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SANTA  BARBARA  CATHOLIC  SCHOOL   274  W  STA  BARBARA  AVE  STE  A   DEDEDO,  GUAM  96929-­‐5378  

  http://sbcs.edu.gu  |  info@sbcs.edu.gu   TEL:  671-­‐632-­‐5578    |  FAX:  671-­‐632-­‐1414   62  years  of  Mercy  Education   Educating  mind,  heart,  and  spirit!  


IMPROVING STUDENT LEARNING

A Self Study for Santa Barbara Catholic School 274 W Santa Barbara Ave Ste A Dededo, GU 96929 Continuous School Improvement Focused On High Achievement Of All Students

2013


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Preface Santa Barbara Catholic School (SBCS) has been providing excellent Catholic education on Guam for 62 years. From its humble Quonset hut beginnings in post-World War II to the latest infrastructure and technological additions, SBCS has become one of the island’s premier schools, offering a holistic curriculum that educates the mind, heart, and spirit. With the opening of the newest building (Our Lady of Mercy Hall) in the Fall of 2007, SBCS strengthened its commitment to provide only the best educational facilities to its diverse student population. Over the past six years, the school has invested in and intentionally pursued the integration of technology in the curriculum. The comprehensive analysis and interpretation of students’ SAT 10 scores of students became a major focus in order to address the issue of improving student learning. Since the last WASC visit in 2007, the school has relentlessly worked to provide quality Catholic education that is focused on student learning while nurturing them in a safe environment. Every year, the administration, faculty and staff meet to review and discuss the action plans which are then shared and discussed with the Parent-Teacher Organization (PTO). In the February 2010 mid-term visit, the WASC Visiting Committee recognized the efforts of the school and congratulated the faculty and staff for the “significant work done in addressing their Action Plan.” In light of new development during its implementation the action plans were slightly revised to reflect progress made. When the five-year Strategic Plan was completed in the Fall of 2011, the school’s road map became clear in addressing key priorities in the school’s operation namely: Purpose, Governance, Curriculum, Finances, Resources/Facilities, Enrollment and Marketing. In SY 2011-2012, the administration, faculty and staff reviewed the school’s mission and vision statements and schoolwide learning expectations (SLEs). Changes were made, reflecting its foundational roots in the Roman Catholic faith, the core values in the charism of the Sisters of Mercy, and the school’s commitment to partner with the parents in providing quality education that supports and promotes the development of the whole person. This year’s self-study process is significant because for the first time SBCS is undergoing dual accreditation with the WCEA and WASC. Aside from examining academic programs, other aspects in the school’s life and the extent to which accreditation criteria are being met, the new self-study protocol (Improving Student Learning) emphasizes Catholic identity and how it is infused into the total school program. The self-study process is an empowering experience for all shareholders. Students strive to achieve the SLEs through the leadership of the administration and the creative innovative strategies employed by the teachers. Parents are encouraged to become more involved in all aspects of their child’s education and are reminded of their collaborative role in molding their children to grow in their faith. The school continues to renew its commitment to excellence in education that is faithful to the gospel and relevant to the changing educational needs of this generation.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS !

Preface ....................................................................................................................................... School Personnel and Positions ..................................................................................................

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Chapter One: Overview of the Process A. How the Self-Study Was Conducted .................................................................................... 9 B. Involvement and Collaboration of Shareholders in Completing the Self-Study .................. 12 !

Chapter Two: Context of the School A. School Profile ....................................................................................................................... 17 B. Use of Prior Accreditation Findings to Support High Achievement of All Students ........... 20 !

Chapter Three: Quality of the School Program A. Assessment of the School’s Catholic Identity ...................................................................... B. Defining the School’s Purpose ............................................................................................. C. Organization for Student Learning to Support High Achievement of All Students ............. D. Data Analysis and Action to Support High Achievement of All Students ........................... E. SLEs and Standards-Based Curriculum to Support High Achievement of All Students...... F. Instructional Methodology to Support High Achievement of All Students .......................... G. Support for Students Spiritual, Personal, and Academic Growth ........................................ H. Resource Management and Development to Support High Achievement of All Students ..

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Chapter Four: Action Plan A. Design and Alignment of the Action Plan with the Self-Study Findings ............................. 59 B. Capacity to Implement and Monitor the Action Plan ........................................................... 70 !

Appendices Appendix A: School Profile A-1: Basic Information .............................................................................................................. A-2: Current Enrollment Information ........................................................................................ A-3: Instructional (Teaching Staff) ............................................................................................ A-4: Support (Non-Teaching) Staff............................................................................................ A-5: Participation in IDEA ......................................................................................................... A-6: Participation in Federal Programs ...................................................................................... A-7: Standardized Testing Program ........................................................................................... A-8: Staff Development Program ............................................................................................... A-9: Organizational Chart ..........................................................................................................

