Issuu on Google+

Undergraduate programs

Social AND Behavioural Sciences

2013


WHY SHOULD I CHOOSE UQ?

Contents

Excellent teachers UQ has won more national teaching awards than any other university in the country. The University has more than 2700 highlyqualified academic staff dedicated to teaching and research, many of whom are recognised internationally as leaders in their fields.

3

State-of-the-art facilities

4

Anthropology Museum

6

Anthropology Archaeology

THE UQ ADVANTAGE UQ has the most comprehensive range of high-quality programs in Queensland, with 350+ programs and more than 4000 courses offered at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. You can also undertake an undergraduate diploma in languages, global issues or music performance at the same time as you are completing your bachelor degree.

2

Why choose Social and Behavioural Sciences?

AREAS OF STUDY

Because we offer excellent teaching, in a world-class environment, with exceptional opportunities for an experience you will always remember.

Choice of programs

Welcome to UQ

Successful graduates

International reputation

Top facilities

UQ has a tradition of leadership in all spheres of society, both here and overseas: we include a Nobel Laureate, an Oscar winner, two Governors-General, several governors, scores of politicians and Olympic athletes, and countless businesspeople, researchers, and inventors among our graduates.

UQ is in the top 100 universities worldwide, as measured through a combination of three key global university rankings – Times Higher Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong, and QS World University. UQ is also one of only three Australian members of Universitas 21, a select international network of comprehensive, research-intensive universities.

Leading research

Great careers

Campus lifestyle

With eight research institutes on-site, UQ is one of the country’s top three research universities across many measures, including annual PhD graduations, commercialisation of discoveries, industry collaboration, Excellence in Research for Australia survey results, and funds received from both government and the private sector.

UQ qualifications are highly regarded by Australian and international employers, and the employment rate and starting salary for UQ graduates is considerably higher than the national average. The multitude of programs reflects the diversity of career opportunities available to graduates, and the industry links ensure success.

You will enjoy the sense of community that pervades UQ’s cosmopolitan campuses at St Lucia, Ipswich, Gatton and Herston. The campuses are renowned as being among the most beautiful and well-equipped in Australia, and offer excellent sporting and cultural facilities plus a broad range of social activities.

UQ is constantly upgrading its teaching facilities to meet the needs of both students and industry. We have an active building program, one of the world’s fastest information networks, one of the country’s best research libraries, and modern teaching spaces that enable the use of the latest technology.

7 8

Communication

10

Criminology and Criminal Justice

12

Development

13

Health and Society

14

Human Services

15

International Relations

16

Internships put students on world stage

17

Graduate takes career to new heights

18

Journalism

19

Peace and Conflict Studies

20

Political Science

21

Psychology

22

Advantage grant assists Greenpeace

24

Public Policy

25

Public Relations

26

The exciting world of PR

27

Outback outlook

28

Social Policy

29

Social Science

30

Social Work

32

Sociology

34

Reporting from Capitol Hill

35

What do we mean?

36

Concurrent diplomas

37

Admission information

38

Money matters

39

International students

40

Further study at UQ

41

Scholarships

42

International opportunities

43

Quick Reference Guide

44

UQ campuses

45


2

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Welcome to UQ

WHY CHOOSE Social and Behavioural Sciences?

Studying with the Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences is your gateway to a world of opportunities. Our focus is on people – how they live, work, and interact in their family, community and different societies. So whether you’re interested in solving human rights injustices, inspiring new generations, unlocking the secrets of the past or developing new communities, we have a program for you. We offer you practical, industry-focused programs; state-of-the-art teaching and learning facilities; and access to award winning teachers and researchers – many of whom are world leaders in their fields. We believe in a global society and the importance of exploring the world while you study, so we encourage you to live and study overseas for one or two semesters of your degree. We are a vibrant and multicultural community with a global perspective. This makes for a diverse cultural life on campus and provides opportunities for international networking. We offer bachelor degrees in Education, Communication, Human Services, Journalism, Psychological Science, Social Science, and Social Work. You can also study many of our disciplines through a Bachelor of Arts. It is people that make a difference in this world. You can be one of them when you study social and behavioural sciences at UQ. I invite you to explore this prospectus, and hope to welcome you to The University of Queensland.

Professor David de Vaus Executive Dean

The UQ SBS advantage: Be in demand Our graduates are in strong demand by Australian and international employers. The knowledge and skills gained through top quality programs give our graduates a competitive advantage in the job market.

Go global

We encourage our students to spend one or two semesters overseas to broaden their perspective and gain additional skills while enhancing their value to employers. We offer a number of scholarships and bursaries to allow students to take advantage of this opportunity.

Leaders creating leaders

Rewards for outstanding students

Our teaching staff have been nominated for, and won, numerous Faculty, University and Australian teaching awards. This means that you will learn from some of Australia’s best and most highly regarded teachers.

We reward our top students by inviting them to be part of our prestigious Dean’s Scholar Program. The program provides outstanding students with a number of benefits and specialised opportunities not available to all students.

Lifelong learning

Practical experiences

smoother transition

We offer a variety of postgraduate study and research areas to enable you to develop your studies further and enhance your career opportunities in your chosen field. Our courses are academically rigorous to ensure you have the right knowledge to apply in diverse situations and build a foundation for lifelong learning.

Our students are given unique opportunities for on-the-job internships where they gain valuable hands-on experience which can lead to employment after graduation. Students who undertake internships during their degrees develop practical skills, build self-confidence, and gain competencies in the workplace.

We understand that making the transition to university study can sometimes be difficult and we have implemented a number of initiatives to help our new students settle in. These include lunchtime workshops on how to make the most of your time at university and student mentors in a number of our Schools.


4

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

State-of-the-art facilities The Kakadu Room located on Level 3, Social Sciences Building 24

To help you get the most from your university experience, UQ has injected more than $5 million into dynamic, state-of-the-art teaching and learning facilities in the social and behavioural sciences.

Journalism and Communication Student Ideas Centre Mock news feeds and on-camera television news reading and reporting are some of the activities available to you at UQ’s School of Journalism and Communication thanks to new state-ofthe-art facilities. The studios and learning spaces span two floors of the Joyce Ackroyd Building and allow you the chance to more comprehensively hone your craft in the digital age. The retro-styled teaching space invites students in with comfortable chairs, coffee tables and easy access to a range of technology. Triggering visions of a modern newsroom, you can stop and watch the variety of pay

TV channels being aired on large flatscreens, surf the internet for online news, listen to radio broadcasts and even step inside the Sound Dome to soak up the latest news. For those keen to engage in group work or discussions, a collaborative learning space is located in the next room with computers and whiteboards for their use.

JACradio – our in-house online radio station JACradio is an around-the-clock online radio station committed to delivering “the ultimate digital radio experience” to UQ students. Operating from the School of Journalism and Communication, JACradio allows journalism and communication students to sharpen their skills in news writing, interviewing and presentation before entering the workforce. You will be trained in the art of broadcasting by industry consultants and academic staff from the School. The studio complex includes cutting-edge production facilities and the latest audio digital editing software. To listen to JACradio, log on to www.jacradio.com.au

Student Learning Centre

Madelin Newman in one of the audio and production booths at the in-house online radio station

We understand the needs of our students have evolved and changed over time. To cater for this our new Student Learning Centre, the Kakadu Room, delivers modern facilities incorporating the latest technology while promoting collaboration and learning among students. Inspired by Kakadu National Park and the Australian Outback, the Kakadu Room reflects a calming and inspiring atmosphere. The space includes fixed and moveable furniture, which allows students to adapt the space to their needs. There are two booths with large screens, laptop connections, hard-wired and

wireless internet access, and audio/recording equipment for group work. There are also four fixed computers, and printing facilities. The flexibility of the room and its equipment enables students to use the space in different ways for different learning purposes.

The Hive The Hive is a collaborative learning space for Arts, Social Science and Humanities students in the Social Sciences and Humanities Library. The contemporary, purpose-built space enables students to work independently or in groups. The installation of state-of-the-art Sound Domes allows students to view study material on the flatscreen monitor without disrupting surrounding study groups. This area is also accessible during the evenings and on weekends and is the access point to UQ’s award winning Library.

Counselling training facility The capacity to make video recordings of practice counselling sessions, and conduct small group counselling sessions are some of the activities made available to our students through our contemporary counselling training facility. The facility includes six recording rooms, a break-out space and two lecture theatres with video conferencing capabilities. The facility makes it possible for you to put into practice your social work skills, and receive instant feedback from your lecturers and peers.

Archaeology laboratories UQ has the largest archaeology program in Queensland, and one of only two programs of its kind in Australia strongly incorporating scientific approaches to archaeology. To ensure you gain the most from your studies, UQ has recently refurbished the archaeology laboratories which have been designed as an integrated teaching and

research facility. This facility combines general purpose spaces and specialised labs to meet the infrastructure needs of our staff, students, and the broader archaeology community. This includes our TARDIS complex which will facilitate courses such as field archaeology, forensic archaeology and ancient technologies by providing students with a hands-on practical learning experience. There are nine individual labs outfitted with state-of-the-art equipment, covering various sub-disciplines across archaeology. These are: – Artefact Laboratory – Quarantine Laboratory – Sample Processing Laboratory – Chemistry Laboratory – Pacific Laboratory – Fauna Laboratory – Secure Laboratory – Microscopy Laboratory – Teaching Laboratory.

McElwain Courtyard Rainforest Space

With the extensive variety of equipment, it can be stated that this facility is unique in Australia and will be one of the best dedicated archaeological, experimental archaeology and practical learning spaces in the world.

McElwain Courtyard Rainforest Space A new collaborative learning environment has been created as an informal space for student learning. The indoor-outdoor space reflects the serene nature of a rainforest and allows for individuals or groups to gather for small group work, presentations and quiet individual study. Features of the innovative new space include wireless internet access, tiered decks with seating for up to 80 students and covered shade sails allowing year round use. With kitchen facilities and a BBQ, the space is able to be booked for student clubs and other faculty events.

Nathan Wright using the archaeology equipment

5


6

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Anthropology

How can I study Anthropology?

Bachelor of

Arts

Anthropology Museum

The University of Queensland’s Anthropology Museum, located in the School of Social Science, boasts an exciting new gallery space, thanks to recent refurbishments of the iconic Michie Building. Housing an impressive collection of more than 26,000 items, the museum is the largest of its type in Australia and celebrates the cultures and societies of Oceania; concentrating on Australian Aboriginal and Melanesian peoples’ works. There are also items from Polynesia and Micronesia and a collection from Northern Thailand. Over 6,500 photographs are included as part of this valuable collection, which proves to be a relevant teaching and research resource for academics, students and the public. Regular exhibitions are aimed at providing an understanding of, and stimulating debate about, inter-cultural issues across a wide range of audiences and disciplines. The museum collection is an important source of cultural heritage for many individuals and communities and the museum provides information, loans and reproduction of photographic material for exhibitions locally, nationally and internationally. For more information visit www.socialscience.uq.edu.au/anthmuseum

Duration

3 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 10/Rank 81, IB 29

QTAC code

707001

Introductory courses are: – Introduction to Anthropology: People, Cultures and Society – Anthropology of Current World Issues: An Introduction.

Areas of Study

Profile

Advanced courses include: – Anthropology of Aboriginal Australia – Medical Anthropology – Political Ecology: Knowledge, Resources and Rights – Aboriginal Heritage: Anthropological and Archaeological Perspectives.

What job can I get?

What is Anthropology? Anthropology is the study of diverse human life and experience in different parts of the world. Anthropologists study cultures in all their richness, in settings that are both distant from and familiar to the researcher. Anthropology addresses the way cultural traditions continue and change over time and how we can understand and explain human beliefs and behaviour.

What will I study? A wide variety of courses are offered. Training relates to employment in industry and government departments, museums, organisations interested in undertaking various land, environment and cultural heritage related research, as well as social impact assessments, gender impact studies and evaluation projects.

Anthropology teaches people how to understand cultural difference, so graduates can be employed in government, industry or community organisations working with people of many diverse backgrounds and lifestyles. In Australia, this could mean work on migrant or ethnic issues, on how and why people may be prepared to adopt new technologies, or on resolution of Aboriginal native title claims and negotiation of resource developments like mining, tourism and fishing. International work might involve economic and social development in Pacific Island countries, attitudes to environmental conservation across the globe, or corporate attempts to engage with the wide range of societies in Asia.

