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Urban Placemaking: Creating a Skateable City Converting dilapidated spaces between inner city skate parks into multi functional, pop-up skate environments to create the first skate-able city. Sebastian Borror Capstone Research / Proposal Lemperi, Milder, Guido, Goettner Fall 2013


Preface.. The case has been made for over a decade that skateboarding doesn’t belong in public spaces. It has been believed that skateboarding culture is destructive and it’s participants cannot be cohesive with the greater public. Over and over we’re finding not only in Philadelphia but cities across the world that skateboarders are being removed from public environments and shunned to dark corners of these cities. In these corners designers are architects have designed prefabricated “skateparks” that don’t embrace the social culture and benefits that skateboarding can bring to the greater community. What these architect and designers don’t realize is that skateboarding environments can accommodate both active and passive users and can help create safer public environments for everyone that uses them. I believe that we can learn from these social failures and shine light on the benefits the skateboarding community brings to urban environments. For me, skateboarding has been so much more then a sport or a piece of wood with wheels connected to it. I’ve experienced friendship, doubts, fears and the feeling of accomplishment over the last twelve years that I’ve skated. For my senior thesis, I think it is only right that I find a way to share this light for others, and with the sport at the climax of being a profession for some I think it is important more now then ever to redefine the standards others have made to push these boundaries as far as we can.` Immediately after returning from an internship over the summer that included working for one of the biggest names in skateboarding, Street League Skateboarding I was strictly focused on figuring out who in Philadelphia was working on pushing the sport forward.


How can we convert these dilapidated spaces into functional environments that support passive and active interactions?


.2 pt Se 01 3

Thesis Introduction Declared that project will be about boarding

Research Oc

Stakeholders Interviews Spot Analysis

2 t. 01

Week 4 Update

3

Interviews and Stakeholders

Week 8 Update

Statement of intent, Pop Up Skatespots

Concepts

3

01

2 v. No

Snythesis Brainstorming Concepts

Week 12 Pecha Kucha

10 Concepts for Urban Placemkaing that involve skateboarding

Synthesis

3 01

c2

De

Prototyping Organizing Presenting

Week 15 Thesis Book

Synthesized book including a concept or idea moving forward

Week 16

Public thesis decleration

4

01 ak 2 re ary J B nu Ja


Table Of Contents Preface Full Project Timeline Table of Contents part one Stakeholders skateboarders (users) synthesis part two Local Park Analysis National Park Analysis synthesis part three placemaking pps death of cities cohesive skating 5th pocket design part four synthesis concepts moving forward prototyping Timeline and Goals Bibliography Solution


Part One Stakeholders and Interviews


Stakeholders Getting connected with whose working with skateboarding in Philadelphia. Finding Josh Nims of the Paine’s Foundation and Jesse Clayton from 5th Pocket Design.


Josh Nims Executive Director for the Franklin’s Paine Fund. The Franklin Paine’s Skatepark Fund is a non-profit organization that works to strengthen communities by empowering youth through skateboarding culture. The foundation has raised over 5 Million dollars and has contributed to over 8 skateparks surrounding the Philadelphia area.

Jesse Clayton Owner and operator for Fifth Pocket Design. Jessie is one of the leading activist for D.I.Y skateparks. With deep roots in the Philadelphia skateboard scene 5th Pocket Design has had the chance to work on many skatepark redesigns including: Whitehall, Paine’s Park, Grays Ferry, Pops Park, Ambler Skatepark, McCreesh and many more in the Philadelphia area.


Stakeholders After finding the Paine’s Foundation I found Anthony Bracali, the architect who designed Paine’s Park and also Jesse Clayton a main consultant for the same project.


Jesse Rendell Owner of Rendell Management and Consulting. Rendell has had the chance to work hand in hand with the Franklin Paine’s Association to help raise money and consult for many of their projects. Being a former musician and extreme sport activist Rendell has been apart of the legal movement to keep skateboardng happen for over a decade.

Anthony Bracali President of Friday Architects/Planners Bracali is a versatile architect who specializes in skateboarding and urban cities. With 20 years of practice Tony has worked on schools, sports, non-profit, and public and community efforts including the Paine’s Park Project. Winning the main commission for the project he worked with Josh Dubin, Skatenrd and 5th Pocket Design to create 4 million dollar project that became Paine’s Park.


