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S E L L I N G

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C H A R L E S T O N

Your Guide to Charleston

Explore our Lowcountry lifestyles and find the place that’s perfect for you at

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WELCOME TO CHARLESTON! The Charleston region, also known as the lowcountry is full of history and opportunity. You have probably already discovered this when doing your research. Or perhaps you have already chosen this region as your new home. Charleston’s beauty and culture are impossible to ignore. It is likely one of the main reasons you’ve decided to come. From historic buildings to beautiful beaches as well as scenic marshlands, you are comforted with the warmth of the grand oak trees draped in Spanish moss. Whether you want to set roots in Summerville, Charleston, Mount Pleasant or anywhere in the surrounding area there’s a community and a home waiting on you. Charleston is deeply rooted in its history which dates back to 1670. Charleston is a favorite travel destination for many. Charlestonians proudly celebrate its history and the people who have helped shape the area into what it is today. Quality of life is key! Charleston has invested in new pedestrian and family friendly neighborhoods and building many mixed established neighborhoods. There is ample opportunities to experience culture, cuisine, arts, outdoor recreation and nightlife. We invite you to explore the region, get to know the neighborhoods and your new neighbors and discover Southern charm of the Lowcountry. It won’t take much long before you become immersed in the areas progressive southern culture.

Welcome home! Welcome to Charleston! We are certainly glad you’re here


TONI GILLIARD Realty ONE Group Coastal (SC)/Realty ONE Group Revolution (NC) ONELUXE RESIDENTIAL & LUXURY HOMES SPECIALIST REALTOR®️/JURIS DOCTOR *Serving Charleston, SC and the surrounding area * Serving Charlotte, NC, Fort Mill,SC, Tega Cay, SC, and Rock Hill, SC

Website: https://www.ToniGilliard.com/ Instagram: @sellingincharleston Facebook: @Sellingincharleston1 C: 843-302-9221 *YO HABLO ESPAÑOL *If you know of anyone interested in Buying, Selling, Investing or Leasing Real Estate, please let me know. I would love to help them. I help small businesses as well! Certified Short Sale & Foreclosure Resource-SFR®️

Jonathan Bullard

mobile 843.261.4850 office/fax 843.212.0165 email jonathan@lendingpathmortgage.com

Charleston Branch Manager 20-Year Industry Veteran

website charlestonsbestmortgage.com

Licensed Mortgage Originator NMLS 1391331. Powered by Lending Path Mortgage NMLS 130562. 1519 Richland St., Columbia, SC 29201. This is not a commitment to lend.


Greetings from Charleston, SC! Luxury services at every price point A home for every lifestyle Looking for a change? Do what you love! Why not start the day with a walk on the beach? A cup of tea or coffee on your front porch or beachfront property perhaps. Or take the boat out for the day and cast a line for tonight’s dinner? Or experience Charleston’s great dining, arts and culture? Whatever your preference, Charleston has it all. It’s obvious why we are consistently voted America’s Number 1 place to visit.

We invite you to explore Charleston with us! At Tonigilliard.com, we use our experience and knowledge of the Charleston South Carolina real estate market to assist our clients successfully. We are experienced with navigating the homebuying process in the low country. Whether you are relocating to the area or looking for a second home, or perhaps you already live in Charleston, we are here to help!

Tonigilliard.com


he Charleston region is full of life, history and opportunity. You have probably already discovered this as you are considering, or have already chosen, the region as your new home. On the surface, the region’s beauty is impossible to ignore. In fact, it’s probably one of the many things that attracted you to the area. Rivers serenely wind through scenic marshlands. Historic buildings are shaded by grand live oaks draped in Spanish moss. There are a lot of advantages to living in an area that’s easy on the eyes, whether you’ve set down roots in Summerville, Charleston, Mount Pleasant or somewhere in between. But much deeper than the region’s beauty is its history, which dates back to 1670 when the first English settlers arrived and established Charles Towne on the banks of the Ashley River. As a favorite destination for travelers, the Charleston region proudly celebrates its history and the people who have helped shape the area into what it is today. In addition, quality of life is something each community takes seriously. Schools are a high priority. New pedestrianand family-friendly neighborhoods are being built that mix seamlessly with established neighborhoods. There are abundant

Photo/Daniel Island Development Company

» WELCOME T Father and sons fishing on Daniel Island.

opportunities to experience arts, culture, outdoor recreation, shopping, dining and nightlife. We invite you to explore the region, get to know your neighbors and discover the charms of the Lowcountry. It won’t take long before you become immersed in the area’s progressive Southern culture and call Charleston your new hometown. We’re certainly glad you’re here. Welcome home. •

WELCOME |

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» WE’VE GOT IT ALL

Special Projects Editor - Steve McDaniel smcdaniel@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3123

Charleston was named the World's Best City in 2016 and has been voted the Best City in the U.S. for seven years in a row by Travel & Leisure magazine. Here are a few reasons why:

Atmosphere and Ambiance

Arts and History The Charleston area is the home of many firsts. The city was founded in 1670, and you can barely take a step in any direction without seeing a historic building, plantation or other landmark. The St. Lawrence String Quartet performing at the 2019 From Rainbow Row and the City Market Spoleto Festival. downtown to Fort Moultrie on Sullivan’s Island, there is much to see and learn about. The Charleston arts scene is vibrant as well. Performing and visual arts come together in the annual Spoleto Festival.

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Our reputation for friendliness and manners is something we’re proud of. We take life a little slower here in Charleston and extend to visitors and newcomers the same hospitality that the city’s founders did. It won’t be long before you, too, will be saying, “Welcome, y’all!”

Lodging Want to stay in a historic inn? No problem. Like the beach with a golf course nearby? You can stay there, too. Luxury hotel, bed and breakfast, marsh or ocean view, harbor or skyline vista? If you can dream it, we probably have it.

Restaurants

Photo/Alina Tyulyu, courtesy of Charleston Wine+Food

2

Charleston is known worldwide as a hot spot on the gourmet food scene. Chefs focus on using farm-fresh produce and seafood straight from local waters. Lots of festivals and events feature our local cuisine, from spontaneous food truck rodeos to the annual Wine and Food Festival.

Shopping

| WELCOME

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Friendliness

Corkscrews and Campfires event held during the Charleston Wine and Food festival.

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Photo/Spoleto Festival USA

Day or night, Charleston’s atmosphere and ambiance beckon. Take a carriage ride to learn about the historic area, watch a sunset at a rooftop bar or venture to the beach to relax. Charleston gets into your soul and we think you’ll agree there’s nothing quite like it.

Associate Editor, Special Projects - Jim Tatum jtatum@scbiznews.com • 864-720-2269

Pick up a handmade sweetgrass basket in the City Market or shop the latest fashions on King Street downtown. Head out to the Tanger Outlets in North Charleston if you’re looking for a great deal or swing by Towne Centre in Mount Pleasant for trendy shops and locally owned boutiques. Whatever you’re looking for, you can find it here.

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» WHY I LIVE HERE

I was born and raised in the Lowcountry and feel privileged to call this special place home. Many of the things I enjoy most about the area, kayaking the waterways, spectacular sunsets, relaxing on the beach and simply enjoying the majesty of a live oak tree, are all activities our community can enjoy at their Charleston County Parks. I started working with the Parks in 1986, and it has been incredible to see how our agency has grown along with Charleston. Today, we offer everything from waterparks to historical sites to undeveloped parks where people can enjoy the quite of nature. And, of course we will also offer many special events that have become fond family traditions such as the Holiday Festival of Lights. The combination of its natural beauty, history and warm people make Charleston a great place to live. Kevin Bowie Associate Executive Director of CCPRC

Welcome messages from our sponsors

Attending college in America’s #1 City is a huge draw for Charleston Southern University students. In fact, many of them stay in the region after they graduate. The metro-centric location of CSU’s campus in the middle of the Charleston metro area also makes CSU a great choice for students who prefer to commute as well as adults who are seeking to begin or finish a degree. As one of South Carolina’s largest independent, private universities, Charleston Southern offers opportunities for a quality education, NCAA Division I athletics, campus ministries and a vibrant campus life. Our undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programs include over 20 programs taught exclusively online. Come visit our beautiful campus and see for yourself why Charleston Southern has been named to such lists as US News and World Report’s #1 Online Bachelor’s Program in South Carolina, America’s 100 Best College Buys, America’s Best Christian Colleges and Military Friendly Schools. Dondi Costin President, Charleston Southern University

“As the state’s only publicly assisted academic health science center, the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) has the unique mission to provide access to top-quality health care, which is fundamental to building healthy communities. By harnessing the power of advanced technology and coupling it with compassionate expertise, our teams of multi-disciplinary specialists are changing what’s possible in health care.” Patrick J. Cawley, M.D., MHM, FACHE

“I like living in the Charleston region because of the area’s dynamic contrasts: A growing economy and a deep sense of history; vibrant urban cores and a serene natural environment; countless cultural events and nothing to do on a lazy summer afternoon. But most of all, I like it because it’s home.” Grady Johnson President and Group Publisher, SC Biz News, publishers of the Charleston Regional Business Journal

CEO, MUSC Health and Vice President for Health Affairs, University

WELCOME |

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23 Photo/Daniel Island Development Company

contents

Photo/College of Charleston

»Welcome

68 Volume 11

Photo/Volvo Car Open by Lee Deas of Obviouslee Marketing

2019

| WELCOME

» Living In 42 Historic Charleston 46 Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island 48 North Charleston 50 Mount Pleasant 53 Daniel Island 55 West Ashley 57 James Island and Folly Beach 59 Johns and Wadmalaw Islands 60 Kiawah and Seabrook Islands 62 Summerville 65 Jedburg and Ridgeville 66 Moncks Corner 68 Goose Creek

»Resource Guide

93 4

2 Introduction to Charleston 3 Sponsors’ Welcome 6 Why, Thank You 8 Market Facts 16 Education in the Lowcountry 23 Higher Education 28 Health and Wellness

70 Sports and Recreation 74 Dog Parks 77 Golf Courses 78 Dining Out 80 Places to Stay 83 Alternative and Outdoor Venues 85 Arts Abound 88 Attractions and Tours 93 Calendar of Events 96 Newcomer Information and Map


Photo/Charleston Area Convention & Visitors Bureau

The Pineapple Fountain is a focal point of Waterfront Park in downtown Charleston.

42 Photo/Fleet Landing

Shrimp & grits, as pictured above from Fleet Landing in downtown Charleston, is a staple of Charleston cuisine.

78 WELCOME |

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Photo/South Carolina Aquarium

WHY, THANK

YOU

The Charleston area keeps racking up the recognition in many areas. Here are a few examples. We’re flattered ... Charleston is the No. 1 U.S. Best City - Travel & Leisure, 2019 (seventh year in a row) No. 10 Best City in the World - Travel & Leisure, 2018 No. 1 Small U.S. City - Conde Nast Traveler, Readers’ Choice The two-story, 385,000-gallon Great Ocean Tank at the South Carolina Aquarium in downto wn Charleston.

Awards, 2018 (eighth year in a row) No. 1 The South’s Best City and Best Food City - Southern Living, 2018 No. 9 Fastest-Growing Midsize Economies - U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2017

What are Market Facts and Lists? Each year, the Charleston Regional Business Journal collects all kinds of data and facts about our region. These are presented in a visual way in Market Facts, which is published annually. In the following pages, you will be introduced to a sampling of this data, presented in chart, graph and table format. You will also be treated to samples from our annual Book of Lists. The lists are just what they sound like: listings of businesses and other organizations by category. The information is ranked by number of employees or some other criteria, and details about each company are painstakingly gathered by our researchers. The facts and lists published here are ones that will be of interest to newcomers. We hope you enjoy both of these added features to Intro Charleston.

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| WELCOME

Named to Top 25 list of America’s Best Cities - Outside, 2017 No. 6 Most Fun Places to Live in the U.S. - U.S. News & World Report, 2018 No. 3 U.S. Island Destination, Kiawah Island - Travel & Leisure, 2018

Sources: Charleston County Economic Development, Charleston Regional Development Alliance


Market Facts C

harleston’s economy has been growing and diversifying at a steady pace, with technology, engineering, architecture, service industries and health care ranking as the area’s fastest-growing job sectors. The emergence of technology startups heralds a growing knowledge economy and has earned Charleston the nickname “Silicon Harbor.” An economic driver for the entire state, the Port of Charleston consistently posts records for traffic and volume while navigating an increasingly complex and fluid global economy. Ports, logistics, manufacturing and distribution companies account for a significant amount of economic activity in the Charleston region. The demand for residential and commercial real estate and rental properties has surged, while home builders and developers struggle to keep up with that demand. Construction in all sectors of the economy is running at near-record levels. Financial institutions operating in the Charleston area represent more than 25% of the financial assets in banks across the state. In the pages that follow we give you a visual representation of some data on the Charleston market through Market Facts. Each year, the Charleston Regional Business Journal publishes Market Facts: data and facts about our region presented in chart, graph and table format. The information here is from the most recent Market Facts publication.

Sponsored by

8

| MARKET FACTS

In this section Economic Drivers...............................................10 Area Information................................................. 12 Real Estate............................................................. 14


» ECONOMIC DRIVERS Manufacturing

Mercedes-Benz Vans and Volvo Cars are now manufacturing motor vehicles in the Lowcountry, and Boeing recently delivered its first-ever 787-10 commercial jet, the first model built exclusively at the North Charleston plant. The companies lead a slate of manufacturers in the Charleston region responsible for more than 10,000 jobs, including Robert Bosch,

KapStone, Nucor Steel, Cummins Turbo Technologies, Century Aluminum, JW Aluminum and more. The addition of Volvo and the Mercedes-Benz expansion are also drawing attention to the region from thirdparty companies that serve those major automakers’ supply-chain needs.

Source: Charleston Regional Business Journal

Port of Charleston The S.C. State Ports Authority handled 1.36 million containers in fiscal year 2019, a 9.1% increase over fiscal year 2018. Charleston’s port is the ninth largest in the U.S., behind Savannah, Ga., its nearest competitor geographically, which ranks fourth in terms of total containers handled each year.

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| MARKET FACTS

Going for a cruise The S.C. State Ports Authority handled a total of

213,081 cruise passengers in fiscal year 2019.

Source: S.C. State Ports Authority


Photo/File

2018 tourism by the numbers

7.3 million visitors

$8.1 billion economic impact

Hospitality & Tourism Hospitality and tourism pump billions of dollars each year into the economies of Charleston and South Carolina as a whole. The robust sector serves as a major economic driver for businesses and communities across the state. In 2018, an estimated 7.3 million people visited the Lowcountry and spent an average of $228 per visitor per day. Overall,

tourism generated a total economic impact of $8.1 billion. The year-round tourist season in the Lowcountry pulls visitors to the Charleston area in support of a vibrant food-and-beverage sector with world-class cuisine and events, including the Charleston Wine and Food Festival, Charleston Restaurant Week and the annual Chef’s Feast, among other festivals

$228 per person for expenditures per day Source: College of Charleston Tourism Analysis

and events that center around culinary arts. Retail shopping, performing arts and history, combined with renowned cuisine and the lure of the area’s beaches and waterways, make the Charleston region a natural choice for vacationers and sightseers. Photo/Senior Airman Dennis Sloan

benthal

be a major job creator with manufacturing, technology, cybersecurity and contracting through Naval Information Warfare Center Atlantic (formerly known as SPAWAR), Lockheed, General Dynamics, SRC and other defense contractors in the region.

ristopher Hu

Joint Base Charleston, which was created when the Naval Weapons Station and the Charleston Air Force Base joined into one military team, serves as the largest employer in the area with more than 20,000 employees. The defense sector continues to

Photo/Staff Sgt. Ch

Defense Sector

MARKET FACTS |

11


» AREA INFORMATION

Average Daily Population Growth, 2018

2018 Charleston-area population By county and major city

26 NET DAILY IN-MIGRATION

+8

221,091

160,647

Berkeley County

Dorchester County

42,841

51,692

Goose Creek

Summerville

BIRTHS MINUS DEATHS

89,338

113,237

North Charleston

405,905

136,208

Charleston County

Charleston

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

THE TREND:

URBAN SPRAWL LEADING TO LONGER COMMUTES

TOTAL POPULATION GROWTH PER DAY Source: Charleston Regional Development Alliance

If you make $50,000 a year in the city of Charleston, here's what you would need to earn to live similarly in these cities:

As more people move farther from the city centers to find more affordable housing, the traffic they experience gets worse.

29.9

34

Mount Pleasant

$83,951

MEAN TRAVEL TIME BY COUNTY 26.3

27.6

21.7

Charleston

25.4 24.7

25.1 U.S. Average

Atlanta

Charlotte

Austin

Berkeley

24.4

Charleston

Dorchester

24.1

Raleigh

Source: 2017 Five Year American Community Survey

12

| MARKET FACTS

$53,498 $50,000

Seattle

Austin

$47,490

$45,679

Atlanta

Raleigh

$43,909

Charlotte

Source: The Council for Community and Economic Research


Photo/U.S. Air Force Airm an

Joshua R. Maund

Defense dollars

Billions of dollars related to military projects flow through the Palmetto State each year, supporting thousands of jobs and contributing a multiplier effect that ripples through the state’s economy. The Charleston region continues to lead the state for defense spending and is No. 2 for jobs in the sector.

Top 10 counties for defense spending 2016

County Contract amounts

Charleston

Richland

Berkeley

Beaufort

Sumter

Marion

Greenville

$133.6M

14%

THE TREND:

JOINT BASE CHARLESTON

$90.3M $49.4M

Pickens

Air Force

$101.7M

Lexington

58+21+147

$290.3M

$127.8M

$59.8M

7%

$1.2B

$229.3M

Georgetown

Who orders the most work

Total defense contracts in South Carolina in 2016 were valued at nearly $5 billion, with the Navy and Marine Corps ordering the majority of the work.

Other defense

One of the largest employers and economic drivers in the Charleston region.

21%

Tens of thousands of people worked in the defense sector in 2016, which injected $2.4 billion in earnings and wages into the state’s economy. Defense payrolls have declined over the past four years. Source: U.S. Department of Defense, Office of Economic Adjustment

58%

Army

$14.2M

Defense payroll in South Carolina

Percentage of defense contracts

$2.8B

2013

$2.7B

2014

$2.6B

2015

Navy/ Marines

$2.4B 2016

MARKET FACTS |

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» REAL ESTATE – 2014

– 2015

– 2016

A look ahead at residential home sales – 2017

– 2018

– 2019 forecast

Average sales price

Number of homes sold

THE HEADLINE:

THE HEADLINE:

UPWARD TREND LEVELING OFF

FEWER HOMES MEAN FEWER SALES

After years of increasing across the region, prices are forecast to level off.

$350K $300K

$291K

$250K $200K $150K $100K

$307K $321K

$340K

– 2020 forecast

With decreases in inventory and new home construction, the number of homes sold is forecast to continue to decline in 2019 and 2020.

$360K $363K $362K 20,000

17,826 16,221

15,000

18,410 18,159 17,900 17,700

14,257

10,000

5,000

$50K 0

0

Sources: Charleston Trident Association of Realtors, 2018 Annual Report; Charleston Metro Chamber of Commerce, Economic Outlook Forecast, 2019-2020

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| MARKET FACTS


Days on market to sale

Inventory of homes for sale

THE TREND:

THE TREND:

– 100 homes

FEWER DAYS ON THE MARKET

LESS TO CHOOSE FROM

-35%

-18%

That’s the percentage change of days that houses stay on the market from 2014 to 2018. It’s a substantial decrease, but if you look at the last three years that trend has slowed signficantly.

80

60

58

6,254

5,914

5,442

5,376

2016

2017

5,109

55 52

5 2016 2017 1 0 2

8 201

201 4

There are 18% less homes on the market in 2018 than in 2014. The lack of inventory will keep days on the market low and prices high.

2014

2015

2018

Sources: Charleston Trident Association of Realtors, 2018 Annual Report

Charleston-area apartment market All information obtained from Real Data Charleston as of March 2019

$1250

Average monthly rent in the Charleston area

Total apartment units – Dorchester County

$1225

$1075 $1050 $1025 $1000 $975 $950 $925 $900 $875 $850 $825 $800 $775

Feb. 2014

5,122

9,269

$1175 $1150 $1125

– Charleston County

– Average Monthly Rent

$1200

$1100

– Berkeley County

Goose Creek

Summerville $

THE TREND:

RENT FLATTENING

Rent increased only $4 from August 2018 to February 2019. That’s the lowest increase represented on this chart. As more apartments come online, rent increases could slow or even begin to drop. PERCENTAGE GROWTH IN RENT FROM FEB. 2014 - FEB. 2019

38+62

1,089

5,254

North Charleston $

8,531

990

Mount Pleasant

10,131

West Ashley

38%

$1,114

$

1,152

2,278

James Island

1,409

$

Feb. 2019

2,489

$1,567

Downtown

$1,767

Source: Real Data, Charleston Apartment Index, March 2019 MARKET FACTS |

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Education T

he greater Charleston region has four school districts covering areas from downtown to suburban neighborhoods to rural and beach communities. Each district offers a variety of school programs, including magnet and charter schools with specialized curricula. Charleston County School District is the largest in the region and second largest in the state, serving nearly 50,000 students countywide. Students living in the cities of Charleston, North Charleston and Mount Pleasant all attend Charleston County schools, as well as those on James Island, Johns Island and Sullivan’s Island. Berkeley County School District serves about 34,500 students in more than 40 schools that span the largely rural and suburban county. Students in such areas as Goose Creek, Hanahan, Cane Bay, Daniel Island and Moncks Corner attend these schools. Dorchester County is divided into two districts that serve a total of nearly 28,500 students. Dorchester School District 2 includes more than 26,000 students in Summerville and areas around it. Dorchester School District 4 educates about 2,300 children in the more rural parts of the county, including St. George, Ridgeville and Harleyville. Details on each district are given on the pages that follow.

Sponsored by

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| EDUCATION

In this section School Districts................................................... 18 Private Schools................................................... 20 Higher Education............................................... 23 Colleges and Universities.............................. 25


Photo/Ryan Johnson/City of North Charleston Photo/Ryan Johnson/City of North Charleston

model site for arts infusion in South Carolina and was selected in 2007 as a Kennedy Center Creative Ticket School of Excellence and in 2010 as a National Blue Ribbon School. The Berkeley Center for the Arts at Goose Creek High School offers programs in creative writing, dance, orchestral strings, theater, visual arts, vocal music, and wind and percussion studies. Other innovative programs and schools include Berkeley County Middle College High School, a magnet school on Trident Technical College’s Berkeley Campus, and Scholars Academy, the district’s International Baccalaureate program. Marrington Middle School of the Arts is a National Blue Ribbon School that incorporates the arts as an essential component of the curriculum. The Gifted and Talented program serves academically advanced students. They are enrolled in classes to enrich and accelerate learning beyond the regular school curriculum, including in English and mathematics.

Charleston County School District 75 Calhoun St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-937-6300 www.ccsdschools.com For information on all the individual schools in the district, along with information on registering your child in the district, visit www.ccsdschools.com/Schools. To look up your neighborhood school based on home address, visit croppermap. Children in North Charleston’s after-school programs visit The Bend, a community redevelopment project on the Ashley com/charleston. River in North Charleston, to learn about the environment and its plant and animal inhabitants. Charleston County School District is Berkeley County School District the second-largest school system in South Berkeley County School District, the 229 E. Main St. fourth-largest school system in the state, is Carolina, representing a blend of urban, subMoncks Corner, SC 29461 growing by about 1,000 students per year. It urban and rural schools over nearly 1,000 843-899-8600 square miles. The district serves almost serves about 34,500 students and operates www.bcsdschools.net 50,000 students in 83 schools and several 43 schools, including nine high schools, 12 For a complete list of schools in Berkeley middle schools, 24 elementary schools and specialized programs. County School District, visit www.bcsdIn Charleston County, each school-aged three alternative and adult option schools. schools.net, Schools tab. child is assigned to a neighborhood school Berkeley County provides arts magnet To determine your neighborhood school schools at each level of elementary, middle based on grade level and home address. based on home address, contact the school In addition, the district offers specialand high school. Howe Hall Arts Infused district office. Register your child online un- Magnet School serves students in kinderized programs, magnet schools and charter der the Students and Parents tab. schools, including such specialized programgarten through fifth grade who are selected ming as Montessori, International Baccalauthrough a lottery process. Howe Hall is a

18

| EDUCATION


» School District Overview School District Map

Student enrollment, 2017-2018

In Dorchester County, the districts divide along Eagle Drive, Indigo Road and Cummings Chapel Road. Berkeley Dorchester County School County School District District 4

50,000 40,000

48,937 34,781

30,000

26,194

20,000 10,000

2,350

Dorchester County School District 2

Berkeley

Charleston County School District

reate, military-infused, math and science, arts and technology programs. A number of options for adult education are also offered in the Charleston district, which strives to close the achievement gap and increase the graduation rate. The district has completed a new strategic plan with the focus on ensuring college, career and citizenship readiness for all students.

Charleston

Dorchester 4

Average SAT scores, 2018 1200 1100

1047

1096

1085

1000

1017

900 800 Berkeley

Charleston

Dorchester 2

Dorchester 4

Source: South Carolina Department of Education

Dorchester School District 2 102 Green Wave Blvd. Summerville, SC 29483 843-873-2901 www.edlinesites.net/pages/Dorchester_County_SD For a complete list of schools, look under the District Information tab on the website. This link has a list of schools for each subdivision in the area. For questions about attendance zones and which neighborhood school your child would attend, call the district office. Dorchester School District 2 is the largest employer in Dorchester County. The district serves about 26,000 students in suburban Summerville through three high schools, six middle schools and 15 elementary schools, plus an alternative program for grades six to 12

Dorchester 2

and an adult community education program. A school improvement program is underway that provided three new elementary schools. A new Rollings Middle School of the Arts opened in early 2018. The improvement program will also fund major expansions and renovations at five elementary and three middle schools. All three high schools will have classroom additions to accommodate increased career-readiness and technology programs to prepare students for college and the workforce. The new schools are helping alleviate overcrowding at all schools in the district. Recognized as a school system of excellence, Dorchester 2 has been awarded district-wide National Accreditation from the AdvancED Accreditation Commission.

Dorchester School District 4 500 Ridge St. St. George, SC 29477 843-563-4535 www.dorchester4.k12.sc.us For a complete list of schools in the district, visit the website and check the Schools tab. To determine your neighborhood school zone, call the district office. Dorchester School District 4 is home to six schools — three elementary schools, two middle schools and one high school — and the Odyssey Educational Center, serving a student population of about 2,300. The district offers honors/advanced placement, college prep, tech prep and occupational courses.

