailor/Designer

+44(0)203 651 4210

info@exclusivetailoring.co.uk

+44(0)203 078 5996

Founder & CEO contact@acrosstheseab2b.biz

Carib Swede Ltd www.acrosstheseab2b.biz

Executive Clothing Ltd www.exclusivetailoring.co.uk

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The LINK NEW MEMBERS

Fagerhult

Advanced Handling

Fagerhult came to be on a cold winter’s night in December 1943, when Bertil Svensson designed and built a lamp for his mother so that she could continue to knit once the Nordic nights set in. Today, the Fagerhult Group is one of Europe’s largest light manufacturers, producing professional lighting systems for public environments, both indoors and outdoors, with over 2,200 employees in 22 locations around the world.

Established in 1977, Advanced experience, providing bespoke for a wide range of industries. with innovation and expertise, environment and application.

By working with a number of leading academic institutions and industry bodies, Fagerhult has positioned itself at the forefront of understanding the impact of light on our lives. Fagerhult manufactures products that are the result of extensive research and testing. With a long-term focus on energy efficiency via intelligent lighting controls and advanced LED technology, Fagerhult is constantly working towards flexible solutions that last. Ms Marianne Trotta

Marketing and Events Executive

Fagerhult Lighting

+44(0)207 403 4123

marianne.trotta@fagerhult.co.uk

www.fagerhult.co.uk

Handling have a wealth of materials handling solutions Our equipment is designed tailored specifically to each

We design our lifting equipment to last, capitalising on the skills of our in house technical design team. Using our products not only means a sound return on your investment but also a happier, healthier and more efficient workforce. Advanced Handling are members of the Sunnex Group based in Sweden, a privately owned group of 20 companies operating in the fields of lifting technology, lighting technology and industrial and medical equipment.

Mr Michael Prince

Managing Director

+44(0)177 834 5365

sales@advancedhandling.co.uk

Advanced Handling Ltd www.advancedhandling.co.uk

Aquavit London

Greenberg Traurig

Aquavit London is a new contemporary morning-to-midnight dining experience, showcasing the best of Nordic cuisine and design. The restaurant takes inspiration from its sister restaurant; the two Michelin star Aquavit in New York but with a more informal setting. The menu will be overseen by Emma Bengtsson, Executive Chef New York, and executed by Henrik Ritzen, Executive Chef London. Dishes will constantly evolve in tune with the changing seasons of the Nordic region.

Greenberg Traurig, LLP is an international multidisciplinary, full service law firm with 38 offices around the globe. GT’s London office specialises in M&A, capital markets, real estate, finance, tax, competition and regulatory, environment and employment across a broad range of sectors.

Ms Madalina Eriksson

Sales Manager

Mr Robert Carlon

Senior Associate

Greenberg Traurig, LLP

+44(0)792 8245 149

madalinae@aquavitrestaurants.com www.aquavitrestaurants.com

+44(0)203 349 8729

CarlonR@gtlaw.com

www.gtlaw.com

Aquavit London Ltd

GT London has considerable experience with companies investing into and out of Sweden and the Nordic region and frequently advises clients on large M&A transactions. With full Swedish-speaking capabilities, GT London is keen to continue to advise companies on investment opportunities between the UK, Sweden and the rest of the world.

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The LINK NEW MEMBERS

Ragnarök

Schroders plc.

Our handcrafted gin is small batch-distilled in a copper pot using a Swedish base spirit. Our aim is to produce a gin that encapsulates the Swedish wilderness, the inspiration of Ragnarök gin. We use carefully selected botanicals to produce an elegantly balanced gin, among them juniper and lingonberries.

Schroders plc is a world-class asset manager operating from 38 offices in 28 countries across Europe, the Americas, Asia and the Middle East with 3700 talented employees. The company manages CHF 445.8 billion (as at 30.06.16) on behalf of institutional and retail investors, financial institutions, charities and high-net-worth clients from around the world. The Wealth Management division which includes Schroder & Co Bank AG in Switzerland accounts for approx. 10 percent of Schroders plc’s total business.

The distillate is blended with pure mountain spring water. Ragnarök is served perfectly on its own and makes a fantastic martini, while at the same time standing up for itself in G&T’s and cocktails. Each bottle of Ragnarök is individually filled, sealed and numbered by hand.