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Appendix B: Data Analysis B-1: Enrollment Trends Over Time ........................................................................................... B-2: Finances/Per Pupil Cost Over Time ................................................................................... B-3.1: Analysis of Test Results: Comparison with Diocesan Data ............................................ B-3.2: School Averaged Scaled Scores For Each Grade ............................................................ B-4: Data Results for the Bottom Quartile of SAT 10 Sub-Tests .............................................. B-5: Analysis of Disaggregate Test Results ............................................................................... WCEA%ISL$2010%

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B-6: ACRE Results Analysis..................................................................................................... 101 Appendix C: Surveys C-1: Staff Survey ....................................................................................................................... C-2: Parent Survey .................................................................................................................... C-3: Student Survey Grades K-3 ............................................................................................... C-4: Student Survey Grades 4-8 ................................................................................................ C-5: Pastor/Parent Association Officers .................................................................................... C-6: Catholic Identity Assessment ............................................................................................

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Appendix E: Catholic Identity Ongoing Review ........................................................................ 133 !

Appendix N: In-Depth Study (Language Arts) .......................................................................... 141

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SCHOOL PERSONNEL AND POSITIONS SY 12-13 Name

Position

Abad, Brenda

Language Arts Chair; Language Arts 7-8

Alcantara, Bernadette

Director of Faith Formation; Religion Chair; Religion 7-8

Badong, Clara Snaer

Language Arts 4; Science 4, 6

Balance, Delson

School Liturgist; Religion 5-7

Cabe, Jenice

2nd Grade

Calumaya, Evangeline

Physical Education 1-4

Camaganacan, Louella

Pre-K4 Aide

Catabay, Margaret

Extended Care, Librarian K-3

Catolos, Gracelda

Kindergarten Aide

Cena, Julius Cesar

Math 6-7; Art 4-8

Cepeda, Karl B.

Special Subjects Chair; Language Arts 7; Music 5-8

Damian, Erlina

1st Grade

Diaz, Maria Dolores

Mathematics Chair & Math 7-8; Music 3-5 (1st semester)

Dizon, Vicky Flor

Science 5; Social Studies 4-5

Elomina, Rizalina

Math 5-8

Fernandez, Madeleine

Art K; Music K-2; PE K

Gabales, Concepcion

Maintenance

Gaite, Sr. Maria Rosario, RSM

Vice-Principal

Gonzales, Barbara

1st Grade Aide; Religion 1; Art 1

Guevara, Joyce

Religion 4; Math 4; Science 4

Legaspi, Glorilyn

Pre-K4

Limjap, Lolita

Science Chair; Science 6-8

Lumanog, Elizabeth

2nd Grade

Mansfield, Stephanie

Guidance Counselor; Language Arts 5

Mararac, Marie

Accountant

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Position

Mina, Abegail

Accounting Clerk

Miranda, Gerry Lyn Ara

1st Grade Aide; Math 1; Art 1

Mojas, Rafael

Athletic Director; Physical Education 5-8

Navasca, Trinidad

3rd Grade

Nelson, Timothy (part-time)

Math 7-8

Ocampo, Romeo

Maintenance

Padios, Cecilia

Religion 2, Social Studies 3, Art 2-3, Computer K-1

Pangan, Honorio Jr.

Systems Administrator

Pangelinan, Sr. Jeanette Marie, RSM

Principal

Pangelinan, Margarita

Social Studies Chair; Social Studies 6-8

Perez, Ederly

Kindergarten Aide (1st Semester)

Piana, Miriam

Health Counselor; Fund Raising Coordinator

Ramos, Victoria

Kindergarten

Reyes, Jonathan

Assistant Systems Administrator

Roso, Madson

Maintenance

Roxas, Maria Kristine Chynna

Language Arts 6; Librarian 4-8

Ruback, Martha

Maintenance

Salas, Rellieta

3rd Grade

Scavetta, Teresita

Kindergarten

Suplido, Arleen-Doris

Director of Curriculum and Grants; Math 8; Mathematics Chair (2nd semester)

Suplido Joel Raymund

Computer 2-8

Suplido, Luz (part-time)