Franklin’s Paine Skate Park Map


Franklin Paine’s Skatepark Fund is a non-profit that works to strengthen communities and empower youth by advocating for skaters and skateboarding culture, educating youth and adults about the art of skateboarding and its benefits to neighborhoods and people, and building free, public skate parks that demonstrate innovative design, community engagement and multi-faceted use.

Top Left: Paine’s Skatepark Top Right: FDR Skatepark Bottom Left: Gray’s Ferry Skatepark Bottom Right: Whitehall Skatepark


Interviews After figuring out the main stakeholders for the project I decided to set up an interview with one of them. Jesse Rendell got back to me through a mutual connection and his thoughts on a skateable city shaped my project going forward.


Sebastian - What do you do Jesse? Jesse - I’m a Consultant. I’ve grown up loving music and action sports so I have a hand in a little of everything. Sebastian - I understand you were apart of the Paine’s Project, could you tell me a little about your part? Jesse - About ten years ago I started doing some consulting for the Paine’s Fund and naturally over ten years we built a strong enough board and opened enough doors that we could get enough funding for the park. $20,000 from the Tony Hawk fund, and a lot of money from both the city and state. SB - What were some of the challenges fund raising for a skate park such as Paine’s? JR - I think some of the challenges you’re going have with skateboarding no matter what. We needed to prove that Skateboarding could be cohesive and shake some of the stereotypes skateboarders get. It’s also a whole other challenge to understand how the government system works and the processes for applying for funding and zoning. We found a big problem with finding people that understood both professional matters but could also understand and communicate with the skateboarding community.


Interviews What is a skateable city and what is space making?


Sebastian - How did you get around some of these challenges? Jesse - What we started to do was come up with certain definitions for each question. We needed to know that the government specifically wanted, what the skaters wanted and also what the communities needed. Sebastian - What would the government want in a public space? Jesse - Location, diversity, space-making and multi-use spaces. Sebstian - What’s your personal end goal after being involved with Franklin Paine’s for so long? Jesse - I think as a city Philadelphia has a unique chance to embrace its skate culture. From the history with Love park and now skate parks being built I would by the end of this to have the first functioning skate-able city.


Interviews I decided I need to talk to some skateboarders and maybe visit a few parks so I checked out Paine’s Skatepark.


Sebastian - How long have you been skating? Steve - 16 years, seriously for 10. Sebastian - What’s on of your favorite places to skate? Steve - Paine’s, Fishbowl and the hills out by Fairmount. Sebastian - Fishbowl? Steve- Gray’s Ferry

Steve

Sebastian - Oh word, I’ve never been but I hear its rad.. Steve - It is, its awesome to just chill at. The only problem is its a little small.

Sebastian - How long have you been skating? Jake - 8 Sebastian - How old are you? Jake- 17, I’m a senior at Lower Merium. Sebastian - Cool, do you come here a lot? Jake - Yeah I skate here almost everyday

Jake

Sebastian - Where do you skate the most? Jake - Here but I skate a lot of street too. It depends on where my friends. I get out of school late and catch the bus in to meet up with them and then we skate Paine’s, Love, sometimes we go up to temple.

Sebastian - Are those the Koston 6’s? Tom - Yeah man, I usually don’t support Nike but these have lasted forever. Sebastian - You like them then? Tom - Yeah, I mean I usually wear Vans or something but these have held up great. If you look at the laces too, i haven’t changed them since I got them two months ago.

Tom

Sebastian - What’s different? Tom - They put the lace loops closer together and further up the shoe.


Interviews After getting more comfortable with talking to people at skateparks I was able to get some good interviews. I spoke to Gaven who told me his friends and him travel from South Jersey to skate in Philadelphia every day.


Sebastian - Whens the last time you got down to FDR? Robin - Maybe last spring when we went, schools been really busy this year.

Sebastian - Have you checked out Gray’s Ferry yet? Robin - Yeah man we literately just take my street all the way up. Its like a ten minute bike ride.

Sebastian - Bike ride? You don’t skate?

Robin

Robin - Usually if its far away I pack up on my bike and ride to spots.

