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2018 Midlands Regional

COMPETITIVENESS REPORT

TM

Imagine More

TALENT | INNOVATION | ENTREPRENEURIAL & BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT | INDUSTRY CLUSTERS | LIVABILITY


TM

Imagine More By 2025, Columbia, SC will be one of the Southeast’s most competitive and prosperous metros. Each year, it is our privilege to work with regional leaders to achieve that ambitious goal and this report serves as our measuring stick toward progress. At the release of last year’s report, Dr. Doug Woodward, our research partner from the University of South Carolina’s Darla Moore School of Business, put it this way: “Columbia’s running the race. But we’re not running fast enough.” As is common with benchmarking reports, we’ve taken some important steps forward, but we’ve also taken steps backward in some areas. This year epitomizes that: after five years of moderate growth among a strong national economy, the Columbia MSA’s real GDP shrank by 0.4%, or $151 million. Despite that slowdown in growth the shock to our region’s economy in the fallout of the V.C. Summer project, growth and development continue throughout new areas of our region, and the passion for progress has never been more apparent. The best example of this is evident in the leadership of the Midlands Business Leadership Group (MBLG), which, over the past two years, has taken critical steps to develop and execute a private sector-led vision for a stronger, more competitive region. In reading this year’s report, you’ll see areas where we’re making progress, such as a lower violent crime rate and improvement in our entrepreneurial environment, and areas where we’re losing ground, including GDP per worker and cost of living. Ultimately, a single group or effort cannot change Columbia’s future alone. To be successful, we must coordinate action by the private sector, nonprofits, education, economic development and government in pursuit of a single vision. As collaboration becomes the norm, rather than the exception, EngenuitySC hopes to continue playing a critical role as we race together toward a more competitive and prosperous Columbia region.

Front Cover Photo/Paul Pope, eyeintheskydroneservices.net

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2018 Midlands Regional Competitiveness Report

Indicators of

Competitive Communities Measuring success around the five indicators of economically competitive communities

1

TALENT

A region’s ability to attract, develop and maintain a vibrant and skilled workforce 2

INNOVATION

A region’s capacity to support the creation of new ideas, products and processes 3

ENTREPRENEURIAL & BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT

A region’s relative ease of doing business and strength of the support system for the startup, growth and maintenance of businesses 4

INDUSTRY CLUSTERS

A region’s relative size, strength and density of high impact clusters and ability to grow industries that are competitive on an international scale 5

LIVABILITY

A region’s ability to build an inclusive and dynamic live, learn, work and play environment


Reading this Report What is the data’s source?

This report is based on data produced by various federal agencies. Data was compiled and analyzed by economists at the University of South Carolina’s Darla Moore School of Business.

What is considered the Columbia MSA?

The data in this report is for the Columbia Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), the primary MSA that covers the South Carolina Midlands. It includes Richland, Lexington, Kershaw, Fairfield, Saluda and Calhoun counties.

What is an index value?

This report examines five indicators of regional economic competitiveness, each comprised of several metrics and compared to our peers. All data in the report is indexed – essentially, a way of benchmarking against the national average so accurate comparisons can be made. For example, an index value of 110 for the Columbia MSA means that our region is performing 10% above the U.S. average. Likewise, an index of 90 means our region is performing 10% below the U.S. average.

(Indicator/U.S. Value) x 100 = Index Value

Other Content in this Report The Metrics • •

Individual data points that, together, make up the overall value for each indicator Each metric has an icon beside it denoting improvement, decline, or no change (year-over-year) - or if it is a new or revised metric

+

= improved

= worsened

=

= no change

= new metric

Trends • •

Positive: the individual metrics within a category where the Columbia MSA showed improvement year-over-year Negative: the individual metrics within a category where the Columbia MSA worsened year-over-year

Opportunities

Suggested short-term, regional priorities to drive growth and move the needle.