Language Arts 5

Valdeavilla, Mary Ann

Kindergarten Aide

Varela, Joycelyn

Secretary/Receptionist

Yanger, Grace

1st Grade

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CHAPTER 1 | INTRODUCTION A. HOW THE SELF STUDY WAS CONDUCTED Santa Barbara Catholic School started its Self-Study Report in November of 2010 when Bro. Tom Butler, FSC, WASC/WCEA Elementary School Commissioner, administered training to the different principals and representatives of Guam’s Catholic Schools. In February 2011, the Self Study Coordinator gave a presentation to the faculty and staff outlining the new protocol that was to be followed. A separate presentation was given to the parents during a monthly PTO meeting in which they were asked to volunteer as members of different committees. Over the summer in 2011, standardized test result data was gathered and the school profile was created. Then different committees and their respective chairs were formed during SY 20112012. The In-Depth Curriculum Committees were composed of the faculty who were tasked to analyze SAT 10 data pertinent to their subject area and discuss Chapters 3D, 3E and 3F. The Self-Study Committees were composed of members from the faculty, staff, student body and parents. Each committee had assigned sections of Chapter 3 to discuss. Of the parents who were asked to serve in the committees, about 56 percent agreed to attend. All students who were invited to participate accepted. Each Self-Study Committee had three to four parent representatives and eight to ten student representatives. A timeline was set with room for changes in dates or additional meetings as the need arose. Teachers were also tasked with putting together evidences to support written narratives as a result of these meetings. During the summer of 2012, SAT 10 data was updated and the first drafts of Chapters 2 and 3 were completed. The drafts were presented to the faculty during their orientation at the beginning of SY 2012-2013, and a summary of its main points to the parents during Back-toSchool Night. The first half of the current school year was utilized to complete Chapters 1 and 4 and the indepth studies for Language Arts and Religion. The different departments also met to discuss the latest SAT 10 scores for their subject areas and to note areas of growth and improvement. The faculty was constantly updated of revisions during monthly faculty meetings. Parents were also updated regularly during monthly Parent-Teacher Organization (PTO) meetings. The final presentation to faculty and parents was given in December 2012. Despite not having a school board, SBCS parents, community members, alumni, and the pastor of Santa Barbara parish were involved through their participation in surveys and committee memberships. The biggest challenges the school faced in completing the Self-Study were: (1) following-up responses to the online parent survey, (2) collating open-ended responses from the different surveys, (3) analyzing and disaggregating SAT 10 data, and (4) scheduling meetings amidst the different ongoing school activities.

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TIMELINE OF MEETINGS AND TASKS TO BE ACCOMPLISHED DATE

TASK / MEETING

PLAYERS

Feb. 16, 2011

Faculty Meeting: Introduction to WCEA Accreditation

Faculty, ISL Coordinator (ISLC)

Summer 2011

Data Gathering: SAT 10, School Profile

Director of Curriculum, Systems Administrator

Jan. 11, 2012

Faculty Meeting: WCEA In-Depth Curriculum Committee (IDCC) assignments

Faculty, ISLC

Jan. 13, 2012

Distribute working papers

ISLC, IDCC chairs

Jan. 18, 2012

Distribute working papers; initial discussions

Profile Committee, ISLC

In-Depth Curriculum Committees and Profile Committee meet as needed Feb. 2, 2012

Student, faculty, staff and parents survey out

Systems Administrator, Computer Teacher, ISLC

Feb. 8, 2012

Faculty Meeting: Self Study Committee (SSC) assignments, list of evidences

Faculty, ISLC

PTO meeting: parental involvement and surveys

PTO

Mission, Vision, SLEs revision

Leadership Team

Feb. 15, 2012

Leadership Team meets as needed re: Mission, Vision, SLEs Feb. 21, 2012

Parent surveys in

Homeroom teachers

Mar. 7, 2012

Faculty Meeting: Mission, Vision, SLEs revision and Self-Study Committee (SSC) assignments

Faculty, ISLC

PTO Meeting: Mission, Vision, SLEs revision

PTO

Student representatives orientation

ISL Assistant Coordinator

Mar. 26, 2012

Self-Study Committees meet as needed Apr. 30, 2012

Summary of surveys

Systems Administrator

May 30, 2012

Assigned write-ups due

SSC chairs, Profile Committee

 

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DATE

TASK / MEETING

PLAYERS

Summer 2012

Writing of Draft: Chap 2 & 3; Data Gathering: SAT 10, School Profile

ISLC, Guidance Counselor, Systems Administrator

Aug. 1-6, 2012

Faculty Orientation: presentation of ISL draft

Faculty, ISLC

Aug. 17, 2012

Open House/Back-to-School Night: presentation of ISL draft

Parents, ISLC

Aug. 21, 2012

Revision of Chap 2 & 3

Leadership Team

Leadership Team meet as needed re: Chap 2 & 3 revisions Aug. 22-29, 2012

Editing and Revision: Chap 2 & 3

Editing Committee

Aug. 30, 2012

Submission of Draft: Chap 2 & 3

ISLC

Sept. 4, 2012

Chap 4: Action Plan and In-Depth Study (IDS)

Leadership Team

Leadership Team meets as needed re: Chap 4 Religion Department meets as needed re: On-going Catholic Identity Review Sept. 5 – Nov. 14, 2012

Faculty Meeting: In-Depth Study (Language Arts)