EDUCATION |

19


Private Schools

For more lists subscribe to:

Ranked by Fall 2018 Enrollment School Porter-Gaud School 300 Albemarle Road, Charleston, SC 29407 Northwood Academy 104 Charger Drive, Summerville, SC 29486 Palmetto Christian Academy 361 Egypt Road, Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Bishop England High School 363 Seven Farms Drive, Charleston, SC 29492 Pinewood Preparatory School 1114 Orangeburg Road, Summerville, SC 29483 Ashley Hall 172 Rutledge Ave., Charleston, SC 29403 Cathedral Academy 3790 Ashley Phosphate Road, North Charleston, SC 29418 Charleston Collegiate School 2024 Academy Drive, Johns Island, SC 29455 Mason Preparatory School 56 Halsey Blvd., Charleston, SC 29401 Northside Christian School 7800 Northside Drive, North Charleston, SC 29420 Charleston Day School 15 Archdale St., Charleston, SC 29401

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Phone

Website / Email

Enrollment / Teachers

Grades / Student:Teacher Ratio B

Administrator(s) / Year Founded

843-556-3620

www.portergaud.edu admissions@portergaud.edu

985 139

1st through 12th 1:11

David DuBose Egleston Jr. 1867

843-764-2284

www.northwoodacademy.com admissions@northwoodacademy.com

787 74

Pre-K through 12th 10:1

Larry L. Evanoff, Darlene W. Anderson, Melanie Van Deusen 1978

843-881-9967

www.palmettochristianacademy.org lisas@palmettochristianacademy.org

709 87

Pre-K through 12th 14:1

JD Zubia 1992

843-849-9599

www.behs.com INP

700 56

9th through 12th 13:1

Patrick Finneran, Nancy Heath, Mary Anne Tucker, Kit Brownell 1915

843-873-1643

www.pinewoodprep.com news@pinewoodprep.com

675 90

3-K through 12th 16:1; 8:1 (preschool)

Steve Mandell 1969

843-722-4088

www.ashleyhall.org admission@ashleyhall.org

645 91

2 years old through 12th 9:1

Jill Muti 1909

843-760-1192

www.cathedralacademy.com contact@cathedralemail.com

320 28

4-K through 12th 15:1

Patrick Stuart 1999

843-559-5506

www.charlestoncollegiate.org amulkey@charlestoncollegiate.org

320 39

Pre-K through 12th 7:1

Hacker H. Burr 1970

843-723-0664

www.masonprep.org mainoffice@masonprep.org

312 39

K through 8th 13:1

Erik Kreutner 1964

843-797-2690

www.northsidecharleston.com cecilbeach@northsideministries.com

260 29

K2 through 12th 17:1

Gavin Lockaby 1975

843-377-0315

www.charlestondayschool.org admissions@charlestonday.org

255 37

K through 8th 9:1

Judith Foley Arnstein 1937

Because of space constraints, only the top-ranked companies are printed. For a full list of participating companies, visit http://www.scbiznews.com/buy-business-lists. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com. B Some schools include volunteers and part-time teachers in their student:teacher ratio.

20

| EDUCATION

Researched by Business Journal staff


EDUCATION |

21


Private Schools

For more lists subscribe to:

Ranked by Fall 2018 Enrollment School Blessed Sacrament Catholic School 7 St. Teresa Drive, Charleston, SC 29407 Charleston Catholic School 888-A King St., Charleston, SC 29403 Summerville Catholic School 226 Black Oak Blvd., Summerville, SC 29485 Crown Leadership Academy 1455 Wakendaw Road, Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Ridge Christian Academy 2168 Ridge Church Road, Summerville, SC 29486 Charles Towne Montessori School 56 Leinbach Drive, Charleston, SC 29407 The Charleston Christian School 2014 Bees Ferry Road, Charleston, SC 29414 Trident Academy 1455 Wakendaw Road, Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 University School of the Lowcountry 690 Coleman Blvd., Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Trident Classical Academy 118 W. Third South St., Summerville, SC 29483 St. John Catholic School 3921 St. John's Ave., North Charleston, SC 29405 William-Randolph Christian Preparatory School of the Arts 8717 Old University Blvd., North Charleston, SC 29406

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

| EDUCATION

Administrator(s) / Year Founded

Website / Email

843-766-2128

843-873-9310

www.scbss.org sbendt@scbss.org www.charlestoncatholic.com charlestoncatholic@charlestoncatholic.org www.summervillecatholic.org scs@summervillecatholic.org

240 23 190 20 165 24

3-K through 8th 15:1 4-K through 8th 10:1 3-K through 8th 12:1

Katharine Murphy 1948 Fred S. McKay 1991 Charlie Tisdale 1984

843-425-2414

www.crownleadershipacademy.org crown@crownla.org

135 18

K through 12th 1:8

Lathan Carey 2010

843-873-9856

www.ridgechristian.info mrsbray@ridgechristian.info

125 25

Birth through 12th 10:1

843-571-1140 843-556-4480

www.charlestownemontessori.org admin@ctmlife.com charlestonchristian.org achandler@charlestonchristian.org

117 6 106 11

15 months through age 14 12:1 4-K through 8th 12:1

Gentry Ard, Maria P. Bray, Brian Benedict 1998 Susan Burkhardt 1972 Ashley M. Chandler 1981

843-884-7046

www.tridentacademy.com admissions@tridentacademy.com

75 20

K through 12th 1:3.5

Betsy A. Fanning 1972

843-884-0902 843-327-7444

www.uslowcountry.org info@uslowcountry.org www.tcasummerville.com tcaofsummerville@gmail.com

75 17 65 8

3rd through 12th 5:1 1st through 8th 12:1

843-744-3901

www.saintjohncatholicsc.org schooloffice@saintjohncatholicsc.org

54 10

4-K through 8th 5:1

Jason R. Kreutner 2007 Claire J. Kabine 2004 Karen Durand, Damian Ryan 1949

843-212-4289

www.williamrandolphprep.org admissions@wrcps.org

53 9

Early Kindergarten through 6th 1:6

Stephanie N. Wallace 2015

843-577-4495

Because of space constraints, only the top-ranked companies are printed. For a full list of participating companies, visit http://www.scbiznews.com/buy-business-lists. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com. B Some schools include volunteers and part-time teachers in their student:teacher ratio.

22

Grades / Enrollment / Teachers Student:Teacher Ratio B

Phone

Researched by Business Journal staff


Photo/Mike Ledford/College of Charleston

The College of Charleston spring commencement ceremony.

» HIGHER EDUCATION

W

hether you are a college-bound student, a college football fanatic, an employee or a resident interested in lectures and continuing education opportunities, there’s a good chance you will find what you are looking for in South Carolina’s higher education system. More than 238,500 students were enrolled in South Carolina’s public and independent two- and four-year institutions as of fall 2017. The College of Charleston, founded in 1770, is the oldest institution of higher learning in the Lowcountry and among the oldest in the nation. It is a nationally Photo/Charleston Southern University

recognized public liberal arts and sciences university located in the heart of historic Charleston. Students attend class in centuries-old buildings, and many spend their evenings working as waiters and bartenders — or pedaling tourists around in rickshaws. Because of their work ethic and spending power, the students are a vital part of Charleston’s thriving hospitality industry. The Citadel is another college with deep roots in Charleston. It’s not uncommon to spot a “knob” walking the Lowcountry’s streets. The freshman class is easily identified by the men’s shaved heads that resemble doorknobs — hence the nickname.

South Carolina is home to 84 institutions of higher learning, including: •

Three research institutions

10 comprehensive teachi ng institutions

Four regional campuses of

16 technical colleges

23 independent senior ins

Two two-year independe nt institutions

Two private professional

24 out-of-state degree-grant ing institutions

USC

titutions

schools

EDUCATION |

23


Photo/File

rsity n Southern Unive Photo/Charlesto

Left: Charleston Southern University offers faith-based graduate and postgraduate degrees. Right: Young cadets marching at The Citadel in Charleston. Photo/MUSC

The Medical University of South Carolina is a leading research and teaching institution and hospital in Charleston. It is also one of the largest employers in the Lowcountry.

A few dozen women also attend the military college, although females were not allowed until 1996. The school is unique because it offers a classic military education described as “intense, meaningful and academically strong.” It differs from the nation’s traditional military schools because students are not required to join the service upon graduation. The Medical University of South Carolina is one of the area’s premier hospitals and includes a strong teaching component. Its specialty degree programs include dental, graduate studies, medicine, nursing and pharmacy. It is also one of the region’s largest employers, and the research conducted there is a vital part of the region’s high-tech biomedical industry. Charleston Southern University, a private, church-supported school, has grown steadily along with the Charleston metro area. Beginning as Baptist College in 1965, the liberal-arts school has an enrollment of more than 3,400 students pursuing four-year

24

| EDUCATION


Colleges and Universities

For more lists subscribe to:

Ranked by Total 2018 Enrollment

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Institution

Phone / Website / Email

Enrollment / Faculty

Public / Private

Top Three Undergraduate Majors, by Enrollment

Administrator

Trident Technical College 7000 Rivers Ave. North Charleston, SC 29406

843-574-6111 www.tridenttech.edu infocenter.ttc@tridenttech.edu

12,148 268

Public

Arts, Science, Nursing

Mary Thornley 1964

College of Charleston 66 George St. Charleston, SC 29424

843-953-5507 www.cofc.edu admissions@cofc.edu

10,783 522

Public

Biology, Business Administration, Psychology

Andrew T. Hsu 1770

The Citadel 171 Moultrie St. Charleston, SC 29409

843-225-3294 www.citadel.edu ocm@citadel.edu

3,717 201

Public

Business Administration, Engineering, Criminal Justice

Lt. Gen. John B. Sams Jr., Gen Glenn M. Walters 1842

Charleston Southern University 9200 University Blvd. Charleston, SC 29406

843-863-7955 www.charlestonsouthern.edu admissions@csuniv.edu

3,459 182

Private

Nursing, Biology, Kinesiology

Dondi E. Costin, Michael L. Bryant 1964

Medical University of South Carolina 171 Ashley Ave. Charleston, SC 29425

843-792-2300 www.musc.edu eslweb@musc.edu

2,943 1,255

Public

Nursing, RN to BSN, Healthcare Studies

David J. Cole 1824

ECPI University & Medical Careers Institute 7410 Northside Drive, Suite 100 Charleston, SC 29420

843-414-0350 www.ecpi.edu jweaver@ecpi.edu

398 19

Private

Health Science, Computer and Information Science, Electronics Engineering Technology

James Weaver 1966

Limestone College Charleston Evening Program 4500 Leeds Ave., Suite 208 Charleston, SC 29405

843-745-1100 www.limestone.edu sbutler@limestone.edu

366 2

Private

Business, Social Work, Liberal Studies

Darrell Parker 1845

American College of the Building Arts 649 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29403

843-577-5245 www.buildingartscollege.us handall@buildingartscollege.us

90 8

Private

Timber Framing, Architectural Iron, Trowel Trades

Colby M. Broadwater III 2004

Saint Leo University 7499 Dorchester Road North Charleston, SC 29418

843-554-2111 www.saintleo.edu/northcharleston northcharleston@saintleo.edu

55 2

Private

Business Administration, Health Care Administration, Criminal Justice

Kai Campbell 2012

USC Darla Moore School of Business 151 Market St. Charleston, SC 29401

803-777-2730 www.sc.edu/study/colleges_schools/ moore gradinfo@moore.sc.edu

51 47

Public

International Business, Finance, Marketing

Peter Brews 1975

Because of space constraints, only the top-ranked companies are printed. For a full list of participating companies, visit http://www.scbiznews.com/buy-business-lists. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com.

Researched by Business Journal Staff

EDUCATION |

25


Photos/Trident Technical College

Trident Technical College offers classes and certifications in a variety of high-demand fields, including welding, emergency medicine and others.

and postgraduate degrees in a variety of disciplines. It was recently named among the top 25 online bachelor’s degree programs in the country by U.S. News & World Report. The Charleston School of Law is a private institution located in downtown Charleston. While the school was founded in 2003, like most things in this city, it is steeped in history. In November 1825, a group of Charleston attorneys petitioned the S.C. General Assembly for a charter institution. The following year, the Forensic Club started offering law lectures, beginning the Southeast’s earliest law school. In 2002, prominent Charleston judges and attorneys set out to

26

| EDUCATION

tical Training Center that will consolidate all aspects of its aircraft and avionics curriculum. Trident Tech also offers training for workers in the surging automotive industry in the Lowcountry to meet workforce demands for Volvo, Mercedes-Benz and their suppliers. Students also have the option of attending satellite campuses for specialty training, such as Embry Riddle Aeronautical University's two Lowcountry locations at Joint Base Charleston and in North Charleston. Charleston is also home to the American College of the Building Arts, which trains students in historical building trades such as ironwork or plaster. Photo/College of Charleston

The Rita Liddy Hollings Science Center and Observatory at the College of Charleston.

establish a law school that would continue the 19th-century club’s tradition. The school earned accreditation in 2006 and graduated its first class the following year. The Charleston region is also home to several technical colleges that offer a host of two-year degrees and trade certifications. These include Trident Technical College in North Charleston, the state’s largest two-year school. Trident Tech has partnered with Boeing since the global aerospace company established its North Charleston campus in 2009 to help fill the demand for trained, skilled workers in the aeronautics industry. The school recently announced a new South Carolina Aeronau-


Photo/Charleston Southern University

The Lowcountry Graduate Center in North Charleston is an organization that formed to help working professionals gain advanced degrees through collaboration between the state’s colleges and universities. Despite myriad choices, South Carolina, like many states, is at a crossroads when it comes to higher education. Many exciting programs are underway here, including the South Carolina Centers for Economic Excellence program. The state created the Centers for Economic Excellence program in 2002 to provide incentives for the state’s research universities to raise capital from private sources to fund endowments for specialized research professorships. The professorships serve a unique role in helping cultivate critical public-private industrial partnerships and expanding the state’s knowledge base. At the same time, South Carolina is grappling with decreasing state funds and increased tuition costs. Without money for new facilities, demand in the coming years may outstrip capacity. And schools are constantly challenged with training students for the evolving high-tech industry. The good news is that university officials and lawmakers spend countless hours studying, debating and creating innovative ways to advance higher learning in South Carolina, without putting the financial burden on students and their families. The state’s colleges and universities, including many in the Lowcountry, offer a competitive education to traditional and returning students. They also help fuel the local economy by serving as some of the area’s largest employers, by luring students and families to town, and by fostering relationships with the community and businesses. The Lowcountry’s institutions of higher learning are — and will continue to be — a major part of the cultural fabric of this region. For more information on higher education institutions in South Carolina, visit the S.C. Commission on Higher Education at www.che.sc.gov.

The Health Science building at Charleston Southern University.

EDUCATION |

27


Health and Wellness W

e like to take things easy here in the Lowcountry, but that doesn’t mean we don’t give attention to a diet and activity level that contributes to our health and wellbeing. In this section you will read about all the reasons living here can help inspire you to healthy living. And when medical care is what you need, we offer the finest in physicians, clinics and hospitals. Charleston has long been home to some of the top hospitals in South Carolina. When you are moving to a new place, finding out about health care can be a challenge. In these pages, we give you a list of urgent care centers, hospitals and retirement communities with full information about each. We hope you’ll find our guide useful in helping you settle into a healthy lifestyle. It’s one of Charleston’s charms.

Sponsored by

28

| HEALTH AND WELLNESS

In this section Urgent Care Centers........................................ 34 Hospitals................................................................ 36 Retirement Communities................................37


Photo/Brian Fancher Photography

James Island County Park East Coast Paddlesports and Outdoor Festival.

A

ll the pieces are in place for a healthy lifestyle when you move to Charleston. The weather is mild all year, fresh food and outdoor activities are readily available, and when you need it, topnotch medical care is close by. So what are you waiting for? If you need a nudge to get started, there are organized efforts to help you. Just one of the many possibilities is Adventure Out, an outdoor fitness program presented by a partnership of Medical University of South Carolina and City of Charleston Parks and Recreation Department. Every week, a free fitness class is offered in a city park. It might be yoga at Brittle Bank Park or Hampton Park. It’s a great way to try out something new. For a schedule, see www.musc.edu/adventureout or the Adventure Out page on Facebook. If you prefer to exercise independently,

30

| HEALTH AND WELLNESS

try walking, swimming or hiking, suggests Suzie Walters, fitness specialist program coordinator in Health Sciences at Trident Technical College. “You have to enjoy what you do,” Walters said, so that you’ll stick with it. Just think about walking across the Arthur J. Ravenel Jr. bridge over the Cooper River or jogging along Folly Beach for inspiration. If you tire of the scenery in your own neighborhood, go walk downtown or along the water. You’re never more than 10 minutes away from a public park, and Charleston area parks have dozens of activities on the weekend. MUSC also partners with other groups on programs that promote the active lifestyle. One of those programs is the Charleston Healthy Business Challenge. It is free for any business and includes a website with scorecard and tips to help improve the cul-

ture of wellness with stress management, healthy eating and exercise. Go to www. chbchallenge.com for more information. Like to run or walk with a lot of new friends? Find organized events and get registered at www.eventbrite.com/d/sc-Charleston/races/ Honoring a former MUSC president, the Greenberg Greenway is a series of greenscapes that connect people with places that support the environment and ecology of the MUSC campus, provide opportunities for hands-on learning, and create an inviting space for exercise and other health-promoting activities. Components of the Greenway include the MUSC Arboretum, Urban Farm, Porcher Medicinal Garden, Walking Trails and the MUSC Fitness Park. The greenway will continue to evolve with the campus. For information, visit musc.edu, Office of Health Promotion.


Photo/Johns Island Farmers Market

For learning about healthy food – and observing how it grows – the Urban Farm at MUSC is a marvelous resource. “It’s five acres on the MUSC campus. We grow crops year-round, with 40 varieties of fruits, herbs and vegetables,” said Susan Johnson, director of Health Promotion at MUSC. The farm, at the corner of Bee and President streets, offers free gardening and health programs, field trips for school children, a wellness and dietitian program, guest speakers and community events. Visitors are invited to take a self-guided tour, or volunteer to help with gardening tasks. You won’t go home empty-handed, as the harvested crops are shared with the community. “It’s a free resource for our community,” Johnson said. There are Saturday work and learn programs with a kid focus. You just might be inspired to plant your own garden – and the Lowcountry climate is congenial for that. During the growing season, fresh foods are always available at the many farmers markets in the Lowcountry. Two of the larger

Homegrown vegetables for sale at the Johns Island Farmers Market.

ones are at Marion Square downtown and in Mount Pleasant. Another way to get your fresh food is by CSA – Community Supported Agriculture. About 10 farms in the area de-

liver fresh produce weekly to those who purchase a CSA membership. Information about CSAs, farmers markets and roadside markets can be found at agriculture.sc.gov.

HEALTH AND WELLNESS |

31


Photo/Cooper River Bridge Run

“When you buy local, you’re not promoting use of fossil fuels,” said Walters of Trident Tech. “It’s also fresher and better for us.” She pointed out that fresh seafoods are also easily found in the Lowcountry. The local seafood won’t contain the antibiotics of farmed seafoods and will be much fresher. When your quest for wellness means you need medical care, you’re in a good place. The Lowcountry is home to several major hospitals and many specialty clinics, rehabilitation services, nursing homes and assisted living facilities. MUSC is building a new hospital dedicated to the care of women and children. The MUSC Shawn Jenkins Children’s Hospital and the Women’s Pavilion are scheduled to open in 2019. The hospital will have a 10-story patient tower, with the top floor dedicated to children’s cancer care, and a five-story inpatient procedure area, with a dedicated floor for labor and delivery. Ground was broken for the hospital, at Calhoun and Courtenay streets, in August 2016. Patient rooms will be larger and fur-

The Cooper River Bridge Run attracts more than 40,000 runners to the annual spring event.

nished to accommodate short or long stays by patients and their families. The hospital will have a neonatal intensive care unit and a comprehensive pediatric heart center. The Advanced Fetal Care Center will be the state’s first comprehensive prenatal center for families expecting babies with

complex congenital birth defects and medical problems. In addition, Roper St. Francis is constructing a hospital and medical office building at Carnes Crossroads, where U.S. Highways 17-A and 176 intersect near Goose Creek, which will serve growing Berkeley County.

» MAKE ROOM FOR GOOD HEALTH IN YOUR BUSY DAY Always on the run with no time to exercise or plan meals? Here are some tips to help:

1. Don’t allow technology to get in the way. Take the stairs, park a couple of blocks away from your destination, and at the golf course, walk rather than taking a cart. 2. At work, incorporate a treadmill desk if possible. You can walk at low speed while talking on the phone or reading reports. 3. Schedule workout meetings, where you walk while you talk. 4. With your children, look for exercisebased outdoor fun. Go to a park or seek out a “Mommy and Me” exercise class. Exercising with kids builds family bonds and healthy habits. When you play with your children, you’re creating memories.

5. When you’re doing household chores or gardening, add a deep knee bend or squat in between steps of a task. Do arm curls with the cans while putting away groceries.

6. Choose the manual tool rather than the power tool when doing chores. A broom or rake gives you more exercise than a power blower. 7. When you’re tired at the end of the day, try the “10-minute ticker.” You can do anything for 10 minutes – such as walking or using the treadmill – and once you start, you’ll continue longer and feel energized. 8. Find a support group to walk or run with. You’ll make new friends and strengthen bonds with your community.

9. Learn to read food labels. Watch out for high levels of sugar and sodium in processed foods. Be sure to eat breakfast to get your metabolism going. 10. Make family meals a time to nourish your body and family by spending quality time with each other. Research suggests that eating family meals at home helps reduce risk of obesity in kids and helps adults maintain healthy weight. 11. Grow your own vegetables to provide fresh produce while improving health, easing stress and building family connections. 12. Teach the value of exercise by teaming up with your children for a fund-raising race. These 5Ks are usually family friendly with a mix of walkers and runners.

Source: Susan Johnson, director of Health Promotion, MUSC; Suzie Walters, fitness specialist program coordinator, Health Sciences, Trident Technical College

32

| HEALTH AND WELLNESS


Photos/Bishop Gadsden

» RETIRING WELL

E

ach year, more and more retirees discover the benefits of relocating to the Charleston area. The mild weather, historic surroundings, cultural arts and idyllic location on the water make it a picturesque place to celebrate days of leisure. South Carolina also has low property taxes and no estate tax, enticing retirees to move to the area. The cost of living is at the national average and crime remains low in the Charleston area. The price of new and existing homes varies significantly in the Lowcountry, depending on how close to the water you want to live and which county you choose. Charleston County homes sell for a median price of just over $380,000, while the median price in Berkeley and Dorchester counties is about $250,000. Attached townhomes and condominiums sell at a median price of about $238,000

in Charleston County and $175,000 in Dorchester and Berkeley. Of course, deep-water-access and beach homes can easily cost in the millions. A robust economy, quality health care facilities and a host of recreational activities give the Charleston area everything retirees require for a relaxing lifestyle. The population of those 65 years and older is growing nationwide, and the Charleston area is no exception. That means planning for more health care facilities, more affordable housing and recreational activities to address the needs of the aging population. The Medical University of South Carolina, Roper St. Francis Healthcare and East Cooper MediLocated on James Isla nd, Bishop Gadsden ha s more than 450 cal Center all serve area health care retired residents and 300 employees. needs. Trident Health Care System HEALTH AND WELLNESS |

33


Senior Centers

For more lists subscribe to:

Listed alphabetically

Berkeley County

Berkeley Seniors, Inc. (BSI) 103 Thurgood Road Goose Creek, SC 29455 (843) 761-0390, Administrative Office Hours: All facilities are open 8:00am 3:30pm, Monday through Friday. Moncks Corner Senior Center Berkeley Seniors, Inc. (BSI) 222 Heatley Street Moncks Corner, SC 29461 (843) 761-0391 Hours: All facilities are open 8:00am 3:30pm, Monday through Friday. Saint Stephen Senior Center Berkeley Seniors, Inc. (BSI) 1264 Russelville Road St. Stephen, SC 29469 (843) 761-0390, Administrative Office Hours: All facilities are open 8:00am 2:00pm, Monday through Friday. Senior Program at Echo House

34

| HEALTH AND WELLNESS

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Charleston County

Awendaw Senior Center South Santee Senior & Community Center, Inc. 6655 U.S. Highway 17 N. Awendaw, SC 29429 843-928-3280 Hours: Main office is open 8:30am 5:00pm, Monday through Friday. The Center operates from 9:00am - 2:00pm, Monday through Friday. CASC Senior Center Charleston Area Senior Citizens, Inc. (CASC) 259 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29401 (843) 722-4127 Hours: Office hours are 8:30am - 4:00pm, Monday through Friday. Program hours may differ.

Coastal Catholic Charities 3921 St. John’s Ave. N. Charleston, SC 29405 (843) 554-7319 Hours: 10:00am - 1:00pm, Tueday & Friday South Berkeley Senior Center Friendship AME Church Group Dining Site South Santee Senior & Community Center, Inc. 203 Royal Avenue Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464 (843) 884-6748 Hours: Main office is open 8:30am 5:00pm, Monday through Friday. The Center operates from 10:00am - 2:00pm, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Mount Pleasant Senior Center 840 Von Kolnitz Road Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 (843) 856-2166 Hours: 6:00am to 7:00pm, Monday

through Thursday; 6:00am to 6:00pm, Friday; and 8:00am to 1:00pm, Saturday. Closed on Sundays.

Dorchester County

David Sojourner Senior Center Dorchester Seniors, Inc. 5361 East Jim Bilton Boulevard St. George, SC 29477 (843) 563-3709 Hours: 8:30am - 4:30pm, Monday through Friday Faith Sellers Senior Center Dorchester Seniors, Inc. 312 North Laurel Street Summerville, SC 29483 (843) 871-5053 Hours: 8:30am - 5:00pm, Monday through Friday


Photo/Daniel Island Development Company

is another provider in the Charleston area, with locations in Summerville and Moncks Corner. The Summerville Medical Center has found a niche in treating ailments common in seniors, routinely scoring top points from the Joint Commission for its treatment of heart attacks, heart failure and pneumonia. Palmetto Primary Care Physicians is building a new medical campus in the Nexton mixeduse community in Summerville. Berkeley County is scheduled to have its first full-service hospital when Roper-St. Francis’ new facility at Carnes Crossroads in Goose Creek opens in 2019. The Charleston area offers a number of public recreational activities and options for a healthy lifestyle. The Charleston County Park and Recreation Commission has a host of parks and waterfront piers and offers discounts on yearly memberships for seniors. The James Island County Park, Mount Pleasant Palmetto Islands County Park and North Charleston Wannamaker County Park offer walking trails, canoeing, kayaking and shelters for gatherings. For those looking for an easy stroll along the beach, there’s the Isle of Palms County Park and Kiawah Beachwalker Park. The Folly Beach Edwin S. Taylor Fishing Pier is a hot spot for catching fish. The current pier, in use since 1995, is undergoing replacement for much of the next two years, and access to sections of the pier will be limited at various times during the project. Charleston County wants to create more biking options in the area. In the next several years, the county plans to construct the Lowcountry Lowline, which will add miles of bike trails to connect all of the county’s parks. Numerous farmers markets offer fresh, local produce. A weekly Saturday morning market draws hundreds to downtown Charleston between April and November. A similar market draws residents and visitors in Mount Pleasant on Tuesday afternoons. Food stands dot the landscape, and most accept vouchers for seniors under the Senior Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program (SFMNP).