Career areas include: Aboriginal Land Councils and consultancy firms

Native Title Researcher, Project Officer, Cultural Heritage Manager

Government departments (e.g., Health, Natural Resources, Parks and Wildlife, Environmental Protection Agency, Indigenous Affairs, Environment and Heritage)

Policy Advisor and Researcher, Positions associated with land, environment and cultural heritage, Liaison Officers, Mediators and Facilitators

International development (e.g., AusAID, NGOs)

Aid Project Officer, Researcher, Country Officer

Museums

Museum Director, Curator, Collection Manager, Community Liaison Officer

Education

Teaching Anthropology in universities and Social Science in schools (in conjunction with education qualifications)

Tourism

Cultural Interpretation, Tourist Operator or Manager, Site Officer

Health

Medical Anthropologist (cross-cultural health issues)

Business/private sector

Consumer Researcher, Human Relations Manager, Researchers in corporate culture

Gemma Irving graduated with a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Anthropology. She is now working as a Cultural Heritage and Native Title Liaison Officer for the Department of Transport and Main Roads in Northwest Queensland. Gemma focused on Aboriginal Studies in her program and says the highlights of her time at UQ included participating in fieldwork at Gummingurru in Toowoomba, carrying out an ethnographic study of vending machine use at UQ, spending a semester abroad at a university in the USA, and completing an Aurora internship at the Goldfields Land and Sea Council in Kalgoorlie, Western Australia. Gemma Irving Bachelor of Arts (Honours)

7


8

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

ARchaeology How can I study Archaeology?

Bachelor of

Arts

Duration

3 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 10/Rank 81, IB 29

QTAC code

707001

Areas of Study

Through hands-on experience, you will learn the skills needed to uncover the secrets of our past. The Archaeology program offers a range of exciting and useful courses for those wanting a career in archaeology as well as those people in industry and government departments interested in undertaking land, environment and cultural heritage research.

Bianca Rack and Joanne Shanahan

Archaeology lecturer Dr Patrick Faulkner with student Nathan Wright

What is Archaeology?

What will I study?

Archaeology is the scientific study of our human past. Archaeologists search out and excavate ancient sites and examine their artefacts and environmental contexts to gain clues about how various peoples and cultures developed and changed through the ages. Archaeologists at UQ undertake research of international importance and their varied interests take them into the field in Australasia, the Pacific (Hawaii, Easter Island), the Mediterranean and Near East (Pompeii, Turkey), the Maya region of Central America, India, and France. In Australia they study the archaeology of 50,000 years of Aboriginal settlement as well as the post-European colonisation period. Through hands-on experience in courses, students learn the many skills needed to uncover secrets of our past through directed exercises in the field, the Archaeological Science Laboratory and the Anthropology Museum. Archaeology at UQ offers a range of exciting and useful courses for those wanting a career in archaeology as well as those people in industry and government departments interested in undertaking various land, environment and cultural heritage related research and evaluation projects.

You will study major themes including our early human ancestors, the development of farming, the rise of cities and ancient civilisations, the human settlement of Australia and the Pacific Islands, archaeological science and forensics, ancient technology and the conservation of our cultural heritage. Introductory courses include: – Discovering Archaeology – Doing Archaeology. Advanced courses include: – Forensics: the archaeology of death and crime scenes – World Prehistory – Archaeology of the Pacific Islands – Field Archaeology – Historical Archaeology – Cultural Heritage Management – Environmental Archaeology – Ancient Technologies. In addition to developing strong research, analytical and communication skills, you will learn practical field and laboratory skills vital to a career in archaeology. Such skills include how to find and excavate archaeological sites, how to analyse pottery, stone and other material culture, how to identify and analyse human and animal bones, how

to use microscopes and computers in laboratory work and how to conduct cultural heritage field research. You will learn to solve problems as an independent researcher as well as a member of a focused research team and how to present research findings in a professional format suitable for publication.

What job can I get? Archaeology is a lucrative profession in Australia with most UQ graduates working in the cultural heritage sector

employed by large corporations and private archaeological consultancy firms to undertake archaeological investigations of development sites. This sector has expanded greatly in recent years as part of Australia’s mining boom and graduates are in high demand. Many graduates also go on to work in the public sector, in museums, and also in teaching and research positions in universities.

Career areas include: Public Service: Federal, State and local Government Heritage Director, Archaeologist, Heritage Project Supervisor, (e.g., Forestry, Environmental Heritage Officer, Site Recorder, Site Database Manager, Protection, Mining and Energy, Field Officer, Community Liaison Officer National Parks, Water Resources, Heritage, Planning and Development) Archaeological consulting firms

Chief Executive Officer, Project Manager, Field Manager, Field Assistant, Researcher

Large corporations (BHP, Rio Tinto, etc.)

Archaeologist – various levels, Project Manager to Field Assistant

Engineering/environmental consultants

Archaeological Consultant, Cultural Impact Assessor, Heritage Assessor, Field Assistant

Aboriginal land councils

Field Officer, Evaluation Officer, Applied Research Officer

Museums

Curator, Assistant Curator, Artefact Collections Manager, Researcher, Conservator, Display Designer, Education Officer

Universities

Lecturer, Senior Lecturer, Reader, Professor, Research Fellow, Research Assistant, Laboratory Technician, Field Archaeologist

9


10

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Communication

Areas of Study

How can I study Communication?

Bachelor of

Communication Duration

3 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 10/Rank 81, IB 29

QTAC code

741001

Bachelor of

Communication/ Bachelor of

Arts

Duration

4 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 10/Rank 81, IB 29

QTAC code

741201

Bachelor of

Communication/ Bachelor of

Journalism Duration

4 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 8/Rank 86, IB 31

QTAC code

741301

School of Journalism and Communication Ideas Centre

Communication is an expanding area of employment and the Bachelor of Communication teaches you how to fit into a wide range of careers in government, business or the community sector.

What is Communication? Communication lies at the heart of our contemporary information economies. Consequently, studying communication prepares you for a whole host of exciting careers in the mass media, the world of corporate communication, government communication or community media. Learning to become a communication professional prepares you to become an expert communicator, a leader of public opinion, and positions you as someone able to work at the forefront of our rapidly changing communication-driven society.

What will I study? The courses you will study cover a wide range of communication forms, including the mass media, the Internet, and written and visual texts. You will study a core set of compulsory courses that teach you about the central features of the communication process. The flexibility of the program allows students to specialise in areas of interest thereby tailoring their own career path. Students may also study some courses from a wide range of non-communication programs taught at the University. Students acquire an array of knowledge and skills highly sought after by employers. Below are the majors you may specialise in:

Communication students Candace Houghton, Adeline Xin Yue Koh and Jessica Doyle in the Ideas Centre

Communication, Media and Culture Combines the study of basic language and communication with the study of contemporary culture and everyday life.

You will consider a range of everyday situations and interactions, and analyse popular cultural texts including television, radio, Internet and print sources as well as the cultural identities, spaces and practices associated with these. Mass Communication Courses cover the impact of mass communication on society; analysis of populations and audiences; understanding of media cultures; political communication; communication of stereotypes, racism, prejudice; and global communication. Organisational Communication Produces graduates with theory and skills to manage communication in organisations. Apart from learning the principles and practice of persuasive business communication, you will learn about cross-cultural management, managing workplace conflict, and interpersonal and team communication with a focus on sustainability, change and creativity. Public Relations Learn the theories of public relations and communication, understand the importance of the management of stakeholder relationships and reputation, acquire skills in public opinion analysis, learn to identify and manage organisational issues, and develop a crisis management plan. Gain the skills required to research, plan, and implement a strategic public relations campaign. These skills range from objectives, stakeholder

identification, and strategies and tactics, to budgeting and evaluation. You will gain an understanding of how globalisation and new media impacts public relations practices, and learn about the legal and ethical frameworks for the profession. Some of the courses you may study include: – Introduction to Communication and Cultural Studies – Mass Communication and Society – Introduction to Film and Television Studies – Introduction to Visual Communication – Mass Media, Spin and Public Opinion – Media Issues Management – Public Relations Writing – Art of Communication – Introduction to Web Design – Celebrity Culture.

What job can I get? Communication is an expanding area of employment and the Bachelor of Communication teaches you how to fit into a wide variety of careers in government, business and the community sector. Employment exists in digital media, government and business communication and in community service organisations where you will have skills in writing, design, production and strategising in a wide range of media formats. These formats include the Web, advertising, public relations, organisational communication, social marketing, publishing, event management, mediation, consultancy and training in intercultural, interpersonal and crisis communication.

Testimonial

“For me the best part of UQ’s Bachelor of Communication was its flexibility. The program took in courses from so many different discipline areas such as Journalism and Communication, Psychology, and Arts. I could choose courses that interested me from many different fields as electives. “UQ’s teaching and research staff focused on excellence and encouraged students to do the same. It sounds corny, but there is a particular work ethic that I picked up to achieve the best results. It’s not just about marks but also about learning, analysing and delivering your best.” David Hill Content Editor and Special Projects Manager, Wotif Group, Milton Office

11


12

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Criminologyand Criminal Justice How can I study Criminology and Criminal Justice?

Bachelor of

Arts

Duration

3 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 10/Rank 81, IB 29

QTAC code

707001

Bachelor of

Social Science Duration

3 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 13/Rank 73, IB 25

QTAC code

747001

Areas of Study

What is Criminology and Criminal Justice? Criminology is the scientific study of crime. Criminologists seek to understand the causes, consequences and prevention of crime. Studies in criminology include how the law, the criminal justice system, governments and other social institutions in society, function to address crime. At UQ, we focus on the social dimensions of crime and our responses to crime (such as policing and the law), and study the way crime and the criminal justice system are shaped by social values, institutions and processes. In undertaking criminology or criminal justice at UQ, you will develop an understanding of the social patterns and causes of criminality and the operations of the criminal justice system in dealing with this activity.

What will I study? A wide variety of courses are offered. Examples of courses in Criminology are: – Introduction to Criminology – Youth and Deviance – Punishment and Society – Advances in Criminological Theory. Courses with a Criminal Justice focus include: – Introduction to Criminal Justice – Police and Society – Psychology of Law and Justice – Indigenous Politics and Policy – Crime and Public Policy.

Development How can I study Development?

Bachelor of

Social Science Duration

3 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 13/Rank 73, IB 25

QTAC code

747001

What job can I get? Criminology and Criminal Justice graduates can pursue professional careers in policing, private security and corrective services, as well as social policy and research careers in criminal justice.

Career areas include: Police/law enforcement agencies, Customs, Immigration

Policing (State and Australian Federal Police), Customs Officer, Immigration Officer

Australian Crime Commission, Crime and Misconduct Commission

Positions in intelligence

Corrections

Institutional or Community Corrections Officer, positions in Youth Offender Programs

Courts

Court Support Officer, Pre-trial Services Officer

Insurance companies

Fraud Investigator, Loss Prevention Officer

Public services departments

Child Safety Officer, Crime Prevention Officer

Education

Teaching Criminology/Legal Studies (in conjunction with education qualifications)

Victims services, youth services

Youth Worker

Government departments

Policy Advisor, Policy Researcher, Crime Prevention Specialist

Bachelor of

International Studies Duration

3 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 10/Rank 81, IB 29

QTAC code

707111

What is Development? Development studies at UQ are concerned with providing an understanding of the social, cultural, economic, political and ethical dimensions of development theory and practice. The Development major will provide you with a social science perspective on international inequality and community level development problems. It focuses on strategies to address poverty and inequality, and the impacts of economic progress on society, community groups, Indigenous peoples and the environment. You will engage in critical evaluation of strategies to address international inequality, enhance community development and respond to the varied effects of development on the social and physical environment. Issues covered include concepts of development, poverty and inequality, Indigenous rights, gender and development, environmental sustainability, security and development, and the social and political implications of globalisation, and consider how and why these issues may be related. The major will offer the knowledge and skills to analyse social and economic issues, and develop, implement and evaluate policy solutions.

What will I study? The Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences has adopted a multidisciplinary approach to Development studies with a number of schools teaching into the program. Some of the courses you may study include: – Introduction to International Inequality and Development – Globalisation and Development in Post-Colonial Societies – Community Development: Local and International Practices – Development Practice and Social Impact – Politics of Development – Globalisation and International Political Economy – Conflict Prevention and Resolution – World Women – Sociology of the Environment – Political Ecology: Knowledge, Resources and Rights.

Areas of Study

In third year, Bachelor of Social Science students will undertake an applied research project linking them with organisations such as government departments, international aid agencies and community-based centres located in the areas of international and community development. Students enrolled in the Bachelor of International Studies must undertake a compulsory study abroad semester at one of UQ’s partner institutions, to further enhance their international and intercultural awareness.

What job can I get? This area of study caters for those who are preparing for careers in government and non-government organisations (NGOs) focused on the social and economic needs of those in disadvantaged communities in developing and developed countries. It is designed to equip you with knowledge and skills for employment in international and community development, democratic institution building, rebuilding communities in post-conflict situations, environmental policy making, and social impact assessment.

13


14

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Health and Society How can I study Health and Society?