It is important to note when reading this report that while a metric’s value may increase on an absolute basis, it is possible for the index value to decrease due to changes at the national level.

www.EngenuitySC.com

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Geography

Fairfield

Columbia MSA The Columbia Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of six counties Richland, Lexington, Kershaw, Fairfield, Saluda and Calhoun - in central South Carolina. Its anchor city is the state capital, Columbia. As of 2017 Census Bureau Estimates, the Columbia MSA is the second-largest metropolitan statistical area in South Carolina, with a total population of 825,033.

Largest cities in MSA (by population): • • • •

Columbia Lexington West Columbia Cayce

Kershaw

Population: 22,607

• • • •

Irmo Forest Acres Camden Batesburg-Leesville

Population: 65,036

Richland Population: 411,592

Saluda Population: 20,452

Lexington Population: 290,642

Columbia Population: 134,309

Why are some Midlands counties not included in this report? Some counties that are often thought of as part of the Midlands are not included in the Columbia MSA. These counties include Newberry, Orangeburg and Sumter, among others. We use the geographical area of the Columbia MSA - not the loose definition of “The Midlands” - in order to compare regions in the fairest way possible.

Calhoun Population: 14,704

Who determines what is included in the Columbia MSA? The U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defines MSAs, which are used by the U.S. Census Bureau and other federal agencies for statistical purposes. An MSA is defined as a geographical region with a relatively high population density at its core and close economic ties throughout the area; typically, MSAs are anchored by a single large city that has a large amount of influence over a region.

Population source: US Census Bureau, 2017 Census Bureau Estimates

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2018 Midlands Regional Competitiveness Report


Our Comparative Locations 1. Raleigh, NC MSA* Population: 1,335,079 2. Knoxville, TN MSA Population: 877,104 3. Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, SC MSA Population: 895,923 4. Columbia, SC MSA Population: 825,033 5. Charleston-North Charleston, SC MSA Population: 775,831

9

7 6 2

1

3

*Raleigh is an aspirational MSA, meaning it serves as a target for Columbia, as opposed to a peer MSA *Population data source: US Census Bureau, 2017 Census Bureau Estimates

How were the comparative locations chosen? 4

8

10

6. Greensboro-High Point, NC MSA Population: 761,184 7. Winston-Salem, NC MSA Population: 667,733 8. Augusta-Richmond County, GA-SC MSA Population: 600,151 9. Lexington-Fayette, KY MSA Population: 512,650 10. Tallahassee, FL MSA Population: 382,627

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The MSAs were chosen based on a diverse set of economic assets comparable to those of the Columbia MSA. These assets vary across the metros, with all having at least one of the following: • Entrepreneurial environment • State capital • Strength in technology • Major university in region • Similar geographic location and landscape • Strong higher education system (2-year and 4-year) • Comparable population

South Carolina counties included in this report: Augusta-Richmond County, GA-SC, MSA • Aiken • Edgefield • Also includes: Burke, Columbia, Lincoln, McDuffie and Richmond counties, GA

Charleston-North Charleston, SC MSA • Berkeley • Charleston • Dorchester

Columbia, SC MSA • Calhoun • Fairfield • Kershaw • Lexington • Richland • Saluda

Greenville-AndersonMauldin, SC MSA • Anderson • Greenville • Laurens • Pickens

www.EngenuitySC.com

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The Metrics

Talent

A region’s ability to attract, develop and maintain a vibrant and skilled workforce

115

100

88

Tallahassee

6

89

Augusta

89

Columbia

Lexington (KY)

90

90

Charleston Greensboro

2018 Midlands Regional Competitiveness Report

90

Knoxville

92

WinstonSalem

93

Greenville

GDP per Worker: Measures a regional workforce’s productivity

STEM Degrees: Percentage of degrees awarded in science, technology, engineering and math

Knowledge Workers: Percentage of population employed in knowledge-intensive occupations

Educational Attainment: Percentage of population with: • – Associate’s degree • + Bachelor’s degree or higher

U.S. Avg.

