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Page 2 Congrats to Iris and John Page 3 Fall 2013 Seminar Series Page 4 Center for Sustainability News Page 5 Green Careers Page 6 Winter 2014 Courses Page 8-9 Letters from Seniors Page 10 Last Call for Baja!

The Department of Environmental Studies & Sciences Santa Clara University

Fall 2013

EnviroNews ESS Search for New Faculty Member in Climate and Energy Science The nexus of climate and energy – including carbon emissions, global warming, renewable energy sources, sea level rise, and ocean acidification – is the most important issue of our time. Yet the ESS Department has, until now, lacked expertise in this key area of environmental science. The good news is that we are now accepting applications for a new tenure-track faculty member working in this arena. This new faculty member will train ES majors in the rapidly changing science of climate and energy and build ties to Silicon Valley companies focused on the development of renewable energy sources. In the coming weeks, we will be screening applicants and conducting phone interviews with the goal of inviting several finalists for on-campus interviews. During the campus visits, each finalist will give a demonstration of their teaching abilities and a research presentation. Please watch for emails announcing the dates and times of the research presentations. We will provide short evaluation forms for students to complete. We very much value student opinions about the candidates. And, as an added incentive, the research talks will count for ESS colloquium credit.


Congratulations to Dr. Iris Stewart-Frey and John Farnsworth Last spring the University announced the promotion of ESS faculty members, Dr. Iris Stewart-Frey and John Farnsworth. Please congratulate both Iris and John on their welldeserved promotions! We look forward to many more years of excellence in teaching and scholarship from them. Dr. Iris Stewart-Frey was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor with tenure. Iris uses a combination of climate models and spatial analysis to understand how a warming global climate will affect the timing and amount of the water supply, particularly in the western US. Over the past several years Iris authored a substantial number of papers in some of the top journals of her field, including the Journal of Geophysical Research, Water Resources Research, Journal of American Water Resources Association, and Climatic Change. Her work has been highly influential in the climate science and hydrology communities. Iris is an excellent teacher both in and out of the classroom. Her courses provide ES majors with in-depth training in earth science, water resources, and GIS, and she collaborates extensively with undergraduate students. John Farnsworth was promoted to the rank of Senior Lecturer. John’s recent scholarship includes an ecocritical analysis of Edward Abbey’s Desert Solitaire published in the journal Interdisciplinary Literary Studies, as well as a paper in the Journal of Natural History Education and Experience about the pedagogies he employs in the Natural History of Baja program. In addition, he currently has a book in progress, entitled Writing Baja. Well known for his habit of beginning every class with a poem, John inspires, engages, and motivates students to reflect upon their place in the world, while also working closely with students to improve the quality of their writing.


Environmental Studies and Sciences Department Fall 2013 Seminar Series Friday October 4th "The Magic of Water" Kathy Machado, Education & Volunteer Program Coordinator Santa Clara Valley Water District Kennedy Commons 12-12:50pm

Thursday October 17th Shauna Sadowski, Director of Sustainability Wiegand Room 5-7pm

Friday November 15th “Fluid Commodities: The Social Making of Ecosystem Services in Coastal Belize" Patrick Gallagher, Adjunct Lecturer, ESS Dept., Santa Clara University Ph.D. Candidate, Anthropology, Stanford University Kennedy Commons 12-12:50pm

TBA Various research presentations. See page 1 for details.


News from the Center for Sustainability... The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) held their annual conference and expo October 6-9 in Nashville, Tennessee. This conference, with the theme of “resiliency and adaptation”, gathered over 2,000 participants to share innovations, activities, frameworks, learning outcomes, tools, strategies, research, theory and leadership initiatives that are changing the face of sustainability in higher education. Among presenters at this conference were ESS Alumni Michelle Tang presenting on "Leaders for the Environment, Art, and Fashion (LEAF): Educating Students About Impacts and Issues of Environment, Art, and Fashion" and Amelia Evans presenting on “Institutionalizing Sustainability in Residence Life” alongside ESS alumna and SCU Sustainability Coordinator Cara Kimberly Uy. These Bronco representatives shared our university’s leadership in sustainability to attendees from around the world!

by Claire Ryan, Intern, Residence Life


Winter 2014 Courses Have you ever tried to register for an ENVS course only to find that it is already full? Good news… All declared ES majors and minors can pre-register for winter quarter ENVS courses! Pre-registration will take place October 28-November 1. Pre-registration works ONLY if you have cleared any holds on your account before November 1. ENVS

12A

Cultures and Ideas II

TR 2:00-3:40

ENVS

21

Intro to Environmental Science

MWF 10:30-11:35

ENVS

21L

Intro to Environmental Science

M 2:15-5:00

ENVS

21L

Intro to Environmental Science

W 2:15-5:00

ENVS

22

Intro to Environmental Studies

MWF 10:30-11:35

ENVS

23

Soil, Water, & Air

TR 8:30-10:10

ENVS

23L

Soil, Water, & Air

T 2:00-4:45

ENVS

23L

Soil, Water, & Air

R 2:00-4:45

ENVS

50

World Geography

TR 2:00-3:40

ENVS

80

Energy & Environment

TR 12:10-1:50

ENVS

95

SLURP

T 4:00-5:00

ENVS

101

Capstone Seminar

RF 4:45-5:50

ENVS

101

Capstone Seminar

RF 3:30-4:35

ENVS

101

Capstone Seminar

RF 2:15-3:20

ENVS

116

Intro to GIS

TR 10:20-12:00

ENVS

122

Environmental Politics & Policy

MW 3:30-5:15

ENVS

140

Sustainability Outreach

T 3:50-4:50

ENVS

142

Writing Natural History—Baja

T 10:20-12:00

ENVS

144

Natural History of Baja

R 10:20-12:00

ENVS

150

Political Ecology

TR 12:10- 1:50

ENVS

153

Conservation Science

TR 3:50-5:30

ENVS

195

SLURP

T 5:00-6:00

Courses offered through other departments in Winter Watch for PHIL 9 Ethics of the Environment, ANTH 140 Food, Culture and the Environment , POLI 167 The Making of Public Policy, TESP 152 Faith, Ethics & Biodiversity, OMIS 108E Sustainable Operations Management, and COMM 120A Environmental Communication .