Sebastian - You come down here a lot? Gaven - Sometimes, I skate FDR a lot

Sebastian - Cool, that’s a cool board you got, you don’t skate a standard? Gaven - This guy over at FDR started his own board company. A lot of dudes over there ride these so I got one, its pretty rad.

Sebastian - Cool, you go to FDR a lot then?

Gaven

Gaven - As much as possible. We live in South Jersey and I can drive now but its easy to catch the train too.

Sebastian - Where do you skate the most? Oz - Camden skate park

Sebastian - You go all the way back to Jersey to skate? Oz - Nah I live in Camden. I commute everyday with the train.

Sebastian - My fault, I always see you around, where

Oz

do you skate over here then? Oz - I skate Pains when I can but schools pretty busy right now and I just injured myself so I don’t skate too much

Sebastian - How do you get there then? Oz - I’ll take the train then usually skate.


Sparks In Conversation What I found interesting through-out my conversations is that everyone is asking for more to skate. All the skateboard users travel to destinations by all types of different forms of transportation because they are too far away. How can we create a skateable city so that they are all skating everywhere?


Robin

Jake

“If I’m going far away I usually take my bike and plan it out. I’ll strap my board to my back and well hit spots on the way”

“I catch the bus from Lower Merium after school and usually meet up with my friends here then we go skate other spots. ”

Gaven

J. Rendell

“Most of the time we drive in but it’s really easy to catch the Pat Co line and then the broad street line to FDR and the new line they just put in takes us to 30th street so we can skate wherever after”

“It would be amazing by the end of this to have the first functioning skate-able city.”


Skateboarding is a social activity. Skateboarders travel for long lengths for specific terrains and stages to perform and interact with, creating diverse communities.


what does any of this mean? After making some connections and getting involved I started to make realizing the similarities between skateboarding and nomadic and tourist cultures. Skateboarders travel to different locations for specific terrains and get there all kinds of different ways. When they get there they socialize but then continue to move to the next place. With Philadelphia now having so many parks what would it take for the Franklin Paine’s Fund to create the first skateable city? Would it take more skateparks closer to each other, or would it take more unique and diverse skate spots in between parks to encourage street skating when traveling?


part two National and Local Skateboard environment analysis.


Paine’s Park


Skatepark Analysis

Key Objects

Granite Benches

Transition Banks

After watching Jake take a few falls trying to do a smith stall on this ledge he told me that he gets bored skating here because the parks downhill and its really hard to flow the whole place at once.

Double Stair Set with Rails

The granite benches adopted from traditional plaza design attracts passive and active users, creating a stage for users to show off each individual technical skill.


FDR Park


Skatepark Analysis

1 1 2 1 2

Key Objects

Open Stages

1

Natural Forms

With having strategically placed forms through the park users engage these to continuously flow the park all at once.

2

Active Community

3

What’s truly inspiring about FDR skatepark is that it is solely built by skaterboarders. No money from the city, no labor from the union, this park is a pure example that skateboarders want places to skate.


Gray’s Ferry


Skatepark Analysis

2

1

3

Key Objects

Pool Copping

1

“I’m not very good at skating pool cooping like this, it’s a lot thicker here then I’ve ever skated on something this small.”

Concrete Banks

2

Natural Forms

3

The nature of this park being more transitional and ramp driven compared to the street styles we’ve been comparing, this park is too small to truly be efficent. Because it acts as one flowing environment with each item strategically placed to continuously cruise, it limits users to only one skater at a time.


Whitehall


Skatepark Analysis

2

3 1

Key Objects

Concrete Ledges

1

Whitehall does a good job at giving the local skateboard community something permanent to show that skateboarding means something in their community. The 45 foot kicker that was installed in 2010 by 5th Pocket Design.

Concrete Tabletop

2

Metal Quarter Pipes

3

Even though this skatepark is healthy for the community the park does not do a good job at recolonizing local potential. This park is slapped in between a broken tennis court and given pre-fabricated metal ramps - nothing was personal about this environment until the 2010 installation.


Lincoln Heights

National Skatepark

national

Stairs with Rails

1

Jersey Barrier

2

Snake Run

3

1

2

3

Lincoln Heights Skatepark does a brilliant job at combining street and transition skateboarding. Mixing in a snake run and multiple 5 foot tranny the park ends into a street course thats packed with plenty of room for flatground. Providing many stages and bleachers for both active and passive users.