90

Raleigh

Global Talent: Percentage of population that is foreign-born

+

STEM Salaries: Weighted average salaries in STEM occupations


Talent

Trends Positive

• Weighted average STEM salaries rose by over $5,000, as demand for high-skilled positions increased in an already-tight labor market • Columbia’s success in attracting and retaining talented workers continued, with a greater-than-average percentage of population holding a bachelor’s degree or higher

Negative • A decrease in GDP per worker can be tied to slow real GDP growth and a low percentage of employment in high-economic value traded clusters • Columbia’s percentage of knowledge workers decreased, despite growth in this area nationally • The percentage of STEM degrees awarded increased, but slipped on an index basis and relative to our peers

UofSC adds graduate degree in Entrepreneurial Engineering Many of the world’s top corporate leaders, such as Tim Cook and Sundar Pichai, didn’t graduate with business degrees - they were, and are, engineers. To help the region and state build on its high number of engineering grads, the University of South Carolina’s Darla Moore School of Business and College of Engineering & Computing collaborated to create the Southeast’s first Master’s in Entrepreneurial Engineering. This accelerated program teaches students the engineering and business skills needed to identify and capitalize on innovations, ultimately building their own companies from the ground up.

Youth Apprenticeships Come to the Midlands The Columbia region is piloting a model with the potential to shape the future of the region’s workforce. Led by the Columbia Chamber and Midlands Technical College, Midlands Youth Apprenticeship allows companies to get a jump on future hiring needs by hiring high school students for two years of on-the-job learning. Students take standard high school classes along with specialized training at Midlands Technical College, working afternoons and evenings as employees at companies. The program’s first year will include Youth Apprenticeships in pharmaceuticals and healthcare, with expansions planned into IT and manufacturing.

6,937

net in-migration of millennials to Columbia -

#2 behind only Seattle,

per a WalletHub study Companies like Capgemini are finding the young talent they need in Columbia. (Photo/Sean Rayford)

Opportunities

• Promote Columbia’s high number of college graduates - over 10,000 annually to attract companies looking for young talent • Develop metrics and methods to track student retention from regional colleges and universities to address graduate needs strategically • Create stronger links between businesses and K-12 programs focusing on high-demand careers of the future in areas such as cybersecurity, computer science, and life sciences www.EngenuitySC.com

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Innovative Capacity A region’s capacity to support creation of new knowledge to generate new ideas, products and processes

What are SBIR and STTR awards?

The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs are two of the largest sources of early-stage capital for technology commercialization in the United States. They allow US-owned and operated small businesses to engage in federal research and development that has a strong potential for commercialization. SBIR Awards can be procured directly by small businesses, while STTR awards require formal collaboration with a research institution.

342

178 162

100

U.S. Avg.

59 40

44

Greensboro

Augusta

8

WinstonSalem

70

83

Columbia Greenville

2018 Midlands Regional Competitiveness Report

89

Charleston

94

Knoxville

Tallahassee

Lexington (KY)

Raleigh

The Indicators –

Innovation Awards: SBIR and STTR Awards per 100,000 residents

=

Intellectual Property Creation: Utility patents per 10,000 workers

+

Research & Development Expenditures: University and college R&D expenditures per 1,000 people

+

Academic Achievement: Percent of population aged 25 years and older holding a graduate degree

Research & Development Funding: Amount awarded from all sources per 1,000 people


Innovative Capacity

Trends Positive

• While college/university R&D expenditures decreased slightly on an index basis, expenditures actually increased on an absolute basis, as well as relative to Columbia’s peers • In line with a higher percentage of bachelor’s degree holders, Columbia also saw an increase in the percentage of graduate or professional degree holders - a strong indicator of long-term success

Negative • We still generate patents at a much slower rate than the national average, though the University of South Carolina is ranked among the top 100 patenting universities • Overall R&D funding slipped, likely indicating less ongoing research activity in the private sector

A Closer Look

UofSC IdeaLabs The University of South Carolina has developed substantial research strengths in numerous areas of biomedical science, including genetics, cancer research, and neuroscience. IdeaLabs - a biosciences incubator - provides innovative researchers wet labs and administrative space to start and grow their companies. IdeaLabs has produced companies like IMCS - a UofSC spinoff using novel techniques in genetics to simplify precision testing for research labs. IMCS started small at IdeaLabs, eventually occupying over 4,000 sq. ft. before building a brandnew headquarters of their own in 2016.