HEALTH AND WELLNESS |

35


Urgent Care Centers

For more lists subscribe to:

Listed alphabetically Care Now Urgent Care 515 St. James Ave., Goose Creek, SC 29445 843-507-8925 www.carenow.com Hours: Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m.-8:00 p.m.; Sun. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Treatment of accidental injuries, allergy symptoms, bronchitis, bug bites, minor bruises and burns, ear infections, eye infections, fever, flu and cold symptoms, joint pain, sprains and strains, pink eye, skin conditions, nausea Centre Point Emergency 5249 Emmett I. Davis Jr. Ave., North Charleston, SC 29406 843-849-2400 www.tridenthealthsystem.com Hours: 24/7 Full service ER Concentra 4115 Dorchester Road Suite 100 North Charleston, SC 29405 843-554-6737 www.concentra.com Hours: M-F: 8:00-5:00pm Treat a wide range of injuries and illnesses, including sprains and broken bones to coughs, colds, and flu Concentra 7519 Rivers Ave., North Charleston, SC 29406 843-735-5020 http://www.concentra.com/ Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8:00 a.m.-5 p.m. Workers comp injury, drug screening, physicals, medical consulting, immigration physicals, vaccinations

www.CharlestonBusiness.com Doctors Care Ivy Hall 3074 U.S. Highway 17 North, Mount Pleasant, SC 29466 843-884-6424 www.DoctorsCare.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Online check-in. Urgent care, family care. Onsite lab and X-rays; foreign travel medicine; sports and camp physicals; cold, flu and allergy testing and care; sprains, cuts, burns and other minor injuries. DOT physicals, OccMed and Workers’ Comp. Open late and on weekend, walk-ins welcome.

Doctors Care West Ashley 1851 Sam Rittenberg Blvd., Charleston, SC 29407 843-556-5585 www.DoctorsCare.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Urgent care, family care. Onsite lab and X-rays; foreign travel medicine; sports and camp physicals; cold, flu and allergy testing and care; sprains, cuts, burns and other minor injuries. DOT physicals, OccMed and Workers’ Comp. Open late and on weekend, walk-ins welcome.

IV fluids, immunizations and vaccinations; annual physicals, sports physicals

Doctors Care James Island 743 Folly Road, Charleston, SC 29412 843-762-2360 www.doctorscare.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Online check-in. Urgent care, family care. Onsite lab and X-rays; foreign travel medicine; sports and camp physicals; cold, flu and allergy testing and care; sprains, cuts, burns and other minor injuries. DOT physicals, Occ Med and Workers’ Comp. Open late and on weekend, walk-ins welcome.

Health First - Mount Pleasant 2863 U.S. Highway 17 N., Mount Pleasant, SC 29466 843-572-5990 www.healthfirstcares.com Hours: Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Urgent care, including treatment of cough, flu, cold, fever, sore throat, sinus and ear infections, allergic reactions and allergies, sprains

Renew Medical IV Spa and Urgent Care 442 King St., 2nd Floor, Charleston, SC 29403 843-800-8110 www.renewmedicalcare.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m. Sat.- Sun. 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Urgent care services including treatment of allergies, arthritis, asthma, bites and stings, bladder and urinary infections, couch and congestion, cuts and scrapes, ear infections, flu, joint inflammation, rashes and eczema, ringworm, sexually transmitted diseases, sinus infection, strep throat, upper respiratory infection; house calls, IV Therapy, Boost camp

Doctors Care Moncks Corner 459 U.S. Highway 52 N., Moncks Corner, SC 29461 843-899-3870 www.doctorscare.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Online check-in. Urgent care, family care. Onsite lab and X-rays; foreign travel medicine; sports and camp physicals; cold, flu and allergy testing and care; sprains, cuts, burns and other minor injuries. DOT physicals, OccMed and Workers’ Comp. Open late and on weekend, walk-ins welcome.

Health First - North Charleston 8740 Rivers Ave., North Charleston, SC 29406 843-572-5990 www.healthfirstcares.com Hours: Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Sun. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Urgent care, including treatment of cough, flu, cold, fever, sore throat, sinus and ear infections, allergic reactions and allergies, sprains Health First - Summerville 1675 N. Main St., Summerville, SC 29483 843-572-5990 www.healthfirstcares.com Hours: Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Urgent care, including treatment of hacking cough, flu, cold, fever, sore throat, sinus and ear infections, allergic reactions and allergies, sprains

Doctors Care Charleston West 3424 Shelby Ray Court, Charleston, SC 29414 843-402-6834 www.DoctorsCare.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Online check-in. Urgent care, family care. Onsite lab and X-rays; foreign travel medicine; sports and camp physicals; cold, flu and allergy testing and care; sprains, cuts, burns and other minor injuries. DOT physicals, OccMed and Workers’ Comp.

Doctors Care Mount Pleasant 631 Johnnie Dodds Blvd., Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843-881-0815 www.DoctorsCare.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Online check-in. Urgent care, family care. Onsite lab and X-rays; foreign travel medicine; sports and camp physicals; cold, flu and allergy testing and care; sprains, cuts, burns and other minor injuries. DOT physicals, OCCMed and Workers Comp. Open late and on weekend, walk-ins welcome.

Doctors Care Clements Ferry 1951 Clements Ferry Road, Charleston, SC 29492 843-990-5260 www.DoctorsCare.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Online check-in. Urgent care, family care. Onsite lab and X-rays; foreign travel medicine; sports and camp physicals; cold, flu and allergy testing and care; sprains, cuts, burns and other minor injuries. DOT physicals, OccMed and Workers’ Comp. Open late and on weekend, walk-ins welcome.

Doctors Care Northwoods 8091 Rivers Ave., North Charleston, SC 29406 843-572-7000 www.DoctorsCare.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Online check-in. Urgent care, family care. Onsite lab and X-rays; foreign travel medicine; sports and camp physicals; cold, flu and allergy testing and care; sprains, cuts, burns and other minor injuries. DOT physicals, OccMed and Workers’ Comp. Open late and on weekend, walk-ins welcome.

Kiawah-Seabrook Medical & Urgent Care 345 Freshfields Drive, Suite J101 Johns Island, SC 29455 http://www.urgentcare.com/clinic/3800/kiawahseabrook-medical-amp-urgent-care 843-768-4800 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. (closed noon-1 p.m.); Sat. 8 a.m.-noon General family medicine and primary care, lab and X-ray services, urgent care and occupational medicine-worksite partners

Doctors Care Dorchester Road 843-871-7900 10160 Dorchester Road, Summerville, SC 29485 843-871-7900 www.DoctorsCare.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Online check-in. Urgent care, family care. Onsite lab and X-rays; foreign travel medicine; sports and camp physicals; cold, flu and allergy testing and care; sprains, cuts, burns and other minor injuries. DOT physicals and employer health services. OccMed and Worker’s Comp. Open late and on weekend, walk-ins welcome.

Doctors Care Summerville 410 N. Main St., Summerville, SC 29483 843-871-3277 www.DoctorsCare.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Online check-in. Urgent care, family care. Onsite lab and X-rays; foreign travel medicine; sports and camp physicals; cold, flu and allergy testing and care; sprains, cuts, burns and other minor injuries. DOT physicals, OccMed and Workers’ Comp. Open late and on weekend, walk-ins welcome.

MedCare Urgent Care Center - North Charleston 8720 Dorchester Road, North Charleston, SC 29420 843-552-3629 www.medcareurgentcare.com Hours: Mon.-Sun. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Walk-in treatment for injury and illness; coughs, colds, fevers, rashes, allergic reactions, abdominal pain, lacerations, sprains, fractures workers’ compensation injuries; on-site lab, digital X-ray, CT scans, EKGs, IV fluids, immunizations and vaccinations; annual physicals, sports physicals

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| HEALTH AND WELLNESS

Health First - West Ashley 1115 Savannah Highway, Charleston, SC 29407 843-572-5990 www.healthfirstcares.com Hours: Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Urgent care, including treatment of cough, flu, cold, fever, sore throat, sinus and ear infections, allergic reactions and allergies, sprains

MedCare Urgent Care Center - West Ashley 1850 Sam Rittenberg Blvd., Charleston, SC 29407 843-793-6093 www.medcareurgentcare.com Hours: 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Mon.-Sun. Walk-in treatment for injury and illness; coughs, colds, fevers, rashes, allergic reactions, abdominal pain, lacerations, sprains, fractures workers’ compensation injuries; on-site lab, digital X-ray, CT scans, EKGs,

Palmetto Urgent Care 2550 Elms Centre Road, North Charleston, SC 29406 843-302-8840 http://palmettoprimarycare.com/Lists/Offices/ OfficeDisplay.aspx?ID=11&location=Urgent%20 Care%20Center Hours: Mon.-Sun. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. General medical care

Roper St. Francis Walk-In Care 180 Wingo Way, Suite 110, Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843-606-7048 www.rsfh.com/late Hours: Mon.- Sat. 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. After hours primary and urgent care Roper St. Francis Express Care 319 Folly Road Charleston, SC 29412 843-402-5283 www.rsfh.com/express-care Hours: Mon.-Sun. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Treatment of many minor injuries or illnesses such as: cold or flu symptoms, sore throats, sinus infections, earaches, upset stomachs, diarrhea or vomiting, sprained ankles, minor cuts or scrapes Roper St. Francis Express Care 8901 University Blvd., Suite 131, North Charleston, SC 29406 843-402-5283 www.rsfh.com/express-care Hours: Mon.-Sun. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Treatment of many minor injuries or illnesses such as: cold or flu symptoms, sore throats, sinus infections, earaches, upset stomachs, diarrhea or vomiting, sprained ankles, minor cuts or scrapes Roper St. Francis Express Care 1114 N. Main St., Summerville, SC 29483 843-402-5283 www.rsfh.com/express-care Hours: Mon.-Sun. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Treatment of many minor injuries or illnesses such as: cold or flu symptoms, sore throats, sinus infections, earaches, upset stomachs, diarrhea or vomiting, sprained ankles, minor cuts or scrapes Roper St. Francis Express Care 4278 Ladson Road, Summerville, SC 29485 843-402-5283 www.rsfh.com/express-care Hours: Mon.-Sun. 8 a.m.- 8 p.m. Treatment of many minor injuries or illnesses such as: cold or flu symptoms, sore throats, sinus infections, earaches, upset stomachs, diarrhea or vomiting, sprained ankles, minor cuts or scrapes


Hospitals

For more lists subscribe to:

Ranked by No. of Licensed Beds

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Phone / Website / Email

Licensed Beds / 2013 Admissions

Active Staff Physicians / Registered Nurses

Administrator(s) / Year Founded

843-792-2300 www.muschealth.org -

700 39,187

1,029 2,935

Patrick J. Cawley, David J. Cole 1824

Roper St. Francis Healthcare 125 Doughty St. Charleston, SC 29403

843-724-2000 www.rsfh.com -

671 24,976

858 1,374

Lorraine Lutton 1852

Roper Hospital 316 Calhoun St. Charleston, SC 29401

843-724-2901 www.rsfh.com -

316 12,428

432 683

Stephen Porter 1829

843-797-7000 www.tridenthealthsystem.com trid.questionscomments@hcahealthcare.com

313 17,574

400 745

Todd Gallati 1975

843-402-1000 www.rsfh.com -

204 9,056

360 395

Anthony Jackson 1882

843-577-5011 www.charleston.va.gov -

152 4,373

280 505

Scott R. Isaacks 1966

East Cooper Medical Center 2000 Hospital Drive Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

843-881-0100 www.eastcoopermedctr.com -

140 0

150 207

Patrick Downes, Patrick Beaver 1986

Summerville Medical Center 295 Midland Parkway Summerville, SC 29485

843-970-5000 www.tridenthealthsystem.com trid.questionscomments@hcahealthcare.com

94 6,705

400 292

Lisa Valentine 1989

Roper St. Francis Mount Pleasant Hospital 3500 U.S. Highway 17 N. Mount Pleasant, SC 29466

843-606-7000 www.rsfh.com -

85 2,313

274 132

Anthony Jackson 2010

Roper Rehabilitation Hospital 316 Calhoun St. Charleston, SC 29401

843-724-2842 www.rsfh.com -

66 1,179

7 26

Troy Powell 1992

843-761-8721 www.tridenthealthsystem.com trid.questionscomments@hcahealthcare.com

8 0

48 18

Todd Gallati 1986

Facility MUSC Medical Center 169 Ashley Ave. Charleston, SC 29425

Trident Medical Center 9330 Medical Plaza Drive Charleston, SC 29406

Bon Secours St. Francis Hospital 2095 Henry Tecklenburg Blvd. Charleston, SC 29414

Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center 109 Bee St. Charleston, SC 29401

Moncks Corner Medical Center 401 N. Live Oak Drive Moncks Corner, SC 29461

Because of space constraints, only the top-ranked companies are printed. For a full list of participating companies, visit http://www.scbiznews.com/buy-business-lists. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com.

38

| HEALTH AND WELLNESS

Researched by Business Journal staff


Retirement Communities

For more lists subscribe to:

Ranked by No. of Beds/Units in the Charleston Area

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

General Store

Guest Apts.

Library

Laundry

397 400

843-856-4700 frankeatseaside.org

330 250

The Village at Summerville 201 W. Ninth North St., Summerville, SC 29483

843-873-2550 www.PresCommunities.org

291 -

Somerby of Mount Pleasant 3100 Tradition Circle, Mount Pleasant, SC 29466

843-849-3096 www.somerbyofmtpleasant.com

247 71

The Palms of Mount Pleasant 937 Bowman Road, Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

843-884-6949 www.thepalmsofmtpleasant.com

200 100

843-556-1000 well-more.com/daniel-island

186 150

Summit Place of Daniel Island 320 Seven Farms Drive, Charleston, SC 29492

843-884-4104 www.summitplaceofdanielisland.com

67 45

The Palmettos of Charleston 1900 Ashley Crossing Drive, Charleston, SC 29414

843-852-0505 www.thepalmettosofcharleston.com

65 75

Sherman House 1635 Raoul Wallenberg Blvd., Charleston, SC 29407

843-763-2242 www.theshermanhouse.org

56 4

843-556-8314 www.charitiessc.org

25 31

843-620-2074 www.enlivant.com/communities/south-carolina/ cypress-place-summerville

-

-

-

-

843-889-9757 -

-

Franke at Seaside 1885 Rifle Range Road , Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

Wellmore of Daniel Island 580 Robert Daniel Dr., Charleston, SC 29492

Carter-May Home/St. Joseph Residence 1660 Ingram Road, Charleston, SC 29407

Cypress Place 205 Midland Parkway , Summerville, SC 29485

Dayspring of Johns Island 3455 Bohicket Road, Johns Island, SC 29455

Because of space constraints, only the top-ranked companies are printed. For a full list of participating companies, visit http://www.scbiznews.com/buy-business-lists. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com.

-

-

-

Transportation

Fitness Center

843-762-3300 www.bishopgadsden.org

Bishop Gadsden Episcopal Retirement Community 1 Bishop Gadsden Way, Charleston, SC 29412

Activities

Beds / Employees

Company

In-House Dr.

Phone / Website

Salon/Barber

Services

C. William Trawick, Sarah E.H. Tipton 1850

Sandy Stoll, Mark H. Lee 1892

Kathy R. Ligon 1958

Christopher Tharp 2008

Greg Woodward, Lisa Bell 1983

Emilee S. Padget, Ashley E. Seeds 2018

Dina I. Mewett 2003

Megan Martin 2002

Administrator / Year Founded

Sandra Slavin 1984

Janine N. Bauder 1929

-

-

-

-

Yassamin B. Marshall 1999

Researched by Business Journal staff

HEALTH AND WELLNESS |

39


Living In N

ow that you have decided to make the Charleston area your new home, you’ll need to decide where you want to live. There are so many choices, and all have something unique to offer. You could live in the historic downtown, across the harbor in Mount Pleasant, in a suburban neighborhood or at the beach. You really can’t go wrong, whether you settle in booming North Charleston or neighborly Moncks Corner. In these pages, we tell you at length about each of the possibilities. We talk about the community, the history, the neighborhoods and businesses and a touch of the lifestyle you can expect. To help you visualize, we show some photos of each area. And when you get ready to move in, you’ll find phone numbers and websites to help you get settled.

Enjoy!

42 40

| LIVING IN


In this section Historic Charleston.....................................42

Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island..... 46

46

North Charleston........................................ 48

50

Mount Pleasant............................................ 50

Daniel Island................................................. 53

53

West Ashley................................................... 55

55

James Island and Folly Beach...............57

Johns and Wadmalaw Islands.............. 59

57

Kiawah and Seabrook Islands.............. 60

Summerville....................................................62

60

Jedburg and Ridgeville............................. 65

Moncks Corner............................................ 66

66

Goose Creek.................................................. 68

68 LIVING IN |

41


Photo/File

LIVING IN

Historic Charleston A blend of old Southern charm and new development

A

city that defines Southern grace and charm, Charleston draws in visitors and residents with its rich history, vibrant culture and waterfront panoramas. Stroll down King Street to browse boutiques, wander through art galleries in the French Quarter, or tour some of the city’s wonderful old homes and churches. Fine dining has become synonymous with the Lowcountry, and downtown Charleston is the heart of a growing world-class culinary scene. Unforgettable dining experiences abound throughout the peninsula. Charleston is home to a well-established higher education community. The College of Charleston was granted a charter in 1785 and the school maintains a large presence downtown. In 1824, the Medical University of South

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| LIVING IN HISTORIC CHARLESTON

Carolina was founded, becoming the first medical school in the South. The MUSC campus and hospital occupy a large area on the peninsula’s western side between Calhoun and Bee streets, along with other health care providers, such as Roper St. Francis and the VA Medical Center. The Citadel, established in 1842 and originally located at Marion Square, now occupies a large section of the Hampton Park area along the banks of the Ashley River in the northern section of downtown. The school’s rich military history has been the subject of many books and movies.

MOVING IN

Sweetgrass Baskets One of the oldest handcrafts of African origin in the U.S. Numerous resident artists still create these baskets from indigenous plants at the Charleston City Market.

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

City of Charleston................................................. 577-6970 www.charleston-sc.gov Charleston County School District.........937-6300 Building permits....................................................577-5550

Charleston Water System..............................727-6800 S.C. Electric & Gas Co..............................800-251-7234 Trash and recycling............................................724-7364


Photo/Charleston Area Convention & Visitors Bureau

THE MUST

DO’S Photo/Minette Hand, courtesy of Charleston Wine+Food

Charleston Wine and Food Festival Held in late February/early March, this annual festival celebrates the culinary history and culture of the Lowcountry.

Photo/Charleston Area Convention & Visitors Bureau

Spoleto Festival USA This 17-day festival draws dozens of music,

Photo/Paul B. Goode, courtesy of Spoleto Festival USA

The Pineapple Fountain is an iconic landmark in downtown Charleston.

dance and theater companies to Charleston with more than 120 performances at many historic and unique venues starting in May. Photo/SEWE

Southeastern Wildlife Exposition Conservation exhibits, birds of prey, retriever demonstrations and the Dock Dogs competition are among the highlights of this expo held each February. Crowds flock to the Charleston City Market on Market Street.

LIVING IN HISTORIC CHARLESTON |

43


Photo/File

Aerial view of Charleston, with The Battery in the foreground.

Charleston is an old city, but new projects have risen all over the peninsula. A surge in renovation and construction, spurred by record tourism numbers and a thriving economy, has added numerous hotels, mixed-use and retail spaces. But the old charm prevails. Despite widespread damage from a major earthquake in 1886 and Hurricane Hugo in 1989, Charleston still has some of the most historic homes and buildings in the South. A designated “historic district” preserves many residential properties.

Neighborhoods

Rainbow Row is one of the most famous landmarks on the peninsula.

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| LIVING IN HISTORIC CHARLESTON

Fort Sumter in Charlest on Harbor is where the Civil War began. It is open for public tou rs.

The housing options downtown range from the sprawling, pastel-colored, multimillion-dollar homes to new luxury condos overlooking the Ashley River. The median price of homes downtown is higher than surrounding areas. South of Broad is the neighborhood literally south of Broad Street that includes the often-photographed Battery and Waterfront Park. This area has some of the most expensive real estate in Charleston with most of the houses coming with a price tag in the

millions. Walk down the streets in this quiet, storied neighborhood to catch a glimpse of traditional Charleston gardens and verandas. The French Quarter is bound by Market and Meeting streets and Waterfront Park. It is characterized by the many art galleries, cobblestone streets and restaurants that fill the area, and it’s named for the French merchants who once occupied the area. Above the French Quarter is Ansonborough, the peninsula’s first neighborhood,


Photo/Landon Neil Phillips/Charleston Music Hall

The Charleston Music Hall combines historical elegance with modern functionality. Above all else, the Music Hall is a listening room; an intimate environment in which the audience and the artist can interact on a more personal level. In this space that boasts the best acoustics in town, there literally is not a bad seat in the house.

although much of it was destroyed in a fire in 1838 and had to be rebuilt. Many of the houses have Greek Revival characteristics and were built by some of Charleston’s oldest family names, such as Joseph Legare and Edward McCrady. Harleston Village is another one of the old neighborhoods that was developed in 1770. It encompasses the area north of Broad Street to Calhoun Street. It includes Colonial Lake, which was set aside for public use in 1768. Renovations in 2016 added more seating and pathways, popular with joggers and dog walkers. The architecture includes Italian and Georgian, as well as styles that span the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. Radcliffeborough is bound by King, Vanderhorst, Smith and Radcliffe streets and contains much of the College of Charleston campus. Many of the houses have Italian and Gothic Revival influences. To the west and north of Radcliffeborough are Cannonborough and Elliottborough, where homes are being renovated at a rapid rate. Close to MUSC, this area is popular with medical students and families who want a house downtown without the price

of a lower-peninsula property. To the east of Radcliffeborough is the Mazyck-Wraggborough neighborhood, which stretches from King over to Washington Street. Anchoring the area is the landmark Marion Square, the 10-acre public park that houses a farmers market on Saturdays from April to December The area also includes the Children’s Museum of the Lowcountry, the Charleston Museum and the newly renovated Gaillard Center, Charleston’s premier venue for performances and special events. Farther up the peninsula, Hampton Park Terrace and Wagener Terrace offer more housing options with turn-of-the-century and brick bungalow homes. New developments are opening up residential spaces, such as the Midtown project on upper King Street that includes condominiums and single-family houses mixed in with commercial space. The WestEdge project is revitalizing areas near the medical district and the Ashley River. The massive project will ultimately include medical research, residential, retail and office space.

LOCAL

KNOWLEDGE Many of the streets and buildings around the peninsula are pronounced in a very distinct way by the locals. Mispronunciation will be a telltale sign that you’re “from off.” Here are a few pronunciations and sayings that will have you sounding like a local, right from the start.

Huger Street Pronounced Hugh-Gee

The Gaillard Center Charleston’s premier venue is pronounced Gil-yard

From off If you weren’t born in Charleston, then come and live here, you’ll always be “from off ”

Pluff mud The mud of the tidal marshes that emit the signature smell of the Lowcountry

LIVING IN HISTORIC CHARLESTON |

45


Photo/City of Isle of Palms

Aerial view of Isle of Palms.

LIVING IN

Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island For a day’s visit or a lifetime, islands’ beaches beckon

46

Moultrie’s sprawling past into creative living spaces and public uses. Victorian homes line shaded streets. About 2,000 people live on the 3.3-square-mile island, which remains a popular destination for beach-goers from Charleston and Mount Pleasant. But with no hotels, the beach is seldom crowded. Easements and strict regulations protect the island’s dunes and maritime forests, and its lighthouse, which began operation in 1962, was conveyed to the National Parks Service in 2008.

MOVING IN

Release program Sea turtles that have been rehabilitated at the S.C. Aquarium are released at the Isle of Palms.

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

City of Isle of Palms...........................................886-6428 www.iop.net Town of Sullivan’s Island.................................883-3198 www.sullivansisland-sc.com Charleston County School District.........937-6300 Isle of Palms building permits...................886-9912 Isle of Palms Water and Sewer.................886-6148

| LIVING IN ISLE OF PALMS AND SULLIVAN’S ISLAND

Photo/City of Isle of Palms

E

ast Cooper’s two beach-front islands are connected by one bridge but represent two distinct lifestyles. Sullivan’s Island lies at the entrance to Charleston Harbor and spent much of its history as a slave port. Its strategic position made it a key to the seaward defense of the city of Charleston and it was fortified well into the 20th century. To Charlestonians of the late 19th and early 20th century, Sullivan’s Island was the beach to which they escaped by boat when the summer heat grew unbearable. Today, the island’s military and beach-retreat heritage give the place an elegantly shabby, slow-moving style that is unique among Southern beach communities. Islanders have adapted abandoned fortifications and disused buildings from Fort

City of Isle of Palms trash..................................720-7111 Sullivan’s Island building permits...........883-5727 Sullivan’s Island water system................. 883-3947 Sullivan’s Island trash.......................................884-8518 S.C. Electric & Gas Co..............................800-251-7234 Recycling (Charleston County).....................720-7111


Photo/Poe’s Tavern

THE MUST

DO’S Front Beach Fest ​The City of Isle of Palms brings in the spring season with a free street festival featuring fun for the whole family.

Poe’s Tavern is one of the lively restaurants Sullivan’s Island residents and visitors enjoy.

million-dollar homes line the water and its Front Beach commercial district bustles with restaurants and shops. The IOP’s Windjammer Lounge is a classic beachfront bar and music venue, and the annual Polar Bear Swim on Sullivan’s Island, which draws thousands of high-spirited bathers every New Year’s Day, originates at Dunleavy’s Pub in the island’s tiny downtown. Life on the islands offers distinct choices for those who can afford them — the upscale energy of the IOP versus the quirkier charms of Sullivan’s Island. Residents of both islands benefit from one of the area's finest elementary schools, enjoy easy access to shopping in nearby Mount Pleasant via the Isle of Palms Connector and can often be spotted tooling around in their ubiquitous electric golf carts.