Duarte Skatepark

1 2

Duarte is a transition, bowl style environment. This park is built so that you don’t have to take any pushes and can use all the momentum built through flowing landscape. Both with 5 foot transitions and a 12 foot bowl in the back. It does lack a street section and it’s only staircase has a very rigid runway.

Concrete Bowl

1

Concrete Spine

2


Skatepark Analysis

Skateparks and skate spots are hubs for their surrounding communities. The places that flourish the most and have the most community involvement are the environments that are permanent and unique.

Skate spots are usually filled with different stages and liminal spaces. Like in this photo, Gaven is performing while the other passive and active users watch from the sidelines. Successful environments create both stages and resting places for users to interact with.


Successfull Skate Environments Have..

Permanent Structures

Unique Terrain

Natural Forms

Skateparks and skate spots have been built an adopted for over thirty years now. After researching the local parks and talking to some of the users I’ve started to realize that there is a liminal space between skateboarders using an environment and traveling to their destination. Even though the Paine’s Foundation covers a lot of ground through the general Philadelphia area there are not enough skate environments in between their parks to encourage skating from park to park. By using crucial elements that make up these skate environments we can dissect and strategically place more skate spots around the city to connect these parks more and more.

Common Stages


The Place Diagram by PPS “The Place Diagram is one of the tools PPS has developed to help communities evaluate places. The inner ring represents key attributes, the middle ring intangible qualities, and the outer ring measurable data.” - Project For Public Spaces, “What is Placemaking?”


part three what is placemaking?


Placemaking After my interview with Jesse Rendell I was left with a few words, one being placemaking. Through conversations with a few civic designers I found PPS, City Repair and was recommended “The Death and Life of Great American Cities” by Jane Jacbs. After picking it up, it sent me down a street of “what if’s” and got me thinking about what creates a working city let alone a skateable city.


SB - How did you get around some of these challenges? JR - We needed to know that the government specifically wanted, what the skaters wanted and also what the communities needed. SB - What would the government want in a public space? JR - Location, diversity, space-making and multi-use spaces.

Project for Public Spaces attempts to revitalize cities through placemaking. Inspired by the workings of William H. White, PPS works to help communities create and sustain public spaces to build stronger communities. They’ve pioneered the “placemaking� approach to these solutions by understanding community needs to help rejuvenate and serve and highlight local assets.

An urban writer who inspired generations with her writings and activity to support community based planning. By reeling on observation and common sense Jacobs wrote some of the most influential texts about the inner workings of cities and their failures.


Project for Public Spaces PPS was founded in 1975 as a Non-Profit in order to expand on the work of William H. Whte. Whyte being the author of The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces. PPS has worked on over 3000 projects since 1975 in over 43 countries and continues to design and educate in order to help people create and sustain public spaces that build stronger communities.


“‘Placemaking’ is both an over arching idea and a hands-on tool for improving a neighborhood, city or region. It has the potential to be one of the most transformative ideas of this century.”

William H. Whyte

Author of The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces.

Jane Jacobs

Author of The Death and Life of Great American Cities.

David Engwicht

Founder of Creative Communities International.

- Project for Public Spaces “What is Placemaking?”

Project for Public Spaces has been using placemkaing for over forty years now. Inspired by pioneers like Jane Jacobs and William H. Whyte, PPS has now created multiple methods and concepts in creating new successful environments. Two concepts that really inspired me were The Power of Ten and the Eleven Principles for Creating Greater Community Places.


Eleven Principles for Creating Great Community Places 1. The Community Is The Expert

The eleven principles to creating great community places is a concept presented by PPS. I believe all of the principles apply to creating communities and maintaining them but 1,2,6,7,9 and 11 really stood out to me.

The important starting point in developing a concept for any public space is to identify the talents and assets within the community. In any community there are people who can provide an historical perspective, valuable insights into how the area functions, and an understanding of the critical issues and what is meaningful to people. Tapping this information at the beginning of the process will help to create a sense of community ownership in the project that can be a great benefit to both the project sponsor and the community.