Bachelor of

Social Science Duration

3 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 13/Rank 73, IB 25

QTAC code

747001

Gain awareness of the critical social determinants of health in local and global contexts, and the value of social research in addressing health problems. What is Health and Society? Health and Society comprises a multidisciplinary mix of courses focused on social inequalities in health and illness, the workings of health systems and services, and health promotion. The work of social scientists focuses attention on the political and economic factors, and the cultural and social conditions that have led to widening inequalities in access to health within and between nations, and the factors that can make a difference to the health and welfare of poor and vulnerable groups. Issues range from sanitation and health promotion,

Areas of Study

gender inequalities in health, and education and employment of health practitioners to climate change and food security. The study of Health and Society equips social scientists to work alongside health practitioners, researchers and planners in a variety of clinical, community and policy contexts to develop better ways of delivering health services, and improving community and personal capacities to prevent and respond to poor health outcomes.

What will I study? The courses you will study in Health and Society provide you with an understanding of the social determinants of health in local and global contexts, and the value of sound social research in addressing health problems. Some of the courses you may study include: – Introduction to Health Illness and Society – Human Bodies, Culture and Society – Sex, Drugs and Disease: Health of the Marginalised – Health Services Planning and Evaluation – Community Development: Local and International Practices – Medical Anthropology: Local and Global Perspectives – Health Economics. Honours level study in Health and Society can be undertaken in the Bachelor of Social Science (Honours) program and in the Bachelor of Arts (Honours) program in a range of disciplines including anthropology and sociology. Health and Society courses also provide a sound basis for Masters programs in Social Science, Social Planning, Development Practice, and Public Health.

What job can I get? Graduates find employment in the health sector in government departments, hospitalbased research and planning units, and community health programs. A background in the study of Health and Society can also lead to employment in fields such as child and youth services, migrant support, community-based employment programs, home and community care for the aged, and disability support. Recent graduates have found employment across Australia and overseas.

Diane Gipey, a UQ graduate and Community Capacity Manager for the Northern Territory Government, on a trip to three communities to discuss various issues such as volatile substance abuse, and alcohol and drug use

Human Services How can I study Human Services?

Bachelor of

Human Services

In all of these areas, a wide range of employment opportunities exist for human services workers who have the knowledge and skills taught in the human services program. These are challenging and rewarding jobs for people who want careers that involve working with people and addressing important social issues.

Duration

3 years full-time

What will I study?

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 13/Rank 73, IB 25

QTAC code

746201

The UQ Human Services program is unique, in that it allows you to combine an in-depth study of your field of interest with practical skills and techniques gained through a recognised human services program. By drawing on courses offered by UQ’s long established and highly regarded Arts Faculty, you will be able to study up to eight courses (subjects) in your preferred field, and have this recognised as a major when you graduate. Your major is combined with skill-based courses and hands-on experience in agencies that employ human services practitioners. You will graduate job-ready, and well positioned to make a significant difference in your chosen profession. Available majors include: – Applied Psychology: study the application of psychology in areas such as mental health, workplace settings, education or sport. – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies: gain your knowledge from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teachers first-hand as well as from nonIndigenous staff who work closely with Aboriginal communities. – Criminology: learn to examine crime and its regulation in the context of social, economic and political shifts within our society. – Sociology: study social change, modern society and culture, social institutions and the relationship between people and the environment. – Peace and Conflict Studies: understand the causes of political conflict and pathways to peaceful solutions. – Public Policy: discover the political, institutional, economic, social and ideological forces that shape Australia and how they inform public policy.

Bachelor of

Human Services/ Bachelor of

Arts

Duration

4 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 10/Rank 81, IB 29

QTAC code

746301

A feature of the Bachelor of Human Services is that students have the opportunity to “learn through doing”. This workplace experience provides a great opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills you acquire through your studies. What is Human Services? The Bachelor of Human Services provides a pathway into a wide range of employment opportunities in fields such as: – the corrections and justice system – youth services – working with Indigenous communities – child and family welfare, including child protection – mental health – disability services – services to the older population – community development – housing and homelessness services – women’s services – counselling and personal support – employment and income security – working with refugees and immigrants.

Areas of Study

Learning in the workplace An attractive feature of the Bachelor of Human Services is that students have the opportunity to “learn through doing”. In the second and third years of the program, students are assigned to organisations where they learn about working in the human services industry from experienced professionals. These workplace experiences provide a great opportunity to apply the knowledge and

Bachelor of Human Services graduate Duncan Smith

skills acquired through your studies. Often these workplace experiences lead directly to employment opportunities after graduation. Most students really enjoy ‘on-the-job’ learning alongside their university studies.

What job can I get? The human services industry is growing rapidly and employment prospects are excellent. There is a great diversity of employment opportunities including both full-time and part-time work, and outstanding opportunities to enjoy a career that is both personally rewarding, and has the potential to make a real difference in people’s lives. Human Services graduates work in government departments such as Disability Services Queensland and Child Safety Services, and in community and churchbased organisations. There are opportunities for work in both Australia and overseas. The professional titles of human services workers are extremely varied. Examples include: – youth development officer – youth worker – child safety support officer – outreach worker – community development officer – program coordinator – case worker – case manager – project officer. Human Services graduates can become fully qualified Social Workers after a further 18 months of study in UQ’s Master of Social Work Studies. They are also eligible to apply for postgraduate study in Counselling and other related fields.

15


16

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

international relations How can I study International Relations?

Bachelor of

Arts

Duration

3 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 10/Rank 81, IB 29

QTAC code

707001

Bachelor of

International Studies Duration

3 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 10/Rank 81, IB 29

QTAC code

707111

Areas of Study

What is International Relations?

What will I study?

The study of International Relations at UQ is designed to: – introduce students to the major trends shaping the world around them and therefore affecting their own lives – train students in how to conceptualise and apply key approaches to the norms and policies that drive contemporary international politics – help students make sense of and situate current events in proper analytical, historical and global context, and – incorporate such training into the development of tangible professional opportunities.

Studies in International Relations equip you with the necessary theoretical and practical tools to understand, analyse and evaluate events and issues both domestically and internationally. Some of the courses you may study as an International Relations student include: – Introduction to International Relations – Introduction to International Inequality and Development – Introduction to Political Ideas – International Organisations and Political Cooperation – Human Rights and International Politics – Terrorism and Insurgency in World Politics – Australian Foreign Policy – Foreign Policies of the Great Powers – International Relations of East Asia – Conceptions of World Politics – Globalisation and International Political Economy – Intelligence and National Security.

The courses you will study seek to integrate significant problems of international political economy, foreign policy analysis, international security studies, international relations theory, international organisations and international law and ethics into a more unified analytical framework.

Rotary World Peace Fellow Maria Fernanda Salina at the United Nations in Geneva

What job can I get? Graduates find employment with Australian Government departments such as Foreign Affairs and Trade, and Defence, as well as with State agencies concerned with trade and economic development. International organisations such as the United Nations, the World Bank and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) also seek graduates with these areas of specialisation, as do employers in the private sector with interests in international business. Career options include: – policy-making and advisory positions within Federal and State Government departments – diplomatic postings abroad, and – advisory positions within business and trade organisations.

Students wishing to pursue careers in international relations may consider joining organisations such as the United Nations Student Association in order to gain further exposure to the issues facing the international community.

Internships put students on world stage Students in the School of Political Science and International Studies are working around the globe in the midst of important legal, political and diplomatic events, after taking up internships with organisations such as NATO and the United Nations.

B

achelor of Arts/Laws student Catherine Drummond is undertaking a six-month internship in the legal chambers of the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. Catherine said her experience in Rwanda comes at a “unique, transitionary time.” “The Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda is winding down its work and will conclude all trials and trial judgments by July 2012,” she said. “It has referred its first case to the Rwandan national court system and will appoint international fair trial monitors to ensure the trial complies with international fair trial standards. “I sat in on the Tribunal’s last ever trial – the Ngirabatware case. Ngirabatware was the Minister of Planning during Rwanda’s 1994 genocide. “I am extremely fortunate to be able to work with some of the world’s most brilliant legal minds and to have the opportunity to contribute to the creation of international criminal law.” Other recent internships include those undertaken by PhD candidate Daryl Morini, who spent six months working at NATO Headquarters in Brussels, and Masters student Cate Carter, who spent three months with the United Nations’ Somalia Desk. The School of Political Science and International Studies supports a number of internship programs in its commitment to help students achieve their career goals. Internships offer students both practical experience and the opportunity to make valuable industry connections. Students who undertake internships during their degrees develop practical skills, build self-confidence and gain competencies in the workplace.

17


18

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Graduate takes career to new heights

Journalism How can I study Journalism?

Bachelor of

Journalism Duration

3 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 8/Rank 86, IB 31

QTAC code

737001

Bachelor of

Communication/ Bachelor of

Journalism Duration

4 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 8/Rank 86, IB 31

QTAC code

741301

Bachelor of

Journalism Bachelor of

Arts

Duration

4 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 8/Rank 86, IB 31

QTAC code

730101

Bachelor of

Journalism/ Bachelor of

While most of Brisbane was either tucked up in bed or just starting their day, Sarah Greenhalgh flew high above the city surveying the roads to keep commuters informed of the best routes to work.

Sarah, who graduated with a Bachelor of Journalism from UQ last year, spent four months of her degree working as a traffic reporter for Channel 9’s Today Show. Her 4am wake-up call was tough at times, but Sarah said it was all worth it once she was cruising the skies above Brisbane. “It was an incredible way to start the day,” she said. “But it was a job that had its highs and lows. In my first two weeks I had to report on a fatal accident and it was difficult to keep the emotion out of my voice. “Then there were times when I reported on incidents that were quite funny, like when there was a cow strolling down the east-west arterial road the night of the Katy Perry concert – we thought she might have been a big fan who had got a little lost.” Sarah worked at The Australian Traffic

Network while completing the final semester of her degree. In addition to reporting for the Today Show and 97.3FM each morning, she was also traffic reporter for Nova, 4KQ and Hot 91 on the Sunshine Coast in the afternoons. Sarah fell in love with Broadcast Journalism after securing a 10-day work placement with the Nine Broadcast Centre covering the Brisbane Ekka back in 2010. “I was lucky enough to get selected as one of two UQ students and spent 10 jam-packed days producing video reports for ninemsn, the UQ website and the official Ekka website, which provided me with some great material to produce a showreel,” she said. Sarah followed her passion for broadcast journalism and is now a reporter for WIN News in Mackay.

Areas of Study

Laws Duration

5.5 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 3/Rank 97.5, IB 40

QTAC code

737102

Bachelor of

Business Management/ Bachelor of

Journalism Duration

4.25 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 8/Rank 86, IB 31

QTAC code

711101

Bachelor of Journalism student Stephanie Gall in the Journalism and Communication Ideas Centre

What is Journalism?

What job can I get?

Journalism has never been so exciting or challenging. New frontiers in information gathering and dissemination are opening up, providing previously unforeseen opportunities for journalists. Journalists today don’t just write a story. They take photographs, compose audio and video, develop websites and much more. In addition they must understand their audiences and produce content that is relevant to a diverse range of needs. To do this, journalists of the future need to be multi-skilled, adaptable, resourceful and creative.

Journalism graduates have career opportunities in the main generalist media – newspapers, television and radio – in Australia and overseas. A developed interest beyond journalism can help in securing work in these and the more specialist media, particularly the large and diverse magazine sector. About a quarter of journalists find their first jobs in the regional media. Online communication is expected to provide more employment over the next few years. It is also increasingly common to work as a freelancer, either in your own journalism agency or in a portfolio career. Journalists tend to be versatile and adaptable. The knowledge and skills they develop are widely valued and can be used in a large number of careers, as varied as media, Web development, reality TV, publishing and marketing. Many large corporations employ journalists in a range of communications positions. People with journalism skills are also sought-after by the public relations industry. Despite the highly competitive nature of journalism, UQ graduates have high success rates in securing jobs in all areas of the media. UQ graduates are employed in metropolitan and national newspapers, commercial and public radio and television, news agencies and magazines both in Australia and around the world. Many hold senior positions. As the media and communications industry multiplies and becomes even more important in everyday life, studying Journalism is an excellent way of getting involved. Journalism students can enhance their formal studies in a number of ways, for example through membership of the Journalism and Communication Student Association (JACS), an independent body run by students for students, and by participating in workshops, seminars, and discussions involving leading journalists and media figures.

What will I study? The University of Queensland has developed its journalism program with the future needs of journalism and journalists in mind. The curriculum develops critical understandings of the role of journalism in society as well as high order and relevant practical production skills. In addition to world-class researchers in the fields of journalism and communication, the School engages a number of Industry Consultants with expertise in television, print, online and radio journalism, as well as producers, film makers, media managers and public relations specialists. Using industry-standard software and equipment, UQ Journalism students extend their theoretical knowledge by gaining sought-after skills in field recording and camerawork, editing of sound, vision and pictures, digital and paper publishing, and multi-platform distribution. Students also gain valuable insights into current production values and practices through the on-site Media and Production Support team, and Industry Consultants drawn from leading media outlets. Housed in state-of-the-art premises, The University of Queensland’s School of Journalism and Communication has invested in journalism for the future. So if you want to be a journalist, UQ is your university.