R2I2 Receives MIT Grant for Solar Research A team of teachers and students at the Richland Two Institute of Innovation have received an MIT InvenTeam grant to solve a major issue in developing countries - powering modern technology cleanly in areas without infrastructure. The team is creating a system of interlocking solar-bioenergy devices to provide enough power for a photocopier in Sare Bilaly, Senegal. The modular system will snap together and be made from inexpensive and sustainable materials so it can be assembled and repaired by students. Ultimately, their invention will bring an affordable, adaptable and sustainable energy source to Senegal and other developing nations.

Digital Transformation Lab Shapes the Future of Manufacturing South Carolina’s economy has long been dependent on manufacturing; however, questions have been raised in recent years about the future of this industry, as automation becomes the norm. In September 2018, the University of South Carolina announced a groundbreaking partnership to transform the future of manufacturing with the opening of their Digital Transformation Lab. Partners on the project include: • IBM Watson • Samsung • Siemens • Yasakawa Photo/Univers The Digital Transformation Lab will ity of South Carolina McNAI enable manufacturers to analyze the R Center efficiency of automated processes, detect and fix issues rapidly and precisely, and predict maintenance needs by leveraging each partner’s advanced technologies.

Ultimately, the Digital Transformation Lab’s research will create an environment in which automated production can take place with maximum efficiency and unmatched safety, while teaching students the skills they need to work in these environments.

Opportunities

• Continue to coordinate priority research areas with economic development efforts, attracting R&D labs and innovative companies • Develop a strong support system for spinoffs in promising areas of technology • Ensure alignment between corporate research needs and university research priorities to generate high-impact collaborations www.EngenuitySC.com

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Entrepreneurial & Business Environment A region’s relative ease of doing business and strength of the support system for the startup, growth and maintenance of businesses

136

137

116

100

The Metrics –

Proprietors’ Income Share: Percentage of income in a region generated by business ownership

+

Small Business Activity: Measure of a region’s capacity to produce new companies

=

Business Density: Number of establishments per 1,000 employees

+

Business Services: Share of population employed in professional and technical services occupations Establishment Growth Rate: Growth in number of business establishments, 2000-2016

U.S. Avg.

61

69

75

79

82

What changed?

85

Since last year, Establishment Growth Rate has been added to the Entrepreneurial & Business Environment index, as the Traded Cluster Establishment Growth Rate previously used in the Industry Clusters metric is no longer available.

32

Greenville

10

WinstonSalem

Greensboro

Lexington (KY)

Knoxville

2018 Midlands Regional Competitiveness Report

Raleigh

Augusta

Columbia Tallahassee Charleston


Entrepreneurial & Business Environment

Trends Positive

• Overall, this index would have risen even without the addition of a revised metric • Small business activity increased over last year, indicative of growing businesses • The share of employment in professional and technical services rose, indicating a functioning support ecosystem and a strong overall economy

Negative • Proprietor’s income share decreased slightly, possibly indicating a flatter overall pay structure

A Look Inside the Technology Incubator Columbia is home to one of the nation’s most successful incubators. Named one of Inc. Magazine’s “Top 3 College Incubators to Watch,” the UofSC/City of Columbia Technology Incubator was the recent launch point for TCube Solutions’ acquisition by global firm Capgemini – resulting in almost 500 new high-skill jobs in Columbia. The Incubator has numerous growing companies in areas such as health sciences, app & software development and cloud computing. A few current leaders include: • NineFX, a software engineering firm focused on cloud computing and software development for the government market. • Carolina Diagnostic Solutions, a health sciences consulting startup focused on improving efficiency and care for pulmonary disease patients. • ASSET LLC, a smart infrastructure firm developing revolutionary footstep-recognition algorithms with potential applications in the medical and Internet of Things markets.