2. Create a Place, Not a Design

If your goal is to create a place (which we think it should be), a design will not be enough. To make an under-performing space into a vital “place,” physical elements must be introduced that would make people welcome and comfortable, such as seating and new landscaping, and also through “management” changes in the pedestrian circulation pattern and by developing more effective relationships between the surrounding retail and the activities going on in the public spaces. The goal is to create a place that has both a strong sense of community and a comfortable image, as well as a setting and activities and uses that collectively add up to something more than the sum of its often simple parts. This is easy to say, but difficult to accomplish

3. Look for Partners

Partners are critical to the future success and image of a public space improvement project. Whether you want partners at the beginning to plan for the project or you want to brainstorm and develop scenarios with a dozen partners who might participate in the future, they are invaluable in providing support and getting a project off the ground. They can be local institutions, museums, schools and others.

4. You Can See a Lot Just By Observing

We can all learn a great deal from others’ successes and failures. By looking at how people are using (or not using) public spaces and finding out what they like and don’t like about them, it is possible to assess what makes them work or not work. Through these observations, it will be clear what kinds of activities are missing and what might be incorporated. And when the spaces are built, continuing to observe them will teach even more about how to evolve and manage them over time.

5. Have a Vision

The vision needs to come out of each individual community. However, essential to a vision for any public space is an idea of what kinds of activities might be happening in the space, a view that the space should be comfortable and have a good image, and that it should be an important place where people want to be. It should instill a sense of pride in the people who live and work in the surrounding area.


6. Start with the Petunias: Lighter, Quicker, Cheaper The complexity of public spaces is such that you cannot expect to do everything right initially. The best spaces experiment with short term improvements that can be tested and refined over many years! Elements such as seating, outdoor cafes, public art, striping of crosswalks and pedestrian havens, community gardens and murals are examples of improvements that can be accomplished in a short time.

7. Triangulate

“Triangulation is the process by which some external stimulus provides a linkage between people and prompts strangers to talk to other strangers as if they knew each other” (Holly Whyte). In a public space, the choice and arrangement of different elements in relation to each other can put the triangulation process in motion (or not). For example, if a bench, a wastebasket and a telephone are placed with no connection to each other, each may receive a very limited use, but when they are arranged together along with other amenities such as a coffee cart, they will naturally bring people together (or triangulate!). On a broader level, if a children’s reading room in a new library is located so that it is next to a children’s playground in a park and a food kiosk is added, more activity will occur than if these facilities were located separately.

8. They Always Say “It Can’t Be Done”

One of Yogi Berra’s great sayings is “If they say it can’t be done, it doesn’t always work out that way,” and we have found it to be appropriate for our work as well. Creating good public spaces is inevitably about encountering obstacles, because no one in either the public or private sectors has the job or responsibility to “create places.” For example, professionals such as traffic engineers, transit operators, urban planners and architects all have narrow definitions of their job – facilitating traffic or making trains run on time or creating long term schemes for building cities or designing buildings. Their job, evident in most cities, is not to create “places.” Starting with small scale communitynurturing improvements can demonstrate the importance of “places” and help to overcome obstacles.

9. Form Supports Function

The input from the community and potential partners, the understanding of how other spaces function, the experimentation, and overcoming the obstacles and naysayers provides the concept for the space. Although design is important, these other elements tell you what “form” you need to accomplish the future vision for the space.

10. Money Is Not the Issue

This statement can apply in a number of ways. For example, once you’ve put in the basic infrastructure of the public spaces, the elements that are added that will make it work (e.g., vendors, cafes, flowers and seating) will not be expensive. In addition, if the community and other partners are involved in programming and other activities, this can also reduce costs. More important is that by following these steps, people will have so much enthusiasm for the project that the cost is viewed much more broadly and consequently as not significant when compared with the benefits.

11. You Are Never Finished

By nature good public spaces that respond to the needs, the opinions and the ongoing changes of the community require attention. Amenities wear out, needs change and other things happen in an urban environment. Being open to the need for change and having the management flexibility to enact that change is what builds great public spaces and great cities and towns.


The Power of Ten When facilitating community involved events, PPS uses the Power of 10 concept to start the placemaking process. It encourages the Placemaker’s role to encourage everyone to think about what’s special in their community. The power of 10 is the idea that any great place itself needs to offer at least 10 things or 10 reasons to be there.