19


20

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Peace and Conflict Studies

Political Science

Students undertaking Peace and Conflict Studies may wish to consider joining organisations such as Amnesty International or Oxfam to gain more information about, and exposure to, issues affecting the international community.

This major enables you to better understand the politics and policy of your own country, and helps you to understand the significance of world events. There is an option for students of exceptional ability to participate in the internship program, in either the Queensland or Federal Parliament, or with industry organisations.

How can I study Peace and Conflict Studies?

How can I study Political Science?

Bachelor of

Arts

Duration

3 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 10/Rank 81, IB 29

QTAC code

707001

What is Peace and Conflict Studies? Peace and Conflict Studies are assuming increasing importance both internationally and within nations as governments and nongovernment organisations struggle to find ways to resolve conflicts without recourse to violence. Studies in this area examine the causes of violence and alternatives to violence. From international to local levels, we examine conflict prevention, conflict resolution and peacebuilding. The focus is on contemporary conflicts such as East Timor and Indigenous reconciliation.

What will I study? Bachelor of

International Studies Duration

3 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 10/Rank 81, IB 29

QTAC code

707111

Peace and Conflict Studies examine a number of social and political issues including international conflict; peacekeeping and peace-building; Indigenous politics; ethics and justice; and development politics. Some of the courses you may study as a Peace and Conflict Studies student include: – Introduction to Peace and Conflict Analysis

– Ethics in International Politics – Conflict Prevention and Resolution – Ethnic Conflict and Nationalism – International Peacekeeping – Conflict and Non-Violent Change – World Women: International Perspectives on Politics and Culture – Politics of Development.

What job can I get? Qualifications in Peace and Conflict Studies can lead directly to employment in a range of areas where analytical skills are required to identify better responses to humanitarian and justice concerns, where practical skills of conciliation and negotiation are required and where an understanding of the interconnectedness of the causes of violence is necessary. These qualifications will especially equip you with capacities relevant to careers in such areas as diplomacy (including the United Nations and its affiliates), developingworld aid and development, AusAID, mediation services, defence planning, welfare and public interest work.

Profile

“I graduated from UQ in 2010, with a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) majoring in Political Science and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies.

Bachelor of

Arts

Duration

3 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 10/Rank 81, IB 29

QTAC code

707001

What is Political Science? Political Science includes studies of political structures, processes and policies in Australia as well as other societies, the contemporary ideas, ideologies and theories that determine the framework for political decision-making, and the organisational and diplomatic approaches to cooperation and conflict resolution in the international system. Studies in political science provide students with detailed knowledge of the discipline’s sub-strands and how they may be integrated into a broader understanding of key political processes.

What will I study? Studies in Political Science enable you to study a broad range of courses that cover significant issues, debates and concepts in the field. The major has four main themes – Australian Politics and Policy, Political Theory and Methodology, Global Governance and Political Economy, and International and Comparative Politics. Students completing this major will have a solid understanding of the political issues affecting modern societies and be able to analyse and comment on these issues.

“Journey to School” by Giorgio Algeri, runner-up in the School of Political Science and International Studies 2011 Photography Competition

Areas of Study

“Undergraduate Political Science studies gave me a fantastic introduction into the world of politics and policy, and studying honours further honed my analytical and research skills. I also developed practical policy skills, working with the Queensland Public Service on their whole-of-government approaches to Remote Service Delivery. “After graduating I spent three months volunteering as a teacher’s assistant in a remote Indigenous community. I took part in a graduate program with the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet in Canberra before being offered a permanent position. “My time spent studying at UQ helped me develop the skills I need to work in a competitive and fast-paced organisation and opened my mind to new and different ideas.” Helen Smith majoring in Political Science and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies

Some of the courses you may study as a Political Science student include: – Introduction to Political Ideas – Australian Political Institutions – Power, Politics and Society: Passionate Encounters – Indigenous Politics and Policy – Politics and the Media – Environmental Politics and Policy – Political Thought: Plato to Modernity – Landmarks of Political Science – Political Leadership – Governance and Australian Public Policy.

What job can I get? Graduates are employed in both public and private sector organisations that place a premium on skills such as critical analysis, preparing papers using the protocols and conventions of the discipline, and using verbal communications skills. Career opportunities include but are not limited to: – researchers for members of parliament and not-for-profit organisations; – policy advisors and policy makers in the public and community sectors; and – specialist media commentators.

21


22

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Psychology How can I study Psychology?

Bachelor of

Psychological Science Duration

4 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 4/Rank 94, IB 36

QTAC code

757001

Bachelor of

Arts (Psychology)* Duration

3 years full-time*

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 10/Rank 81, IB 29

QTAC code

707001

*plus one-year Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Psychology

Bachelor of

Science (Psychology)* Duration

3 years full-time*

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 10/Rank 81, IB 29

QTAC code

731001

*plus one-year Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Psychology All programs are accredited by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC)

Areas of Study

What is Psychology? Psychology is the scientific study of how people behave, think and feel. It is a broad ranging discipline that spans topics including brain function, memory, conscious experience, lifespan development, social behaviour and the full spectrum of functional and dysfunctional behaviour. Training in psychology involves not only the acquisition of information, but also the development and cultivation of analytical thinking skills, which are valuable personally and in many professions. Many people who study psychology will not go on to become psychologists but should find their training to be relevant and useful in their lives and work. Those who do become psychologists may work in a variety of settings. Clinical psychologists, for example, may work in hospitals where they might assess and treat people with emotional and behavioural problems, or they may work in private practice or clinics. Organisational psychologists may consult independently or work within private and public organisations as human resource professionals, helping to develop a motivated and skilled workforce and to diagnose and solve group and organisational problems. Educational psychologists typically work within schools or the public service, and sports psychologists often work to enhance the performance of teams or individuals. These and many other specialist psychologists may also work as researchers and teachers in universities or be employed as researchers in industry and government agencies.

What will I study? The School of Psychology’s course offerings are designed to meet several goals: 1. to provide a foundation of study in psychology to students from many different faculties and schools 2. to educate students across a wide spectrum of psychology 3. to provide students with a foundation for a career in psychology, and 4. to prepare students to conduct independent psychological research. The first goal is met mainly by our first-year courses which survey the field and provide you with an introduction to psychological research methods. These courses include: – Introduction to Psychology: Physiological and Cognitive Psychology – Introduction to Psychology: Developmental, Social and Clinical Psychology – Psychological Research Methodology I

Dr Mark Nielsen from the School of Psychology undertaking field research in early childhood development in a remote San Bushman community in the Kalahari Desert

Second and third-year courses give students a more detailed knowledge of psychological research and practice. These include: – Psychological Research Methodology II – Neuroscience for Psychologists – Child Development – Social and Organisational Psychology – Learning and Cognition – Psychological Research Methodology III – Principles of Psychological Assessment – Psychological Research: Interpretation and Evaluation Electives in third-year are available in five areas of specialisation: – Applied/Professional Psychology – Biological Psychology – Cognitive Psychology – Developmental Psychology – Social Psychology Fourth-year provides the insight that comes with advanced study.

What job can I get? Psychology prepares you for a range of career opportunities, including human

resource management, mental health services, youth work, relationship counselling, residential care work, family and social services, public service management, private sector administration and management, market research, disabilities services, juvenile justice and corrective services, advertising and statistical research positions. Students contemplating a career as a psychologist should undertake an accredited four-year degree (either a four-year degree or a three-year undergraduate degree followed by an honours year). To gain full psychologist registration with the Psychology Board of Austalia, students complete further studies and/or supervised work experience. Professional careers in psychology include: – Clinical Psychology: specialising in the assessment, treatment and prevention of a wide range of emotional and behavioural problems. – Clinical Neuropsychology: specialising in the assessment and treatment of emotional and behavioural disorders associated with dysfunction of brain process or head injury.

– Counselling Psychology: helping individuals, families and other groups with issues related to personal wellbeing, interpersonal relationships, work, recreation, health, and crisis management. – Organisational Psychology: applying knowledge of the scientific study of human behaviour to the enhancement of organisational effectiveness and productivity and individual well-being. – Sport and Exercise Psychology: helping individuals develop the skills needed to enhance performance, enjoyment and participation in physical activity. – Research/Academic Psychology: applying skills to the advancement and communication of knowledge relating to psychology. – Geropsychology: applying practical knowledge of primary prevention strategies, clinical intervention and rehabilitation for older people. – Health Psychology: learning skills in illness prevention and treatment in public health settings.

PhD candidate Katharine Baker attaching an EEG cap

23


24

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Advantage grant assists Greenpeace

Public Policy

How can I study Public Policy?

Bachelor of

Arts

Duration

3 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 10/Rank 81, IB 29

QTAC code

707001

Bachelor of

Social Science Sarah Pearse in Wellington

UQ psychology student Sarah Pearse’s dream of working for a nongovernmental organisation came true recently after completing an internship with Greenpeace in Auckland, New Zealand.

T

his experience was made possible with a UQ Advantage Grant, as well as additional funding from the Social and Behavioural Sciences Faculty. Working for Greenpeace provided Sarah with the opportunity to develop her skills as she continues on her journey to become an organisational psychologist. “I have dreamt for a long time about working in a non-governmental organisation (NGO), but never thought I would get the opportunity to give it a go before I’d even finished my masters,” she said.

Sarah was thrilled to assist Greenpeace, as she believes it to be a wonderful organisation with a true dedication to changing the way we care for the environment. “As with many other NGOs, funding is tight, as they have a lot of work they need done but often don’t have the money to pay for it. “With the support of my supervisors at UQ and Massey University, I believe we have been able to provide some meaningful assistance to Greenpeace, at no cost to the organisation. “What better way for grant money to be spent?” she said. During her time with Greenpeace, Sarah completed a project which reviewed the core competencies of fundraising by collecting data from focus groups, oneon-one interviews with coordinators, and management and analysis or organisational documentation. This data was then presented back to management and a list of core competencies of successful fundraisers was defined. Finally, a number of suggestions for improvement of the recruitment and selection processes at Greenpeace were made. “I was able to fortify connections with other members of the Poverty Research Group at Massey University, and my time with Greenpeace offered me my first real opportunity to practise my skills in an NGO – one of my long term career goals,” she said. Sarah said the whole internship experience

was the opportunity of a lifetime, and that her time in New Zealand was “amazing”. “This opportunity has been the highlight of my academic career to date. It will hopefully be the first of many more opportunities like it,” she said. Director of the Office of Undergraduate Education Dr Jessica Gallagher said graduates now compete for jobs on a global scale, and UQ is committed to supporting students to take advantage of opportunities which will assist them with developing international networks, experiencing another culture and broadening their transferable skill set. “Employers are looking for graduates who have had a wide range of experiences and who are intellectually and globally engaged,” Dr Gallagher said. UQ Advantage Grants provide funding to students who want to participate in a range of co-curricular activities such as volunteering, internships, research programs, and international conferences. “These activities will enhance students’ UQ studies and student experience, and represent valuable professional development opportunities. “We encourage students to make use of the UQ Advantage Grants to really challenge themselves, explore the world and get involved,” she said.

(together with Social Policy)* Duration

3 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 13/Rank 73, IB 25

QTAC code

747001

*Public Policy and Social Policy (see page 29) are complementary study areas

Queensland Parliament House

What is Public Policy? Studies in Public Policy are designed to help students come to grips with issues of modern governance in general and with the institutions and processes of public policy in particular. The main focus of studies in this area is on the political, institutional, economic, social and ideological forces that shape Australian governance and public policy. The questions that students completing the major should be equipped to answer include: How do we formulate and analyse economic, environmental, social or foreign policy? Which groups have the most say? How do we understand the complexities of the policy system and make sense of what governments do? Is the public policy process “rational”? How do we design better policies? What knowledge and skills do policy-makers need?

What will I study? Studying Public Policy equips students with the superior analytical abilities necessary to embark on policymaking and advising careers within the public, private and community sectors. It includes a range of courses focusing on areas such as environment and social policy, political institutions, Indigenous political issues, Australian foreign policy and international development. Some of the courses you may study as a public policy student include: – Introduction to Politics and Public Policy – Australian Political Institutions – Indigenous Politics and Policy – The Government of Queensland – Environmental Politics and Policy – Politics of Law and Justice in Australia – Australian Foreign Policy – Politics and the Media – Political Leadership – Politics and the Economy – Democratic World Politics – Governance and Australian Public Policy – Issues in Australian Politics.

Areas of Study

The Public Policy major also offers high performing students opportunities to engage in a semester length internship program, which will link them with project work in agencies in the Queensland Public Sector or the Queensland Parliament. The knowledge and skills gained in this major will provide students with the qualities relevant to employment in non-government organisations and the public sector.

What job can I get? The types of organisations that seek graduates with the analytical abilities provided by the Public Policy major include, but are not limited to all levels of government in Australia, international aid organisations, peak business organisations, interest and lobby groups, welfare organisations, and community groups. Career options include policy-making and advisory positions in government agencies, private enterprise, nongovernment organisations and international organisations, business-government liaison officers, and community development positions both domestically and internationally.