Isle of Palms Farmers Market Shop local food and art, and enjoy live music entertainment. The market is open every Thursday from 4-7 p.m.

LOCAL

KNOWLEDGE “Meet me at Station 12.”

Photo/Charleston County Parks and Recreation

Though Sullivan’s Island was home to two settlements in the 19th century, the neighboring Isle of Palms remained a remote, sparsely populated vacation spot until the early 20th century. A 50-room hotel opened in 1906, followed in 1912 by a beach pavilion and amusement park. First known as Hunting Island, and then Long Island, developers renamed it the Isle of Palms in 1913 to attract tourists. Development of the 5.6-square-mile island didn’t begin in earnest until the 1940s. The boom started in 1944 with the purchase of 1,300 acres by The Beach Co., which laid out roads and began building a mixture of vacation and affordable housing. The Ben Sawyer Bridge connecting Mount Pleasant to Sullivan’s Island completed the Charleston-to-IOP automobile link in 1945 and more growth followed. By the 1970s, developers turned their eyes toward a 1,600-acre tract and began construction of what is today the gated Wild Dunes Resort. This exclusive community features two golf courses, extensive tennis facilities and a system of walking and bicycling trails. Hurricane Hugo destroyed 95% of the IOP’s buildings in 1989 and the influx of insurance cash led to a burst of luxurious gentrification. Today, the island has a population of more than 4,500, multi-

All of the cross streets on both Sullivan’s Island and Isle of Palms are called stations. Each one is numbered, so an easy way to make plans to meet on the beach is to pick a station and let all of your friends know.

Where the waves are The Isle of Palms is the place to go to catch a wave on this side of town. Surfers of all types and skill levels can be seen catching the waves on most days.

Isle of Palms County Park offers year-round amenities, including boardwalks, playground, sand volleyball court, and picnic/grill areas. LIVING IN ISLE OF PALMS AND SULLIVAN’S ISLAND |

47


Photo/Tony Tassarotti/City of North Charleston

Widespread Panic performing at the 2019 Trondossa Festival at North Charleston’s Riverfront Park.

LIVING IN

North Charleston

Area is home to Boeing, ice hockey, concerts and conventions

N

orth Charleston is an area in transition. With industrial and military roots, the city in recent years has committed to redeveloping its central neighborhoods and reinventing itself as a trendy yet affordable place to live. The area north of Charleston was developed as plantations by early colonists, but after the Civil War, it grew into an industrial center. Early in the 20th century, the U.S. Navy targeted a huge swath of land along the Cooper River for a new naval base, and planned neighborhoods were created to house workers, the military and their families. The North Charleston area boomed during World War II. The dynamic area incorporated as a city in 1972 and has expanded to include land in Charleston, Dorchester and Berkeley counties.

48

| LIVING IN NORTH CHARLESTON

In the 1990s, the federal government closed the navy base in North Charleston. The city of North Charleston has since partnered with developers to infuse new life into the area’s historic neighborhoods. Redevelopment areas include Park Circle, a community of neighborhoods planned early in the 20th century. Park Circle is now a trendy and vibrant community with a number of restaurants and bars. Riverfront Park on the old Navy base hosts festivals, concerts and other events throughout the year, and North Charleston has become a haven for craft breweries in

MOVING IN

recent years. At least six breweries operate in the city, with plans for several more. Residential developments such as Oak Terrace Preserve have earned a reputation for their sustainable building practices. Nearby Montague Avenue is a Main Street of the past alive again with shops and restaurants. Redevelopment is ongoing on the former Navy base as well, where once-empty military buildings now bustle with art studios, private offices and other commercial activity collectively known as the Navy Yard at Noisette. North Charleston is a center of business

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

City of North Charleston ..............................554-5700 www.northcharleston.org Charleston County School District ........937-6300 Building permits .................................................. 740-2578

Charleston Water System ............................727-6800 S.C. Electric & Gas Co. ...........................800-251-7234 Trash ...............................................................................745-1026 Recycling (Charleston County).....................720-7111


Photo/Ryan Johnson/City of North Charleston

THE MUST

DO’S Photo/Ryan Johnson/City of North Charleston

The annual St. Patrick’s Day celebration in Park Circle draws a large crowd.

activity for the region, with many of the Charleston area’s commercial and industrial employers located there. Boeing Co. builds its 787 Dreamliner commercial airplane in North Charleston, and Mercedes-Benz Vans has recently launched a major expansion of its manufacturing facility in the Ladson area. North Charleston is home to Joint Base Charleston, a combined Navy and Air Force operation and a major employer in the region. It shares some facilities with Charleston International Airport, which has set new passenger records yearly since 2015 and is in the midst of expansion and improvement projects. One of the area’s major attractions is the North Charleston Coliseum and Performing

Arts Center and adjacent Charleston Area Convention Center. The complex is home to the Stingrays, a minor league hockey team, and is a venue for concerts, performances and meetings large and small. Nearby shopping centers include the Tanger Outlet Center and Northwoods Mall. The Rivers Avenue corridor is home to one of the region’s largest concentration of national and local retailers. Interstate 26 runs through North Charleston as it carries travelers east to Charleston and west toward Columbia. Interstate 526, which has terminal points in Mount Pleasant and West Ashley, reaches its peak in North Charleston.

North Charleston Farmers Market The market takes place every Thursday from May through October at the Felix C. Davis Community Center. The market offers an abundance of fresh, locally grown produce, and features art and craft vendors, food trucks, specialty foods, kids’ activities and entertainment.

LOCAL

KNOWLEDGE

Photo/Ryan Johnson/City of North Charleston

The MUSC Children’s Health R. Keith Summey Medical Pavilion offers pediatric services in North Charleston.

Craft brewery capital of the Lowcountry North Charleston boasts many breweries, with more on the way. To imbibe on the local brews check out: • Coast Brewing Co. • Freehouse Brewery • Holy City Brewing Co. • Lo-Fi Brewing • Rusty Bull Brewing Co. • Commonhouse Aleworks LIVING IN NORTH CHARLESTON |

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Photo/File

A sunset view of the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge, which connects Mount Pleasant to Charleston.

LIVING IN

Mount Pleasant

Town across the harbor offers many residential options

D

espite its reputation as a suburban gateway to Charleston and the East Cooper beaches, the historic heart of Mount Pleasant can still be found near picturesque Shem Creek, where the fishing fleet docks beside popular local eateries. The Old Village, founded in 1680 and incorporated in 1837, sits on breezy bluffs that overlook the harbor just seaward of Shem Creek. The opening of the $650 million Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge in 2005 marked the beginning of a new era of growth for what is now the state’s fourth-largest municipality. The U.S. Census-estimated population is now nearly 90,000, up more than 30% from the 2010 population of 68,000. Locals still treasure the area’s 18th century homes, quaint Pitt Street commercial

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| LIVING IN MOUNT PLEASANT

district and the neighborhood’s authentic shade-drenched ambiance. Residents and visitors alike enjoy trips to Alhambra Hall Park and the nearby Pitt Street Bridge, which once connected the town to Sullivan’s Island by trolley but now offers views of Charleston Harbor and easy access to fishing and crabbing. Other glimpses of Mount Pleasant’s past can be found across town on scenic Long Point Road. On one side of the road, motorists may turn off and wander down a broad alley of oaks that leads to Boone Hall Plantation.

MOVING IN

Shrimp season Fresh shrimp can be bought right off the boat on Shem Creek. Typically, brown shrimp are caught from May to August and white shrimp from September to December.

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

Town of Mount Pleasant .................................884-8517 www.tompsc.com Charleston County School District ........937-6300 Building permits ..................................................884-5184

Mount Pleasant Waterworks ....................884-9626 S.C. Electric & Gas Co. ...........................800-251-7234 Blue Flame Gas ......................................................884-2017 Trash and recycling ...........................................884-8518


Photo/File

Shrimp boats and restaurants line Shem Creek in Mount Pleasant.

Settled in 1743, it remains a working plantation. Its “you-pick ’em” fields and seasonal events are beloved by local families. On the other side of Long Point Road, the Charles Pinckney National Historic Site interprets life at Snee Farm Plantation, home of one of the original signers of the U.S. Constitution. The U.S. Park Service staff

makes a special effort to explain and preserve the region’s Gullah culture. Glimpses of that Gullah heritage can be seen along U.S. 17, where the area’s “basket ladies” still make and sell the Lowcountry’s signature sweetgrass baskets from simple roadside stands. A weekly farmers market on Tuesday

afternoons from April to October gives access to affordable, healthy food. The town unveiled two new modern hospitals in 2010. East Cooper Regional Medical Center and Roper St. Francis Mount Pleasant Hospital. Fitness has also been on the upswing since the new bridge opened with a lane Photo/Charleston Area Convention & Visitors Bureau

The USS Yorktown as seen from Patriots Point. LIVING IN MOUNT PLEASANT |

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Photo/Charleston County Parks and Recreation

THE MUST

Photo/Chart Photography

DO’S Cooper River Bridge Run Tens of thousands of runners participate in this world-class 10K held in late March or early April. The race starts on the Mount Pleasant side of the Arthur Ravenel Bridge. Runners get amazing views of Charleston Harbor as they run over the bridge to Charleston.

Photo/Charleston County Parks and Recreation

Splash Island Waterpark Located deep within the tropical vegetation of Mount Pleasant Palmetto Islands County Park, this seasonal family water attraction provides hours of fun and recreation.

LOCAL

KNOWLEDGE The Pitt Street Bridge Tucked away at the end of Pitt Street in the Old Village area of Mount Pleasant, the Pitt Street Bridge offers sweeping views of the Lowcountry and plenty of spots to drop a fishing line.

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| LIVING IN MOUNT PLEASANT

Laurel Hill County Park features an oak allée , large open meadows and gorgeous backdrops.

for bicyclists and pedestrians. Residents make extensive use of the town’s numerous parks, ballfields and gyms, and recreational sports leagues are numerous. Palmetto Islands County Park, a 943acre facility, has nature trails, picnic areas, a water park and pedal boat rentals. Patriots Point on Charleston Harbor boasts a staterun military museum that displays World War II-era vessels, featuring the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown, and more than a dozen vintage aircraft. Patriots Point also connects to the Ravenel Bridge by way of Memorial Waterfront Park. Mount Pleasant’s neighborhoods have varying styles and offer residents a range of choices, including large historic homes in the town’s Old Village, new family home construction in many neighborhood developments and upscale condominium communities. I’On, a new-urbanist development off Mathis Ferry Road, is an award-winning

neighborhood of beautiful homes, elaborate public spaces and mixed-use construction. Farther out, the sprawling developments of Park West, Dunes West and Carolina Park are moving the geographic and population center of town more to the north. With people come businesses, most of them oriented on either U.S. Highway 17 or Coleman Boulevard. The town’s most prominent shopping area is Towne Centre, between the Isle of Palms Connector and the end of Interstate 526 along U.S. 17. In keeping with tradition, the town loves a good festival. Mount Pleasant hosts festivals for the arts, oysters, Scottish games, local foodies and children. Every April, the town turns out for the annual Blessing of the Fleet at Memorial Waterfront Park. The Christmas parade is a big draw, as is the Cooper River Bridge Run, which attracts runners and walkers by the tens of thousands each spring.


Photos/Daniel Island Development Company

The Guggenheim Terrace is a new outdoor venue in the center of downtown Daniel Island.

LIVING IN

Daniel Island

A master plan guides development of luxury neighborhoods

T

he Lowcountry’s newest address is also one of its most attractive. Daniel Island has grown from an undeveloped expanse of forest and farmland into a thriving community of more than 5,000 people. The 4,000-acre island at the tip of the Cainhoy Peninsula was essentially uninhabited when Interstate 526 crossed it in the 1990s, linking the land between the Wando and Cooper rivers to the mainland for the first time. Development, guided by a master plan worked out in conjunction with the Guggenheim Foundation (which owned the island from 1947 to 1997), began in the

late 1990s. Today, the Daniel Island community spans nine neighborhoods, a central commercial district, more than 400 acres of public parkland, 25 miles of walking trails, two golf courses and a world-class tennis facility. Daniel Island is incorporated into the city of Charleston, even though it is located in Berkeley County and residents must pass through Mount Pleasant or North Charles-

MOVING IN

ton to reach it. Though generally considered a bedroom community, the island’s daytime population swells to an estimated 8,500, thanks to employers such as software firm Blackbaud and the 34-acre campus of Bishop England High School, which moved to the island in 1998 after more than 80 years in downtown Charleston. Home prices range from the $300,000s to more than $3 million, with select lots

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

Daniel Island/City of Charleston .............724-3765 www.danielisland.com Berkeley County School District ............899-8600 City of Charleston building permits ..... 724-7320

Charleston Water System ............................727-6800 S.C. Electric & Gas Co. ...........................800-251-7234 Trash (City of Charleston) .............................724-7364 Recycling (Berkeley County).......................719-2383 LIVING IN DANIEL ISLAND |

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Photos/Daniel Island Development Company

THE MUST

DO’S Photos/Volvo Car Open by Lee Deas of Obviouslee Marketing

Volvo Car Open The Volvo Car Open is the largest women’s only tennis tournament in North America. Every April, Charleston welcomes 90,000 spectators and more than 100 world-class,

Daniel Island’s neighborhoods are family-friendly with ample green space and beautiful homes.

selling for upward of $1 million. Condominiums are available for around $200,000, but the island’s network of public spaces, services, shopping, education and amenities generally tends to put a premium on property values. Plans point toward an eventual population of 15,000. While Daniel Island is clearly oriented to residential living, its commercial component is vibrant and expanding. Blackbaud, a provider of fundraising software for the nonprofit and education sectors, recently opened a new, 172,000-square-foot facility to house many of its 1,400 employees. The company is also constructing a second, larger building in anticipation of additional hiring in the near future. Benefitfocus, a human resources software firm, also has its headquarters on Daniel Island. The company, which employs approximately 1,500 people across all divisions, has experienced strong growth in recent years. The island’s main business district is

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| LIVING IN DANIEL ISLAND

women athletes to the Family Circle Tennis

populated with small businesses, restaurants and shops. New retail shops, restaurants and mixed-use projects are going up on the island to support a growing population and healthy economy. Life on the island benefits from 23 miles of shoreline, much of it open to the public, and the extensive system of parks and docks give neighborhoods plenty of public spaces and room to socialize. Smythe Park, on the southern end of the island, hosts an annual picnic and concert that draws thousands of residents and visitors. The island’s event calendar gets more crowded every year, thanks in large part to the Family Circle Tennis Center, which hosts the Volvo Car Open Women’s Tennis Association tournament in April. MUSC Health Stadium, home pitch for the Charleston Battery Soccer Club since 1999, has been sold to developers with plans for mixed-use construction at the site. The Battery will remain in the Charleston area at an undetermined location.

Center to participate in the excitement of the Volvo Car Open. Records are broken and memories are made as extraordinary tennis stars take Stadium Court to compete for the coveted title.

LOCAL

KNOWLEDGE

Osprey Ospreys are large raptors that nest near water. Several osprey nests are located on Daniel Island, prompting The Daniel Island School to name the bird as its mascot. The Daniel Island Garden Club built an “Osprey Trail” garden oasis with an 11-foot-tall copper osprey sculpture for the community to enjoy.


Photos/Charleston Regional Business Journal

The Avondale Point area of West Ashley bustles with shops, restaurants and bars.

LIVING IN

West Ashley

One of the first suburbs has old plantations, visionary greenway

T

he area west of the Ashley

New residential development has continued

River in Charleston is home to

in recent years, especially past the western

some of the area’s oldest sub-

boundary of Interstate 526, in neighborhoods

urban neighborhoods and, a

like Shadowmoss and Carolina Bay.

little farther out, some of the newest. West Ashley, as it’s called, also features a

Long-ago residents of West Ashley have left behind several historic plantations and

range of old and new shopping centers and

gardens that have been preserved and are

restaurants, historic plantations and other

open for tours. Magnolia Plantation, Middle-

Charles Towne Landing

attractions, and a unique outdoor walking trail.

ton Place and Drayton Hall Plantation allow

Neighborhoods closest to the Charleston

visitors to learn about the architecture and

Guests can step aboard and tour the Adventure, Charleston’s only 17th-century replica sailing ship, see cannons fired, or take a peek at otters, bears, bison and more at the Animal Forest natural habitat zoo.

peninsula were built in the 1920s through the

life of South Carolinians in the 1700s and the

1950s. Among the older subdivisions are Old

centuries following.

Windermere, Byrnes Down, Moreland, Avondale and The Crescent. Development continued through the 1970s and 1980s in neighborhoods farther out from the city, such as Northbridge, Northbridge Terrace and Wespanee Plantation.

MOVING IN

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

West Ashley/City of Charleston ..............724-3765 www.charleston-sc.gov Charleston County School District ........937-6300 City of Charleston building permits ..... 724-7320

Charleston Water System ............................727-6800 S.C. Electric & Gas Co. ...........................800-251-7234 Trash ..............................................................................724-7364 Recycling (Charleston County).....................720-7111 LIVING IN WEST ASHLEY |

55


Photo/Charleston Area Convention & Visitors Bureau

THE MUST

DO’S Photo/Charleston Area Convention & Visitors Bureau

Middleton Place Middleton Place’s 110 vibrant acres include 65 acres of America’s oldest landscaped gardens — floral allées, terraced lawns, a pair of ornamental lakes shaped like butterfly wings — as well as a house museum, Eliza’s House, working stableyards with artisans and Drayton Hall contains the oldest preserved plantation house in America.

heritage breed animals, a restaurant, inn and organic farm, all waiting to be explored.

Photo/Gavin Lyons

Photo/Avondale 5K board

Another historic destination in West Ashley is Charles Towne Landing, the site of the English settlement that would become the Carolina colony. The 664-acre attraction is a state park. When getting around by car, main highway corridors in West Ashley are U.S. 17, called Savannah Highway, and S.C. 61, also known as Ashley River

Avondale 5K This popular annual neighborhood 5K race winds through the scenic Avondale subdivision in West Ashley with a lively after-party at the Triangle Char + Bar

S.C. 7, also called Sam Rittenberg Boulevard.

Braised Keegan Filion Pork Belly plate at The Glass Onion in West Ashley.

Interstates 526 and 26 connect West Ashley to North Charleston to the north and Mount Pleasant to the east. For those interested in seeing West Ashley

stretches to Johns Island. Shopping is plentiful in West Ashley. Shopping centers anchored by national retailers

parking lot. Strollers and dogs are welcome.

by foot or bike, the West Ashley Greenway is a

and restaurants are located all along Savannah

The race benefits Charleston’s Charles

good option. This 10.5-mile walking and biking

Highway and Sam Rittenberg Boulevard. West

Webb Center, which serves children with

path weaves among residential areas and

Ashley also includes eclectic shopping strips

shopping centers and through small marshy

filled with many locally owned stores and eat-

areas and swaths of trees. The trail starts near

eries, such as the Avondale shopping area along

the South Windermere Shopping Center and

U.S. 17.

special needs.

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Road. The two highways are connected by

| LIVING IN WEST ASHLEY


Photo/File

Located on the "Edge of America," Edwin Taylor Folly Beach Fishing Pier boardwalk attracts tourists and saltwater anglers.

LIVING IN

James Island and Folly Beach Looking for the beauty of nature? You’ll find it here

J

 ames Island and Folly Beach, located just south of Charleston, represent a distinctly independent streak in the Lowcountry character. Long a semirural area, James Island has seen its population boom since the early 1990s and the opening of the James Island Connector, a bridge that links the island directly to the Charleston peninsula. James Island is bounded by Wappoo Creek, Charleston Harbor and the Stono and Folly rivers. Its network of marshes, inlets, sounds and creeks gives it one of the most scenic natural environments in the region. It was a strategic key to Charleston during the Revolutionary and Civil wars.

The Confederate attack on Fort Sumter began in 1861 with a shot from the island’s Fort Johnson, modern-day home of a stateof-the-art government marine science research facility. McLeod Plantation, with its alley of slave cabins visible from Folly Road near the foot of the Wappoo Bridge, stands near the entrance to the private Country Club of Charleston. The Riverland Terrace neigh-

MOVING IN

borhood, located between Maybank Highway and Wappoo Creek, features enormous live oaks and deeply shaded lanes. A nearby commercial district offers fine restaurants, antiques and the Terrace Theatre, the area’s only art-house cinema. Recreational options include the Charleston Municipal Golf Course and James Island County Park, a 643-acre facility with trails, fishing docks, a 50-foot

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

Town of James Island .........................................795-4141 www.jamesislandsc.us City of Folly Beach .............................................588-2447 www.cityoffollybeach.com Charleston County School District ........937-6300 City of Charleston building permits ..... 724-7320

Charleston Water System ............................727-6800 S.C. Electric & Gas Co. ...........................800-251-7234 Berkeley Electric Cooperative...................559-2458 James Island trash .........................795-9060, ext. 118 Folly Beach Public Works ...............................513-1831 Recycling (Charleston County).....................720-7111

LIVING IN JAMES ISLAND AND FOLLY BEACH |

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Photo/Charleston County Parks and Recreation

THE MUST

DO’S Photo/Vive Media

Folly festivals Folly Beach street festivals are held throughout the year. The Sea & Sand Festival, Taste of Folly, Follypalooza and the New Year’s Eve Flip-Flop Drop are major events that feature live music, food and art vendors.

Above: Kayakers at the James Island County Park. Right: A dolphin swims by the Morris Island lighthouse.

Each benefits a local nonprofit.

700 light displays. It has been named one of the best holiday displays in the country.

LOCAL

KNOWLEDGE Milton P. Demetre Park Formerly known as 'Sunrise Park,' it offers sweeping views of the harbor from James Island.

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| LIVING IN JAMES ISLAND AND FOLLY BEACH

ntures

the holidays with more than three miles of

n Outdoor Adve

The James Island County Park lights up for

Photo/Charlesto

Photo/Charleston County Parks

Holiday Festival of Lights

climbing wall, kayak rentals, picnic areas and a campground. The park’s Splash Zone water park is extremely popular with families during summer months, and the county park’s annual Holiday Festival of Lights attracts motorists on winter nights. James Island ends where Folly Road enters a marsh marked by the landmark “Folly Boat,” an abandoned hull that was deposited on the roadside by Hurricane Hugo. Locals have been painting messages on it ever since. Another treasured local landmark – Bowen’s Island Restaurant – sits on a tidal creek in a hummock of trees in the vast marsh between James Island and Folly Beach. Folly Beach calls itself “The Edge of America,” and the seven-mile island certainly seems to take the nickname seriously. The island celebrates its bars, fishing shacks, funky eateries and nefarious characters, and East Coast surfers swarm to the spot they call “The Washout” whenever an Atlantic swell pushes big waves ashore. A county-run 1,000-foot fishing pier marks the center of the island. Portions of the

24-year-old wooden structure will be closed starting in 2019 for up to two years while the county constructs a replacement pier. The undeveloped eastern end of the island was the longtime site of a Coast Guard station. Morris Island, where the Union assault depicted in the movie Glory took place, lies across the inlet from the old station. The island has been heavily eroded, and the Morris Island Lighthouse has been surrounded by water for decades. Long described as the Lowcountry’s “poor man’s beach,” Folly’s signature shacks ceased to be affordable escapes for drifters, starving artists and beach bums a decade ago. Nonetheless, the island’s 2,300 yearround residents preserve its identity as a place where corporate homogenization hasn’t taken over – yet.


LIVING IN

Johns and Wadmalaw Islands Home to many farms, plant nurseries and produce stands, these are among the Lowcountry’s last rural sea islands Photo/Liz Segrist/Charleston Regional Business Journal

J

The Angel Oak’s age is the subject of much debate. Estimates range from 400 years to more than 1,500 years.

The Charleston Executive Airport is a small facility that offers convenience to resort visitors and flying lessons for locals. A 16,000-square-foot library, completed in 2004, is the county’s largest branch. Much of the development on the island today is upscale, including The Preserve at Fenwick Hall. Other developments offer a mixture of affordable and luxury choices, varying from waterfront lots to Charlestonstyle urbanism to custom rural seclusion. The island’s central commercial district is located at the intersection of Main, Maybank and Bohicket roads. Johns Island is a stronghold of Gullah culture and holds a special place in the Lowcountry’s civil rights history. Native son Esau Jenkins, despite no formal education beyond fourth grade, understood in the 1950s and ‘60s that the future of the island’s black communities would depend on bootstrapping programs for their education

MOVING IN

and health. He and others founded “Citizenship Schools” that helped residents — many illiterate — qualify to vote, and their Sea Island Health Corp. brought doctors and nurses to rural corners that had never received proper care.

Photo/Johns Island Farmers Market

ohns Island, the Lowcountry’s last remaining rural sea island, is a vast swath of land between James Island, the mainland west of Charleston and the private barrier islands of Kiawah and Seabrook. Its future is one of the most important undecided questions in the Lowcountry. The island grows much of the area’s fresh organic produce and is home to numerous farms, nurseries, packing houses and produce stands. And though its main transportation arteries are heavily trafficked, the island has miles of long, quiet, tree-lined roads that attract Lowcountry bicyclists. Traffic remains one of the island’s most pressing issues. The debate continues, as opponents don’t want to trade their rural way of life for the suburban development better roads would bring. The island boasts the Angel Oak, believed to be one of the oldest trees east of the Mississippi. Estimates of its age range from 400 years to more than 1,500 years. However old it is, this ancient oak is a graceful giant, 65 feet tall and more than 25 feet around. Owned by the city of Charleston, it is open to the public. Another local gem is the village of Rockville at the end of neighboring Wadmalaw Island. This remote, picturesque village plays host each August to the Rockville Regatta, an event that dates back more than 100 years and marks the end of the Lowcountry’s competitive sailing season. Horses raised for work, transportation or recreation have long been a part of life on the island. The public Mullet Hall Equestrian Center at Johns Island County Park provides facilities for horse shows, plus 20 miles of riding trails.

Johns Island Farmers Market The market features more than 50 local farmers and artisans, food vendors and live music. Check out goods like breads and pastries, local seafood, free-range eggs, handcrafted cheeses, olives and olive oil, pet food, kosher honey, pickled products and more.

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

City of Charleston ............................................... 724-3745 www.charleston-sc.gov Charleston County School District ........937-6300 City of Charleston building permits ..... 724-7320 Charleston Water System ............................727-6800

St. John’s Water Co..............................................559-0186 S.C. Electric & Gas ....................................800-251-7234 Berkeley Electric Cooperative...................559-2458 Republic Services (trash)............................. 937-4048 Recycling (Charleston County): ..................720-7111 LIVING IN JOHNS AND WADMALAW ISLANDS |

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Photo/Kiawah Island Resort

Kiawah Island’s Ocean Course played host to the 2012 PGA Championship and will do so again in 2021.