In Switzerland, Schroders employs 290 people and has approx. CHF 66 billion administered and cumulated assets (31.12.15). Schroder & Co Bank AG holds a full banking license and, as a specialised Private Bank, focus solely on the requirements of its discerning clients and external asset managers.

Mr Rupert Hart

Owner/Director

Ten Bears Spirits Ltd

Mr Michel Rossi

Market Head Nordics, Director

Schroder & Co Bank AG

+44(0)773 8442 457

ru@ragnarokgin.com

www.ragnarokgin.com

+41(0)44 250 14 28

michel.rossi@schroders.com

www.schroders.ch

Out of Office After Work

Southbank Centre

The highly successful straight-from-work party concept “Out of Office After Work” founded in Stockholm in 2013 has grown exponentially over the last couple of years. OOOAW is a straight from work party during early hours just once a month, between 6-10pm in Stockholm, Gothenburg, Malmö, Oslo, Copenhagen and London.

The festival spirit is the very heart of Southbank Centre and inspires everything that we do.

The guests are young professionals in the age span 25-35 within finance, marketing, IT, sales etc. that all loves the nightclub environment, but not necessarily until 4 am in the morning. OOOAW is also a window of opportunity to meet positive, ambitious and hardworking colleagues for a few hours each month.

Born out of the Festival of Britain in 1951, we are proud to be the UK’s only permanent festival site. We believe that the positive and welcoming nature of festivals can help break down barriers in people for whom art and culture may seem irrelevant or daunting and through our festivals we bring diverse people and communities together to celebrate, discuss, debate and unite.

out of office after work

Mr Mikael Wennerros

Founder/President

+46(0)735 002 740

mikael.wennerros@oooaw.com

Out of Office International www.oooaw.com

Ms Khadeen O’Donnell

Head of Corporate Development

Southbank Centre

+44(0)207 9210 989 khadeen.odonnell@southbankcentre.co.uk www.southbankcentre.co.uk

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The LINK NEW MEMBERS

Trade Finance Solutions Inc.

Vaimo

Trade Finance Solutions is an international provider of working capital and global trade finance. We have offices in Toronto, Miami, Los Angeles, New York and London.

Vaimo is a global leader in full-service eCommerce on the Magento platform helping brands, retailers and manufacturers to grow and develop online sales. By creating online stores that attract visitors and turn them into loyal customers, Vaimo has helped more than 400 brands and merchants reach higher revenues and build stronger brands.

The Company provides commercial finance options for businesses seeking secure, efficient alternatives to traditional, often inflexible services offered by some financiers. We service global markets across four continents for clients including distributors, manufactures, suppliers and retailers Products offered: Factoring, Asset Based Lending, Supply Chain Financing, Purchase Order Financing

With offices in 11 countries and more than 250 employees, we provide an international presence that allows us cultivate close, long-term relationships with our clients globally. Vaimo has launched hundreds of digital storefronts for celebrated brands such as Jack Daniel’s, Dyson, Bauhaus, GANT, Björn Borg and HP.

Trade Finance Solutions offers a creative approach and have the capital strength to get deals done.

Mr Ben Boateng

Head of Sales - EMEA

Trade Finance Solutions

Mr Robin Carlsson

Country Manager

Vaimo UK Ltd

+44(0)203866 1953

bboateng@tradefinancesolutions.com

www.tradefinanceslutions.com

+44(0)845 5280 642

robin.carlsson@vaimo.com

www.vaimo.com

Scandicanvas

Stella Advisors

Scandicanvas is a start-up business based in the south of Sweden.

Stella Advisors is a leading investment bank, focused on the media, Internet and related technology sectors. We have offices in London, Stockholm, Berlin, and San Francisco.

We offer canvas art inspired by Scandinavia. Our products are unique, affordable and produced in an eco-friendly way. They provide scenic views to your home and office or make great gifts for family and friends.

Founded in 2005, we combine standout sector knowledge with first class advisory and execution capabilities, ranging from M&A, financing and strategic advice to wealth management.

Most of the images are from around our local area but there are also a selection of canvases with pictures from other parts of Scandinavia and our travels. All images are our own and are carefully selected by us.

We are Nordic market leaders in our core sectors and through our global reach, generate transactions cross boarders to Europe and the USA.