Policy Practice – A course for the real world of policy

This unique course offers students an opportunity to experience the workings of government firsthand. It is delivered jointly by a policy practitioner and an academic, and has a strong practical component aimed at developing some of the essential skills required for work as a policy practitioner. You will hear firsthand from guest speakers working in government and the public sector; and have the opportunity to visit policy coordination centres, see Parliament behind the scenes, and sit in on Question Time. This course is open to students from any discipline wishing to pursue a career as a policy officer in the public service.

25


26

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Public Relations How can I study Public Relations?

Bachelor of

Communication

suppliers, creditors, regulators, industry, politicians, communities and competitors – because they seek to understand their audiences. Public and private sector organisations benefit directly from employing public relations practitioners because they bring with them an ability to research, interpret and reflect audience needs.

Duration

3 years full-time

What will I study?

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 10/Rank 81, IB 29

QTAC code

741001

When you study Public Relations at UQ, you’ll learn innovative and real ways to deal with communication issues in any workplace. Our courses involve practical, hands-on workshops, working with the most sophisticated technology available. Within the workshops you learn to solve communication issues and design creative communication campaigns that address the issues that will confront you in the workforce. Some of the courses you may study include: – Introduction to Public Relations – Public Relations Writing – Media and Issues Management – Public Relations Practice and Strategy – Mass Media, Spin and Public Opinion – Mass Media and Society – Public Relations Internship.

What is Public Relations? Public Relations (PR) people are communication professionals who plan and deliver strategic advice, information and programs on behalf of their client organisations or individuals. PR is an exciting, dynamic profession which has expanded rapidly over the past decade. PR is about two-way communication with carefully identified target audiences or stakeholder groups. PR people work closely with other communication professionals such as those in journalism, marketing and advertising. Those who study Public Relations enjoy the challenges of establishing and/ or maintaining a variety of strategic communication channels between an organisation and its key stakeholders – potential and existing customers, the media,

What job can I get? Studying PR at UQ offers key skills valuable to employers including an ability to think creatively and critically, to evaluate arguments

Areas of Study

as well as to communicate effectively with other people verbally and in writing. Graduates of the UQ Public Relations program have found jobs in PR consultancies, as in-house PR staff for corporations and non-government organisations, and in local, state and federal government, as well as in international organisations. The practice of Public Relations includes: – community consultation and engagement – corporate communication – corporate writing and media production – crisis communication – event and exhibition management – fashion and lifestyle PR – government relations – health communication – internal communication within organisations – investor relations – issues management – media monitoring – media relations – media training – promotion and publicity – public education programs – research – sponsorship and fundraising – Web content management.

The exciting world of Just over a year ago, Bachelor of Communication student Sally Hall started an internship at Brisbane PR agency memery. Three short months later, Sally was hired as memery’s new Account Coordinator.

The digital revolution has transformed PR practice, and graduates are expected to have high levels of digital literacy. PR is a global industry and graduates can expect to find employment overseas as well as in Australia.

Bursaries help start careers

PR students Rebecca Brown and Lily Howe were the inaugural recipients of the Cole Lawson Bursary. They each received a $2500 prize for the quality of their applications, study, PR work, and commitment to their careers. Cole Lawson Communications Managing Director Margaret Lawson (centre) praised the recipients for the high standard of their applications and for being “wonderful young professionals”. She said the bursary aimed to provide practical assistance to the students at an uncertain time in their careers. “Public relations is an amazing profession leading to amazing careers,” she said.

ince then, Sally has Sally Hall found herself working on PR campaigns for brands like the St George Reds, Breaka Flavoured Milk and the Make-A-Wish Foundation. Sally’s love of PR stems social media are complementary platforms. from the ever-changing, fast-paced nature “Getting your story into the Twittersphere of the job. and the world of Facebook is so important “My day can include writing media – it brings so many more people to the releases, helping to plan events, organising conversation than traditional PR alone,” photo opportunities and interviews, liaising Sally said. with media about potential stories, writing If you enjoy being busy, Sally believes PR blogs, even updating a client’s Facebook is the perfect job for you, as no two days in and Twitter accounts, the list is endless,” an agency are the same. she said. “I love the fact that you have to be across In today’s day and age, traditional PR and so many different clients and projects all at

once. I need a bit of variety in my daily routine to keep me sane,” she said. Sally is excited about completing her Bachelor of Communication at UQ this year and seeing where her PR and communication career will take her in the future. “While I would be lying if I said there haven’t been times I have been stressed about university and just wanted it over, overall I have loved being at UQ. “I love that the lecturers in the School of Journalism and Communication are so enthusiastic about their subjects; that passion makes for a great learning environment,” she said.

27


28

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Outback outlook

Social Policy

After spending her fourth year placement in remote Central Australia, UQ social work student Briege Douglas came to realise the immense complexities, hardships and barriers that Indigenous people face in today’s political, cultural and social times.

Social Policy students will understand the values and ideas underpinning policy, and the impact of policy on issues of equity, fairness and social justice.

Prior to placement, Briege had little exposure to mental health and remote work, so being based at the Alice Springs General Practice Network Northern Territories (GPNNT) in the area of primary mental health proved to be a steep learning curve for her. “While this lesson was challenging and confronting at times, it was also one of the most rewarding moments of my life; I had the opportunity to soak up the richness of the Centre and learn from a unique and diverse population of beautiful people,” Briege said. A week’s work out bush required a flexible and open schedule, and while the office was based in Alice Springs, each worker had around four communities to service. “When we were out bush, working days strayed from the normal nine to five and could sometimes consist of starting at 10am and finishing at 10pm to optimise effectiveness of service delivery. “While this took some getting used to, it also made me appreciate community life and a different pace to the hustle and bustle that occurs in the city,” Briege said. Significant learning opportunities were given to Briege at GPNNT, including working with Aboriginal community members

and health staff around mental health issues, particularly suicide prevention and responding to signs of suicide risk. “I found this process very interesting and rewarding to be a part of. Ongoing activities required following up with people in the communities who live with mental health problems and assess how they and their families are coping to ensure that nobody falls through the gaps,” she said. Briege believes the primary health care model was instrumental to the development of her social work skills and developing that framework to practice. “My experiences in remote Central Australia have shown me how vital my role as a social worker is to push for justice and equality, when working with people of all ages, cultures and backgrounds to achieve harmony, freedom and one’s basic human rights. “I thoroughly recommend to any student interested in doing a rural/remote placement in Australia to pursue it. It is life changing, rewarding, and full of new learning experiences. You will form memories and friendships that will last a lifetime,” she said.

How can I study Social Policy?

Bachelor of

Social Science

(together with Public Policy)* Duration

3 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 13/Rank 73, IB 25

QTAC code

747001

*Social Policy and Public Policy (see page 25) are complementary study areas

What is Social Policy? Social Policy is the study of actions and decisions of government that contribute to the wellbeing of the population and individuals. It involves policy areas such as social security and welfare, disability, health, education, employment services, Indigenous peoples, community services and child protection. The study of Social Policy focuses on understanding the values and ideas underpinning policy and the impact of policy on issues of equity, fairness and social justice. Social policy research critically analyses actual and proposed policy. It identifies the strengths and weaknesses of policy, the political dynamics behind policy, and asks the important question of who benefits from government policy.

What will I study? Courses in Social Policy examine the structure and distribution of government policy to assist and enhance the wellbeing of Australians and how these arrangements have changed over time in response to

Areas of Study

political, social and economic factors. You will also learn about policy implementation and service delivery as important elements in making social policy. Courses focusing on specific areas of social policy include: – Health – Indigenous Peoples – Social and Income Security – The Economy and Employment. A final-year course provides students with a simulated policy experience. You will develop a policy proposal in the form of a pseudo-Cabinet Submission which is sent to the appropriate government Minister.

What job can I get? Graduates in Social Policy are well suited for careers in the State and Federal Governments as public servants, policy analysts and advisors to the Minister. Jobs in non-government and community sector agencies and peak advocacy bodies also require Social Policy graduates. Social policy analysis skills are also highly relevant for staff delivering and managing social services.

Profile

For Policy Officer Alice Ruxton, the best things about being a UQ student were living on campus, participating in an exchange program, and doing an internship.

“... you will form memories and friendships that will last a lifetime ...”

“Campus life was great, and completing an internship enabled me to secure a job that I’m really enjoying.” Alice, who graduated with a Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Social Science, is a policy officer with the National Seniors Australia’s National Policy Office in Canberra. She is responsible for assisting the work of the Queensland, Victoria and New South Wales policy groups; contributing to national policy work through research, writing of submissions, preparing media releases/articles; assisting with lobbying activities at the state and federal level; and working with other non-government organisations. Alice Ruxton Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Social Science

29


30

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Social Science

Areas of Study Profile

Bachelor of Social Science (Development) graduate Banthida Komphasouk currently works for World Vision in Laos.

How can I study Social Science?

Bachelor of

Social Science Duration

3 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 13/Rank 73, IB 25

QTAC code

747001

Banthida is the Community Health Coordinator and responsible for the Early Childhood Care and Development (ECCD) project and the Water and Sanitation Hygiene (WASH) project and any other community health related projects required.

What is Social Science? In UQ’s Bachelor of Social Science students learn how to develop strategies to address major social challenges facing society in an increasingly globalised world. Social Science covers a number of fields, and students will have the opportunity to specialise in Criminal Justice, Development, Health and Society, or Social and Public Policy, as well as the opportunity to study a minor field in Communities and Social Change, Cultural Heritage, Environment and Society, Past Civilisations, or Globalisation and International Political Economy.

“ECCD aims to improve maternal and child health and well-being through a participatory family conversation approach,” said Banthida. “I’m now at the stage of mainstreaming ECCD in 32 villages across seven Area Development Projects (ADPs) in the southern province of Savannakhet in Laos. We are also starting to introduce ECCD to three other provinces, Khammoune, Bolikhamxay and Luangprabang Province.”

What will I study?

Bachelor of

Arts/

Bachelor of

Social Science Duration

4 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 10/Rank 81, IB 29

QTAC code

707301

Students may also continue their studies at honours level with an individually designed research program, complementary coursework and honours thesis.

The Bachelor of Social Science at UQ is a unique and innovative program that will give students expertise in social science research design and implementation, and detailed knowledge of a specialised field of practice. Students undertake a set of core courses equipping them with theoretical knowledge and research skills, and include: – Social Being: Personal and Social Identities – Social Being: Power, Structures and Agency – Principles of Social Research – Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods – Research, Planning and Design. Third-year students gain experience in the real world of social research by undertaking a supervised research project, related to their specialised field of study, and linked with an industry partner. In addition to the set of core courses, Bachelor of Social Science students have an opportunity to specialise in a particular area of interest: – Criminal Justice – gives students the background and skills to critically evaluate how we can better respond to emerging crime problems in our communities. Courses focus on the social factors leading to criminality and the response to criminal behaviour from the justice system. – Development – offers a social science perspective on international and community development issues. Students focus on strategies to alleviate poverty and inequality, and to develop

Banthida was an AusAID funded student from Laos and graduated with first class honours from the Bachelor of Social Science in 2010.

Honours graduate Karinya Louttit has worked for the National Health Service in Britain on an engagement project, enabling health consumers to have input into the development of healthcare facilities

sustainable societies, communities and environments. – Health and Society – provides students with an understanding of the social, cultural, economic and ethical factors influencing health and illness. Courses focus on the way the health system works, and on the skills relevant to becoming a social science worker in the health sector. – Social and Public Policy – provides students with the ability to gain the technical skills required to analyse social and economic issues and develop, implement and evaluate policy solutions. Studies in this major will connect the social sciences to the world of practical politics. Some of the courses you may study in these areas of specialisation include: – Punishment and Society – Introduction to International Inequality and Development – Medicine, Markets and Health – Australian Social Policy.

In addition to the four majors in the program, five minor fields of study are offered: Communities and Social Change, Cultural Heritage, Environment and Society, Past Civilisations, and Globalisation and International Political Economy.

What job can I get? As a Bachelor of Social Science graduate, you will be equipped with relevant and marketable skills including problem solving, effective written and oral communication, information processing, creative and critical thinking, cross-cultural awareness, social research skills, and computer literacy. These skills will enable graduates to seek future employment with organisations such as government departments, policing agencies, community service agencies, healthcare providers, NGOs, and in the business/ private sector.

Third-year students undertake a supervised research project that is linked with an industry partner, and gain experience in the real world of social research.

“The knowledge, information and experience I gained from my studies at UQ has helped me immensely with my development work here in Laos. This is especially so for the work required in my final honours year. “I really benefitted from the hands-on research, real world experience and analytical skills needed to complete my honours.” Banthida Komphasouk Bachelor of Social Science (Honours)

31


32

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Social Work

How can I study Social Work?

Bachelor of

Social Work Duration

4 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 13/Rank 73, IB 25

QTAC code

734001

Master of

Social Work Studies* Duration

2 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

*For students who already have an appropriate degree and wish to qualify as a social worker. Entry is direct to the School of Social Work and Human Services.