LIVING IN

Kiawah and Seabrook Islands Life on private islands is like a vacation every day

K

iawah and Seabrook islands, two private resort communities south of Charleston, offer a quality of life that includes world-class golf, upscale homes and breathtaking views of the Lowcountry’s landscape. Pottery found on Kiawah Island dates as far back as 4,000 years. Ownership of the island changed many times through the years from the Indians to the British and then to some of the earliest “Charlestonians.” Its history is linked to names you may already be familiar with: Gibbes, Vanderhorst and Middleton, to name a few. Development of the island loosely began in the 1950s when C.C. Royal, who made his fortune in the lumber business,

60

purchased the island. He built a home for his wife and seven children and then sold 65 lots to friends. In 1974, the Kuwait Investment Co. purchased the island from Royal’s heirs and created a land plan that consisted of a resort and residential development. Kiawah Development Partners is currently the master developer of the island. Approximately 1,200 full-time residents inhabit the island, but the population swells

| LIVING IN KIAWAH AND SEABROOK ISLANDS

MOVING IN

Sea bird sanctuary Kiawah and Seabrook islands are home to a variety of coastal waterfowl, including herons, gulls, terns, opreys and more.

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

Town of Kiawah Island .................................... 768-9166 www.kiawahisland.org Town of Seabrook Island .................................768-9121 www.townofseabrookisland.org Charleston County School District ........937-6300 Town of Kiawah building permits .......... 768-9166

Kiawah Island Utility (water)......................768-0641 Berkeley Electric Cooperative...................559-2458 Kiawah trash and recycling ....................... 768-9166 Seabrook Island building permits............768-9121 Seabrook Island Utility Commission......768-0102


Photo/Seabrook Island Club

THE MUST

DO’S Photo/Chris M. Rogers Photography

Horseback riding

An aerial view of the Beach Club clubhouse on Seabrook Island.

The Equestrian Center on Seabrook Island Island and finally Seabrook when it was purchased by William Seabrook in 1816. Originally developed in 1972 as a resort and conference center location, the island has evolved into a private oceanfront community. There are more than 2,500 properties on Seabrook Island and more than 700 families live on the island year round. There is no shortage of things to do on Seabrook Island, from golfing on two private courses, to playing tennis, horseback riding, biking and boating. There are also several restaurants to choose from. Inhabitants of both islands place a high value on the environment and have made sure that the buildings are constructed in harmony with the natural surroundings. There are also plenty of opportunities to observe and study wildlife, whether strolling on the beach or exploring the waterways via kayak or canoe. Just 30 minutes from Charleston, the islands are close enough for a day trip into the city. However, if shopping is your pleasure, there are several opportunities for excursions on both islands. Freshfields Village, at the crossroads between the two islands, offers a variety of stores, from sporting goods to groceries, as well as several restaurants.

offers a rare opportunity for visitors and residents to ride horseback on three miles of beautiful trails along the beach. A full-service Equestrian Center caters to riders of all skill levels.

LOCAL

KNOWLEDGE Photo/Kiawah Island Resort

in the spring and summer when about 600 of the island’s properties are rented. The island is also home to the Kiawah Island Golf Resort, which includes five public golf courses and two private courses; The Sanctuary, a AAA Five Diamond hotel; an award-winning spa; and several restaurants. The resort’s Ocean Course is a world-renowned site of high-profile golf. As a brand-new course, it hosted the classic and controversial 1991 Ryder Cup competition, which became known as the “War by the Shore” and marked a turning point in the tenor surrounding the then 64-year-old, biennial event. The course also hosted the 2012 PGA Championship, a PGA Tour major that brought more than $200 million of economic impact to the area. The Ocean Course will host the event again in 2021. Outside of golf, the island also caters to tennis players and is a destination for runners during the annual Kiawah Island Marathon, held each December. Seabrook Island, just across the marsh from Kiawah Island, is a 2,200-acre mix of forest, salt marsh and beach. The island was discovered by settlers in 1666 and indigo and rice were its first cash crops. The island was first called Jones Island, then Simmons

The Sanctuary Hotel The Carolina coast offers countless vacation destinations and places to stay. But none equal The Sanctuary Hotel at Kiawah Island Golf Resort. Just 21 miles from Charleston, this South Carolina luxury beach resort hotel delivers 5-Star service and world-class accommodations.

LIVING IN KIAWAH AND SEABROOK ISLANDS |

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All Photo/Visit Summerville.com

The newly developed Hutchinson Square in Summerville’s historic downtown.

LIVING IN

Summerville

Town is alive with family-friendly festivals and natural beauty

S

ummerville is a community that still gathers at Town Square to celebrate the Fourth of July and a place where Friday night high school football draws a spirited crowd. In early December, the holiday season is ushered in with an annual Christmas tree lighting downtown. In this modern Southern city, progress and preservation are inextricably intertwined, making it a dynamic and diverse place to live and work. Downtown Restoration, Enhancement and Management (D.R.E.A.M.), a nonprofit group spearheaded by local residents, has done much since its inception in 1992 to bring focus and support to Summerville and its historic downtown district. The commercial area is bustling again with unique shops, a local bookstore, art galleries and

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| LIVING IN SUMMERVILLE

eateries. Guerin’s Pharmacy — the oldest still operating in South Carolina — contains antiques, a full-service pharmacy and an old-style soda fountain that serves drug store classics such as cherry and vanilla Cokes, milkshakes and chili dogs. The Summerville Dorchester Museum documents cultural and natural history with a film and exhibits of colonial settlers, early churches and architecture. More than 700 buildings have been placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Summerville traces its roots to the

MOVING IN

1780s, when it was known as Pineland Village to plantation owners wanting to escape the swamp fever and insects of the Lowcountry summer. After being deemed by medical specialists in 1899 as one of the best areas in the world for lung and throat disorders, the area experienced a golden era, with special lodgings and resorts springing up to accommodate pulmonary patients. The most famous was Pine Forest Inn, which sometimes served as the Winter White House for Presidents William Howard Taft and Theodore Roosevelt.

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

Town of Summerville..........................................851-4201 www.summervillesc.gov Dorchester District 2 schools......................873-2901 www.dorchester2.k12.sc.us

Building permits....................................................851-4220 Public Works............................................................851-4225 S.C. Electric & Gas Co. ...........................800-251-7234 Waste Pro (trash)..................................................619-0800


THE MUST

DO’S Sweet Tea Festival Come and enjoy the annual Sweet Tea Festival with plenty of sweet tea and food.

Azalea Park is the starting point (right) for the town’s self-guided Walking Tour of Homes and Flowers.

Today, Summerville is Dorchester County’s largest city with an estimated population of more than 50,000. Named one of the 50 best small towns in America by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine, Summerville offers residents the best of both worlds in terms of quality of life and housing. Known for its stately Victorian homes, the city also offers a variety of new construction options attracting families, businesses and military personnel to the area. Dubbed “Flower Town in the Pines,” Summerville still gets high marks for natural attributes. The Flowertown Festival draws more than 200,000 people every spring for a weekend dedicated to artisans and crafts amid the profusion of blooms in Azalea Park. This event is consistently ranked one of the Top 20 events in the Southeast by the Southeast Tourism Society. Azalea Park, a 12-acre oasis of ponds, paths, fountains and tennis courts, has also been the site for one of South Carolina’s premiere outdoor arts events, Sculpture in the South. This exhibit and sale of original sculpture typically features more than 30 artists from across the country representing a range of sculpture from Western to whim-

Take your time while walking through the many unique shops, boutiques and vendor booths. Enjoy the local musical talents throughout the historic downtown area. sical. During the event, patrons also can explore 22 permanent sculptures displayed in public places in Summerville. Summerville residents can take to the trails at nearby Givhans Ferry State Park, on the former site of an 18th-century ferry that once crossed the Edisto River. The park features camping, cabins, fishing, picnic areas and river access. At Francis Beidler Forest in Four Holes Swamp, shaded boardwalks wind through ancient groves of towering cypress and Pleistocene swamps. The forest — a National Natural Landmark — is protected and managed by the National Audubon Society and is the largest remaining virgin stand of bald cypress in the world. A popular destination for visitors, Summerville offers plenty of hotel rooms and bed and breakfast inns, including the Linwood Bed & Breakfast, built in 1883 by Julia Drayton Hastie, heiress to Magnolia Plantation. The Victorian mansion is surrounded by nearly two acres of award-winning landscaped gardens. The mansion itself is appointed with heart of pine floors,

Hope to see you there!

LOCAL

KNOWLEDGE

Mason - the world’s largest glass of sweet tea Summerville was awarded a trademark to be considered the birthplace of sweet tea, and the town set the Guinness World Record for the largest glass of sweet tea made from scratch — more than 2,500 gallons — in June 2016.

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Photo/West Rock

The Parks Apartments at Nexton are within walking distance of corporate offices, the Brown Family Park and the Carolina Ale House.

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Photo/WestRock

high ceilings, chandeliers, Victorian bays and triple sash windows, many with original glass. Summerville has plenty of fine and fun dining options. Across the board, restaurants use style and originality to create menus that appeal to an array of tastes. Summerville’s eateries include both chain and independently owned restaurants. Downtown, you’ll find an area called Short Central, a cobblestoned, pedestrian-only streetscape with shops and cafés just a block from Town Hall. For those interested in stocking up on ingredients to create a feast at home, Summerville’s farmers market is a popular event. It runs weekly on Saturdays from April to November and is located near Town Hall. The market features artisanal foods and local produce. A recent major addition to the many established neighborhoods and communities is Nexton, a 4,500-acre master planned community located at the intersection of U.S. Highway 17-A and I-26. It includes offices, hotels, apartments, schools, parks and trails, and several options for dining, entertainment and shopping.

The Corner House Cafe and Information Studio at newly built Summers Corner provides a place for residents, newcomers and people in the community to gather, learn about the planned residential development and enjoy fresh, local food and beverages.

Nexton is South Carolina’s first gigabit community, which means internet speeds are 100 times faster than the average fixed high-speed Internet connection, a plus for businesses that want to send large files quickly. Nexton was selected as the 2015 Community of the Year by the Charleston Home Builders Association. Adding to the town’s many things to do and places to go, Summerville officials have created a Sweet Tea Trail that promises an

adventure in Southern hospitality through history, food and shopping. The trail tells the story of sweet tea’s birth in Summerville. It’s said that tea plants landed in Summerville in the late 1700s by way of the Ashley River. Andre Michaux, a French explorer and botanist, imported them along with varieties of camellias, gardenias and azaleas near Charleston at what is now known as Middleton Place Plantation. In 1888, a wealthy scientific philanthropist acquired 600 acres in Summerville and established the Pinehurst Tea Plantation. The plants were eventually moved to a spot on Wadmalaw Island, which is now known as the Charleston Tea Plantation and is owned by Bigelow. The town has held a Sweet Tea Festival in recent years to celebrate Southern traditions and, of course, sweet tea. From its Friday night football games to its annual festivals, Summerville is a place where rich history and progress mix seamlessly. Leaders focus on stimulating economic development in and around Summerville while making sure Flower Town in the Pines does not lose its small-town charm.


LIVING IN

Jedburg and Ridgeville Rural countryside poised to change with industrial development

Photo/Kathy Allen

T

Photo/Liz Segrist

he suburban sprawl that has enveloped the Lowcountry slowly fades as you head northwest out of Summerville on U.S. Highway 78, past Jedburg Road, and approach the town of Ridgeville. But that rural, small-town feel belies the fact that this part of Dorchester County is undergoing a profound change. That transformation started in 2015 when Swedish automaker Volvo announced its first North American production facility at the Camp Hall tract, about seven miles northeast of Ridgeville across Interstate 26 in Berkeley County. The campus has started manufacturing operations of the S60 sedan and has hired around 1,500 workers. The company’s long-range plan is to add production lines to build the XC90 SUV by 2021 and hire a total of 4,000 workers, a number that could rise based on demand for the two models that will be built there. That influx of skilled automotive workers will change forever this sleepy stretch of pine forests, farmland and small communities. A drive through Ridgeville’s business district will take you into a quintessential Southern railroad town, past barbecue restaurants, a general store and other small businesses. It’s a place where just about everybody knows each other, where store owners have served multiple generations of the same families. The U.S. Census lists Ridgeville’s population at approximately 1,600, but that includes nearly 900 inmates at the state’s Lieber Correctional Institute on the outskirts of town. Quiet and close to nature, Ridgeville is just minutes from the Francis Beidler Forest, a National Audubon Society wildlife sanctuary, and Givhans Ferry State Park,

Downtown Ridgeville (above) is a mix of family-owned restaurants, retail and other businessess typical of a small Southern town. The final assembly facility (right) for Volvo’s new automotive manufacturing plant near Ridgeville is the largest building on the site.

along the Edisto River. The Cypress Methodist Camp Ground off S.C. Highway 173, a religious and community gathering place established more than 200 years ago, is still in use and is on the National Register of Historic Places. The Volvo project is also attracting other new industry and infrastructure improvements. An industrial park is being developed near the intersection of U.S. 78 and S.C. Highway 27, and a new interchange near Volvo at Interstate 26 is being added to accommodate the increase in commuter and commercial traffic.

MOVING IN

Growth is also evident in the area around Jedburg Road. New businesses have opened in anticipation of increasing demand for gas, food and other consumer needs. Developers have initial plans for several new residential communities to meet expected demand from Volvo workers and a growing population in the Summerville area. Other large employers in the area include Showa Denko Carbon, which supplies a key component for steel manufacturing, and Key West Boats, a recreational boat maker.

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

Town of Ridgeville mayor’s office.............871-7960 Email................................ridgevillecityhall@sc.rr.com Dorchester School District 4......................563-4535 Building permits..................................................... 832-0011

Ridgeville Water Dept.......................................873-3286 S.C. Electric & Gas Co..............................800-251-7234 Edisto Electric Cooperative............................245-5141 Waste Pro (trash and recycling)..............619-0800 LIVING IN JEDBURG AND RIDGEVILLE |

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Photo/Cypress Gardens

Cypress Gardens has been a popular destination since 1932.

LIVING IN

Moncks Corner

Quiet, close-knit community also home to Google’s data center

M

oncks Corner was a colonial trading post with a history that dates back to 1735. It was founded by landowner Thomas Monck, for whom the town was named. In 1853, Moncks Corner became an official scheduled stop on the North East Railroad and two buildings were subsequently built to accommodate freight and passengers. The original train depot was destroyed by fire in 1915, and the existing building was constructed at the current site. The train depot was an important social landmark for residents in the early 1900s, just as it is today. Officials renovated the historic building in 2000 to serve as the town’s visitor and cultural center. Special events are held at the depot throughout the year, including the Fourth of July Street Dance and Christmas festivities. Residents also can rent it for special events.

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Moncks Corner today has nearly 11,000 residents and is the Berkeley County seat. The original downtown is populated with progressive shops and restaurants and the town has positioned itself for growth. Moncks Corner is home to the corporate office for Santee Cooper, a state-owned utility company. Google established two data centers in 2007 at a cost of $600 million, and the facility was expanded in 2013 with another $600 million project. Swedish automaker Volvo has established its first North American manufacturing facility at the Camp Hall tract about 15 miles west of town. The company plans to eventually hire up to 4,000 workers,

MOVING IN

and other new jobs will likely be created as suppliers bring their operations to nearby locations. With the area’s growth, Moncks Corner’s neighborhoods offer residents a convenient location in a quiet community. Neighborhoods include Cypress Ridge, Fairmont South, Stoney Creek and Foxbank Plantation. There are several options for schools in Moncks Corner. Students attend public schools within the Berkeley County School District, which received 22 Palmetto Gold and Silver awards for excellence in for the 2014-15 school year. Private schools also are available. Moncks Corner’s proximity to area at-

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

Town of Moncks Corner...................................719-7900 www.monckscornersc.gov Berkeley County School District.............899-8600 www.berkeley.k12.sc.us Moncks Corner building permits..............719-7900

Berkeley Electric Cooperative.....................761-8200 Public Works Commission.............................719-7965 Berkeley County Water & Sanitation...... 761-8817 Santee Cooper Electric Utility....................761-8000 Republic Services (recycling).....................552-4751


World-class waterskiing, wind surfing, sailing, boating and fishing are popular on man-made Lake Moultrie and, farther inland, Lake Marion. The two massive bodies make up the Santee-Cooper Reservoir, which provides hydroelectric power and recreation. The Palmetto Trail, a recreational trail that stretches statewide, takes trekkers off the beaten path for a closer experience with Southern fauna and wildlife. In addition to these options, a 52-acre recreation complex in the center of town opened in 2015 with four lighted baseball fields, paved parking, a concession stand/ press box, event signs, paved access road, an irrigation system and walking trails. The complex is also home to the Moncks Corner Farmers Market from 3-7 p.m. Thursdays through December. The town invested $5.4 million into phase one of the center with future plans for tennis courts and a recreation center with a basketball court, swimming pool, jogging track and community rooms. Picnic areas and playgrounds are also planned for the complex.

THE MUST

DO’S Photo/Town of Moncks Corner

tractions, parks and more make it a match for residents who enjoy outdoor living. Old Santee Canal Park commemorates America’s first summit canal, which began operating in 1800. In addition to tours of the historic site, the park features the Berkeley County Museum and Heritage Center. Exhibits and artifacts portray the region’s history, including that of Brig. Gen. Francis Marion, who was also known as the “Swamp Fox” and was born near Moncks Corner. The museum also includes the history of Native Americans, colonial life, the Civil War and the Francis Marion National Forest. Mepkin Abbey, a former plantation perched on bluffs above the Cooper River, now serves as home to a Trappist monastery with a garden and chapel open to the public. Visitors can tour the monastery and gardens, or take part in spiritual retreats. Cypress Gardens, a county-owned public park and well-known tourist attraction, has reopened after being closed for more than three years since sustaining significant flood damage in 2015.

Regional Recreation Complex The Moncks Corner Recreation Complex hosts baseball and softball games, and attracts travel softball and baseball tournaments. A farmers market is also held at the complex from April to December with vendors selling homegrown, homemade and hand-crafted products.

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Photo/City of Goose Creek

Carnes Crossroads is one of several large residential developments near Goose Creek.

LIVING IN

Goose Creek

New homes spring up where rice plantations once ruled

T

he magazine Bloomberg Businessweek reported in 2012, “Goose Creek is on our list of best places to raise kids for the second year in a row. There are more than a few reasons. This quiet, pretty suburb of Charleston has much to offer, from great parks to solid schools, to rolling bike trails.” Indeed, Goose Creek, located about 20 miles north of Charleston, has become a very desirable place to live in the Lowcountry. It ranks as the state’s eighth largest municipality with more than 42,000 residents. While the exact origin of the city’s name is unknown, this area of the Lowcountry has been called Goose Creek since the late 1600s. Early settlers were planters from

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Barbados who brought with them knowledge of various crops, including rice and indigo. These crops were successfully grown in the region for more than 100 years. Fast forward to 1961, when the city of Goose Creek was incorporated and farmlands in the area began to be sold and subdivided to accommodate the fast-growing area and subsequent housing boom. Today Goose Creek is the most densely populated city in Berkeley County. Its easy

MOVING IN

access to I-26 and proximity to Charleston continue to make it a popular bedroom community in the region. Well-known housing developments include Carnes Crossroads, Crowfield Plantation and Cane Bay Plantation. Crowfield, a former rice plantation, spans 382 acres and includes residential housing, as well as commercial development, churches and schools. Its recreation amenities include a golf course and country club, lakes, hiking and biking trails, and rec-

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

City of Goose Creek............................................ 797-6220 www.cityofgoosecreek.com Berkeley County School District.............899-8600 www.berkeley.k12.sc.us/ Building permits..............................797-6220, ext. 1100 Garbage......................................................................824-2200

Berkeley Electric Cooperative.....................761-8200 S.C. Electric & Gas......................................800-251-7234 Goose Creek water service...........797-6220, ext. 0 Berkeley County Water & Sanitation...... 761-8817 Charleston Water System ............................727-6800


Photos/City of Goose Creek

Windmill Station restaurant at Carnes Crossroads.

THE MUST

DO’S Photo/City of Goose Creek

BBQ and Brews Festival Come enjoy an evening of live music, ons Station, which is part of the Lowcountry’s largest employer, Joint Base Charleston. The Naval Weapons Station employs nearly 13,500 and is the command center for the U.S. Navy’s Nuclear Power Training program. Other major employers in Goose Creek include aluminum manufacturers Century Aluminum Mount Holly and JW Aluminum, and lighting manufacturer Quoizel Lighting. Quoizel, founded in 1930 in New York, relocated its headquarters to a state-of-theart, 500,000-square-foot facility in Goose Creek. Google built a $600 million data center in 2008 in Mount Holly, which is between Goose Creek and Moncks Corner. The internet search engine expanded its facility with another $600 million investment in 2013. In addition to creating jobs, Google helped fund the city’s free WiFi network that has been implemented at four locations in the county, including Central Avenue downtown. Swedish automaker Volvo has begun production at its first North American manufacturing facility at the Camp Hall tract, about 25 miles northwest of town. It expects to eventually hire up to 4,000 workers.

barbecue food vendors, beer and lawn games. Activities for the kids, too! Bring a blanket or lawn chair. Admission and parking are free. Parking will be available at the pool parking lot, in the grassy lot behind the barn, and at Sweetgrass Pediatrics.

LOCAL

KNOWLEDGE Photo/City of Goose Creek

reational areas. Cane Bay Plantation spans 4,500 acres and includes several neighborhoods — including Del Webb, an active senior living neighborhood — as well as schools, parks, playgrounds, athletic fields, hiking and biking trails, and retail centers. Carnes Crossroads is a another sprawling, planned community of 2,300 acres near the intersection of U.S. Highways 176 and 17-A. It is projected to be home to more than 15,000 people at final buildout. Opportunities for outdoor living in the Lowcountry are plentiful and Goose Creek is no different. The city’s recreation department has constructed several parks throughout the area featuring playgrounds, picnic areas and ball fields. Golf enthusiasts can enjoy 18 holes at Crowfield Golf and Country Club, which also has tennis and swimming. There also are plenty of activities within a short drive of Goose Creek. Tennis fans can watch the annual Volvo Car Open tennis tournament, held each spring at the Family Circle Tennis Center on nearby Daniel Island. The Charleston Riverdogs, a minor league baseball team, play home games at Joe Riley Jr. Park, about a 30-minute drive. Goose Creek is home to the Naval Weap-

Spring Concerts at the Crowfield Golf Course You’re invited to the City of Goose Creek’s 2019 Spring Concert Series. In addition to great music, the free event features a variety of food vendors. All ages are welcome. Admission and parking are free. Please no outside coolers, alcohol or pets. LIVING IN GOOSE CREEK |

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Sports and Recreation O

ne of the best things about life in the Lowcountry is the myriad opportunities for outdoor activities. The weather is good most of the year, and sports and recreational activities are there for the taking. You can join an organized team or take up an individual activity, such as kayaking or paddle boarding. Every community in the Charleston area has a well-developed sports and recreation program. In the pages that follow, we tell you about the recreation offerings for each city and town, with some of the highlights of the year. There is also a listing of other recreational possibilities beyond the municipal departments, such as bocce, roller derby or rugby. So, pick your favorite and get out there and enjoy yourself!

In this section City of Charleston Recreation Department...................................72 Charleston County Park and Recreation Commission..............74 Dog Parks...............................................................74 North Charleston Parks and Recreation.......................................75 Mount Pleasant Recreation...........................76 Golf Courses.........................................................77 Dining Out............................................................. 78 Places to Stay...................................................... 80 Alternative and Outdoor Venues............... 83 Arts Abound......................................................... 85 Attractions and Tours....................................... 88 Calendar of Events............................................ 93 Newcomer Information and Map.............. 96

Sponsored by

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Photo/City of Charleston Recreation Deptartment

City of Charleston Recreation Department 823 Meeting St., Charleston, SC 29403 843-724-7327 Laurie Yarbrough, director www.charleston-sc.gov/recreation www.facebook.com/chsrecreation The City of Charleston Recreation Department serves downtown Charleston, James Island, Johns Island, West Ashley and Daniel Island. Youth sports offered: soccer, tackle football, baseball, softball, cheerleading, gymnastics, flag football, lacrosse, basketball, tennis, aquatics, track, cross country, wrestling, volleyball, golf

Other activities: summer camps, therapeutic

A coach instructs a young baseball player during a coach pitch baseball game in West Ashley. Photo/City of Charleston Recreation Deptartment, courtesy of Post & Courier

recreation, adult sports, fitness classes, cooking, art, boxing, karate, environmental education, senior programs and trips, dance, tumbling, lifeguard training, manners classes and babysitting classes

Top three citywide events of the year Easter Eggstravaganza: held near Easter; egg hunt, activities, games; Hampton Park.

Celebration of Summer: An end-of-summer party held in Hampton Park in late July. Family friendly with pony rides, jump castles and more.

Easter Eggstravaganza, held annually at Hampton Park, is the City of Charleston Recreation Department’s largest event. Photo/City of Charleston Recreation Deptartment

Trick or Treat in the Park: Halloween night; wear costumes and trick or treat at decorated cars; Hampton Park.

A few places to check out Park hours are dawn to dusk unless otherwise posted. Some of the city’s popular parks are:

Hazel Parker Playground 70 E. Bay St. A variety of family/community days each month

James Island Recreation Complex 1088 Quail Drive Gymnastics center, pool, camps, classes and sports for all ages

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Soccer is widely popular and is offered by many recreation departments around the Lowcountry.


Photo/Chas. County Parks and Rec.

I

n the Lowcountry, outdoor living is a special draw. You can go surfing, kayaking, fishing or biking – all in the same weekend. But outdoor recreation is just the start. When you move your family to a new community, a concern may be whether your new hometown offers the sports and recreational activities your family enjoys. In the Lowcountry, you will find most activities are available, even some you might not expect, such as lacrosse and ice hockey. This section includes a listing of the offerings by the major parks and recreation departments in the area. The largest are City of Charleston, Mount Pleasant and North Charleston, but smaller departments such as Summerville and Isle of Palms also have a lot to offer. While recreation departments are set up to serve the residents of their communities, most allow non-residents to register for programs for an added fee. Charleston County Park and Recreation Commission provides mostly individual park-based activities, such as kaya-

king, climbing and water parks. The county does run team sports in some rural areas that aren’t served by other departments. Most parks offer programs for all ages, from preschool to senior adults. In general, permits are required to hold an event in a park; check with the local parks department to see what is needed. And if your interest runs to college or professional sports, the Charleston area has a lot to offer. Charleston Southern University, The Citadel and College of Charleston all have standout sports programs. The Lowcountry is home to three professional teams: the Charleston RiverDogs (baseball), a Class A affiliate of the New York Yankees; the Charleston Battery (soccer) of the United Soccer Leagues; and the South Carolina Stingrays (hockey), a member of the East Coast Hockey League affiliated with the 2018 Stanley Cup champion Washington Capitals. The Volvo Car Open tournament brings women’s tennis stars to Daniel Island every spring.