Mr Ville Peltomäki

Scandicanvas

Mr Greger Larsson

Partner

www.scandicanvas.co.uk

+46(0)207 2908 130

greger.larson@stellaadvisors.com

+44(0)703 1812 996

Owner info@scandicanvas.co.uk

Stella Capital Advisors Ltd www.stellaadvisors.com

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The LINK MEET

Lena Bergström TEXTILE AND GLASS DESIGNER, ORREFORS WORDS: REBECCA MARTIN

Lena Bergström is an award-winning textile and glass designer, with roots firmly in Northern Sweden. She had her first breakthrough in the early nineties with a collection for the Swedish textile company Ljungbergs and soon she was also hired by Swedish crystal manufacturer Orrefors, a collaboration that is still going strong two decades later. “As a designer, being able to see something that I have visualised becoming a reality and experiencing the teamwork and trust between the designer and the craftsmen – that’s what I enjoy the most,” Bergström told The LINK. After graduating high school, Bergström landed a job as visual merchandiser for the Swedish department store Domus. She spent a few years there, learning about how to best highlight products through display, but soon realised that she wanted more and moving to Stockholm, she applied to the prestigious art school Konstfack. After graduating in 1989, Bergström started working as a freelance designer and today has an impressive CV, and a great track record of scholarships and awards to her name. When thinking of what it is that has made her the very successful designer she is today, she stresses the importance of mentors, of teachers, of people that have believed in her.

Today, she is as busy as ever, having recently exhibited here in London at the Vessel Gallery and with many new projects, both secret and otherwise, in the pipeline. The LINK caught up with her to speak Swedish design, keeping ancient craftsmanship alive, and what she finds the most rewarding with her work.

traditional craftsmanship, those make me enormously satisfied.” Bergström describes herself as a person in love with materials, something that is reflected in her art. Working with different materials, finding and interpreting their own inherent qualities, is key to her work. “Every material comes with its own fascinating qualities and its own challenges. Glass may be magical in the sense that from a 1,200-degree hot and pliable mass you get, in its cold state, a stiff and transparent object – it is a bit like doing magic. Of course, a linen fibre may not go through that kind of transformation, but it would be impossible to choose which one I prefer, because to me linen has its own fascinating characteristics.” Changing the subject slightly to the characteristics of a specific “Nordic” style, Bergström says that it is easier to reflect on what is ultimately a very broad subject if one approaches it with a historical perspective.

“Being encouraged to do crafts at home, to experiment, to see what I could achieve, I think that has had a major impact on me choosing this career path. Having people believe in me throughout my training. I always believed I could do it, but that just brought it home - this is the right way for me,” she says.

“In Sweden, we have always been very near to nature, a society of fishermen and farmers, creating objects from wood, moss and other natural materials, and there has been a great functionality in all we do, which is what people tend to associate us with.”

Despite the recognition that Bergström has met, it is the lasting products, those that are still on sale years after the initial design, that she is most proud of.

However, through immigration, through travel and other influences, the already existing culture has been enriched with new ideas, today creating a fusion between the stark and sometimes neutral Nordic style and more colourful and warm touches.

“Successful, long-lived products that people continue buying, and those that create work opportunities through safeguarding

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“What people perceive as our Nordic style, is most likely timelessness and

functionality, the purity in the objects. But this, as everything, is changing. Younger generations, perhaps with different cultural backgrounds, are adding to our heritage. Personally, I am drawn to elegance and would like describe my style as simplicity with a twist.” In the near future, Bergström has several ventures in the pipeline. She has created a new collection of carpets for Design House Stockholm, inspired by her roots in Northern Sweden, which will be showed at the Swedish Design Fair this spring. For Orrefors, she has created new vases in her Carat series, and as the Swedish glassworks Kosta Boda has its 275th anniversary this year, Bergström is involved in the jubilee exhibitions. In the pipeline is also several secret projects that she is not at liberty to reveal yet. “What I can say is that among other things I get to work within a group of products I have never made before, so that is very exciting. And that’s is really what I love about this job, that at times it can be nervous but also very exciting! What would you do if you weren’t a designer? Architect or inventor. What would be your dream project? Working with public spaces, creating glass on a large scale, in an architectural setting. But also, something completely different, creating meeting spaces, combining serviced apartments for the elderly with day care facilities for young children.

One of Lena Bergström’s ‘Planets’ are featured on the cover of this magazine.

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“From a 1,200-degree hot and pliable mass you get a stiff and transparent object – it is a bit like doing magic.”

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