5

th

Columbia ranks fifth in the nation in lowest startup costs, per a SmartAsset study - its fourth straight year in the top 10.

A Closer Look

Women’s Business Center at Columbia College South Carolina has one of the nation’s largest number of female business owners, according to a study by American Express. Backed in part by Google and the SC Department of Commerce, Columbia College has launched the South Carolina Women’s Business Center. Through mentorship, counseling and personal coaching, the center aims to increase jobs in the community, boost revenue, and enable women to achieve economic independence as they grow and scale their businesses. A major long-term goal? More women-owned, milliondollar businesses in South Carolina.

From Startup to Industry Leader: ZVerse The 3D printing industry is a massive one - expected to reach over $44B by 2025 - and Columbia-based ZVerse aims to capture a huge chunk of that by solving the 3D content creation problem. A startup founded by local entrepreneur John Carrington and backed by venture capital, ZVerse’s proprietary software enables them to easily translate 2-dimensional renderings into ready-to-print 3D files. ZVerse partners with established 3D printing giants, such as Rock Hill-headquartered 3D Systems, and has the potential to capture a significant market share of customers - those without the skill or resources to create printable files. With South Carolina’s enormous manufacturing industry, a ready-made customer base lies right outside their front door, and ZVerse is adding design capabilities and platforms to expand their global reach.

Opportunities

• Develop and share a complete asset map showing the spectrum of resources available to entrepreneurs, ensuring alignment and discovering gaps while minimizing overlap • Convene entrepreneurial resource providers on a regular basis to share “wins” and solve issues • Encourage greater participation in regionally focused angel investment and venture capital groups, linking the area’s long history in finance and law with its growing strength in advanced technologies www.EngenuitySC.com

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High Impact Clusters A region’s relative size, strength and density of high impact clusters and ability to grow industries that are competitive on an international scale

What’s a traded cluster?

Traded clusters are comprised of industries where the market is national or global, as opposed to local clusters, which focus on the immediate area. Traded clusters represent about 1/3 of businesses, but these pay higher wages and generate 90% of innovative activity.

The Metrics –

High Impact Density: Share of regional employment in traded clusters

+

Employment Diversity: Concentration of employment in top five occupations

+

High Wage Employment: Concentration of jobs in high-wage occupations (annual pay above median household income)

302

Traded Cluster Employment Growth: Growth of employment in traded clusters, 2010-2016

+

100

111

U.S. Avg.

128

143

155

156

Lexington (KY)

Augusta

163

164

What changed?

176

Establishment growth rate in traded clusters is no longer tracked; this metric was replaced with growth in traded cluster employment.

80

Tallahassee Columbia

12

Knoxville

Greenville

2018 Midlands Regional Competitiveness Report

WinstonSalem

Greensboro Charleston

Employment Density: Indicator of infill development and opportunities for creative collision

Raleigh


High Impact Clusters

Growth Potential in Life Sciences

Trends Positive

• Columbia’s share of jobs paying above the median increased, especially relative to its peers • Concentration of employment continued in our strongest industries, indicating solid clusters • Employment density increased over last year as the region hovers near full employment levels, with unemployment at just 3.2% as of December 2018

Negative • Columbia’s traded cluster employment remains much lower than its competitors; when considering that these industries generate a disproportionately large economic impact, this means our economy lacks some short-term growth potential

As the number of university graduates with health and life sciences degrees increases, so do opportunities for companies in the Columbia region. Building off existing strong and innovative health and life sciences degree programs, the University of South Carolina has plans to expand its impact in this area with a new medical school. In addition, a partnership with Nephron Pharmaceuticals - the Kennedy Pharmaceutical Innovation Center - represents a collaborative effort to grow a strong workforce, teaching pharmacy students both the technical and business skills needed to thrive in entrepreneurial companies. As these employees develop into entrepreneurs and leaders, opportunities to link local capital with local innovation will be critical in sustaining growth.