Power of Ten can include:

Places to sit

Art to Touch

History to Experience

People to meet


Creative Placemaking: Making Streets Safer

“But sidewalks and those who use them are not passive beneficiaries of safety or helpless victims of danger. Sidewalks, their bordering users, are active participants in the drama of civilization verses barbarism. To keep the city safe is a fundamental task of a city’s street and its sidewalks.” - Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities The uses of sidewalks: safety, page 30


The Life and Death of Great American Cities Jane Jacobs The Life and Death of Great American Cities by Jane Jacobs gave me great insight for furthering my project. I believe that with the insights Jacob’s provided and the ideas PPS contribute I can start to create a definition of what a skateable city is: A skateable city is a city that is reassured by the constant rumble of skateboard wheels contacting the cement on its sidewalks. A skateable city understands the roll each person plays in the city and allows everyone to interact with each other. A skateable city supports the arts and supports new growth. A skateable city is now, the skateable city is growing and the community is waiting to be embraced in order to make the streets safer again.

“Nevertheless, even though it is misleading to consider any two city parks actual or potential duplicates of one another, or to believe that generalizations can thoroughly explain all the peculiarities of any single park...” - Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities The uses of neighborhood parks, page 91 “But sidewalks and those who use them are not passive beneficiaries of safety or helpless victims of danger. Sidewalks, their bordering users, are active participants in the drama of civilization verses barbarism. To keep the city safe is a fundamental task of a city’s street and its sidewalks.” - Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities The uses of sidewalks: safety, page 30 “In speaking about city sidewalk safety, I mentioned how necessary it is that there should be, in the brains behind the eyes on the street, an almost unconscious assumption of general street support when the chips are down-when a citizen has to choose, for instance whether he will take responsibility, or abdicate it, in combatting barbarism or protecting strangers. There is a short word for this assumption in support: trust. The trust of a city street is formed over time from many, many little public sidewalk contacts. It grows out of people stopping by at the bar for a beer,getting advice for the proper and giving advice to the newsstand man, comparing opinions with other customers at the bakery’s and nodding hello to the two boys drinking pop on the stoop, eyeing the girls while waiting to be called for dinner, admonishing the children, hearing about a job from he hardware man and borrowing a dollar from the druggist, admiring the new babies and sympathizing over the way a coat faded. Customs vary; in some neighborhoods people compare notes on their dogs; in others they compare notes on their landlords. - Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities The uses of sidewalks: contact, page 57


It is important when designing skateboard environments to include the surrounding communities in order to understand neighborhood and individual needs.


Creating Cohesive Skate Environments “Bracali held 13 public workshops in four different neighborhood to truly understand what the community needed” - Anuj Desai; Dwell Magazine “We agreed that collaboration should be a key element in this process. This design needed to serve many users, and, therefor it needed to be designed by more than just skateboarders. The City, the community and the site required a philosophy that addressed the failings of the current skatepark design model. ” - Anthony Bracali; t_landscapes “The key is any type of sophisticated design exercise is not in replicating the characteristics of any place that has already been created. It is in creating new spaces which recognize the unique nature of their individual sites, contexts and user communities.” - Anthony Bracali: skateboarding:sport or art? “Paine’s Park, like the other new amenities, reflects a shifting sensibility that is becoming evident as younger generation repopulates Philadelphia. Drawn to the sociability of city life, this demographic puts a priority on quality public spaces and doesn’t mind sharing them with diverse users” - Anthony ; Inquirer “Changing Skylines”


5th Pocket Design is ran by Jesse Clayton.

They strive to offer economical alternative to prefabricated and large concrete park builders while not compromising quality and creativity in skatepark designs. Utilizing recycled materials and cutting edge construction techniques they use DIY methods to bring skateboard environments to life.


The “Do it yourself� or DIY movement has grown. This is a skate environment created by skateboarders on Broad and Washington in Philadelphia, PA.


Attempting to create concrete prototypes of skateboard environments.


part four skateable city


what is a skateable city? After all the interviews, the research, the readings and the skating i’m still left on how do we create a skateble city?


“I catch the bus from Lower Merium after school and usually meet up with my friends here then we go skate other spots. ”

Jake

“It would be amazing by the end of this to have the first functioning skate-able city.”