Charleston County Park and Recreation Commission 861 Riverland Drive, Charleston 29412 843-795-4386 David Bennett, executive director www.ccprc.com A clickable map is available at www.ccprc.com/DocumentCenter/14480/ AGENCY-MAP Charleston County Park and Recreation Commission provides park and recreation services but does not duplicate services provided by municipalities and other special recreation districts. The county commission has developed a countywide park system that emphasizes individual and family activities such as outdoor recreation, environmental education and public beach access. The commission runs rural recreation sports programs in areas not otherwise served at McClellanville, Johns Island and Hollywood.

Activities: Summer camps, water parks, climbing wall, geocaching, group and corporate services, nature and history programs, swim lessons and water safety

Top events Holiday Festival of Lights Popular family event held in November and December, James Island County Park

Charleston Sprint Triathlon Series Swim 600-yard freshwater lake; bike 12 miles; run 5K; held in May, June, July and August; James Island County Park

A few places to check out Some of the most popular parks are:

James Island County Park 871 Riverland Drive, James Island camping, challenge course, climbing wall, water park

CawCaw Interpretive Center 5200 Savannah Highway, Ravenel

SK8 Charleston Skate Park 1549 Oceanic St., Charleston

Palmetto Island County Park 444 Needlerush Pkwy, Mount Pleasant

Charlie is the mascot of the Riverdogs. (Photo/Charleston Riverdogs)

Hampton Park 30 Mary Murray Dr., Charleston

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Photo/Caw Caw Interpretive Center

Canoeing at Caw Caw Interpretive Center near Ravenel in southern Charleston County.

For outdoor fun, Folly Beach is considered a top surfing destination on the East Coast, and you can check conditions at its storied “Washout” via webcam. Kayaking in the blackwater rivers and swamps and/or quieter areas of Charleston Harbor is a favorite. There are outfitters along Shem Creek in Mount Pleasant who rent equipment. Recreational boating and sailing are local passions. Each April hundreds of

sailors take to Charleston Harbor for Charleston Race Week, sponsored by the Charleston Ocean Racing Association. Deep sea fishing charters are available at Shem Creek and other locations. Locals fish off piers at Folly Beach or the Memorial Waterfront Park in Mount Pleasant, or net crabs in tidal creeks. Running has grown in popularity since the founding of the Cooper River Bridge Run in 1978. The Bridge Run takes place

Dog Parks Here are some parks set up expressly for dogs and their owners.

Charleston County

Ackerman Park Dog Run, 55 Sycamore Drive Bees Landing Recreation Complex, 1530 Ashley Gardens Blvd. Cannon Park, 131 Rutledge Ave. Easy Bay Dog Park, 41 S. Adgers Wharf

North Charleston Wannamaker County Park, 8888 University Blvd.

Governor’s Park, 165 Fairbanks Oak Alley

All dogs must be up to date on vaccinations and must be under their owners’ supervision at all times.

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City of Charleston

James Island County Park, 871 Riverland Drive

Mount Pleasant Palmetto Islands County Park, 444 Needlerush Parkway

| SPORTS AND RECREATION

each April, attracting world-class 10K runners and tens of thousands of amateur athletes and walkers. The race begins near Shem Creek in Mount Pleasant and finishes in downtown Charleston. The area’s flat roads make for fast cycling. The Lowcountry hosts a series of popular cycling events, including group rides and races. So, test out your old favorites or try something new. It’s all here.

Hampton Park Dog Run, corner of Rutledge Avenue and Grove Street Hazel Parker Dog Run, 70 E. Bay St. James Island Recreation Complex, 1088 Quail Drive


Photo/City of Charleston Recreation Deptartment

North Charleston Parks and Recreation  2500 City Hall Lane North Charleston, S.C. 29406 843-740-5814 Ed Barfield, recreation director www.northcharleston.org North Charleston Parks and Recreation serves the city of North Charleston.

Sports offered: Softball, baseball, basketball, football, soccer, wrestling, volleyball, track and field

Activities: Adult and senior fitness, after-school programs, aquatics, camps, ceramics, dance, disc golf, cheerleading

Top events Youth Pitch, Hit and Run: local competition held in April; winners advance to sectional competition Whirlin’ Waters Adventure Waterpark located within North Charleston’s Wannamaker County Park.

Other parks and recreation departments Isle of Palms Parks and Recreation

Hanahan Recreation and Parks 3100 Mabeline Road, Hanahan, SC 29410 www.cityofhanahan.com The department serves the city of Hanahan. Offered are basketball, football, baseball, softball, soccer, volleyball, as well as T-ball, dance, tumbling, camps and fitness.

515 W. Boundary St., Summerville, SC 29485 843-851-5211 www.summervillesc.gov Among the sports offered are softball, baseball, tennis, football and cricket. The town has a major sports center, the Jerry Blackwell Sports Complex, at 515 W. Boundary St. Also unique are the Sawmill Branch Trail and a skate park.

A few places to check out Among North Charleston’s gems are: Photo/Ryan Johnson/City of North Charleston

24 28th Ave., Isle of Palms, SC 29451 www.iop.net This department serves the Isle of Palms with baseball, softball, basketball, volleyball and soccer. Also offered are fitness, dance, taekwondo, gymnastics, and camps. Events include the Sand Sculpting Contest; the IOP Beach Run and Community Wellness Fair.

Summerville Parks and Recreation

Winter Wonderland: held in November and December for young children at Armory Park

Goose Creek Recreation 843-569-4242 www.goosecreekrecreation.com Goose Creek Recreation serves residents at Goose Creek Community Center and Goose Creek Activity Center, as well as a city pool and parks. Activities offered include baseball, softball, golf, basketball, volleyball, pickleball, football, cheerleading, gymnastics, camps, soccer and tennis.

Moncks Corner Recreation Department 118 Carolina Ave., Moncks Corner 843-719-7900 The recreation department offers baseball, T-ball, football, soccer, cheerleading, basketball and softball.

Riverfront Park 1001 Everglades Ave. On the Cooper River with beautiful views, a performance pavilion and meadow

Park Circle Butterfly Garden 4800 Park Circle Butterflies and plants, picnics, walking paths

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Photo/City of Charleston Recreation Deptartment

Mount Pleasant Recreation 3 91 Egypt Road, Mount Pleasant 29464 843-884-2528 Steve Gergick, director www.tompsc.com Mount Pleasant Recreation Department serves the town of Mount Pleasant.

Sports offered: Tennis, baseball, basketball, golf, soccer, softball, track, cross country, football, lacrosse, volleyball

Also: Camps, art, therapeutic recreation, music, aquatics, dance, skate park A coach gives instructions to a young gymnast during practice.

Top events Spring Carnival: held in May, children’s activities; at Alhambra Hall Park Blessing of the Fleet and Seafood Festival: held in April; blessing of the fleet ceremony, boat parade, seafood sampling, music, arts and crafts; Memorial Waterfront Park

Music and Movies in the Park: Fridays in August; Memorial Waterfront Park.

Old Village Harbor 5K Run, Walk, Stroller and Dog Jog: held in November starting at Alhambra Hall Park; for all ages

A few places to check out Some of Mount Pleasant’s best-loved parks are:

Other Sports and Rec Sports Event Organizers, Volunteer Groups, Training Resources and Sports Facilities

Middleton Place Hounds Hunt Club www.middletonplacehounds.com

FOX HUNTING

ROCK CLIMBING (WALLS)

BEACH VOLLEYBALL

GYMNASTICS

Coastal Climbing coastalclimbing.com

Charleston Beach Volleyball & Social Club www.charlestonvolleyball.net

Gymnastics Academy of Charleston www.gymnasticsacademyofcharleston. com

BOCCE

HIKING

Chucktown Bocce League www.facebook.com/pages/ChucktownBocce-League/101115219964370

West Ashley Greenway Bike/Hike Trail www.westashleygreenway.org

DANCE

Carolina Ice Palace www.carolinaicepalace.com

Ballroom Dance Club of Charleston www.ballroomdancecharleston.org

Alhambra Hall and Park

Charleston Shag Club www.charlestonshagclub.com

131 Middle St. Reception hall, waterfront green space, playground.

DISABLED SPORTS

Park West Recreation Complex 1251 Park West Blvd. Lighted tennis courts, indoor pool, athletic fields, lake pavilion, walking trails.

The view from the po

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LACROSSE

Summerville Miracle League www.summervillemiracleleague.org

MARTIAL ARTS

FENCING rch of Alhambra Hall.

Charleston Hurricanes Women's Rugby www.facebook.com/ Charleston-Hurricanes-WomensRugby-244597408915995/

Lowcountry Lacrosse Youth League www.lowlax.com

DOG SPORTS

Fencing Fight Club facebook.com/fencingcharleston/

RUGBY

Figure Skating Club of Charleston fscofcharleston.com

Special Olympics of the Lowcountry www.facebook.com/solowcountry

Low Country Dog Agility Club www.lowcountrydogagility.com

Lowcountry Highrollers Women’s Derby team www.lowcountryhighrollers.com

Charleston Outlaws Rugby Football Club www.charlestonrugby.com

Charleston Miracle League www.charlestonmiracleleague.org

DODGEBALL

ROLLER DERBY

ICE HOCKEY /SKATING

Charleston Hurricanes Men’s Lacrosse Club facebook.com/CharlestonHurricanesLax

Charleston Sports & Social Club www.charlestonssc.com

Charleston County PRC ccprc.com

Charleston Martial Arts chas-ma.com

STANDUP PADDLE BOARDING www.charlestonsupsafaris.com

SURFING

Southern South Carolina/ Eastern Surfing Association ssc.surfesa.org

ULTIMATE FRISBEE

OCEAN RACING

Charleston Ultimate Players Association www.charlestonultimate.com

POLO

WAKEBOARDING & WATERSKIING

Charleston Ocean Racing Association www.charlestonoceanracing.org Charleston Polo Club charlestonpoloclub.com Hyde Park Polo Club www.hydeparkpoloclub.net

Trophy Lakes Watersports Center www.trophylakesports.com

Source: Charleston Area Sports Commission


Golf Courses Berkeley

Berkeley Country Club at Exeter Plantation 772 Exeter Plantation Road Moncks Corner, SC 29461 Semiprivate with event facilities 843-761-4653 www.berkeleycc.com Crowfield Golf Club 300 Hamlet Circle Goose Creek, SC 29445 Semiprivate public 843-764-4618 www.crowfieldgolf.com Redbank Plantation Golf Course 2316 Redbank Road Goose Creek, SC 29445 Private 843-794-7828 www.jbcharlestongolf.com/golf Yeamans Hall Club 900 Yeamans Hall Road Hanahan, SC 29410 Private 843-744-3351 www.yeamanshallclub.com

Charleston

Beresford Creek Course at Daniel Island Club 600 Island Park Drive Daniel Island, SC 29492 Private with event facilities 843-971-3555 www.danielislandclub.com Charleston Municipal Golf Course 2110 Maybank Highway Charleston, SC 29412 Public 843-795-6517 www.charleston-sc.gov/golf Charleston National Golf Club 1360 National Drive Mount Pleasant, SC 29466 Semiprivate 843-884-4653 www.charlestonnationalgolf.com Coosaw Creek Country Club 4110 Club Course Drive North Charleston, SC 29420 Semiprivate with event facilities 843-767-9000 www.coosawcreek.com

Cougar Point Golf Club, Kiawah Island Golf Resort 1 Sanctuary Beach Drive Kiawah Island, SC 29455 Public resort with event facilities 800-654-2924 www.kiawahresort.com Country Club of Charleston 1 Country Club Drive Charleston, SC 29412 Private 843-795-0422 www.countryclubofcharleston.com Crooked Oaks Golf Course 3772 Seabrook Island Road Seabrook Island, SC 29455 Private with event facilities 843-768-2500 www.discoverseabrook.com Dunes West Golf & River Club 3535 Wando Plantation Way Mount Pleasant, SC 29466 Semiprivate with event facilities 843-856-9000 www.duneswestgolfclub.com The Golf Club at Briar’s Creek 4000 Briar’s Creek Lane Johns Island, SC 29455 Private 843-768-3050 www.briarscreek.com The Links at Stono Ferry 4812 Stono Links Drive Hollywood, SC 29449 Semiprivate with event facilities 843-763-1817 www.stonoferrygolf.com Oak Point at Kiawah Island Golf Resort 4394 Hope Plantation Drive Kiawah Island, SC 29455 Resort with event facilities 800-654-2924 www.kiawahresort.com The Ocean Course at Kiawah Island Golf Resort 1000 Ocean Course Drive Kiawah Island, SC 29455 Public resort with event facilities 800-654-2924 www.kiawahresort.com

Ocean Winds Golf Course 3772 Seabrook Island Road Seabrook Island, SC 29455 Private with event facilities 843-768-2500 www.discoverseabrook.com Osprey Point at Kiawah Island Golf Resort 1 Sanctuary Beach Drive Kiawah Island, SC 29455 Resort with event facilities 800-654-2924 www.kiawahresort.com Patriots Point Links 1 Patriots Point Road Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Public 843-881-0042 www.patriotspointlinks.com Ralston Creek at Daniel Island Club 600 Island Park Drive Daniel Island, SC 29492 Private with event facilities 843-971-3555 www.danielislandclub.com RiverTowne Country Club 1700 RiverTowne Country Club Drive Mount Pleasant, SC 29466 Semiprivate with event facilities 843-849-2400 www.rivertownecountryclub.com Shadowmoss Plantation Golf Club 20 Dunvegan Drive Charleston, SC 29414 Semiprivate 843-556-8251 www.shadowmossgolf.com Snee Farm Country Club 1200 Club Drive Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Private with event facilities 843-884-8571 www.sneefarmcc.com Turtle Point at Kiawah Island Golf Resort 1 Turtle Point Drive Kiawah Island, SC 29455 Public resort with event facilities 800-654-2924 www.kiawahresort.com

Wild Dunes Resort Harbor Course 5881 Palm Blvd. Isle of Palms, SC 29451 Resort with event facilities 855-998-5351 www.destinationhotels.com/wild-dunes/ golf Wild Dunes Resort Links Course 1 Sundial Circle Isle of Palms, SC 29451 Resort with event facilities 855-998-5351 www.destinationhotels.com/wild-dunes/ golf Wrenwoods Golf Club 100 Cusabee Trail, No. 601 Charleston, SC 29404 Semiprivate 843-963-1833 www.jbcharlestongolf.com/golf

Dorchester

The Golf Club at Wescott Plantation 5000 Wescott Club Drive Summerville, SC 29485 Public with event facilities 843-871-2135 www.wescottgolf.com Legend Oaks Golf & Tennis Club 118 Legend Oaks Way Summerville, SC 29485 Semiprivate with event facilities 843-821-4077 www.legendoaksgolf.com Pine Forest Country Club 1000 Congressional Blvd. Summerville, SC 29483 Semiprivate 843-851-1193 www.pineforestcountryclub.com Summerville Country Club 400 Country Club Blvd. Summerville, SC 29483 Semiprivate public with event facilities 843-873-2210 www.summervillecountryclub.com

SPORTS AND RECREATION |

77


Photo/Commonhouse Aleworks

Relax with a cold brew and food from Florie’s at Commonhouse Aleworks in Park Circle.

» DINING OUT C harleston loves to eat well. The view is beautiful, the things to do are fun, the beach beckons – but soon after you get here (maybe even before), you’ll find yourself hungry. And luckily, there’s a world of good food to choose from. The signature dish of Charleston may be shrimp and grits. It’s so popular that most every restaurant has its own version, sometimes in a tomato sauce, other times in a cream sauce. The shrimp will be fresh from the sea and the grits ground in a nearby mill. It makes a filling meal that marries the two flavors perfectly. If grits aren’t on your menu of likes, then you might like to try Lowcountry boil. This hefty stew generally includes shrimp, sausage, corn and potatoes, but once again, everybody has their own version. Some

78

| DINING OUT

recipes include oysters, fish or mussels, depending on the season. In any event, when the concoction is turned out hot and steaming onto a sideboard, you’ll find your mouth watering. Speaking of oysters, there’s no better season of the year than oyster season – late fall through March – in our opinion. The plump bivalves roasted outside are the food of the gods. There’s just enough work involved to get them out of the shell. Immediately, you feel a connection to the sea. Seafood not your favorite? Then head out for barbecue. South Carolinians lay claim to originating mustard-based sauce, but many places offer a variety including vinegar-based and tomato-laden. The slow-smoked meat is the most important factor anyway.

If your passion is fried chicken, then you’re in luck. Southern home cooking restaurants and even pickup places pride themselves on the tastiness of their chicken. And you’ll want to pair it with fresh biscuits and sweet tea. Charleston is home to dozens of top-notch restaurants. Eating out or meeting friends for drinks is treated with reverence here. Whenever there’s a contest for the best city for food, Charleston is in the running. If you’re feeling like something more casual, we’ve got that too. There’s no shortage of bar and grill, coffee shop and drive-in eateries. And you won’t have to look far for foodrelated events. The Charleston Wine and Food Festival and the Lowcountry Oyster Festival are just two of many.


Photo/Ghost Monkey Brewery

Photo/Bon Bahn Mi

Bon Bahn Mi offers Southeastern Asian cuisine with locations in Charleston and Mount Pleasant.

Cold brew at Ghost Monkey Brewery in Mount Pleasant. Photo/Kwei Fei

Photo/The Glass Onion

Explore the flavors of Western China at Kwei Fei on James Island.

Crispy Whole Fried Southern Flounder with Apricot Glaze at Fleet Landing in downtown Charleston.

Photo/The Rusty Rudder

Photo/The Tattooed Moose

Roasted garlic and bleu cheese fries from the Tattooed Moose in Charleston and Johns Island.

Slider Trio at the Rusty Rudder in Mount Pleasant. DINING OUT |

79


» PLACES TO STAY

C

harleston is a top travel destination – and that means plenty of places to stay the night when you’re visiting. You’ll find rooms available at historic inns and bed and breakfasts, beachfront resorts and everything in between. Wake to the sound of the ocean or the sight of yachts in the harbor.

The Charleston area has the perfect accommodations for you and your family, whatever your needs. And should you want to plan your wedding in Charleston, as hundreds of people do every year, there’s a whole list of possible venues awaiting you. They are also available for family reunions, meetings

Hotels Properties in the Charleston Area, Ranked by No. of Guest Rooms Hotels

or conferences. In these pages, we give you a comprehensive list of hotels in the area, starting with those with the largest number of rooms. You’ll also find a list of the area’s alternative and outdoor venues for events. For more lists subscribe to:

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Properties in the Charleston Area, Ranked by No. of Guest Rooms Property

Phone / Website / Email

Property Wild Dunes Resort

Phone / Website / Email 843-886-6000

5757 Palm Blvd. Isle of Palms, SC 29451 Wild Dunes Resort 5757 Palm Blvd. Isle of Palms, SC 29451 Charleston Marriott 170 Lockwood Blvd. Charleston, SC 29403 Charleston Marriott 170 Lockwood Blvd. Charleston, SC 29403

www.destinationhotels.com/wild-dunes CHSDH-Reservations@hyatt.com 843-886-6000 www.destinationhotels.com/wild-dunes CHSDH-Reservations@hyatt.com

Rooms / Mtg. Rooms / Avg. Corp. Rate Rooms / Mtg. Rooms / Avg. Corp. Rate 486 18 $289 486 18 $289

Hotel Amenities

Sales Manager

Hotel Amenities

Sales Manager

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, spa, business center Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, spa, business center

General Manager / Year Founded General Manager / Year Founded

Jeffrey Payne

Jeffrey Payne 1972

Jeffrey Payne

Jeffrey Payne 1972

843-723-3000 www.marriottcharleston.com mhrs.chsmc.sales@marriott.com 843-723-3000 www.marriottcharleston.com mhrs.chsmc.sales@marriott.com

344 13 $179 344 13 $179

On-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center

Karen Burr

Patrick Rogers 2007

On-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center

Karen Burr

Patrick Rogers 2007

843-747-1900 www.marriott.com/chsmn 843-747-1900 www.marriott.com/chsmn -

291 12 $209 291 12 $209

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, 24-hour room service, airport shuttle, fitness center, business center Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, 24-hour room service, airport shuttle, fitness center, business center

Leigh Cannon

Patrick Rogers 2016

Leigh Cannon

Patrick Rogers 2016

843-768-6000 www.kiawahresort.com reservations@kiawahresort.com 843-768-6000 www.kiawahresort.com reservations@kiawahresort.com

255 15 $383 255 15 $383

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, 24-hour room service, airport shuttle, fitness center, business Free spa, Wi-Fi, on-site center restaurant, pool, 24-hour room service, airport shuttle, fitness center, spa, business center

Marty Couch

Roger Warren 2004

Marty Couch

Roger Warren 2004

Courtyard Charleston Waterfront 35 Lockwood Drive Charleston, SC 29401 Courtyard Charleston Waterfront 35 Lockwood Drive Charleston, SC 29401

843-722-7229 www.marriott.com/chscy ashley.a.sundstrom@marriott.com 843-722-7229 www.marriott.com/chscy ashley.a.sundstrom@marriott.com

179 2 $169 179 2 $169

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center

Christine Greenleaf

Mark Thomas 1997

Christine Greenleaf

Mark Thomas 1997

Holiday Inn Charleston Riverview 301 Savannah Highway Charleston, SC 29407 Holiday Inn Charleston Riverview 301 Savannah Highway Charleston, SC 29407

843-556-7100 www.holiday-inn.com/chs-riverview sales@hiriverview.com 843-556-7100 www.holiday-inn.com/chs-riverview sales@hiriverview.com

179 3 $179 179 3 $179

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center

Clayton Hersom

Sean Archer 1971

Clayton Hersom

Sean Archer 1971

843-884-6000 www.mountpleasantlyindigo.com cmlittle@northph.com 843-884-6000 www.mountpleasantlyindigo.com cmlittle@northph.com

158 6 $149 158 6 $149

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center

Caitla M. Little

Shakir Hussain 2018

Caitla M. Little

Shakir Hussain 2018

843-724-8800 www.tinyurl.com/cbvonaw chsms_ds@hilton.com 843-724-8800 www.tinyurl.com/cbvonaw chsms_ds@hilton.com

139 4 $189 139 4 $189

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center, in-room kitchen Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center, in-room kitchen

Laurin Fuller

Brian Rafferty 2017

Laurin Fuller

Brian Rafferty 2017

843-566-7300 www.marriott.com/chsal sales@aloftcharlestonairport.com 843-566-7300 www.marriott.com/chsal sales@aloftcharlestonairport.com

136 1 $119 136 1 $119

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, business center Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, business center

Melissa Hornyack

James Gildea 2008

Melissa Hornyack

James Gildea 2008

843-606-4600 www.charlestonmtpleasant.hgi.com sarah.parrish@hilton.com 843-606-4600 www.charlestonmtpleasant.hgi.com sarah.parrish@hilton.com

133 4 $199 133 4 $199

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, 24-hour room service, fitness center, business center Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, 24-hour room service, fitness center, business center

Sarah Parrish

Ron Jaicks 2015

Sarah Parrish

Ron Jaicks 2015

North Charleston Marriott 4770 Goer Drive North Charleston, SC 29406 North Charleston Marriott 4770 Goer Drive North Charleston, SC 29406 The Sanctuary 1 Sanctuary Beach Drive Kiawah Island, SC 29455 The Sanctuary 1 Sanctuary Beach Drive Kiawah Island, SC 29455

Hotel Indigo Mount Pleasant 250 Johnnie Dodds Blvd. Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Hotel Indigo Mount Pleasant 250 Johnnie Dodds Blvd. Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Homewood Suites by Hilton Charleston Convention Center/Airport 415 Meeting Street HomewoodSC Suites by Hilton Charleston, 29403 Charleston Convention Center/Airport 415 Meeting Street Charleston, SC 29403 Aloft Charleston Airport & Convention Center 4875 Tanger Outlet Blvd. North Charleston, SC 29418 Aloft Charleston Airport & Convention Center 4875 Tanger Outlet Blvd. North Charleston, SC 29418 Hilton Garden Inn Charleston / Mount Pleasant 300 Wingo Way Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Hilton Garden Inn Charleston / Mount Pleasant 300 Wingo Way Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

Because of space constraints, sometimes only the top-ranked companies are published in the print edition. View the

online at TO www.scbiznews.com/buy-business-lists. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors | list PLACES STAY 80 full

sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com. Because of space constraints, sometimes only the top-ranked companies are published in the print edition. View the

Researched by Business Journal staff


Hotels

For more lists subscribe to:

Properties in the Charleston Area, Ranked by No. of Guest Rooms

Property Tides Folly Beach 1 Center St. Folly Beach, SC 29439 Courtyard by Marriott Mount Pleasant 1251 Woodland Ave. Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 SpringHill Suites by Marriott Downtown / Riverview 98 Ripley Point Drive Charleston, SC 29407 Home2 Suites by Hilton, Charleston Airport / Convention Center 3401 W. Montague Ave. North Charleston, SC 29418 Holiday Inn Charleston Historic Downtown 425 Meeting Street Charleston, SC 29403 Residence Inn by Marriott Charleston Riverview 90 Ripley Point Drive Charleston, SC 29407

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Hotel Amenities

Sales Manager

General Manager / Year Founded

132 5 $189

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center

Hope Johnston

Pietro Giardini 1985

843-284-0900 www.marriott.com/chscm juliana.shores@marriott.com

130 5 $159

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center

-

Cheryl M. Craven 2007

843-571-1711 www.marriott.com/chssh ashley.a.sundstrom@marriott.com

123 $139

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center, in-room kitchen

Christine Greenleaf

Robert Heilman 1999

843-744-4202 www.charlestonairportconventioncenter.home2suites.com chscc_ds@hilton.com

122 $149

Free Wi-Fi, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, free breakfast, business center, inroom kitchen

Tom Brinkerhoff

Linda Dawalt 2011

843-718-2327 www.ihg.com/holidayinn info@hihistoric.com

120 3 $189

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center

Laurin Fuller

Brian Rafferty 2013

843-571-7979 www.marriott.com/chsri ashley.a.sundstrom@marriott.com

119 1 $159

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center, in-room kitchen

Christine Greenleaf

Scott Donovan 2000

Phone / Website / Email

Rooms / Mtg. Rooms / Avg. Corp. Rate

843-588-6464 www.tidesfollybeach.com sales@tidesfollybeach.com

Because of space constraints, sometimes only the top-ranked companies are published in the print edition. View the full list online at www.scbiznews.com/buy-business-lists. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com.