New Class For Winter 2014!

Internships Info and Pizza Night! November 20th, 5:30-6:30 pm Kennedy Commons Come hear graduating seniors tell you how they found, applied for, and landed the coolest environmental internships around. This is an information-packed hour that will help guide you through the process of fulfilling your ESS internship requirement. Pizza will be served. Watch for posters and emails.


Letter from a Senior: Carlos Carrillo, Class of 2013 To the newest members of the ESS community, Welcome to possibly the best kept secret in all of SCU: The Environmental Studies and Sciences Department. We’re a tight community of people with diverse skills and interests here to help YOU make the most out of your time here at Santa Clara. We’re pretty cool, if I do say so myself. There’s not a doubt in my mind that these past three years have been the best years of my life, and I look forward to the fourth and final year of this chapter of my journey. My freshman year, the only question I had in my mind was “Where am I going?” and writing this letter I’m asking myself “How did I get here?” It’s tricky. You can connect the dots when you reflect on the past, but you can never foresee what will come looking forward. For example: 1. I took a Geographical Information Systems class in the spring of my sophomore year (at the time it wasn’t mandatory) 2. I had a talk with my advisor who taught the GIS about my interest in hydrology (what do you know she’s a hydrologist!) 3. She offers me a job junior year as a research assistant for her hydro-climate work (side note: my childhood dream was to be a weather man and have always loved climate) 4. She then recommends me to apply for an internship for NASA DEVELOP, and BOOM! I land a summer internship at the NASA Ames Research Center. When I signed up for the GIS class, I had no clue that I was laying out the foundation for getting an incredible internship one year down the road. Looking further back, I didn’t know that obsessively watching the weather channel as a kid would spark my interest to be an ESS major. You never know what opportunities you are making for yourself when you make these “dots”; I encourage you to make as many as you can while you are here so you can enjoy connecting them later on in life. The ES majors are broad and multifaceted: this proves to be a blessing and a curse. Chances are you don’t quite know exactly what you want to do with your life yet and having a plethora of options can be overwhelming (pressure from parents excluded). However, my main advice is to never be discouraged and always be flexible. Environmental Studies is a vital part of many fields including the physical sciences, public health, political sciences, biology, economics, law, technology, business and even engineering. So don’t ever think that you are in any way limited by it. There are many possible career paths for an ES major, so take the time to explore the possibilities out there. If you work hard, take risks, and have fun, you never know where you just might end up. To quote Paul Hawken: “You are brilliant, and the earth is hiring!” Oh, and take the Baja class if you can. I can speak for many in saying that it is the best class offered at this school. All the best, Carlos Carrillo


Letter from a Senior: Shawn Warren, Class of 2013 To the new ESS Majors: It’s bitter-sweet, starting my final year here at SCU. The past three years have been some of the best of my life, and I’ve had amazing experiences here that I’ll carry with me in the future. In particular, there’s one experience I could not have had without the Environmental Science and Studies Department. As ESS majors, we have one requirement for graduating that not all other majors have. We are required to work 100 hours at an internship with an environmental focus. The best advice I can give you is to take the internship requirement seriously. Apply for a position working somewhere you think you would enjoy or where you can see yourself working in the future. You’ll learn what you’ll like in a job, and, in some cases, what you don’t. I’m currently working as a research assistant to Virginia Matzek, a professor in the department, and learning a lot in the process. I’ve gone on a number of weekend trips to sites along the Sacramento River, collecting soil and leaf litter samples, and experiencing the wilderness in a way that I never really had a chance to before. This summer we constructed a gas line for analyzing CO2 that I am using in an experiment I’m conducting myself. Remember, you will learn a lot from your classes here; but, nothing compares to working and learning from first-hand experience. If you aren’t sure what route you want to take for your internship, ask someone! Take advantage of the knowledge of your professors and advisors. The Environmental Studies Department has some of the nicest, most genuine professors on campus. Don’t take that for granted. Your advisors are here to help you and if you feel lost or confused in your time here, do not be afraid to ask for help. I know this from personal experience. I was having a hard time finding an internship in a field that interested me, so I set up a meeting with my advisor. After talking about my interest in possibly pursuing research in ecology, my advisor pointed me in the direction of Professor Matzek. This led to me getting my first taste of research. Also, don’t be afraid to talk to upperclassmen about their experiences. You’ll get some great feedback on internships they’ve done or classes they’ve taken. I’m excited for you to start your journey at this University and with the ESS Department. Get involved. Meet new people. Make new friends. Pursue your interests. Aim high. Surprise yourself. I hope you have the best four years you can possibly have! Sincerely, Shawn Warren ‘14 swarren@scu.edu


Last Call for Baja 2014! There are three open spots for Junior or Senior ESS majors for the 2014 Expedition to circumnavigate Isla Espiritu Santo. Application deadline is October 31st. Course fee is $1,375 plus airfare, which is anticipated to run around $700. Members of the expedition must take ENVS 142, Writing Natural History, as well as ENVS 144, Baja Natural History, which will be taught as a single course TR 10:20 during the winter quarter.

For more information, contact Baja TA Claire Ryan, ceryan@scu.edu. Applications and info can be found at: http://www.scu.edu/studyabroad/baja/overview.cfm.


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