J. Rendell

Permanent Structures

Natural Forms

Common Stages

6. Start with the Petunias: Lighter Quicker, Cheaper

The complexity of public spaces is such that you cannot expect to do everything right initially. The best spaces experiment with short term improvements that can be tested and refined over many years! Elements such as seating, outdoor cafes, public art, striping of crosswalks and pedestrian havens, community gardens and murals are examples of improvements that can be accomplished in a short time.

what is a skateable city? A skateable city is a city that is reassured by the constant rumble of skateboard wheels contacting the cement on its sidewalks. A skateable city understands the roll each person plays in the city and allows everyone to interact with each other. A skateable city supports the arts and supports new growth. A skateable city is now, the skateable city is growing and the community is waiting to be embraced in order to make the streets safer again.

how do we create a skateable city? After research I believe this project is broken into two different parts. Part one is answering the first needs for skaterboarders in the city: Building More Spots. The second part is completely community involved and actually holding community placement events to understand, design and put in place an enviornment that promotes skateboarding and healthy communities. This can only be done by understanding everyones point of view and hopefully by using the 11 principles and power of 10 that PPS provides as concepts I can get involved with multiple communities moving forward.

Part One

Part Tw0

Building More Skatespots

Community Placemaking


Blue Sky Concepts

Intersection Takeover Intersection Skate Comp. Intersection takeover would use the principles City Repair uses for their intersection projects. Using common skate culture I would set up objects for users to interact with and also create a skate compassion to show that skateboarding could be cohesive and not be in the way even while events are going on.

adding friendly cohesive objects that skateboarders are accustomed to without intruding on the communities pathways

adding objects that regular community users are accustomed to that can be multi-functional

Tourist Attractions Skateable Art It is important in creating sustainable communities to reach outside just the users that make up that community. In order for skateboarding to be cohesive with everyone else we need to get artists involved and make things that other people would want to interact with but are also beautiful and add value to the city.


Blue Sky Concepts

Existing Elements Legendary Spots By understanding what skateboarders want in skate environments I would like to do research and learn where skaters dream of skating. This means learning the most legendary places and using elements of these places and putting them in new environments.

Better City Lighting Making People Safer By lighting objects that skateboarders have interacted with this will add more depth to public environments. By designing a system that could light benches after they’ve been skated to let other skaters know they’ve been used it could make places safer at night by adding more light and to let people know that it is a frequently used place.


Building More Skatespots

By using portable resources

Concept Moving Forward Pho Fake Spots Converting dilapidated spaces between inner city skate parks into multi functional, pop-up skate environments to create the first skate-able city.

Build Pop Up Items That: -Look Permanent -Are Multifunctional -Skateable

Place items at dilapidated spaces

After, observe and invite


Material Exploration

Considering I have no idea how to work with concrete I decided to dive right in. I started making models of forms that I saw in the skateboarding world. Small scale seemed to work and they weren’t too heavy, but they did crack afterwards.


After the smaller models I decided to step up my next iteration. Without thinking I mixed 20 pounds of concrete and realized that it wasn’t going to get me anywhere when working in actual scale. This made me reevaluate how I was going to create pop-up fake permanent structures.


Concepts

Synthesis

Snythesis Brainstorming Concepts

Prototyping Organizing Presenting

Fe b

De c2 01 3

No v. 20 13

Oc

t. 20 13

Se pt .2 01

3

Stakeholders Interviews Spot Analysis

Thesis Introduction Declared that project will be about boarding

Week 16

Week 4 Update Interviews and Stakeholders

Public thesis decleration

Week 8 Update

Statement of intent, Pop Up Skatespots

20 14

Research

J Break January 2014

Timeline Moving Forward

Week 12 Pecha Kucha

10 Concepts for Urban Placemkaing that involve skateboarding

Week 15 Thesis Book

Synthesized book including a concept or idea moving forward

Struggles With being 16 weeks into a year long design project and also doing something so close to the heart I’ve encountered a lot of struggles with this project. One is I don’t skate as much I wish I do, I find myself in the study researching what skateboarders like instead of throwing events at skate environments to get their input on things. The second being too deep in research and not synthesizing in time. I feel I could have arrived at the place I’m at after 16 weeks a few weeks ago and that would have given me some time to put together more community events or prototype more. A key part of this project even being successful is being involved with the community and I’m not sure if I’ve accomplished that yet.