Faculty, ISLC, IDS Chair

Sept. 5, 2012

PTO Meeting: Mission, Vision, SLEs updates

PTO, ISLC

Sept. 11-30, 2012

IDCC meetings re: SY 11-12 SAT 10 scores

all IDCC

Oct. 10, 2012

PTO Meeting: Action Plan & IDS updates

PTO, ISLC

Nov.15, 2012

Faculty Meeting: Presentation of Action Plan

ISLC

Nov. 19 – Dec. 28, 2012

Editing & Revision: Chap 1-4

Editing Committee

Dec. 5, 2012

Faculty Meeting: Presentation of ISL updates to Faculty

Faculty, ISLC

PTO Meeting: Presentation of ISL updates to Community

PTO, ISLC

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B. INVOLVEMENT AND COLLABORATION OF SHAREHOLDERS IN COMPLETING THE SELF STUDY The school involves all shareholders in data review, analysis and dialogue about perceived accomplishments in the area of student learning, and in developing, implementing and monitoring goals for improvements in student learning. Santa Barbara Catholic School has involved all shareholders in completing its 2013 WCEA SelfStudy: Improving Student Learning. Parents, students, faculty and staff, alumni, and the Pastor of Santa Barbara Catholic Church all contributed through surveys, membership in various committees, and in the revision of the school’s Mission, Vision, and Schoolwide Learning Expectations. All faculty were part of at least one In-Depth Curriculum Committee (IDCC). Each IDCC focused on a particular subject area, reviewed and analyzed SAT 10 results, and discussed questions pertaining to their curriculum. Their input was shared with the different Self-Study Committees (SSC). There were four SSCs composed of faculty, staff, parents, and students. Each SSC was in charge of specific sections of the self-study. The SSC of Catholic Identity and Purpose addressed Chapters 3A and 3B. The SSC of Curriculum and Instruction focused on Chapters 3D, 3E, and 3F. Chapters 3C and 3G were handled by the SCC of Organization for Student Learning and Support for Student Growth. The SCC of Resource and Management addressed Chapter 3H. The School Profile Committee oversaw Chapter 2. Revision of SBCS’s Mission, Vision and SLEs began in February 2012 and was conducted through several meetings with the Leadership Team, faculty, parents, and students. The guiding principles were: 1) to look at the Mission, Vision, and SLEs as the anchor of the accreditation work, 2) to revise the Mission, Vision, and SLEs to reflect the school’s current situation and its intended audience, and 3) to highlight the Mercy charism and core values. After a series of discussions, the final version of the Mission and Vision was approved in April 2012. The faculty had originally decided to combine the SLEs of Committed Christians and Responsible Members of the Community, but input from students and parents expressed a desired need for the distinction between the two categories. Rubrics for Committed Christians and Responsible Members of the Community were formulated and approved by the faculty in August 2012, and became the new quarterly assessment for Deportment grades. These rubrics were presented to the community during the Back-to-School Night and the first Parent-Teacher Organization (PTO) meeting of the year. During scheduled parent-teacher conferences, parents and teachers have the opportunity to discuss a student’s academic progress and achievement of these SLEs. The Leadership Team supervised the creation and writing of Chapters 1 and 4, while the faculty was involved in the In-Depth Study on Language Arts. The Religion Department focused on the In-Depth Study of Religion. Every month, developments in these areas were presented during

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faculty meetings and PTO meetings. Comments and suggestions were noted and included in the next round of committee meetings. All shareholders are part of the process of continuous school improvement. Aside from having provided input during the formulation of the Action Plan, regular reports through meetings, RenWeb, and website updates ensure that they are kept informed of developments regarding its implementation. LEADERSHIP TEAM Sr. Jeanette Marie Pangelinan, RSM, Principal Sr. Maria Rosario Gaite, RSM, Vice-Principal Arleen Suplido, Director of Curriculum & Grants, Self-Study Coordinator Bernadette Alcantara, Director of Faith Formation, Self-Study Assistant Coordinator Jo-Ann Schaaf, Guidance Counselor, SY 08-12 Stephanie Mansfield, Guidance Counselor, SY 12-13 Honorio Pangan Jr., Systems Administrator Marie Mararac, Accountant Department Chairs: Bernadette Alcantara, Religion Brenda Rose Abad, Language Arts Orlando Cruz, Mathematics, SY 10-12 Maria Dolores Diaz, Mathematics, 1st sem. SY 12-13 Arleen Suplido, Mathematics, 2nd sem. SY 12-13 Lolita Limjap, Science Vicky Flor Dizon, Social Studies, SY 10-12 Margarita Pangelinan, Social Studies, SY 12-13 Karl Cepeda, Special Subjects SCHOOL PROFILE COMMITTEE Sr. Jeanette Marie Pangelinan, RSM, Principal Sr. Maria Rosario Gaite, RSM, Vice-Principal Arleen Suplido, Director of Curriculum & Grants, Self-Study Coordinator Honorio Pangan Jr., Systems Administrator Jo-Ann Schaaf, Guidance Counselor, SY 08-12 Stephanie Mansfield, Guidance Counselor, SY 12-13 Joy Varela, Secretary Marie Mararac, Accountant Roselle Cainguitan, Accounting Clerk, SY 07-12 Abigail Mina, Accounting Clerk, SY 12-13

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IN-DEPTH CURRICULUM COMMITTEES (IDCC)

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KINDERGARTEN & GRADE 1 IDCC

GRADES 2 & 3 IDCC

Victoria Ramos, KA – Chair Louella Camaganacan, KC Erlina Damian, 1A Joyce Guevarra, 1B Glorilyn Legaspi, K4 Teresita Scavetta, KB Grace Yanger, 1C