The practical nature of the field placements help students prepare for the workplace and it is these placements that often help secure employment after graduation.

What is Social Work? Social work is a career for those interested in working with individuals, families and communities, and in addressing social issues and problems through interpersonal, community and policy practice. Social work and social policy play vital roles in contemporary Australia, as issues such as unemployment, an ageing population, and economic uncertainty impact on our society. Most people find themselves facing complexities of our society and sometimes need support and assistance in resolving their problems. The role of social workers is to play a key part in developing a society based on social justice, and in redressing situations that disadvantage people. Social workers aim to stimulate action to change the social circumstances of individuals and groups who are disadvantaged. They also work to alleviate personal pain and distress, and provide direction for individual development and control over life situations.

What will I study? In preparing for a personally rewarding career, you’ll develop core knowledge and skills in social work, including direct practice with individuals, families, groups and communities, as well as social policy practice and research practice. You will gain an understanding of the legal context of practice, human development, the moral and ethical foundations of social work, and the theories that guide what social workers do in their everyday workplace. You will also develop competence in working with people with mental health needs and their friends and families. You will have the opportunity to specialise in a key area of practice in social work by choosing a minor in: – Child, Youth and Family – Health and Ageing – Mental Health.

Why become a Social Worker? A career as a professional social worker will provide you with: – opportunities to put social justice principles into practice and make a

Areas of Study

real difference in the lives of individuals, families and groups – the opportunity to impact on local, national and global social policy – flexibility with practice areas: many social workers will work in a variety of settings during their careers – eligibility for membership with the Australian Association of Social Workers (AASW), a professional body for social work practitioners – excellent employment opportunities in Australia and overseas.

Learning in the workplace As a UQ social work student, you will have the opportunity to “learn through doing”. In the third and fourth year of the program, students are assigned to organisations where they learn about working in the social work industry from experienced practitioners. These workplace experiences provide an excellent opportunity to apply the knowledge acquired through your studies and finetune the application of skills learnt in practice courses. Industry placements ensure that students who graduate from this program are job-ready and highly sought after in the workforce. A significant number of placements lead directly to employment opportunities for students after they graduate.

What job can I get? Graduates of the UQ Bachelor of Social Work program are employed in government agencies, community organisations, and in private practice. Social Workers may find themselves working: – as advocates and negotiators acting for individuals who are facing discrimination or who are unable to act for themselves – with community groups and local government as community workers in neighbourhoods, where they work to bring about desired changes and develop services needed – in hospitals assisting patients and their families to cope with and adjust to their health conditions – with individuals and families facing personal distress or crisis associated with family and personal relationships

Social work student Tanya Vanderiet

– with those experiencing loss, trauma and stress in their lives through loss of health, loss of employment or disability – in local, state and federal government departments, where they may be involved in the policy practice, and planning and management of social and welfare services – in private practice as family therapists or as counsellors with people wanting to bring about changes in their life. Some of our more experienced graduates are CEOs of government and nongovernment organisations, policy officers, community development workers, overseas aid workers, family therapists, probation officers and juvenile justice workers.

Social Workers are employed in: – Centrelink – child protection agencies – community corrections – defence forces – disability services – drug and alcohol support clinics

– hospitals – Indigenous health and welfare agencies – legal centres – local councils – multicultural agencies – neighbourhood centres – policy development units – private practice – refugee support organisations – rehabilitation units – residential care – women’s refuges – many other organisations. Job prospects in this sector are outstanding. The Department of Education, Training and Workplace Relations has projected employment growth of 48.5 percent for the social work industry over the next five years.

Further study The School of Social Work and Human Services offers Graduate Certificate, Masters and Research Higher Degree programs covering Social Work, Social Policy, Community Development and Counselling.

Why study social work at UQ? – We have nationally and internationally recognised teaching staff who are leaders in their fields and write the text books used by other universities. – We have a track record of more than 50 years of social work education. This means our curriculum is founded on a wealth of experience and leading research, which has been expertly adapted for students’ needs. – We have strong links with the health and community services industry. Students undertake a work experience placement as part of their degree (see the learning in the workplace section for further information) and our strong links with the sector allow us to offer a wide range of placement opportunities. You may even be able to undertake your placement in an overseas agency.

33


34

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Sociology

How can I study Sociology?

Bachelor of

Arts

Duration

3 years full-time

Location

St Lucia

2012 entry score

OP 10/Rank 81, IB 29

QTAC code

707001

One of the most exciting student internship opportunities offered through the Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences is the UniCapitol Washington Internship Programme, where Australia’s best and brightest are given a chance to head to Washington.

Areas of Study

What is Sociology?

What will I study?

Sociology’s basic assumption is that social life is orderly – in the sense of being regular, patterned and therefore capable of being analysed. Such order can be found at all levels of social organisation, from the way we exchange greetings in face-to-face encounters or over the telephone, to the way the social class structure is reproduced over time. Even the negative or undesirable features of social life – how arguments start and conclude, as well as more serious matters such as industrial conflict, crime and deviant behaviour – can be shown to be “orderly”. Sociology’s goal is ultimately to describe and explain the observed regularities in social life. Finding out how things occur and how different aspects of social life are mutually connected through careful research is the first step in suggesting how problems can be addressed.

You will study a range of introductory and advanced courses that introduce you to key sociological concepts and theories, research methods for sociology and key substantive areas. Students can choose between a single and extended major and may also do a fourth-year honours program that provides advanced training in sociological research. Examples of introductory courses are: – Introduction to Sociology – Gender, Sexuality and Society – Introduction to Health, Illness and Society. Examples of advanced courses are: – Sociology of the Environment – Media, Culture and Society – Sociology of the City.

What job can I get? Graduates can pursue careers in policy analysis, statistics, research or social planning in government, or in market research and analysis in the private sector.

Career areas include: Government departments (e.g., Communities, Health, Natural Resources, Tourism and Emergency Services)

Policy Advisor, Policy Researcher, Social Planning Officer and Research Officer

Communications and public relations

Market Researcher, Industry Analyst, Media Relations Advisor and Public Relations Consultant

Media and advertising

Marketing Consultant, Project Manager and Event Manager

Health provision

Health Services Manager

Community services

Counsellor, Lobbyist

Health provision

Health Services Manager

Consultancy firms

Ethics Advisor, Evaluation Officer, Applied Research Officer

Education

Teaching sociology and social science (in conjunction with education qualifications), Education Administrator

T

he internship allows some of UQ’s most talented students to showcase their future leadership skills while undertaking work experience on Washington’s Capitol Hill. The students are placed in a Congressional Office of a member of the US House of Representatives or US Senate each January and February and are exposed to many academic, professional and cultural opportunities. Carl Tessman was fortunate enough to secure an internship in 2011 and, according to him, this unique experience was a standout part of his university experience. Carl couldn’t wait to take up the challenges that came with being placed with the House Committee on the Judiciary (Minority Office). “Working in this office was brilliant – not only due to the wonderful people and political direction given by Ranking Member John Conyers, Jr. (D-Mi.), but as a law student, it was a dream come true to work on issues relating to crime, the constitution, intellectual property and privacy. “The work included relatively little administrative and constituent support, because, as a committee, most of the intern work involved providing research and assistance to the legislative counsels on the committee: all lawyers with expert knowledge in their respective fields,” Carl said. During his placement, Carl would attend congressional briefings and hearings, research legislative and policy issues, prepare issue briefs, and help counsels prepare for committee mark-ups. “Some memorable hearings I witnessed included the four-hour grilling of Attorney General Eric Holder regarding gun walking operations, and the foreign affairs testimony of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton,” he said. Other highlights for Carl were more unexpected, such as receiving an impromptu invitation to attend a reception for the National Narcotic Officers’ Association, and attending an “amazingly interesting”, in-depth tour of the US Terrorist Screening Center in Virginia.

The day-to-day internship is only one part of UCWIP. Founder of the program, Eric Federing, goes to great lengths to ensure interns get a well rounded American experience – arranging trips to the State Department, Australian Embassy, and Australian Mission to the UN in New York; organising discussions with congressional journalists and C-SPAN producers; and day trips to Gettysburg and Philadelphia. “Washington DC is a great city to live in – full of diversity, amazing museums, memorials and fantastic places to have weekend brunches. Furthermore, it’s central to many other cities – I travelled to Boston and twice to New York, including for New Year’s Eve,” Carl said. SBS Associate Dean (Academic), Associate Professor Julie Duck, believes students gain more than just academic experience from this program. “It’s about the personal experiences they go through and immersing themselves in the reality of a political atmosphere,” Associate Professor Duck said. “It’s about finding opportunities and creating networks – all of which are absolutely invaluable,” she added. Carl agrees that the experience was indeed invaluable, and strongly recommends this internship opportunity to anyone interested in American politics or governance. “Everyone’s experience, from year to year, from office to office, will be completely different – it’s an internship where you just cannot predict what will happen and often some of the most memorable experiences will happen without warning,” he said. Carl’s advice for prospective interns is make sure you do plenty of research on the offices on offer via office websites, news pieces etc, and only apply to an office you’d like to intern with. “Finding the right match will guarantee a great experience and is the bedrock of this fantastic program,” he said. To find out how you can take part in the Uni-Capitol Washington Internship Programme, visit www.uq.edu.au/sbs/washington

Reporting from Capitol Hill

35


36

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

What do we mean? You will hear a lot of new terms at University: here is an explanation of some of them ... Bachelor degree A qualification awarded for the first level of study undertaken at university, generally requiring three to five years of study, depending on the bachelor degree studied. Course (formerly known as subject) A component of study within a program, similar to a subject at school. Full-time students usually study four courses per semester. Dual program A combination of two UQ degree programs undertaken at the same time. These are sometimes called dual degrees, parallel degrees, combined degrees, or double degrees. Elective A course that you can choose to study from a set of options. Some UQ programs allow electives from outside your main area of study. Entry scores Undergraduate students are given an entry score based on high school studies or other post-secondary studies. If you complete high school studies in Queensland you are assigned an Overall Position (OP). Year 12 students in other Australian states are assigned an Interstate Transfer Index (ITI). All other students are assigned a rank. Once you have completed a full year of study at UQ, your OP or ITI is converted to a rank based on Grade Point Average (GPA). Grade point average (GPA) The average grade of your results, weighted by the unit value of each course. GPA is determined on a semester basis and ranges from 1 (lowest) to 7 (highest).

Forgan Smith Building, St Lucia campus

Faculty A major organisational unit within UQ, with responsibility for academic programs, e.g., Faculty of Arts. Faculties may have a number of sub-faculty academic units called Schools, e.g., School of ... The head of a faculty is called an Executive Dean. Honours If you are enrolled in a three-year degree, you must undertake additional study to be considered for honours. For four- or fiveyear bachelor degrees, honours is awarded based on academic performance during the program. International student A student who is not an Australian citizen or permanent resident, nor a New Zealand citizen, and is enrolled or proposes to enrol at an institution in Australia. Temporary residents of Australia are also classified as international students. Major/Extended/Dual Major A major or extended major is an area of specialised study within a program, for example, chemistry. A major, extended major, or dual major may be a formal requirement in a program. Minor A small group of courses in a discipline. A minor is worth approximately half the value of a major. Overall Position (OP) Overall Positions, or OPs, provide a Statewide rank order of students (on a 1 to 25 scale, 1 being the highest) based on your achievement in Authority subjects studied for the Queensland Senior Certificate. Your OP shows how well you have performed in your senior studies when compared with the performances of all other OP-eligible students in Queensland.

Postgraduate programs Programs studied after graduating from undergraduate degrees which include graduate certificates, graduate diplomas, masters, and doctorates. Program (formerly known as course) A sequence of study involving enrolment, study and graduation, normally awarded with a qualification such as a bachelors degree, graduate diploma, or certificate. Program code A unique identifying number assigned by the University to a program. QTAC The Queensland Tertiary Admissions Centre (QTAC), the central admissions body for all Queensland undergraduate programs. Semester The University teaching year is divided into three semesters: Semester 1, Semester 2, and Summer Semester. Most programs only require enrolment in Semesters 1 and 2 each year. Study Abroad A program where students enrolled at an overseas university study at UQ for one or two semesters as part of their home university degrees. Undergraduate programs Usually refers to first-time university programs including diplomas and bachelor degrees. Unit The value of a course (#). Most courses at UQ are worth two units but some are higher. UQ Terminology www.uq.edu.au/study (see UQ Toolkit)

Once you are enrolled at UQ, you may decide to undertake a Diploma in either Music Performance, Languages, or Global Issues at the same time as you complete your bachelor degree.

ConcurrenT DIPLOMAS At UQ, you can now study one of three undergraduate diplomas concurrently with your bachelor degree. You may choose to undertake this over an accelerated period, or spread the load across the duration of your degree.