Next-Gen Tech Expanding Much attention has been given to Capgemini’s

A Closer Look

Aerospace in the Midlands Aerospace is widely recognized as a major industry for the state of South Carolina as a whole, but it’s quietly a significant sector in the Columbia region. A recent study by the SC Council on Competitiveness found that the Midlands’ aerospace cluster encompasses over 21,000 employees and $4.5 billion in economic output. The University of South Carolina is the state’s only university offering an aerospace engineering degree. In addition, the McNAIR Aerospace Center - which partners with industry leaders like Boeing - is home to cuttingedge research in aerospace fields, including advanced composites, combustion, predictive maintenance and unmanned vehicles. Going forward, developable land and capacity at Columbia Metropolitan Airport provide a landing spot for new companies looking to take advantage of the region’s strong workforce. Across the board, the Columbia area has a significant opportunity throughout the aerospace supply chain.

purchase of insurance services firm TCube Solutions and its subsequent expansions in Columbia, including new Advanced Technology Development and Security Operations Centers. Drawing from a deep pool of skilled tech Capgemini’s growing home at the BullStreet employees, Columbia is a growing hotspot development. (Photo/Burton Fowles) for IoT, artificial intelligence, and advanced security. Recently, IBM launched its Applied Innovation Center, focused on its Watson IoT capabilities, and SIOS Technology opened an R&D center focused on artificial intelligence. Continued focus on growing these industries will be vital - as automation begins to replace current jobs, technologies like these will be critical in shaping the workforce of tomorrow.

Opportunities

Undergrad research engineer Evan Barnett starts up the rear rotor of the Apache helicopter at the McNAIR Center. (Photo/Jeff Blake)

• Create purposeful connections between growing biosciences companies and capital providers, including both debt and equity sources, to ensure innovators can access the resources needed for growth • Support spinoffs as they emerge from research at the McNAIR Center, while leveraging its unique research capacity and industry partnerships to attract new companies to the region • Continue to position Columbia as a rising star in advanced technologies such as machine learning and IoT • Leverage Columbia’s dense distribution cluster, much of which is within a 10-mile radius of downtown, as a potential testing ground for growing capabilities in automation and unmanned vehicles www.EngenuitySC.com

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The Metrics

Livability

A region’s ability to build an inclusive and dynamic live, learn, work and play environment

100

104

U.S. Avg.

88

88

91

92

93

95

98

82 78

Knoxville

14

WinstonSalem

Greensboro Columbia Greenville

2018 Midlands Regional Competitiveness Report

Charleston Tallahassee

Augusta

Raleigh

Lexington (KY)

Arts and Entertainment: Employment in arts, entertainment and recreation, 2012-2017

Healthcare Access: Physicians per 100,000 residents

Commute Time: Average commute time to work

Vitality: Percentage of population 15 - 44 years old

Cost of Living Index: Relative cost of housing and everyday items

+

Crime: Violent crime rate per 100,000 residents

Gallup Well-Being Index: A 5-part index measuring community vitality, health, and financial and social well-being


Livability

Trends Positive

• Violent crime rates dropped significantly, a big step in the right direction - though much more remains to be done • Growth in arts, entertainment and recreation is the fastest of all our peers, surpassing Charleston for the first time • Columbia remains a relatively young city, compared to both our peers and the national average

Negative • Average commute time increased once again, symptomatic of growth in outlying suburbs • Columbia has steadily dropped in the Gallup Well-Being Index, measuring people’s perceptions of their lives and community, and is now among the bottom fifth of all metropolitan areas • Cost of living remains somewhat higher than many of Columbia’s peers, though housing costs generally remain affordable - especially when compared nationally

“When our residents have access to the information and support they need to make their lives better, our entire community is elevated. Richland Library is proud to be a part of what makes the Columbia region a welcoming, progressive place to live, learn, work and play.” Melanie Huggins, Executive Director, Richland Library The Richland Library recently received the Institute for Museum and Library Services’ National Medal, the highest possible honor.