Elizabeth Lumanog, 2A – Chair Jenice Cabe, 2B, Alumna Trinidad Navasca, 3B Rellieta Salas, 3A

RELIGION IDCC

LANGUAGE ARTS IDCC

Bernadette Alcantara, Religion 8 – Chair Delson Balance, Religion 4, 5 Louella Camaganacan, Religion K Barbara Gonzales, Religion 1, Alumna Rellieta Salas, Religion 3 Grace Yanger, Religion 1 Marlon Vargas, Religion 4, 6, 7

Brenda Abad, Language Arts 7, 8 – Chair Clara Badong, Language Arts 4 Delson Balance Language Arts 5 Karl Cepeda, Language Arts 7 Maria Kristine Roxas- Language Arts 5, 6

MATHEMATICS IDCC

SCIENCE IDCC

Orlando Cruz, Math 6-8, Alumnus – Chair Julius Cena, Math 7 Maria Dolores Diaz, Math 7, 8 Rizalina Elomina, Math 4, 5, 8 Isabel Santos, Math 1 Arleen Suplido, Math 7, 8

Lolita Limjap, Science 5-7 – Chair Clara Badong, Science 4, 5 Vicky Flor Dizon, Science 5 Arleen Suplido, Science 8

SOCIAL STUDIES IDCC

SPECIAL SUBJECTS IDCC

Vicky Flor Dizon, Social Studies 4, 5 – Chair Trinidad Navasca, Social Studies 3 Cecilia Padios, Social Studies 3, Alumna Margarita Pangilinan, Social Studies 6-8

Karl Cepeda, Music 5-8 – Co-Chair Joel Suplido, Computer 2-8 – Co-Chair Evangeline Calumaya, PE 1-4 Grace Catolos, Art K Julius Cena, Art 4-8 Ashley Cepeda, Art PK Orlando Cruz, Computer K-1, Alumnus Maria Dolores Diaz, Music 3-5 Madeline Fernandez, PE K, Music K-2 Gerry Lyn Ara Miranda – Art 1 Rafael Mojas, PE 5-8 Cecilia Padios, Art 2,3, Alumna Ederly Perez, Art K Nerza Valencia, Art K

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SELF-STUDY COMMITTEE on CATHOLIC IDENTITY and PURPOSE Sister Jeanette Marie Pangelinan, RSM - Chair Bernadette Alcantara – Director of Faith Lawrence Alam – Parent, Former Faculty Formation, Religion 8, Mercy Club Luz Suplido – Grandparent, Member of Community Delson Balance – Religion 4-5, Language Arts 5, Gina Taitano – Parent, Alumna School Liturgist Cathleen Moylan – Parent Jenice Cabe – Alumna, 2B, Parent Sandra Caliguia – 8B Class of 2012, NJHS Louella Camaganacan – KC Ella Macatugal – 8A Class of 2012, NJHS Maria Dolores Diaz – Honor Choir, Music 3-5, Jonae Sayama – 8A Class of 2012, Sports, NJHS Math 7- 8 Aubrey Cabatic – 7B Class of 2013, NJHS Barbara Gonzales – Alumna, Religion1, Art1, Parent Angelika Nulud – 7A Class of 2013, NJHS Lolita Limjap – Science 5-7 Noah Patawaran – 7A Class of 2013 Marlon Vargas – Religion 4, 6, 7 Gino Reyes – 7A Class of 2013, NJHS Grace Yanger – 1C, Parent Princess Sherill – 7B Class of 2013 Chris Diego – PTO President

SELF-STUDY COMMITTEE on CURRICULUM and INSTRUCTION Arleen Suplido – Chair Brenda Abad – Language Arts 7-8, Parent, NJHS Terersita Scavetta – KB Clara Badong – Science 4, Language Arts 4, STUCO Stephanie Mansfield – PTO Secretary, Educator Delson Balance – Religion 4-5, Language Arts 5, Hazel Reyes – Parent, Educator School Liturgist Margaret Uchima – Parent, Educator Evangeline Calumaya – Physical Education 1-4 Cyd Coloma – Parent, Educator Grace Catolos – KB Aide, Art K, Parent Kate Aragon – 8A Class of 2012, NJHS Julius Cena – Art 4-8, Math 7, MATHCOUNTS Demi Cerillo – 8A Class of 2012, NJHS, STUCO Orlando Cruz - Math 6-8, Computer K-1 Chadler Iriarte – 8B Class of 2012, NJHS, STUCO Erlina Damian – 1A Therese Nulud – 8B Class of 2012, NJHS, STUCO Glorilyn Legaspi – K4 Kevin Quilantang – 8B Class of 2012, NJHS Lolita Limjap – Science 5-7 Joshua Tingson – 8A Class of 2012, NJHS Elizabeth Lumanog - 2A Alyssa Cabatic – 7B Class of 2013, NJHS Margarita Pangelinan – Social Studies 6-8, ACB Camille Castro – 7A Class of 2013, NJHS Relly Salas – 3A, Grandparent Taylor Diego – 7B Class of 2013 Isabel Santos – Art1, Math 1 Angela Espiritu – 7A Class of 2013, NJHS