Researched by Business Journal staff

PLACES TO STAY |

81


Hotels

For more lists subscribe to:

Properties in the Charleston Area, Ranked by No. of Guest Rooms

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Phone / Website / Email

Rooms / Mtg. Rooms / Avg. Corp. Rate

Hotel Amenities

Sales Manager

General Manager / Year Founded

Holiday Inn Express & Suites Mount Pleasant 350 Johnnie Dodds Blvd. Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

843-375-2600 www.hiemountpleasant.com mlytton@charlestownehotels.com

116 1 $99

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

Meredith Lytton

Steve Lavelle 2009

Cambria Hotel Mount Pleasant-Charleston 1472 U.S. Highway 17 N. Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

843-849-9677 www.cambriamountpleasant.com kate.neville@cambriahotelmp.com

112 1 $119

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center

Kate Neville

2018

843-284-5250 www.marriott.com/chsmt cheryl.driver@marriott.com

110 1 $139

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

Cheryl Driver

2016

Hyatt Place Mount Pleasant Towne Centre 1600 Palmetto Grande Drive Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

843-473-3105 www.hyattplacemountpleasanttownecentre.com jennifer.maxwell@hyatt.com

92 3 $149

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center

Jennifer Maxwell

2019

Residence Inn by Marriott Mount Pleasant 1116 Isle of Palms Connector Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

843-881-1599 www.marriott.com/chsmp juliana.shores@marriott.com

90 $179

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center, inroom kitchen

-

Carla Reynolds 2002

Fairfield by Marriott Charleston North / Ashley Phosphate 2540 N. Forest Drive North Charleston, SC 29420

843-725-5400 www.Marriott.com/CHSFN charlestondos@lrphotels.com

84 $99

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

-

Brenda Pieper 2010

843-577-7970 www.TheVendue.com info@thevendue.com

84 1 $289

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, free breakfast

Caitlin Corrigan

Steve Spear 2014

Sleep Inn Charleston 1524 Savannah Highway Charleston, SC 29407

843-556-6959 www.sleepinn.com/hotel/sc212 brichards@charlestownehotels.com

74 $99

Free Wi-Fi, pool, free breakfast, business center

Bill Richards

Bill Richards 2000

The Palms Oceanfront Hotel 1126 Ocean Blvd. Isle of Palms, SC 29451

843-886-3003 www.PalmsCharleston.com reservations@palmscharleston.com

68 $199

Free Wi-Fi, pool, free breakfast, business center

-

Aaron Rowland 2000

The Inn at Middleton Place 4290 Ashley River Road Charleston, SC 29414

843-556-0500 www.theinnatmiddletonplace.com reservations@theinnatmiddletonplace.com

55 2 $139

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, 24-hour room service, spa, free breakfast, business center

Roxanne Rollins

Abigail Martin 1987

843-853-8439 www.harbourviewcharleston.com gm@harbourviewcharleston.com

52 1 $209

Free Wi-Fi, free breakfast, business center

Jessica R. Bowman

Mark Henry 1998

Property

SpringHill Suites Charleston / Mount Pleasant 245 Magrath Darby Blvd. Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

The Vendue 19 Vendue Range Charleston, SC 29401

HarbourView Inn 2 Vendue Range Charleston, SC 29401

Because of space constraints, sometimes only the top-ranked companies are published in the print edition. View the full list online at www.scbiznews.com/buy-business-lists. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com.

82

| PLACES TO STAY

Researched by Business Journal staff


Hotels

For more lists subscribe to:

Properties in the Charleston Area, Ranked by No. of Guest Rooms

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Phone / Website / Email

Rooms / Mtg. Rooms / Avg. Corp. Rate

Hotel Amenities

Sales Manager

General Manager / Year Founded

843-881-1000 www.shemcreekinn.com mlytton@charlestownehotels.com

51 $139

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, free breakfast

Meredith Lytton

Chelsea Reich, Aaron Rowland 1986

French Quarter Inn 166 Church St. Charleston, SC 29401

843-722-1900 www.fqicharleston.com frontdesk@fqicharleston.com

50 2 $199

Free Wi-Fi, free breakfast, business center

Jessica R. Bowman

Carlo Carroccia 2002

Hotel Bella Grace 115 Calhoun St. Charleston, SC 29401

843-990-7501 hotelbellagrace.com guestcare@hotelbellagrace.com

50 3 $299

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, fitness center, free breakfast, business center, in-room kitchen

Kelsey Stoffel

Kelsey Stoffel 2018

Fulton Lane Inn 202 King St. Charleston, SC 29401

843-720-2600 www.fultonlaneinn.com fli-concierge@charminginns.com

45 1 $145

Free Wi-Fi, free breakfast

Ginny Severs

Tom Moorman 1994

Andrew Pinckney Inn 40 Pinckney St. Charleston, SC 29401

843-937-8800 www.andrewpinckneyinn.com bhutto@charlestownehotels.com

41 $159

Free Wi-Fi, free breakfast, business center

Jessica R. Bowman

Barry Hutto 1995

Spectator Hotel 67 State St. Charleston, SC 29401

843-724-4326 www.thespectatorhotel.com info@thespectatorhotel.com

41 2 $249

Free Wi-Fi, free breakfast, business center

Jessica R. Bowman

Carlo Carroccia 2015

The Elliott House Inn 78 Queen St. Charleston, SC 29401

843-518-6500 www.elliotthouseinn.com jbowman@charlestownehotels.com

25 $179

Free Wi-Fi, pool, free breakfast

Jessica R. Bowman

Ashley Fitzgerald 1981

843-875-2600 www.woodlandsmansion.com stay@woodlandsmansion.com

18 3 $325

Free Wi-Fi, pool, free breakfast, business center

Becky Harper

Tom Limehouse 2012

Property Shem Creek Inn 1401 Shrimp Boat Lane Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

Woodlands Mansion 125 Parsons Road Summerville, SC 29483

Because of space constraints, sometimes only the top-ranked companies are published in the print edition. View the full list online at www.scbiznews.com/buy-business-lists. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com.

Researched by Business Journal staff

Alternative & Outdoor Event Venues Ranked by Maximum Capacity Ranked by Maximum Capacity Venue Venue

Exchange Park Exchange Park 78 9850 U.S. Highway 9850 U.S. Ladson, SCHighway 29456 78 Ladson, SC 29456 McAlister Field House McAlister Field 171 Moultrie St. House 171 MoultrieSC St.29409 Charleston, Charleston, SC 29409 Patriots Point Naval & Patriots Naval & MaritimePoint Museum Maritime 40 PatriotsMuseum Point Road 40 Patriots Point SC Road Mount Pleasant, 29464 Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 North Charleston Performing North Charleston Performing Arts Center Arts 5001Center Coliseum Drive 5001 Coliseum Drive North Charleston, SC 29418 North Charleston, SC 29418 Middleton Place Middleton 4300 AshleyPlace River Road 4300 AshleySC River Road Charleston, 29414 Charleston, SC 29414 Charleston Gaillard Center Charleston Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St. 95 Calhoun SC St. 29401 Charleston, Charleston, SC 29401 Candlelite Pavilion Candlelite Pavilion at Summerville Country Club at 400Summerville Country ClubCountry Blvd. Club 400 Country Club Blvd. Summerville, SC 29483 Summerville, SC 29483 Kiawah Island Golf Resort Kiawah Island GolfDrive Resort 1 Sanctuary Beach 1Kiawah Sanctuary Beach Drive Island, SC 29455 Kiawah Island, SC 29455 The Golf Club at Wescott The Golf Club at Wescott Plantation Plantation 5000 Wescott Club Drive 5000 WescottSC Club Drive Summerville, 29485 Summerville, SC 29485

Phone / Phone Website/ / Email Website / Email

Top Local Official(s)/ Top Official(s)/ YearLocal Founded Year Founded

843-572-3161 843-572-3161 www.exchangepark.org www.exchangepark.org denise@exchangepark.org denise@exchangepark.org 843-953-2665 843-953-2665 www.citadel.edu/events www.citadel.edu/events reservations@citadel.edu reservations@citadel.edu 843-884-2727 843-884-2727 www.patriotspoint.org www.patriotspoint.org info@patriotspoint.org info@patriotspoint.org

Michael Carney, Denise Michael Carner Carney, Denise Carner 1979 1979 Allison Bringardner Allison 1939 Bringardner 1939

843-529-5002 843-529-5002 www.northcharlestoncoliseumpac.com www.northcharlestoncoliseumpac.com 843-556-6020 843-556-6020 www.middletonplace.org www.middletonplace.org info@middletonplace.org info@middletonplace.org 843-724-5212 843-724-5212 www.gaillardcenter.org www.gaillardcenter.org info@gaillardcenter.org info@gaillardcenter.org 843-873-2210 843-873-2210 www.summervillecountryclub.com www.summervillecountryclub.com sblanton@knology.net sblanton@knology.net 843-768-2749 843-768-2749 www.kiawahresort.com www.kiawahresort.com bryan_hunter@kiawahresort.com bryan_hunter@kiawahresort.com 843-871-2135 843-871-2135 www.wescottgolf.com www.wescottgolf.com lmonroe@wescottgolfclub.com lmonroe@wescottgolfclub.com

Frank Lapsley Frank 1999 Lapsley 1999

Bobby Kotlowski, Chris Bobby Hauff Kotlowski, Chris Hauff 1975 1975

M. Tracey Todd M. Tracey Todd 1741 1741 Steve Bedard Steve 2015 Bedard 2015 Bo C. Blanton Jr., Bufort Bo C. Blanton Jr., Bufort Blanton Blanton 2009 2009 Kirtland Kordonis, Roger Kirtland Warren Kordonis, Roger Warren 1976 1976 Lindsey Monroe, Perry Lindsey Monroe, Perry Green, Jason Narwold Green, 2000 Jason Narwold 2000

Max. Capacity / Max. Capacity Outdoor / / Outdoor / Reception Reception 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 1,575 1,575 6,000 6,000 0 0 6,000 6,000 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,500 1,500 1,500 2,341 2,341 -2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 1,850 1,850 -800 800 800 800 500 500 676 676 800 800 440 440 600 600 500 500 500 500

Because of space constraints, only the top-ranked companies are printed. For a full list of participating companies, visit Because of space constraints, only the top-ranked companies printed. For to a full list accuracy, of participating http://www.scbiznews.com/buy-business-lists. Although everyare effort is made ensure errors companies, sometimes visit http://www.scbiznews.com/buy-business-lists. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com. occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com.

For more lists subscribe to:

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Description Description

Venue buildings, open land with pond, 70 acres of indoor and outdoor Venue buildings, openacres land with pond, space 70 acres of indoor and outdoor event space and 100 of parking event space and 100 acres of parking space 6,000-seat multipurpose facility and home to The Citadel's basketball, 6,000-seat multipurpose facility and home to The Citadel's basketball, volleyball and wrestling teams volleyball and wrestling teams Harbor and city skyline views, competitive pricing, more than 20 group Harbor venues and city skyline views, competitive pricing, more than 20 group venues 2,300-seat proscenium theater for hosting major concerts, family 2,300-seat proscenium theater for major concerts, family shows, ballets and symphonies, andhosting art festivals shows, ballets and symphonies, and art festivals 18th-century plantation, America's oldest landscaped gardens, house 18th-century America's oldest landscaped gardens, house museum and plantation, plantation stableyards with indoor and outdoor reception museum and plantation stableyards with indoor and outdoor reception sites sites Lobby spaces, ballroom, terrace lawn, park and gardens Lobby spaces, ballroom, terrace lawn, park and gardens Covered outdoor pavilion with pull-down curtains if needed; large Covered outdoor pavilion pull-down curtains if needed; large outdoor patio suitable for with oyster roasts and weddings with 40' x 40' outdoor patio suitable for chairs oyster on roasts tent available; tables and site and weddings with 40' x 40' tent available; tables and chairs on site Indoor-outdoor meeting and event space, convention space, Indoor-outdoor and event space, convention space, clubhouse, hotelmeeting lawns, boardrooms clubhouse, hotel lawns, boardrooms Antebellum-style clubhouse with wraparound porch, hardwood floors, Antebellum-style clubhouse with wraparound porch, hardwood floors, twin fireplaces and vaulted ceilings; 6,000-square-foot tented patio for twin fireplaces and vaulted ceilings; 6,000-square-foot tented patio for weddings and outdoor events weddings and outdoor events Researched by Business Journal staff Researched by Business Journal staff

PLACES TO STAY |

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Alternative & Outdoor Event Venues Ranked by Maximum Capacity Venue

Phone / Website / Email

Lowndes Grove Plantation 266 St. Margaret St. Charleston, SC 29403

843-853-1810 www.pphgcharleston.com hello@pphgcharleston.com

Beresford Creek Course at Daniel Island Club 600 Island Park Drive Daniel Island, SC 29492

Top Local Official(s)/ Year Founded

Max. Capacity / Outdoor / Reception

For more lists subscribe to:

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Description

Amber Cote 2007

600 600

Panoramic sunset views of the Ashley River; 1786-era architecture and period furnishings; expansive piazza; grand lawn framed by century-old live oaks and private river dock

843-971-3555 www.danielislandclub.com diinfo@danielislandclub.com

Greg Keating 1999

500 500

Nationally ranked Tom Fazio layout available on a limited basis for member-sponsored charity and corporate events when course is closed for member play

The Cedar Room 701 East Bay St., Suite 200 Charleston, SC 29403

843-793-4103 www.thecedarroom.com gervin@theindigoroad.com

Graham Ervin 2015

500 200 500

Open space with historic wood columns, blond reclaimed wood floors from the original space and rustic elements of the circa-1881 building

Charleston Fun Park 3255 U.S. Highway 17 N. Mount Pleasant, SC 29466

843-971-1223 www.charlestonfunpark.com info@charlestonfunpark.com

Brian N. Lee, Melissa A. Benner 2006

500 500

Corporate meetings, corporate events, team building, birthday parties, group events, school functions

Daniel Island Club 600 Island Park Drive Daniel Island, SC 29492

843-971-3555 www.danielislandclub.com info@danielislandclub.com

Greg Keating 1999

500 500

Private country club with two championship golf courses; 7,100-square-foot ballroom, dividable; private boardroom; outdoor venues; full-service catering options; popular for weddings, corporate events and fundraising events

Laurel Hill County Park 1400 S.C. Highway 41 N. Mount Pleasant, SC 29466

843-795-4386 www.ccprc.com/2005 customerservice@ccprc.com

David Bennett 2015

500 500 -

Oak allee, large open meadows, scenic backdrops; capable of handling groups up to 500 people, but intimate enough for a small private function; amenities limited

Old Towne Creek County Park 1400 Old Towne Road Charleston, SC 29407

843-795-4386 www.ccprc.com/1728 customerservice@ccprc.com

David Bennett 2011

500 500 500

In-town country setting for weddings, corporate picnics or any occasion needing a convenient and secluded location; large open meadows, marsh views; construction and renovations set for late 2019

Ralston Creek at Daniel Island Club 600 Island Park Drive Daniel Island, SC 29492

843-971-3555 www.danielislandclub.com -

Greg Keating 2006

500 500

Nationally ranked Rees Jones layout available on a limited basis for member-sponsored charity and corporate events when course is closed for member play

South Carolina Aquarium 100 Aquarium Wharf Charleston, SC 29401

843-577-3474 www.scaquarium.org info@scaquarium.org

Kevin Mills 2000

500 -

Aquarium galleries and harbor overlook accommodate guest counts from 50 to 500 comfortably and enable creative placement of food and action stations, bar service, dance floors and musical entertainment

The William Aiken House 456 King St. Charleston, SC 29403

843-853-1810 www.pphgcharleston.com hello@pphgcharleston.com

Amber Cote 2000

500 500

1810 National Historic Landmark in downtown Charleston; indoor and outdoor spaces with period artwork, piazzas and private grounds with manicured lawns, bluestone courtyards, reflection pool and Gothicstyle carriage house

Johnson Hagood Stadium Club Level 68 Hagood Ave. Charleston, SC 29403

843-953-6703 www.tinyurl.com/stadiumclublevel reservations@citadel.edu

Allison Bringardner 2006

SpiritLine Cruises and Events 360 Concord St., Suite 201 Charleston, SC 29401

843-722-2628 www.spiritlinecruises.com sales@spiritlinecruises.com

Ian Harris 1961

400 350

Available for corporate meetings and outings, private cruises and charters and for all types of group tours; offering on-site event planners; additionally, an executive chef

Edmund's Oast 1081 Morrison Drive Charleston, SC 29403

843-727-1145 www.edmundsoast.com edmundsoast@edmundsoast.com

Scott Shor 2014

350 350

Accommodating 130 guests inside, the interior has an open kitchen with chef’s counter seating; house-cured meats hanging overhead; expansive bar and communal tables; plentiful on-site parking

843-768-0429 www.stchristopher.org info@stchristopher.org

Bob Lawrence, Ned Collins, Will Henry Lawrence 1938

340 -

Waterfront facility with beach access; large multipurpose building; large conference room; several small, intimate conference areas; two chapels; cabins and lodge rooms

843-852-4200 www.charlestownelanding.travel ctlandingsp@scprt.com

Rob Powell, Jason Robinett 1970

300 200 300

Site of first permanent English settlement in the Carolinas; includes three special-event venues: Founders Hall, the historic Legare Waring House and the visitor center classroom

843-722-1112 www.charlestonharbortours.com sales@charlestonharbortours.com

Drew K. Yochum 1908

300 250 200

Fleet of three vessels on Charleston Harbor for private dinner cruises, cocktail cruises, special tours, weddings, rehearsal dinners and any special event

843-795-4386 www.charlestoncountyparks.com customerservice@ccprc.com

Randy Woodard, Kevin Gillum 1990

300 300 300

Equipped with picnic tables, grills and electricity; venues include Picnic Center Porch, 768 sq. ft., capacity 75; Wando & Stono shelters, 1,600 sq. ft., cap. 200 each; Wappoo Shelter, 2,100 sq. ft., cap. 300; Picnic Center Stage, cap. 75

843-795-4386 www.charlestoncountyparks.com customerservice@ccprc.com

Edmonds Brown 1995

300 300 300

Three covered shelters: Cottonwood, 1,840 sq. ft., capacity 200; Tupelo, 2,575 sq. ft., cap. 300; Magnolia, 1,585 sq. ft., cap. 100; each has picnic tables, restroom, electricity, fans, lakeside canopy and umbrellas

843-606-2083 www.ioncreekclub.com info@ioncreekclub.com

Mike Russo, Peggy Thomas 1999

300 300 300

Weddings, receptions and corporate events; views

St. Christopher Camp and Conference Center 2810 Seabrook Island Road Johns Island, SC 29455 Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site 1500 Old Towne Road Charleston, SC 29407 Charleston Harbor Tours & Events 10 Wharfside St. Charleston, SC 29401 Covered Shelters at James Island County Park 871 Riverland Drive Charleston, SC 29412 Covered Shelters at Wannamaker County Park 8888 University Blvd. North Charleston, SC 29406 The Creek Club at I'On 44 Saturday Road Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

450 20,000 450

Because of space constraints, only the top-ranked companies are printed. For a full list of participating companies, visit http://www.scbiznews.com/buy-business-lists. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com.

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| PLACES TO STAY

Two outdoor terraces available with 500-person capacity each

Researched by Business Journal staff


Photo/Spoleto Festival USA

Shakespeare’s Globe presents The Comedy of Errors at the Dock Street Theatre during Spoleto Festival USA in downtown Charleston.

» ARTS ABOUND

The depth and breadth of Charleston’s arts scene may surprise you. From established galleries and historic theaters to funky festivals and improv comedy, the Holy City and surrounding areas have much to offer. The following is just a small selection of what’s available to satisfy your artistic cravings.

Visual arts Charleston Gallery Association www.charlestongalleryassociation.com The Charleston Gallery Association is made up of more than 40 galleries showcasing local, regional and national artists’ work. The association holds art walks four times a year, on the first Friday of March, May, October and December. Charleston Renaissance Gallery fineartsouth.com Focusing on fine art of the American South, the Charleston Renaissance Gallery has of-

ferings ranging from 18th century portraits and engravings to contemporary paintings and sculpture. 103 Church St., Charleston; 843-723-0025 City Gallery at Waterfront Park citygalleryatwaterfrontpark.com The City Gallery presents several exhibits each year focusing on contemporary visual arts created by local, regional, national and international artists. 34 Prioleau St., Charleston; 843-958-6484. Gallery Chuma www.gallerychuma.com

Specializing in the works of the Gullah people of coastal South Carolina, Gallery Chuma features Gullah art, books, crafts, storytelling, tours and food. 188 Meeting St., #N1, Charleston; 843-722-1702. Gibbes Museum of Art www.gibbesmuseum.org As Charleston’s only visual arts museum, the Gibbes also offers educational programs, group tours and art discovery walking tours. The museum recently completed extensive renovations. 135 Meeting St., Charleston; 843-722-2706.

ARTS ABOUND |

85


Photo/The Gibbes Museum of Art

The Gibbes Museum of Art.

Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art halsey.cofc.edu Administered by the School of the Arts at the College of Charleston, the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art was created to advocate, exhibit and interpret visual art, with an emphasis on contemporary art. 161 Calhoun St., Charleston; 843-953-4422.

Spoleto Festival USA spoletousa.org Held each spring since 1977, this 17-day festival features visual art exhibits and more than 120 performances from opera to jazz music. 843-579-3100.

MOJA Arts Festival www.mojafestival.com Started in 1984, the annual MOJA Arts Festival is a celebration of African American and Caribbean arts and features music, visual art, storytelling, performances, crafts, children’s activities and more. 843-724-7305.

The Actors’ Theatre of South Carolina www.actorstheatreofsc.org Founded in 1995 and headquartered in Charleston, the Actors’ Theatre has members who travel the state presenting a full season of performances as well as acting classes and a film division. 843-696-2761.

Performing arts

Piccolo Spoleto www.piccolospoleto.com Piccolo Spoleto was created in 1979 to coincide with the international Spoleto Festival USA and primarily features artists from the Southeast. Held at a variety of locations in downtown Charleston. 843-724-7305. The Gaillard Center at dusk in downtown Charleston. | ARTS ABOUND

Charleston Music Hall www.charlestonmusichall.com Said to offer some of the best acoustics in Charleston, the Charleston Music Hall welcomes a variety of performers throughout the year from bluegrass to blues. 37 John St., Charleston; 843-853-2252. Charleston Stage www.charlestonstage.com Charleston Stage, which calls the renovated Dock Street Theatre home, was founded in 1978 and is the state’s largest professional theater company. 843-577-7183. Charleston Symphony Orchestra charlestonsymphony.org Founded in 1936, the Charleston Symphony Orchestra is known for its Masterworks and Pops series. The CSO also offers holiday perPhotos/Charleston Area Convention & Visitors Bureau

North Charleston City Gallery www.northcharleston.org, arts and culture tab Located in the commons area at the Charleston Area Convention Center, the North Charleston City Gallery features exhibits that are rotated on a monthly basis. 5001 Coliseum Drive, North Charleston; 843-740-5854.

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American Theater www.pphgcharleston.com/venues/ the-american-theater The American Theater opened in 1942 as one of Charleston’s premier movie houses. It closed in 1977 but was revitalized and reopened in 2005 as a state-of-the-art meeting and conference facility. It also hosts a variety of performances, including Spoleto activities. 446 King St., Charleston; 843-853-1810.


Photo/Theatre 99

formances and family concerts throughout the year. CSO makes its home at the newly renovated performance hall at the Gaillard Center. 843-723-7528. Dock Street Theatre www.charlestonstage.com/dock-streettheatre.html The historic Dock Street Theatre is managed by the city of Charleston. It originally opened in 1736 and was the first building in America built specifically for theatrical productions. It completed a $19 million, three-year renovation in 2010 and is a performance venue for Spoleto Festival USA and home of Charleston Stage. 135 Church St., Charleston; 843-577-7183. Flowertown Players www.flowertownplayers.org This community theater presents a range of productions from musicals to serious dramas as well as performances and classes for children. 133 S. Main St., Summerville; 843-875-9251. Footlight Players Theatre www.footlightplayers.net Since 1931, the Footlight Players Theatre has presented a variety of stage productions and has become known as one of the top community theaters in the South. A typical season includes six performances. 20 Queen St., Charleston; 843-722-4487.

The Meeting Street Maniacs perform their improv show every Wednesday through Saturday at Theatre 99.

and stand-up offerings three or four nights a week. Local shows are held at Theatre 99, the group’s own theater. 280 Meeting St., Charleston; 843-853-6687. Memminger Auditorium memmingerauditorium.com Built in the 1930s as an auditorium for Memminger High School, the building had stood vacant since the 1960s and was severely damaged by Hurricane Hugo in 1989. Spoleto Festival USA played a large part in the building’s recent $6 million renovation and the facility reopened in 2008. Now used for a variety of performances and also available for rental for events. 56 Beaufain St., Charleston; 843-724-1196.

The Gaillard Center www.gaillardcenter.com Recently renovated and reopened, the $142 million Gaillard Center is a world-class performing venue. It hosts a multitude of events and performances from Charleston Symphony Orchestra concerts to rock-‘n’roll. 95 Calhoun St., Charleston; 843-242-3099.

North Charleston Coliseum and Performing Arts Center www.northcharlestoncoliseumpac.com The North Charleston Coliseum and Performing Arts Center hosts events as varied as hockey games and Broadway shows throughout the year. The coliseum seats 13,000-plus for concert performances. The Performing Arts Center seats 2,300. 5001 Coliseum Drive, North Charleston; 843-529-5000.

The Have Nots! Comedy Improv theatre99.com Theatre 99 has developed into a company of about 50 individuals, who along with visiting artists create affordable improv, sketch

PURE Theatre puretheatre.org PURE Theatre has gained respect as a small professional theater focusing on the works of contemporary playwrights.

477 King St., Charleston; 843-723-4444. Sottile Theatre sottile.cofc.edu The Sottile Theatre opened in 1927 as the Gloria Theater and hosted the premiere of Gone With the Wind in 1939. It’s now the home of various events, including Charleston Comedy Festival performances. 44 George St., Charleston; 843-953-6340. South of Broadway Theatre Co. southofbroadway.com The South of Broadway Theatre Company produces a season of seven shows plus PlayFest, showcasing local playwrights and actors. The theater also offers classes and Summer Theatre Camp. 1080 E. Montague Ave., North Charleston; 843-745-0317. Woolfe Street Playhouse woolfestreetplayhouse.com The 200-seat Woolfe Street Playhouse is home to the Village Repertory Co., which brings bold productions of new and established works. The company moved into a century-old meatpacking warehouse in the former industrial center of the Charleston peninsula. 34 Woolfe St., Charleston; 843-856-1579.