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J Break January 2014 Week 16

Public thesis decleration

k 15 Thesis Book

esized book including a ept or idea moving forward

Goals I believe my project has a lot of momentum going forward. I would like to hold community involved events to better understand how skateboarding can impact the community using PPS eleven principles and the power of ten. By the end of this we can successfully produce environments for dilapidated neighborhoods to promote skateboarding, February Hold Community Involved Events to understand the needs of communities. March Continue to prototype pop - up skate environments. April

Have enough community involvement and spot building experience to propose a final community environment.

May

Raise enough money to actually build a multi functional environment for a community based around skateboarding.


Bibliography Images Jesse Rendel http://m.c.lnkd.licdn.com/mpr/mpr/shrink_200_200/p/1/000/1ea/024/04825a1.jpg Jesse Clayton http://www.popularmechanics.com/cm/popularmechanics/images/qn/hometown-1-md.jpg Anthony Bracali http://www.dwell.com/outdoor/article/all-inclusive-architecture Josh Nims http://franklinspaine.com/joshua-nims Paine’s Park http://fallen.blackboxdist.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/painesparkThumbnail-Image-.jpg http://media.philly.com/images/go-skate-6001.jpg FDR Park http://www.awesome-skateboard.com/images/FDR.jpg http://chrisgphoto.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/film-49.jpg http://hiddencityphila.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/fdr-hiddenphila-2.jpg http://fc05.deviantart.net/fs71/i/2009/351/f/6/FDR_skate_park_2_by_yellowcaseartist.jpg http://www.iskatehere.com/media//1255036952_377535_FULL.jpg http://www.bombdecks.com/community/sites/default/files/fdr_skatepark.jpg http://c413246.r46.cf1.rackcdn.com/0_57408_1343796002.9752.jpg Whitehall Park http://franklinspaine.com/skateparks/whitehall-skatepark http://franklinspaine.com/skateparks/whitehall-skatepark Lincoln Heights Park http://www.skateallcities.com/wordpress/blog/2011/03/lincoln-heights-skatepark-los-angeles-ca/ http://www.be-mag.com/uploads/media_files/picture/670x420/13038018733529cf9403956da6a3a5acd0bc31fe3dbd6b127ea9.jpg http://i1.ytimg.com/vi/TsNjzGaT7Kw/maxresdefault.jpg - lincoln stairs Duarte Skatepark http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2798/4272705685_2f236254a3_z.jpg?zz=1 http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-7tCeYhgaaa8/T0G7gukW78I/AAAAAAAACuY/lIIIW2P3A9c/s640/IMG_0943+copy.jpg http://www.skatopia.net/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=36016&g2_serialNumber=5 Place Diagram by PPS http://www.pps.org/general_gifs/place_diagram.gif Project for Public Spaces http://www.janejacobswalk.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/jane-jacobs1.jpg http://www.humanemetropolis.org/gallery/whyte.jpg http://www.pps.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/David-Engwicht-300x297.jpg 5th Pocket Design http://fifthpocketdesign.com/ https://www.facebook.com/pages/5th-Pocket-Design/141577559198785 Blue Sky Concepts http://www.theyouthsheltersupply.com/image.axd?picture=2010%2F2%2FEastmanSE.jpg


Bibliography Books / Websites / Articles / Videos http://www.pps.org/reference/11steps/ http://www.pps.org/reference/poweroften/ http://www.pps.org/reference/what_is_placemaking/ http://www.dwell.com/outdoor/article/all-inclusive-architecture http://franklinspaine.com/about/our-story http://franklinspaine.com/skateparks http://www.activeliving.org/node/593 www.anthonybracali.com/ http://www.artplaceamerica.org/articles/principles-of-creative-placemaking/ http://www.sktnrd.com/ http://nextcity.org/ http://www.design.upenn.edu/pennpraxis http://cityrepair.org/ http://anthonybracali.com/t_lecorbusier.html http://anthonybracali.com/t_landscapes.html http://anthonybracali.com/n_07_0812_mcall.html Jane Jacobs Death and Life of Great American Cities William H. Whyte The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces


I believe that by providing more spots for skateboarders to call their own the more ownership they will have in the city. If we could keep more people on the street, caring about the street our cities will be safer. By building more pop up skate spots around the city, I hope to shed light on the positivity the skateboarding community brings to urban communities.


Urban Placemaking: Skateable City