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SELF-STUDY COMMITTEE on ORGANIZATION FOR STUDENT LEARNING and SUPPORT FOR STUDENT SPIRITUAL, PERSONAL and ACADEMIC GROWTH Bernadette Alcantara – Chair Ashley Cepeda – K4, Art K4 Mervin Tamayo – Parent Vicky Flor Dizon - Science 5, Social Studies 4-5 Becky Aguon Toves – Parent, Educator Riza Elomina – Math 4, 5, 8, Parent, Math Olympiad Roger Ramos – Parent, Volunteer Coach Joyce Guevara – 1B Anne Tabilas – Parent Rafael Mojas – Athletics Director, PE 5-8, Parent Arianna Lansigan – 8B Class of 2012, NJHS Trinidad Navasca – 3B Claire Matanguihan – 8A Class of 2012, NJHS Ederly Perez – KC Aide, Art KC Jonelle Sayama – 8A Class of 2012, NJHS Victoria Ramos – KA Richard Taitano – 8A Class of 2012, NJHS, STUCO Kristine Roxas – Language Arts 5- 6, STUCO Cyndal Abad – 7A Class of 2013, NJHS Joanne Schaaf – Guidance Counselor Isaiah Ibanez – 7B Class of 2013 Joel Suplido – Computer 2-8, Yearbook Maya Lescano – 7A Class of 2013, NJHS Alice Tamayo – Parent Neo Pangilinan – 7B Class of 2013 Christopher Reyes – 7A Class of 2013, NJHS SELF-STUDY COMMITTEE on RESOURCE MANAGEMENT and DEVELOPMENT Sr. Maria Rosario Gaite, RSM – Chair Marie Mararac – Accountant Honorio Pangan Jr. – Systems Administrator Roselle Cainguitan – Accounting Clerk Miriam Piana – Health Counselor Margaret Catabay – Library, Extended Care Nerza Valencia – KA Aide, Art Karl Cepeda – Music 5-8, Language Arts 7, Honor Art Chan – Former PTO President Choir, Garage Band Patrick Lansigan – PTO Vice President Madeleine Fernandez – Music K-2, PE K Zar Atalig – PTO Treasurer Gerrylyn Ahra Miranda – 1A Aide, Art 1 Clarissa Patague – Former PTO President Cecilia Padios – Religion 2, Math 1, Art 2-3, Social Joyce Sayama – Parent Studies 3, Alumna

EDITING COMMITTEE Arleen Suplido – Self-Study Coordinator Sr. Maria Rosario Gaite, RSM – Vice-Principal Brenda Rose Abad – Language Arts Chair, Language Arts 7-8 Karl Cepeda – Special Subjects Chair, Language Arts 7 Stephanie Mansfield – Guidance Counselor, Language Arts 5 Evidence: • Committee meeting minutes and rosters • Action Plan that includes shareholders in the monitoring and evaluation

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CHAPTER 2 | CONTEXT OF THE SCHOOL A. SCHOOL PROFILE (with supporting data) Santa Barbara Catholic School (SBCS), an Archdiocesan Catholic elementary and middle school, provides a holistic environment while educating the mind, heart, and spirit of its students from K4 to 8th grade. It is located in the northern village of Dededo, the largest village on the island, having the biggest population with 44,943 families according to the Guam 2010 Census. Established in September 1950 by Reverend Father Fulgence Petrie, OFM, Cap., then pastor of Santa Barbara Parish, the school has, since its foundation, been administered by the Sisters of Mercy. Sister Mary Redempta Thomas, RSM, was the first principal of 150 students in Kindergarten through 4th grade. For 62 years, it has and continues to provide a Catholic education inspired by the charism of Venerable Catherine McAuley, the foundress of the Sisters of Mercy. While not a Mercy owned institution, the charism of the Sisters of Mercy is strongly integrated in the faith life of the school community. In its review and revision of the school’s mission and vision statement, the core values identified to be central in the school’s curriculum and faith life are consistent and gleaned from the Institute Direction Statement of the Sisters of Mercy. These core values mentioned in the updated Vision Statement of the school are: compassion, justice, respect for the dignity of the human person, and stewardship of earth. Currently, there are two Sisters of Mercy serving as administrators in the school. Both have a Masters degree in Catholic Educational Leadership. The instructional staff consists of 36 lay teachers. Fifteen of which have Bachelor of Science degrees, 18 Bachelor of Arts degrees, two have Associate degrees, two have completed their academic requirements for Masters degrees, eight have units for Masters degrees, and two are currently enrolled in a Masters program. One faculty member is currently undergoing Youth Ministry Certification under the Archdiocese of Agana. Majority of the teaching staff are Filipinos (81%) and the rest are Chamorros (19%). There are 16 support staff consisting of a guidance counselor, director of curriculum and grants, director of faith formation, systems administrator, assistant systems administrator, administrative secretary, school accountant, accounting clerk, athletic director, health counselor, two librarians and four maintenance staff.