For more about arts events in the area, visit charlestonarts.org.

ARTS ABOUND |

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Photo/Charleston Area Convention & Visitors Bureau

Boone Hall Plantation in Mount Pleasant.

» ATTRACTIONS AND TOURS

Adventure Outdoors Charter Fishing 50 41st Ave. Isle of Palms, SC 29464 843-345-9969 fvonk@msn.com www.advoutdoors.com Single Adult Admission: $125 Inshore charter fishing out of the Isle of Palms marina in the Charleston Harbor area; harbor tours and boat rides available

Carolina Ice Palace 7665 Northwoods Blvd. North Charleston, SC 29406 843-572-2717 info@carolinaicepalace.com www.carolinaicepalace.com Single Adult Admission: $6-$12 Two NHL size ice skating rinks, Penalty Box Sports Lounge, meeting rooms, pro shop, birthday party rooms, catering, figure skating and hockey

Aiken-Rhett House Museum 48 Elizabeth St. Charleston, SC 29403 843-723-1159 info@historiccharleston.org www.historiccharleston.org/aiken-rhett Single Adult Admission: $12 Intact mansion and associated outbuildings demonstrating urban life in antebellum Charleston

Caw Caw Interpretive Center 5200 Savannah Highway Ravenel, SC 29470 843-889-8898 customerservice@ccprc.com www.ccprc.com Single Adult Admission: $2 654-acre site with intact rice fields, interpretive trails, exhibit center, wildlife

Avian Conservation Center/Center for Birds of Prey 4719 U.S. Highway 17 N. Awendaw, SC 29429 843-971-7474 info@thecenterforbirdsofprey.org www.thecenterforbirdsofprey.org Single Adult Admission: $18 One of the nation’s largest and most diverse collections of live birds of prey; guided tours and flight demonstrations available

Charles Pinckney National Historic Site 1254 Long Point Road Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843-881-5516 chpi_information@nps.gov www.nps.gov/chpi Single Adult Admission: Free Country estate of Charles Pinckney; Constitution history, archaeology, AfricanAmerican history; closed Mondays and Tuesdays

Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site 1500 Old Towne Road Charleston, SC 29407 843-852-4200 ctlandingsp@scprt.com www.charlestownelanding.travel Single Adult Admission: $10 Birthplace of the Carolinas, Charleston’s largest natural habitat zoo, costumed interpretation, 17th-century trading ship adventure, picnic areas, bike rentals, cannon firings, museum, and gift shop

Charleston Fun Park 3255 U.S. Highway 17 N. Mount Pleasant, SC 29466 843-971-1223 info@charlestonfunpark.com www.charlestonfunpark.com Single Adult Admission: $1-$100 Mini golf, go-karts, climbing wall, virtual reality coaster, bumper cars, mini bowling and arcade; birthday parties and group events Charleston Harbor Tours & Events 10 Wharfside St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-722-1112 sales@charlestonharbortours.com www.charlestonharbortours.com Single Adult Admission: $28 and up Harbor tours, combination tours, group

Note: Admission prices are listed for adults; check websites or call for youth, senior and other discounts.

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| ATTRACTIONS AND TOURS

tours, corporate events, weddings, social events, three vessels of varying sizes to accommodate events

The Charleston Museum 360 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29403 843-722-2996 info@charlestonmuseum.org www.charlestonmuseum.org Single Adult Admission: $12 America’s first museum, showing a variety of cultural and natural history artifacts relating to the S.C. Lowcountry Charleston RiverDogs 360 Fishburne St. Charleston, SC 29403 843-577-3647 clewis@riverdogs.com www.riverdogs.com Single Adult Admission: $8 Minor league baseball team; facility also hosts numerous non-baseball events, fundraisers and concerts Charleston Stage Co. 135 Church St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-577-7183 email@charlestonstage.com www.charlestonstage.com Single Adult Admission: Varies


South Carolina’s largest professional theatre company, produces a full season of plays, musicals and theatre for youth programs

Single Adult Admission: $10 Learning adventures for children from birth to 10 years and their families

Charleston Tea Plantation 6617 Maybank Highway Wadmalaw Island, SC 29487 843-559-0383 jknight@rcbigelow.com www.charlestonteaplantation.com Single Adult Admission: Factory tour free; trolley ride $14 Tea plantation with informational tours of the onsite factory, trolley rides designed to educate the public on the growing and processing of tea

Corrigan Gallery LLC 7 Broad St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-722-9868 art@lesecorrigan.com www.corrigangallery.com Single Adult Admission: Free Local, contemporary fine art

Charleston Zipline Adventures 1152 Guerins Bridge Road Awendaw, SC 29429 843-928-3947 sales@charlestonziplineadventures.com www.charlestonziplineadventures.com Single Adult Admission: $79 Zipline canopy tours, kids zipline course, climbing wall, birthday parties, summer, camp, corporate team building events, outdoor event venue rental, special events and parties, 10 acres of forest Children’s Museum of the Lowcountry 25 Ann St.1 Charleston, SC 29403 843-853-8962 community@exploreCML.org exploreCML.org

Deep Water Vineyard & Winery 6775 Bears Bluff Road Wadmalaw Island, SC 29487 843-559-6867 fran@fireflyvodka.com www.deepwatervineyard.com Single Adult Admission: $7 tastings Winery Drayton Hall 3380 Ashley River Road Charleston, SC 29414 843-769-2608 info@draytonhall.org www.draytonhall.org Single Adult Admission: $32 Colonial American site, and the nation’s oldest preserved plantation house open to the public, with 1790s African-American cemetery

Edmondston-Alston House 21 East Battery Charleston, SC 29401 843-722-7171 csmith@middletonplace.org www.edmondstonalston.com Single Adult Admission: $12 Daily tours and private tours available, as well as reception and dinner space Edwin S. Taylor Folly Beach Fishing Pier 101 E. Arctic Ave. Folly Beach, SC 29439 843-588-3474 customerservice@ccprc.com www.ccprc.com Single Adult Admission: $10 per vehicle Fishing pier, gift shop, restaurant, rental equipment available, tournaments, special events Exchange Park 9850 U.S. Highway 78 Ladson, SC 29456 843-572-3161 denise@exchangepark.org www.exchangepark.org Single Adult Admission: Varies per event 170-acre multipurpose event complex, wide variety of special-event programming, indoor and outdoor space available

Firefly Distillery 6775 Bears Bluff Road Wadmalaw Island, SC 29487 843-577-1405 info@fireflyvodka.com www.fireflyvodka.com Single Adult Admission: $6 Distillery with farm, tastings, vineyard on site Folly Beach County Park 1100 W. Ashley Ave. Folly Beach, SC 29439 843-762-9516 customerservice@ccprc.com www.charlestoncountyparks.com Single Adult Admission: $10 per vehicle Restrooms, outdoor showers, parking, designated swimming area with lifeguards, snack bar, chair and umbrella rentals and wheelchair accessibility Fort Sumter and Fort Moultrie National Historical Park 1214 Middle St.1 Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482 843-883-3123 fosu_information@nps.gov www.nps.gov/fosu Single Adult Admission: $7 for Fort Moultrie; $23 for Fort Sumter Two forts span history from 1776-1947, including the start of the American Civil War; Fort Sumter is accessible only by concessionoperated ferry; Fort Moultrie by is accessible by car

ATTRACTIONS AND TOURS |

89


Photo/Andy Hagedon/Children’s Museum of the Lowcountry

Fort Sumter Tours 360 Concord St., Suite 201 Charleston, SC 29401 843-722-2628 sales@spiritlinecruises.com www.fortsumtertours.com Single Adult Admission: $23 Daily tours departing from Liberty Square and Patriots Point Friends of the Hunley 1250 Supply St. North Charleston, SC 29405 843-743-4865 kellen@hunley.org www.hunley.org Single Adult Admission: $16 Weekend tours of the Hunley, interactive experience, explores the mysteries surrounding the Hunley, the first successful combat sub Gibbes Museum of Art 135 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-722-2706 Gibbes@louhammond.com www.gibbesmuseum.org Single Adult Admission: $12 American art from the 18th century to the present in addition to 6-8 special exhibitions annually Isle of Palms County Park 1 14th Ave. Isle of Palms, SC 29451 843-762-9957 customerservice@ccprc.com www.charlestoncountyparks.com Single Adult Admission: $10 per vehicle Dunes, boardwalk, showers, restrooms, lifeguards, vending, 350 parking spaces James Island County Park 871 Riverland Drive Charleston, SC 29412 843-406-6990 customerservice@ccprc.com www.charlestoncountyparks.com/jicp Single Adult Admission: $2 643-acre park with crabbing, fishing, biking, lagoon boating, dog park, playgrounds, shelters, climbing wall, cottages, campsites and challenge course James Island County Park Challenge Course 871 Riverland Drive Charleston, SC 29412 843-762-2172 customerservice@ccprc.com www.charlestoncountyparks.com/ challengecourse Single Adult Admission: $20-$80 High and low ropes course for team building; customized programs for all ages and abilities

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| ATTRACTIONS AND TOURS

Your child’s imagination comes alive in the Medieval Creativity Castle at the Children’s Museum of the Lowcountry in downtown Charleston. James Island County Park Climbing Wall 871 Riverland Drive Charleston, SC 29412 843-795-4386 customerservice@ccprc.com www.charlestoncountyparks.com/wall Single Adult Admission: $12-$14 50-foot climbing wall and 1,000-square-foot bouldering wall for supervised climbing James Island County Park Splash Zone 871 Riverland Drive James Island, SC 29412 843-795-7275 charlestoncountyparks@ccprc.com www.splashparks.com Single Adult Admission: $11.99 Two 200-foot slides, lazy river, Caribbean play structure, concessions, kiddie pool, lockers, lifeguards, vending Johns Island County Park 2662 Mullet Hall Road Johns Island, SC 29455 843-768-5867 customerservice@ccprc.com www.ccprc.com Single Adult Admission: $1 Features miles of scenic unpaved trails, archery ranges, plus Mullet Hall, a 738-acre host site for competitive horse shows, events and exhibitions Karpeles Manuscript Museum Library 68 Spring St. Charleston, SC 29403 843-853-4651 KMuseumChr@aol.com www.rain.org/~karpeles/chasfrm.html Single Adult Admission: Free Displays historical manuscripts on a wide variety of cultural, scientific, social, intellectual, economic, historical subjects

Kiawah Beachwalker Park 8 Beachwalker Drive Kiawah Island, SC 29455 843-762-9964 customerservice@ccprc.com www.charlestoncountyparks.com Single Adult Admission: $10 per vehicle Beach access park with 300 feet of ocean frontage, dressing areas, outdoor showers, restrooms and seasonal lifeguards Legare Farms 2620 Hanscombe Point Road Johns Island, SC 29455 843-559-0788 Info@legarefarms.com www.legarefarms.com Single Adult Admission: $1 300-acre farm on the Stono River; provides food products and holds family events yearround Magnolia Plantation & Gardens 3550 Ashley River Road Charleston, SC 29414 843-571-1266 weddings@magnoliaplantation.com www.magnoliaplantationweddings.com Single Adult Admission: $20 Pre-Revolutionary War plantation house, early American antiques, biblical garden, antebellum cabins, train tour, nature boat tour, slave cabin tour McLeod Plantation Historic Site 325 Country Club Drive Charleston, SC 29412 843-795-4386 customerservice@ccprc.com Single Adult Admission: $10 Former sea island cotton plantation with historic structures and buildings

Mepkin Abbey 1098 Mepkin Abbey Road Moncks Corner, SC 29461 843-761-8509 frjoetedesco@gmail.com www.mepkinabbey.org Single Adult Admission: $5 Gardens are open to the public Middleton Place 4300 Ashley River Road Charleston, SC 29414 843-556-6020 info@middletonplace.org www.middletonplace.org Single Adult Admission: $29 A National Historic Landmark, home to a signer of the Declaration of Independence, house museum, stableyards, America’s oldest landscaped gardens Mount Pleasant Memorial Waterfront Park 99 Harry Hallman Jr. Blvd. Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843-884-8517 events@tompsc.com experiencemountpleasant.com Single Adult Admission: $0 Park located under the entryway to the town at the base of the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge Mount Pleasant Pier 71 Harry Hallman Blvd. Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843-762-9946 customerservice@ccprc.com www.charlestoncountyparks.com Single Adult Admission: Free admission/$5 fishing fee 1,250-foot-long pier at the foot of the Ravenel Bridge featuring covered pavilion, cafe, gift shop, fishing equipment rentals, seating, restrooms Nathaniel Russell House 51 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-723-1623 hcf@historiccharleston.org www.historiccharleston.org Single Adult Admission: $12 200-year-old Federal town house with elaborate plaster work, fine furnishings and a free-flying staircase Nature Adventures 1 Shrimp Boat Lane Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843-568-3222 info@natureadventureschs.com www.NatureAdventuresCHS.com Single Adult Admission: $45 Kayaking and paddleboarding rentals and tours


Photo/Nathan Bell/South Carolina Aquarium

River otter saying hello at the South Carolina Aquarium. North Charleston Fire Museum & Education Center 4975 Centre Pointe Drive North Charleston, SC 29418 843-740-5550 msterling@northcharleston.org www.northcharlestonfiremuseuem.org Single Adult Admission: $6 Interactive exhibits, hands-on equipment, play area with functioning fire pole, theater experience

The Powder Magazine 79 Cumberland St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-722-9350 info@powdermag.org www.powdermag.org Single Adult Admission: $6 Oldest public building in South Carolina, stored gunpowder from 1713-1748 and 1780 during the Revolution, today the building is a colonial military history museum

Palmetto Islands County Park 444 Needlerush Parkway Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843-406-6950 customerservice@ccprc.com www.charlestoncountyparks.com/picp Single Adult Admission: $2 943-acre nature-based park with playgrounds, trails, boating, biking, shelters, water park, special events

The Reel Deal Charters LLC 1 Seafood Drive Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843-388-5093 thereeldealcharterssc@gmail.com www.thereeldealcharters.com Single Adult Admission: $325 Year-round inshore and offshore, deep sea and big game saltwater fishing; licenses, bait and tackle included

Palmetto Islands County Park Splash Island 444 Needlerush Parkway Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843-884-0832 customerservice@ccprc.com www.splashparks.com Single Adult Admission: $6.99 200-foot slide, Cyclone swirling water ride, 16foot otter slide, kiddie pool, sprays, waterfalls, geysers, vending

The Riley Park Club 360 Fishburne St. Charleston, SC 29403 843-793-4103 bailey@riverdogs.com www.rileyparkevents.com/club Single Adult Admission: Varies Space within the Joseph P. Riley Jr. ballpark, views of the Ashley River, available for gameday use and as an event rental space

Patriots Point Naval & Maritime Museum 40 Patriots Point Road Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843-884-2727 info@patriotspoint.org www.patriotspoint.org Single Adult Admission: $24 USS Yorktown, USS Laffey, interactive Vietnam Experience Exhibit and the Medal of Honor Museum

SK8 Charleston 1549 Oceanic St. Charleston, SC 29403 843-795-4386 customerservice@ccprc.com www.sk8charleston.com Single Adult Admission: $3 32,500-square-foot skate park with a raised building, large viewing deck overlooking the action, and skate shop

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| ATTRACTIONS AND TOURS

Sky Zone Charleston 411 Wando Park Blvd. Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843-588-5777 info@skyzonecharleston.com www.skyzone.com/charleston Single Adult Admission: $16/60 mins 15,000 square feet of wall-to-wall trampolines South Carolina Aquarium 100 Aquarium Wharf Charleston, SC 29401 843-577-3474 info@scaquarium.org www.scaquarium.org Single Adult Admission: $29.95 Thousands of amazing aquatic animals from river otters and sharks to loggerhead turtles in more than 60 exhibits representing the biodiversity of the state South Carolina Stingrays 3300 W. Montague Ave., Suite A-200 North Charleston, SC 29418 843-744-2248 info@stingrayshockey.com www.stingrayshockey.com Single Adult Admission: $17 Minor league hockey team, the ECHL (AA) affiliate of the NHL’s Washington Capitals, host 36 regular season games at the North Charleston Coliseum during the months of October through April SpiritLine Cruises and Events 360 Concord St., Suite 201 Charleston, SC 29401 843-722-2628 sales@spiritlinecruises.com www.spiritlinecruises.com Single Adult Admission: $57.95 Fleet is available for private charters and dinner cruises

Striped Pig Distillery 2225-A Old School Drive North Charleston, SC 29405 843-276-3201 info@stripedpigdistillery.com www.stripedpigdistillery.com Single Adult Admission: $10 Distillery tours, facility rentals and sampling of our locally made, award-winning spirits Wannamaker County Park 8888 University Blvd. North Charleston, SC 29406 843-762-5585 customerservice@ccprc.com www.charlestoncountyparks.com Single Adult Admission: $2 1,015-acre park, two playgrounds, 20-foot play hill, picnic sites with grills, open meadows, paved trails, boat rentals, water park, meeting space Whirlin’ Waters Adventure Waterpark 8888 University Blvd. North Charleston, SC 29406 843-572-7275 Charlestoncountyparks@ccprc.com www.splashparks.com Single Adult Admission: $21.99 27,000-square-foot wave pool, lazy river, treehouse play structure, kiddie pool, seven-story multislide complex, racer slides, birthday parties, new attraction to open Summer 2019


Photo/SEWE

Dock Dogs competition at the annual Southeastern Wildlife Exposition.

» CALENDAR OF EVENTS Charleston is a busy city – there’s always a race, festival or tour of homes going on. If it’s January, there must be oysters; if it’s spring, there must be a race over the bridge. You can count on it. Here are some of the main events that shape our year.

JANUARY Happy New Year, Charleston This is a time to celebrate as only the Lowcountry knows how. There will be crowds everywhere as Charlestonians and visitors welcome the New Year at venues all over the area. Folly Beach and Sullivan’s Island both have popular “polar bear” plunge events on New Year’s Day and hundreds of people run from the beach into the freezing ocean water to celebrate the new year.

Lowcountry Oyster Festival www.charlestonrestaurantassociation. com Each January, two tractor trailer loads of oysters – more than 65,000 pounds – are brought in for the annual Lowcountry Oyster Festival at Boone Hall Plantation. Contests, live music and other activities are scheduled throughout the day, including an oyster shucking contest, oyster eating contest and a contest among local chefs for the best oyster recipe.

FEBRUARY Southeastern Wildlife Exposition sewe.com Known for its world-class original art, diverse exhibits and animal demonstrations, the annual Southeastern Wildlife Exposition brings 120 artists and more than 350 exhibitors to venues throughout Charleston for a long weekend. Conservation exhibits, birds of prey and retriever demonstrations, and Dock Dogs are among the highlights.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS |

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Photo/Alina Tyulyu, courtesy of Charleston Wine+Food

Corkscrews and Campfires event at the Charleston Wine and Food Festival.

MARCH Charleston Wine and Food Festival charlestonwineandfood.com Starting in early March, this festival celebrates the culinary history and culture of the Lowcountry. Foodies can enjoy dozens of events during the five-day event. Marion Square is the center of the action. Charleston Antiques Show www.historiccharleston.org Each year in mid-March, collectors and enthusiasts are treated to an array of English, European and American antiques from dealers across the country. Visitors can learn through educational presentations and purchase furnishings, decorative and fine art, architectural elements, garden furniture, vintage jewelry and silver. Held at Charleston Gaillard Center, 95 Calhoun St.

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| CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Spring Festival of Houses and Gardens www.historiccharleston.org Starting in late March, this monthlong event opens some of Charleston’s finest historic gardens and houses for touring. Let the Historic Charleston Foundation be your guide for one of the tours that give a rare chance for a glimpse inside private homes.

APRIL World Grits Festival worldgritsfestival.com Who could resist a festival that’s all about grits? This family oriented festival in St. George celebrates all forms of coarsely ground hominy and crowns a winner in the official Grits Rolling Contest. Summerville Flowertown Festival www.flowertownfestival.com The three-day event showcases the beautiful

blooming azaleas, wisteria and dogwood in Summerville, a northern suburb of Charleston. The festival brings a host of artisans, food vendors, children’s activities and musical performances. It is organized by the Summerville Family YMCA. Cooper River Bridge Run bridgerun.com Start in Mount Pleasant and run across the Cooper River on the expansive Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge. You’ll wind up in downtown Charleston. Held in late March or early April each year, the event features a popular world-class 10K run as well as a walk. Volvo Car Open www.volvocaropen.com In 2015, the week-long Charleston women's professional tennis tournament became the Volvo Car Open. Home to the tournament is the Family Circle Tennis Center, built through a partnership between the city of Charleston and Family Circle magazine. The tournament is held at the Daniel Island center each April. Watch the stars play, then come back to attend concerts and events held throughout the year.

MAY & JUNE Spoleto Festival USA spoletousa.org Each year since 1977, dozens of music, dance and theater performances as well as visual arts exhibits have come to the Charleston area for Spoleto USA. The 17day festival begins in late May and continues into June. It fills Charleston’s historic theaters, churches and outdoor spaces with more than 120 performances. Piccolo Spoleto USA www.piccolospoleto.com This festival, running concurrently with Spoleto Festival USA, focuses primarily on artists from the Southeast, offering theater, music, visual arts, dance, ethnic culture presentations, comedy, crafts and film. It takes place at a variety of locations around Charleston.


Photo/Volvo Car Open by Lee Deas of Obviouslee Marketing

JULY Fourth of July www.patriotspoint.org Fireworks launched from the flight deck of an aircraft carrier at Patriots Point and a shoreside party with beach music make Independence Day in Charleston fun. Communities all over the area have their own celebrations. Sit on the beach and watch fireworks all around.

AUGUST SC Reggae Jerk Wine Festival This event, held at Magnolia Plantation and Gardens in August, is the place to celebrate all things Jamaican, Reggae Music and Jerk Foods, and introduce wines to pair with jerk. Music, food tastings, products and suggestions on wine pairing with jerk, wine and jerk sample, Garden Admission, Wine Glass & Tastings, Domino Tournament, Jerk Cook-off and more. Lowcountry Jazz Festival Ring in the Labor Day weekend, starting Aug. 30, with the Lowcountry Jazz Festival, to be held in Gailliard Auditorium. 2019 lineup includes Kirk Whalum, Peter White, Jonathan Butler, Richard Elliot, Keiko Matsui, Marion Meadows, The Sax Pack, DW3, and The West Coast Jam Horns.

The Volvo Car Open women’s professional tennis tournament is held every spring on Daniel Island.

OCTOBER

MOJA Arts Festival www.mojafestival.com In late September through early October, the MOJA Arts Festival celebrates African American and Caribbean arts. Featured are music, visual arts, storytelling, performances, crafts and children’s activities at various locations.

Fall Tour of Homes and Gardens www.preservationsociety.org Charleston’s historic homes and gardens welcome visitors on a rotating basis, starting in late September through most of October. Over five weeks, you can experience history close up while helping the Preservation Society raise funds.

Photo/MOJA Arts Festival

SEPTEMBER

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER Holiday Festival of Lights www.ccprc.com Experience the spirit of the holidays with millions of sparkling lights at James Island County Park. The display opens the second week of November and continues through New Year’s. There are more than 600 light displays, many reflected in the park’s waterways.

The MOJA Arts Festival is a celebration of African-American and Caribbean arts. CALENDAR OF EVENTS |

95


17

26

78

17A

Berkeley County

78

Dorchester County

Summerville

Goose Creek

17A

17A 52

61

17

165

Hanahan

33 41

North Charleston

17 7

642

Daniel Island

26

526

Mt. Pleasant

517

17

Ravenel

West Ashley

17

162

Isle of Palms

Charleston 30

Charleston County

699

703

Sullivan's Island

James Island

Atlantic Ocean

164 700

Johns Island

171

Meggett Folly Beach Kiawah Island

174

Seabrook Island

» NEWCOMER INFORMATION TELEPHONE AT&T 800-331-0500 www.att.com Home Telecom 843-761-9101 www.homesc.com WOW! 843-225-1000 www.wowway.com

CABLE

ELECTRICITY AND NATURAL GAS Berkeley Electric Cooperative 843-761-8200 www.becsc.com Edisto Electric Cooperative 800-433-3292 www.edistoelectric.com Santee Cooper 843-761-8000 www.santeecooper.com

Comcast 800-266-2278 www.comcast.com

South Carolina Electric & Gas 800-251-7234 www.sceg.com

WOW! 843-225-1000 www.wowway.com

GARBAGE

Spectrum (formerly Time Warner) Cable 866-892-7201 www.spectrum.com

96

City of Charleston 843-724-7364 www.charleston-sc.gov City of Goose Creek 843-824-2200 www.cityofgoosecreek.com

| NEWCOMER INFORMATION

City of Hanahan 843-529-3413 www.cityofhanahan.com

Town of Summerville 843-851-4225 www.summervillesc.gov

City of Isle of Palms 843-886-6148 www.iopwsc.com

City of Isle of Palms 843-886-8956 www.iop.net

WATER AND SEWER

James Island Public Service District 843-795-9060 www.jipsd.org

James Island Public Service District 843-795-9060 www.jipsd.org Town of Moncks Corner 843-719-7900 www.monckscornersc.gov Town of Mount Pleasant 843-849-2022 www.tompsc.com City of North Charleston 843-745-1026 www.northcharleston.org Town of Sullivan’s Island 843-883-3198 www.sullivansisland-sc.com

Berkeley County Water & Sanitation Authority 843-572-4400 www.bcwsa.com Charleston Water System 843-727-6800 www.charlestonwater.com Dorchester County Water and Sewer Dept. 843-563-0075, 843-832-0075 www.dorchestercounty.net City of Folly Beach 843-588-2447 www.cityoffollybeach.com City of Goose Creek 843-797-6220, ext. 1 www.cityofgoosecreek.com

Town of Moncks Corner 843-719-7900 www.monckscornersc.gov Johns Island 843-559-0186 St. Johns Water Co. Town of Sullivan’s Island 843-883-5733 www.sullivansisland-sc.com Summerville Commissioners of Public Works 843-871-0810 www.summervillecpw.com Mount Pleasant Waterworks 843-884-9626 www.mountpleasantwaterworks. com

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Your Guide to Charleston - Toni Gillard  

Toni Gillard, of Realty One Group Coastal, proudly presents your comprehensive guide to relocating to the Charleston, SC area. Published by...

Your Guide to Charleston - Toni Gillard  

Toni Gillard, of Realty One Group Coastal, proudly presents your comprehensive guide to relocating to the Charleston, SC area. Published by...

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