Music Performance If you love music, this is the diploma for you – no matter what your main academic interest. You can choose between Music Studies and Ensemble in which you can practise performance skills in an orchestral setting, as well as develop other musical techniques and knowledge; or Popular Music and Music Technology which focuses on the technologies of performance, recording, and distribution of popular music’s different genres.

Languages If you are keen to learn a new language, whether for personal interest or to enhance your career prospects in the global economy, you can study the Diploma in Languages. This diploma will suit you if you studied a language at high school and want to maintain your proficiency. But it will also suit you if you have never studied a foreign language: you don’t need any prior experience. The diploma is available in French, German, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, Russian and Spanish.

Global Issues The Diploma in Global Issues will appeal to you if you wish to pursue a career in an area where having a global perspective on the environment, economics, politics, and social change will be of advantage. In this program, you will learn how individuals, societies and countries are all interconnected. One exciting feature of this program is the opportunity to make the most of UQ’s extensive international connections through study at one of our partner universities.

How to enrol in a concurrent diploma If you are interested in the Diploma in Music Performance or the Diploma in Languages, you can apply for these programs directly to UQ once you have been offered a place at UQ through QTAC. If the Diploma in Global Issues is your area of interest, you will need to complete one year (16 units) of undergraduate studies before applying. To find out more about undergraduate diplomas, please contact the UQ Admissions Team. UQ Admissions www.uq.edu.au/study Email admissionsenquiries@admin.uq.edu.au Phone (07) 3365 2203

37


38

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

admission information Admission requirements To gain admission to undergraduate programs, you must satisfy prerequisites and have a sufficient entry score (OP/IB/Rank). But there are alternative pathways for entry if you do not meet the requirements, and you can upgrade your score. See Alternative entry or Improving an entry score (upgrading) in the next column. See What do we mean? on page 36 for definitions of Australian (domestic) and international applicants.

Prerequisites Subject prerequisites are the Queensland Year 12 subjects required for individual programs. You may also gain admission to programs with subject equivalents from interstate or overseas schooling, external senior studies, or tertiary studies. Some programs have additional prerequisites, e.g., the Undergraduate Medicine and Health Sciences Admission Test (UMAT).

Entry scores Entry scores include Overall Positions (OP) and ranks. Eligible applicants are selected for admission to a program in order of merit based on entry scores. Those with the highest entry score are selected first, and so on until the program quota is filled. The minimum OP or rank required for entry varies from year to year and is determined once applications have been processed and places allocated. While it is difficult to predict exactly what OP or rank will be needed for entry to a program, the previous year’s cut-off points can be used as a guide (see table on page 44). Current Queensland Year 12 students receive an OP on the basis of their overall achievement at school in comparison with other students. OPs are determined by the Queensland Studies Authority and range from 1 to 25, with 1 being the highest. All other applicants are allocated a rank on a scale of 1-99.9, with 99.9 being the highest. This common ranking scale allows many different types of qualifications to be compared, such as: – interstate Year 12 students are allocated a Nationally Agreed Common Index – Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR), which is used to calculate a rank. – Australian students who complete the International Baccalaureate (IB) are allocated a Nationally Agreed Common Index – referred to as the “Combined Rank” by QTAC, which is used to calculate a rank. – non-school-leavers (including previous Queensland Year 12 students who qualified for an OP) and OP-ineligible Year 12

school-leavers are allocated a rank when they apply for tertiary education through QTAC based on previous secondary, tertiary, bridging and preparatory studies, and/or work experience. English language requirements If you are from a non-English-speaking background, you must provide evidence of English proficiency. This may be achieved through a pass in Queensland Year 12 English (or interstate equivalent) or by other means, as outlined in the Entry Options booklet available from UQ Admissions. Alternative entry If you did not complete Year 12, did not achieve a high enough entry score for your preferred program, or are a matureaged applicant, there are alternative entry pathways to UQ. Contact UQ Admissions for advice on these alternatives. Improving an entry score (upgrading) If you are not offered a place in your preferred program and want to improve your entry score or meet subject prerequisites, you can accept an offer in a lower preference program and try to improve your entry score or meet program prerequisites. This process is called upgrading. It involves the allocation of a new entry rank that, depending on factors such as academic performance in the lower preference program and your history of previous studies, is potentially higher than your previous rank. For information about other ways to improve your entry score, please contact UQ Admissions. Special entry programs If you are of Australian Aboriginal and/ or Torres Strait Islander descent, or have suffered financial hardship or severe disadvantage beyond your control that has affected previously satisfactory results, you may be eligible for special entry to UQ. Contact UQ Admissions for more information. UQ’s Bonus Rank Scheme gives current Year 12 high school students bonus points towards their entry score for completing certain approved subjects. Contact UQ Admissions for more information. Programs for high school students UQ’s Enhanced Studies Program (ESP) provides high-achieving secondary school students with an opportunity to extend their studies in an area of interest and to “test drive” university life. Students accepted into the program can study one UQ course (subject) during Semester One of Year 12. ESP students who successfully complete the program will be eligible to receive

one bonus point towards their university entrance rank through UQ’s Bonus Scheme. Most ESP students who later enrol in a relevant UQ degree also receive credit for their completed course. ESP study counts towards your Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE). For more information, visit www.uq.edu.au/guidance/esp

How to apply You can apply for admission to undergraduate programs at UQ through the Queensland Tertiary Admissions Centre (QTAC). The QTAC Guide provides essential information on the application process and explains the entry requirements for all programs offered through QTAC. Free copies are given to all current Queensland Year 12 students and some interstate schools. You can also buy a copy from newsagents or through QTAC. For 2013 programs, the deadline for ontime applications is 28 September 2012. Contact QTAC for more information. Current Year 12 students – lodge an application online through QTAC’s Twelve to Tertiary (TTT) Web application service at www.qtac.edu.au International students studying Year 12 in Australia – visit www.uq.edu.au/international/ ausyear12 for more information on application procedures and entry requirements Other prospective students – lodge an online application using QTAC’s Apply by Web service at www.qtac.edu.au

Enrolment Once you have been offered a place in a UQ program, you can formally accept the offer by lodging a response with QTAC. You can then enrol at UQ by using the UQ link from QTAC’s Current Applicant online service. The UQ enrolment website (www.uq.edu.au/enrolment) provides information about the enrolment process to help you get started. Also check www. uq.edu.au/startingatuq/ for step-by-step instructions on enrolment procedures. QTAC www.qtac.edu.au Phone 1300 GO QTAC (1300 467 822) UQ Admissions www.uq.edu.au/study Email admissionsenquiries@admin.uq.edu.au Phone (07) 3365 2203 International Admissions Section www.uq.edu.au/international Queensland Year 12 students Phone (07) 3346 7376 Interstate Year 12 students Phone 1800 671 980

Money Matters When planning your study experience, consider the following financial options. Fees and charges

Living costs

When you study at university, you will have to pay fees for each course in which you enrol. Most undergraduate places at UQ are funded partly by the Australian government (Commonwealth supported) and partly by you, and the amount you pay depends on the band level of your course. National priority courses (Mathematics, Science, Statistics) attract the lowest charges. You are eligible for Commonwealth supported (CSP) funding if you are an Australian or New Zealand citizen, or an Australian permanent resident. International students must pay full tuition fees. At UQ, fees are charged each enrolment period (e.g., semester or year) according to the courses you undertake, not the program in which you enrol and, because charges are levied according to your exact enrolment, it is not possible to publish a fixed annual fee.

As a university student, you will also need to consider other costs of living, especially if you are living away from home for the first time. These include accommodation, books and study requirements, transport, and parking. Fortunately, a wide range of assistance is available. UQU, the Student Union, has a secondhand bookshop at St Lucia, and provides many low-cost entertainment activities. UQ’s Student Services offer help with accommodation and finding a job. And the Australian Government provides financial support for low-income earners, as well as fee repayment options for all students.

Fee Calculator To help you estimate your fees for an enrolment period, UQ has developed an online Fee Calculator, available on the Courses and Programs website. The Fee Calculator shows individual course fees and allows you to add them to a list to calculate the overall fee for your enrolment. Before you enrol, Academic Advisors can help you develop a study plan. Fees information www.uq.edu.au/study Fee calculator www.uq.edu.au/study (see UQ Toolkit)

University of Queensland Union www.uqu.uq.edu.au UQ Student Services www.uq.edu.au/student-services

Financial assistance Centrelink student services The Australian Government’s Centrelink provides three income-support payments for Australian tertiary students: Youth Allowance, Austudy, and Abstudy. You can apply for these payments at any Centrelink Customer Service Centre. Other schemes include: – an interest-free advance loan for students, where you are paid part of your allowance as a lump-sum advance – the Pensioner Education Supplement (PES), which is a payment to certain categories of pensioners commencing study

– the Health Care Card, which enables Commonwealth health concessions, such as low-cost pharmaceuticals, under the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS). Centrelink www.centrelink.gov.au Youth and student services Phone 13 24 90 Abstudy Phone 13 23 17

HECS-HELP If you are a domestic student in a Commonwealth supported place, you may be eligible to receive HECS-HELP. HECS-HELP allows Australian citizens or permanent humanitarian visa holders in Australia to defer all or part of their student contribution amounts for repayment when their incomes meet a specific threshold. This means that you do not start repaying your HECS debt until you earn a certain income level (currently $47,195 per tax year). It is then taken out of your pay as additional tax. Each enrolment period, if you pay “upfront”, i.e. at the time of enrolment, you will receive a 10 percent discount on your fees. (Please note that New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents without a humanitarian visa must pay up-front and do not receive a discount.) HECS-HELP information www.studyassist.gov.au Scholarships See page 42

39


40

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

further study at UQ Once you have completed your undergraduate degree, you may decide to keep going: UQ has many postgraduate study options from which to choose.

Postgraduate study

international students You are an International student if you are a: – Temporary Resident (visa status) of Australia – Permanent Resident (visa status) of New Zealand, or – resident or citizen of any other country.

Eligibility for UQ study For admission into undergraduate programs at UQ, you must have: – completed recognised upper secondary or equivalent Year 12 studies to the required standard – satisfied individual program requirements (e.g., specific subject prerequisites, auditions or interviews) – satisfied English language requirements. If you do not meet these criteria, you might consider taking the foundation year bridging course offered by International Education Services (IES) or English language training offered by the Institute of Continuing and TESOL Education (ICTE). More information www.uq.edu.au/international www.foundationyear.com www.icte.uq.edu.au

Study Abroad and exchange

Services for international students

If you are an international student currently studying overseas at an accredited university, you can study at UQ for one or two semesters as part of the Study Abroad program. If another university has an exchange agreement with UQ, you can study at UQ as an exchange student for one or two semesters. More information www.uq.edu.au/international/exchange www.uq.edu.au/studyabroad

International Student Advisors can help you quickly settle into life as a UQ student. These include collecting you from the airport, helping you find temporary accommodation, organising your orientation, and scheduling your academic preparation sessions. They can also answer your questions about health services, family matters, schooling or childcare, social events, and cultural or religious organisations.

Expenses

More information www.uq.edu.au/international-guide

When you apply for a student visa, the Department of Immigration and Citizenship (DIAC) may ask you for evidence that you have sufficient funds to complete your studies. Expenses to be considered include visa and medical (pre-departure) fees, tuition fees (for full degree or study abroad fees), general living expenses (around $18,000 - $22,000 a year), return airfares, and Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC). More information www.uq.edu.au/international/fees

More than 11,000 international students from over 100 countries currently call UQ home.

Fees and charges Fee-paying students pay tuition fees based on the courses they undertake, regardless of the program in which they enrol. Fee information www.uq.edu.au/international/fees Fee calculator www.uq.edu.au/study/feecalculator

Applying to UQ See the 2013 UQ Guide: International Undergraduate Students at www.uq.edu.au/international

Contact details International Recruitment Manager Email (online enquiry form) www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry Phone +61 3 8676 7004 (outside Australia) 1800 671 980 (within Australia)

UQ offers both coursework programs or research higher degrees (RHD) at the postgraduate level. Both will provide you with specialised knowledge, give you a significant advantage in the employment market, enable you to upgrade your qualifications, enhance your promotion potential, or pave the way for a career in academia. UQ postgraduate qualifications can provide you with specialised knowledge, give you a significant advantage in the employment market, enable you to upgrade your qualifications, enhance your promotion potential, or pave the way for a career in academia.