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The school community is comprised of a diverse student and staff population. While majority of the students come from Catholic (91%), middle-income families, the school’s ethnic makeup comprises students and staff from different backgrounds. Sixty six percent of students are of Filipino ethnicity, eight percent are Chamorro, twenty four percent are multi-racial, and three percent are of other Pacific Islander and Asian ethnicities. Seventy eight percent of the teaching and non-teaching staff are of Filipino ethnicity, eighteen percent are Chamorros, and four percent are Chuukese. (Appendix A-2) The school’s close-knit environment provides students, parents, administrators, faculty, and staff a meaningful experience in school activities. Most of the student population come from the northern part of Guam with a majority residing in the villages of Dededo and Yigo. The school’s reputation for quality Catholic education attracts students from other villages such as Tamuning, Mangilao, Barrigada, Chalan Pago, and Agat. The enrollment has consistently averaged 450 since SY 2005-2006. In SY 2008-2009, with the introduction of the Pre-K program, enrollment was at 491. The SY 2011-2012 yielded an enrollment of 463 students from pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade. The number of enrollees has been affected by factors such as: (a) a decrease in job placement and availability because of the US recession, (b) an increase in the number of people who leave Guam to seek job opportunities in the U.S. mainland, (c) a decrease in income that resulted in students transferring to the public schools, (d) personal reasons, and (e) parents seeking schools closer to their workplaces.

Data from the last five years shows that Santa Barbara Catholic School has had a 100 percent acceptance rate of graduates into Catholic high schools. The school’s alumni excel both academically and in extracurricular activities in the private and public schools. SBCS alumni often graduate high school as valedictorians, salutatorians or with honors and academic distinctions. Parent surveys in SY 2011-2012 have shown that academic excellence is their number one reason for sending their child to SBCS, followed by the Catholic faith and values formation offered by the school. A majority has rated all subjects and the faith formation offered as effective or highly effective. A similar survey given in SY 2010-2011 also showed that parents were very satisfied with the education their child was receiving. (Appendix C-2)

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Students have likewise indicated their satisfaction with the school, its curriculum, personnel, programs, and facilities in both SY 2010-2011 and SY 2011-2012 surveys. (Appendix C-3 and C-4) Standardized test results in the SAT 10 for the past five years have been fluctuating, but majority of students are performing in the average and above average range. SY 2010-2011 and SY 2011-2012 have shown an increase in the number of students scoring at or above the 50th percentile. Language, Reading and Math are the areas that need improvement. (Exhibit B) SBCS students have also scored well on the Assessment of Catechesis/Religious Education (ACRE), ranking higher than the parish national average. Majority of the students are either at the proficient or advanced level. (Appendix B-6) A common area for improvement is the need for additional professional development in terms of instructional methodologies, technology, and assessment. Although teachers are utilizing alternative and varied techniques in their teaching, the rapid advancement of technology and the diverse learning needs of today’s students call for continuous professional growth. The school recognizes this need and has been funding opportunities for workshops, conferences, and membership in professional organizations. Evidence • Appendix A • Appendix C • demographic data • newspaper articles • list of workshops and other professional development

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B. USE OF PRIOR ACCREDITATION FINDINGS TO SUPPORT HIGH ACHIEVEMENT OF ALL STUDENTS The school has used the prior accreditation findings, both those discovered by the school and those identified by the Visiting Committee, and other pertinent data to ensure high achievement of all students and to drive school improvement. Since the last WASC visit in 2007 and mid-term visit in 2010, Santa Barbara Catholic School (SBCS) has exerted due diligence and effort in using prior accreditation findings to ensure high achievement of all students. This has included reports from the Visiting Committee, and other pertinent data; such as the revised Action Plans in 2010. The development and completion of the school’s Five Year Strategic Plan in SY 2010-2011 has become the road map for the school in determining its priorities, growth areas, and needs relative to improving student learning. The Strategic Plan presents a comprehensive approach in addressing key priorities in the operation of the school for the next five years, namely: Purpose, Governance, Curriculum, Finances, Resources/Facilities, Enrollment and Marketing. The Action Plan, approved during the last midterm accreditation visit, has been integrated into the Strategic Plan. In school year 2011-2012, in order to strengthen and actualize the school’s Catholic mission and identity as a Sister of Mercy administered school, SBCS established the Office of Faith Formation. Within that school year, formation activities increased in the form of retreats for all students from 5th to 8th grade and different and meaningful prayer experiences and outreach projects for the faculty and students. Currently the Director of Faith Formation is designing a school-wide faith formation program. As part of its self-study process for the WCEA accreditation, the school reviewed and revised its Mission and Vision statements to clearly define its goals, aligning them with the Sisters of Mercy’s direction statement, and ensuring that the language used is clear, direct, measurable, and meaningful. Through the Mercy Charism Group, organized by the school’s vice-principal and vocation director of the Sisters of Mercy, SBCS has begun collaborating with other Mercy schools in furthering the Mercy Charism, developing a culture of vocations in the school, and sharing resources that would enhance the faith formation in the school’s improvement process. One faculty is currently receiving certification training in Youth Ministry from the Archdiocese of Agana. In school year 2009-2010, the National Catholic Educational Association’s (NCEA) “Assessment of Catechesis/Religious Education” (ACRE) test was reinstated and is administered every two years in grades five and eight. The most recent results show that our students consistently scored higher compared to the parish national average. (Appendix B-6) In the area of curriculum and technology, the school has consistently taken steps to monitor its impact on student learning and achievement across its Pre-K to 8th grade Archdiocesan approved curriculum. As indicated in the school’s Strategic Plan, there is an ongoing review of all assessment results to determine the subject areas of grades scoring below proficiency and