A Closer Look

Serve & Connect

Serve and Connect was initially founded by Kassy Alia, whose husband Greg - a police officer in the Midlands - was killed in the line of duty. Over the past several years, Serve & Connect has grown from a simple hashtag into an organization that connects police officers with the communities they serve. Serve & Connect seeks to empower officers to address challenges in the community, build trust between community members and officers and make a positive impact in the community. These three goals are aimed at combating the division between the police and the community and recognizing the positive acts of service performed by members of law enforcement every day. Ultimately, community-driven efforts such as these represent a strong path forward toward continued reductions in violent crime.

The Drive for Density An uptick in commute time is one of several factors holding back Columbia’s livability index, as suburban development spreads ever farther from the region’s employment centers. At the same time, the City of Columbia’s population remains flat - despite large Source: Goo gle Earth areas of low-density or undeveloped land in the downtown area. On a national scale, increased demand for the convenience of urban living has been a driver of economic growth, spawning new restaurants and retail while improving downtown business environments across the nation - and Columbia is no exception. As the region’s population grows rapidly, increasing urban density represents an opportunity to build a can’t-miss downtown that attracts tourists, new residents and businesses alike. However, continued growth is ultimately dependent on housing beyond student apartments - without a hyperlocal customer base, amenities such as chef-driven restaurants and popular retail outlets are unable to stay open. Consideration should be given to furthering policies that encourage development - or redevelopment - of downtown housing and enhance connectivity between neighborhoods and entertainment districts.

Opportunities

• Continue supporting community health efforts, such as Mayor Benjamin’s community weight loss challenge, to improve residents’ long-term well-being • Actively pursue opportunities to increase residential density in downtown areas while developing infrastructure to connect districts, such as the MBLG’s efforts to improve safety along Assembly Street • Evaluate long-term feasibility of expanded mass transit options, such as the COMET bus system, to ease suburban commutes www.EngenuitySC.com

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Platinum Sponsors

Gold Sponsors TM

Imagine More

1000 Catawba Street, Suite 130, Columbia, SC 29201

Silver Sponsors

803.354.5720 | engenuitysc.com

EngenuitySC Board Members

Headquartered in Columbia, S.C., EngenuitySC is a nonprofit focused on long-term competitiveness and prosperity in the Midlands. EngenuitySC specializes in managing collaborations between business, government, education and community leaders to help build a more prosperous region.

• Founding Co-Chair: Mayor Steve Benjamin, City of Columbia • Founding Co-Chair: Dr. Harris Pastides, University of South Carolina • Chair: Lee Bussell, Chernoff Newman • Chair-elect: Mayor Elise Partin, City of Cayce • Councilwoman Tameika Isaac Devine, Columbia City Council • Chairwoman Debbie Summers, Lexington County Council • Scott Graves, BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina • Steve Hall, Ovation Partners • Commissioner Cheryl Harris, Richland County School District One • Lou & Bill Kennedy, Nephron Pharmaceuticals • Bill Kirkland, University of South Carolina • Lasenta Lewis-Ellis, LLE Construction • Councilman Paul Livingston, Richland County Council • John Lumpkin • Ted Nissen, First Community Bank • Dr. Ron Rhames, Midlands Technical College • Chairwoman Joyce Dickerson, Richland County Council • Dr. Keith Shah, Palmetto Health

For more information, visit www.engenuitysc.com.

Designed and published by:

Visual Infonomics Group, a division of SC Biz News, publisher of the Columbia Regional Business Report

Bronze Sponsors

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About EngenuitySC

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Profile for SC BIZ News

2018 Midlands Regional Competitiveness Report  

By 2025, Columbia, SC will be one of the Southeast’s most competitive and prosperous metros. Each year, it is our privilege to work with reg...

2018 Midlands Regional Competitiveness Report  

By 2025, Columbia, SC will be one of the Southeast’s most competitive and prosperous metros. Each year, it is our privilege to work with reg...

Profile for scbiz