Queensland Year 12 (secondary school equivalent)

English language studies

Undergraduate (concurrent) diploma

Coursework programs Postgraduate coursework programs include graduate certificates, graduate diplomas, coursework masters, and professional doctorates, and require you to complete prescribed assessment. There may be a research component in some programs but they mostly require lectures, laboratories, tutorials, assignments and examinations. Graduate certificates, graduate diplomas, and masters (by coursework) programs are frequently available in progression or individual programs under a wide range of disciplines. Depending on your background, you may enter a masters program directly, or be asked to apply for a graduate certificate, then progress to a graduate diploma, then to a coursework masters. Research higher degrees Research higher degrees (RHDs) require that at least two-thirds of the program is supervised independent research (a thesis). Some limited coursework may be required. RHDs include the Master of Philosophy (MPhil) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) programs. The PhD takes three-and-a-half years and the MPhil one-and-a-half years to complete and to be awarded these degrees you must produce either a 40,000 or 80,000 word thesis of original research. Postgraduate study www.uq.edu.au/study Graduate School www.uq.edu.au/grad-school

Foundation year (bridging program)

Undergraduate program (associate degree/Bachelor/dual program)

Undergraduate honours (coursework and research)

Graduate Certificate

Graduate Diploma

Master of Philosophy (MPhil)

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Continuing professional development Several faculties also offer ongoing tuition to ensure you remain current in your industry: some courses are run intensively over several days or hours, while others are offered on a semester-long basis. Still others are offered online. Check your faculty website for details. The Institute of Continuing and TESOL Education (ICTE-UQ) also offers a wide range of highly practical technical, academic and vocational programs, corporate training and professional development,

Coursework Masters

Professional Doctorate

educational tours and professional year programs for industry. You can choose between certificate, diploma, short course or customised program. ICTE-UQ www.icte.uq.edu.au/continuing-education

41


42

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Study at university is much easier when you don’t have to worry about money. Check out what you may be eligible for before you start.

SCHOLARSHIPS Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences Dean’s Scholars Melissa Allison, Ellen Begley and Kaitlin Hinchliffe

DEAN’S SCHOLARS Each year the Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences (SBS) acknowledges its top students by awarding them a place in its prestigious Dean’s Scholars Program. Dean’s Scholars are chosen from all SBS undergraduate programs and sequences of study, including students in dual degrees and students enrolled in the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science, who have an SBS major. Dean’s Scholars receive a number of benefits and opportunities, including:
 – Participation in a limited-entry research course – Priority in Summer Research Scholarships
 – Priority in overseas exchanges
 – Printing credit in the SBS computer labs
 – Library photocopy card.

 Dean’s Scholars are awarded a place in the program for the duration of their degree, as long as they maintain a high GPA. The Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences values the outstanding commitment and enthusiasm that Dean’s Scholars bring to their university studies and looks forward to their continued development and academic success at UQ.

UQ is committed to enabling all students, – regardless of background or financial circumstances – to realise their full potential. That’s why we offer a wide range of scholarships to help you fund your tertiary education. Scholarships at UQ are awarded for academic excellence, for research purposes, to help you if you have financial difficulty, to assist elite athletes, and to help with the costs of overseas study. You can apply for many of them before you start studying. Scholarships are not only funded by the University, but also generously supported by our industry partners, private donors and the government. See www.uq.edu.au/ study/scholarships for full details.

Academic scholarships UQ wants to encourage and attract high-achieving school leavers who also demonstrate the potential to be future leaders, and so has a generous academic scholarship program in place. Selection for the three scholarships – UQ Vice-Chancellor’s, UQ Excellence, UQ Merit – is based on your academic achievement in Year 12, your demonstrated leadership potential, and other achievements.

Equity scholarships UQ has a strong commitment to providing support for you if you are financially disadvantaged and offers a range of equity scholarships to Commonwealth-supported students, including the UQ-Link Access Scholarships and Indigenous Access Scholarships (IAS). For more information, go to www.uq.edu.au/study/scholarships, click on Undergraduate Students, and select Equity.

Scholarships for Indigenous students As an Indigenous student you have many scholarships from which to choose, including the Indigenous Access Scholarship (IAS), Indigenous Youth Leadership

program, and the Pearl Duncan Teaching Scholarship. Go to www.uq.edu.au/study/ scholarships, click on Undergraduate Students, and select Indigenous students for full details.

International opportunities If you complete part of your studies as an exchange student through UQ Abroad, you may be eligible for a UQ Student Exchange Scholarship. Jubilee Scholarships as well as the Australian University Mobility in Asia and the Pacific Program (UMAP) are also available.

Sporting scholarships If you are a talented sportsperson you may be interested in applying for a UQ Sports Achievement Scholarship or the Clem Jones Sporting Scholarship. Apply online before November via the UQ Sport website, under High Performance Sport.

Other scholarships If you are studying at UQ Ipswich or Gatton, you may be eligible for additional scholarship opportunities: see www.uq.edu. au/ipswich/scholarships-and-prizes (for Ipswich), or www.science.uq.edu.au/ scholarships (for Gatton). Similarly, a wide range of scholarships is available across all fields and for all levels of study, including for summer research projects. Go to www.uq.edu.au/study/ scholarships, click on Undergraduate Students, and select Field of study or Honours or Summer research for full details.

INteRNATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES Studying in another country is a great way to learn about the world and broaden your horizons. UQ can help with costs and give you credit towards your degree.

UQ Abroad

Learn a language

While at UQ, you can have the exciting experience of studying on exchange overseas for up to a year, while still gaining credit toward your UQ degree.

If you would like to learn a new language, you can enrol in an IML course while at UQ. No formal entry requirements are required and the program will not be counted towards your degree.

UQ Abroad is an ideal way to combine study and travel. Discover a new culture first-hand and improve your foreign language skills as you broaden your career and academic opportunities, establish a worldwide network of friends, and gain a different perspective on your studies. Because UQ has many exchange agreements with other institutions, you will have the choice of more than 150 universities in 37 countries. Under the exchange, tuition fees at the host university are waived. You continue to be enrolled and pay fees at UQ and are responsible for your own airfares, accommodation, personal insurance, and living costs: you can even apply for a UQ scholarship to help with costs. If you would prefer a shorter international experience, take advantage of UQ’s many overseas placements, conferences, internships and voluntary work opportunities.

IML, the Institute of Modern Languages, is a centre within the Faculty of Arts at UQ St Lucia that offers courses in more than 25 languages, from Arabic to Vietnamese, at beginner to advanced levels. All four communication skill areas – listening, speaking, reading, and writing – are covered in small, friendly classes for an exciting cultural experience. Institute of Modern Languages www.iml.uq.edu.au Email iml@uq.edu.au Phone (07) 3346 8200

UQ Abroad www.uq.edu.au/uqabroad Email uqabroad@admin.uq.edu.au Phone (07) 3365 9075 or (07) 3365 8832

Undergraduate Scholarships and Prizes Office www.uq.edu.au/study/scholarships Email ugscholarships@uq.edu.au Phone (07) 3365 7113 UQ Admissions www.uq.edu.au/study/uqlink-entry Email uq.link@admin.uq.edu.au Phone (07) 3365 2203 UQ Abroad www.uq.edu.au/uqabroad/financial-assistance UQ Sport www.uqsport.com.au Phone (07) 3365 6243 Grace Gowen, Arizona State University

43


44

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Social and Behavioural Sciences UQ Guide 2013

Quick reference guide

UQ CAMPUSES UQ’s campuses are renowned as being among the most beautiful and well-equipped in Australia.

Academic programs QTAC Code CSP

Bachelor degree in [unless otherwise stated]

Duration (years)

Delivery mode

Location

QLD 2012 OP

QLD 2012 Rank

2012 IB

Prerequisites (QLD Year 12 or equivalent)

See page

707001

Arts

3

Internal

St Lucia

10

81

29

English

741001

Communication

3

Internal

St Lucia

10

81

29

English

10

746201

Human Services

3

Internal

St Lucia

13

73

25

English

15

707111

International Studies

3

Internal

St Lucia

10

81

29

English

737001

Journalism

3

Internal

St Lucia

8

86

31

English

19

757001

Psychological Science

4

Internal

St Lucia

4

94

36

English

22

747001

Social Science

3

Internal

St Lucia

13

73

25

English

30

734001

Social Work

4

Internal

St Lucia

13

73

25

English

32

Social Work Studies (Master)

2

Internal

St Lucia

n/a

n/a

n/a

English, plus a completed degree

32

Duration (years)

Location

QLD 2012 OP

QLD 2012 Rank

2012 IB

*

UQ ST LUCIA Situated on the Brisbane River just seven kilometres from the central business district, UQ St Lucia is one of Australia’s most attractive campuses. With its striking sandstone buildings and beautiful parklands, it is the ideal setting for both study and recreation. You can find just about everything you need onsite, including excellent sporting venues, shops and cafés.

*Apply directly to the School of Social Work and Human Services

Dual programs QTAC Code CSP

Bachelor degree in

707301

Arts/Social Science

711101

Business Management/Journalism

741201 741301

Prerequisites (QLD Year 12 or equivalent)

See page

4

St Lucia

10

81

29

English

30

4.25

St Lucia

8

86

31

English, Maths

19

Communication/Arts

4

St Lucia

10

81

29

English

10

Communication/Journalism

4

St Lucia

8

86

31

English

10, 19

746301

Human Services/Arts

4

St Lucia

10

81

29

English

15

UQ GATTON

UQ IPSWICH

UQ HERSTON

730101

Journalism/Arts

4

St Lucia

8

86

31

English

19

737102

Journalism/Laws

5.5

St Lucia

3

97.5

40

English

19

UQ Gatton delivers excellence in agricultural and natural resource sciences in a relaxed, friendly atmosphere. Just over an hour’s drive west of Brisbane, the campus offers a unique blend of recreational amenities, support services, modern teaching facilities, state-of-the-art laboratories and historic buildings, along with the $100 million School of Veterinary Science.

UQ Ipswich provides a high-quality teaching and learning environment in a supportive, friendly campus community. Students benefit from small classes held in purpose-designed teaching spaces and enjoy a range of support, amenities and recreational services, including a bookshop, cafés, sports court, oval and gym. UQ Ipswich is also home to UQ College, a new academic preparation centre.

Herston is UQ’s core clinical health teaching and research site. The campus is close to Brisbane city and is located alongside the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital and the Royal Children’s Hospital. This co-location demonstrates UQ’s commitment to working closely with health professionals and researchers to deliver innovative and contemporary health education programs.

45


Contact details and Further Information Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences The University of Queensland Brisbane Qld 4072 AUSTRALIA Phone +61 7 3365 7487 Fax +61 7 3346 9136 Email sbs@uq.edu.au Internet www.uq.edu.au/sbs

UQ Admissions JD Story Building The University of Queensland Brisbane Qld 4072 AUSTRALIA Phone +61 7 3365 2203 Fax +61 7 3365 2061 Email AdmissionsEnquiries@admin.uq.edu.au Internet www.uq.edu.au/study

UQ International Admissions JD Story Building The University of Queensland Brisbane Qld 4072 AUSTRALIA Phone +61 7 3365 7941/ 1800 671 980 Fax +61 7 3365 1794 Email study@uq.edu.au Internet www.uq.edu.au/international

QTAC PO Box 1331 Level 2, 33 Park Road, Milton Brisbane Qld 4064 AUSTRALIA Phone +61 7 3858 1222/ 1300 467 822 Fax +61 7 3367 1164 Email qtac@qtac.edu.au Internet www.qtac.edu.au

Undergraduate Scholarships and Prizes Office Phone +61 7 3365 7113 Fax +61 7 3365 7559 Email ugscholarships@uq.edu.au Internet www.uq.edu.au/study/scholarships

Fees and Commonwealth Scholarships See www.uq.edu.au/scholarships for the latest information.

Disability Unit Student Services Building 21D The University of Queensland Brisbane Qld 4072 AUSTRALIA Phone +61 7 3365 1704 Fax +61 7 3365 1702 Email ss@uq.edu.au Internet www.uq.edu.au/student-services/ Disability If you have a disability, please contact a Disability Advisor in Student Services at the start of semester to learn about the services and alternative academic arrangements available to you as a UQ student.

UQ publications UQ Admissions holds several publications that can help you find out more about UQ programs, campuses, student services, admissions procedures and fees: – UQ Guide: Australian Undergraduate Students – UQ Guide: International Undergraduate Students – UQ Guide: Australian Postgraduate Students – UQ Guide: International Postgraduate Students.

Campus tours If you would like to experience UQ through a hosted campus tour, please contact the UQ School Liaison team (details below). Campus tours of UQ Ipswich and UQ Gatton are available all year round. UQ St Lucia tours are provided only during the Queensland school holidays, but you can request a self-guided discovery tour map if you wish to explore the campus yourself at any other time. Phone +61 7 3346 9649 Email school.liaison@uq.edu.au Internet www.uq.edu.au/schools In the event of any conflict arising from information contained in this publication, the material approved by The University of Queensland Senate shall prevail.

CRICOS Provider Number 00025B

Tertiary Studies Expo (TSXPO) RNA Showgrounds Saturday and Sunday, July 21-22, 2012

QTAC closing date For on-time applications Friday, September 28, 2012

UQ Open Day UQ St Lucia campus Sunday, August 5, 2012

Semester 1, 2013 Classes commence Monday, February 25, 2013

UQ Ipswich campus Wednesday, August 8, 2012 UQ Gatton campus Sunday, August 19, 2012

62295 9K BSG MAY12

Key Dates


UQ Guide for the Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences 2013