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Scan Magazine | Design Profile | Joha

Left: Joha recently took over Danish children’s company Katvig, which uses organic and recycled materials to make cute, healthy and ethical clothes for children.

Wool has cotton, in knit? Joha clothes are made with everyone in mind. Unusually, this statement refers not simply to the customer, but to everyone – and everything – involved in the production of the brand’s practical, comfortable and high-quality children’s clothing. “To feel pride in our final product,” says co-owner Kristine Frølund Johansen, “we must be able to look ourselves in the mirror and truthfully say that we are proud of how our clothes are produced, and make sure that our employees at every single stage of the production process can say that they are too.” By Louise Older Steffensen | Photos: Joha

Kristine Frølund Johansen and her husband Michael are the third generation of Johansens to run Joha, a well-loved Danish children’s wear company specialising in top-quality wool and cotton products. Established in 1963 by Michael’s grandparents, the business has stuck to the same four principles since its inception: quality, practicality, comfort and ethical business conduct. Michael and Kristine took over the business from Michael’s parents in 2012, having worked within the company for years already. Their experience ensured that the company’s established ethics and business model were respected and maintained while new ideas and innovation were allowed to flourish.

16 | Issue 69 | October 2014

Michael and Kristine are the third generation of Johansens to run Joha, and the fourth generation helps out by modelling the clothes.

A business that cares Today, Joha employs 350 people across the world, including a core team of designers at their headquarters in Sunds, mid-Jutland. They source the finest cotton and the softest Australian Merino wool every year. Joha never buys wool from mulesing sheep: a large part of the world’s wool is produced using the mulesing method, but animal rights campaigners regularly protest against the ruthless methods by which the sheep are kept hygienic. “Although we think about it less, the treatment of animals in the clothes industry is just as important as animal welfare is in the food industry,” Kristine points out. Joha’s high ethical standards do not stop at animals either. The company has its basic dyeing and knitting of raw yarn done in Poland – not despite, but because of, Poland’s adhesion to the strictest of the EU’s regulations. Fabric dyeing is inevitably a chemical procedure, and abiding by the strictest health and safety standards ensures that Joha’s employees are kept as safe as can be.

Profile for Scan Group

Scan Magazine | Issue 69 | October 2014  

Promoting Brand Scandinavia. Featuring interview with actress Signe Egholm Olsen.

Scan Magazine | Issue 69 | October 2014  

Promoting Brand Scandinavia. Featuring interview with actress Signe Egholm Olsen.