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distinguished level. SAT 10 results in the past four years (Exhibit B) have indicated that Reading and Language in 3rd to 5th grade and Math in 5th and 6th grade are the areas that need the most improvement. In SY 2007-2008, the Language Arts department implemented the Scholastic Reading Program; where students read books within their Lexile measure, then take comprehension quizzes on designated computers in the classroom or computer labs. Through this program, teachers are able to monitor reading comprehension and plan lessons to focus on areas that need improvement. In SY 2009-2010, MyWritingWeb was implemented in 3rd through 8th grade. This program, funded by a three-year grant from Title V-A, was designed to help students write more and become better writers. The program integrated student-oriented activities such as keyboarding, paragraph editing, and composing with meaningful, real-time feedback to encourage growth and achievement. To support the current and emerging intellectual needs of our students, the use of technology is highly encouraged in the teaching and learning process. Faculty members have received and continue to have regular training in the use of technology. An additional computer lab was added to the facilities in SY 2008-2009, for use by the 4th to 8th grade language arts and mathematics classes. In SY 2007-2008, the library was equipped with six computers and a printer for student use. The school has more than 20 multimedia projectors, six interactive whiteboards, numerous laptops, 32 iPads, five document cameras, and BrainPop (an animated curriculum that engages students, supports educators and bolsters achievement for all students) for teacher and student use in the classrooms.

The library is being used daily by all grades and its collection of books was augmented by funding from Title V-A. Donations from students, parents, faculty and student organizations of books, DVDs and audio books have also contributed to the library’s growth. In addition to the many genres available, each title is labeled with its Lexile measure to aid the students in making appropriate selections. Students in 4th to 8th grade participate in the Reading for Enjoyment and Development (R.E.A.D.) program. The program’s objectives are: motivate students to have a better appreciation for literature, foster a genuine love for reading, and enhance reading skills through independent, paired, group reading, read aloud, and sustained silent reading. A full time school systems administrator and assistant systems administrator are in-charge of overseeing the school’s technological needs, training of faculty members, upgrading the school’s technological capabilities and resources, and maintaining the school’s website and RenWeb; an Internet-based school management system that offers teachers and parents an online portal for WCEA  ISL  2010  

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viewing or manipulating school information. Started in SY 2008-2009, RenWeb has become a valuable tool for sharing information, such as grades, lesson plans, homework, progress reports, calendars, and report cards between parents and teachers. A plan to revive the technology committee that will review and improve the current technology plan, drafted in 2009, is included in the school’s Strategic Plan. The school has increased its budget for professional development to support the need for ongoing training and education of its faculty. In addition to assisting the Director of Faith Formation with graduate studies, on-island and off-island professional development workshops are also funded by the school. Supplemental funding comes from events held in cooperation with the ParentTeacher Organization such as the annual 5K Fun Run, Ice Cream Festival, Spring production and Royal Court. In 2009, the Msgr. Zoilo Camacho Endowment Fund was formally launched to raise funds for tuition assistance and faculty development. With professional development as a priority of the school, students have benefited from an increase in knowledge and input from their teachers who apply new techniques and classroom innovations in their teachings. Beginning in SY 2008-2009, the administration established the Leadership Team; composed of the Principal, Vice-Principal, Guidance Counselor, Director of Curriculum and Grants, and all the department chairpersons. In SY 2011-2012, the Director of Faith Formation was included in the team. Since its formation, the Leadership Team has assisted the administration in decisionmaking, monitoring of its action plans, Five Year Strategic Plan and most recently in the development of the ISL Action Plan. At the start of every school year, the school-wide action plans, and the strategic plan, are reviewed and discussed with the faculty and staff during orientation workshops. Parents are informed about the school’s achievements, action plans, and current activities through the Backto-School Night, monthly PTO meetings, and announcements posted on the school’s website and RenWeb. Since its last WASC accreditation visit in 2007, the school has consistently maintained its commitment and thrust in facilitating a continuous school improvement process through the involvement of the entire school community, i.e. administration, faculty and staff, parents, and students. Evidence: • Previous Self Study and Report of Findings • Previous Action Plan and copies of annual updates • Strategic Plan • Communications (newsletters, meetings minutes, etc.) informing school community of progress toward accomplishment of Action Plan

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• • • • • • •

Other prior accreditation findings that have been addressed by the school Copy of Faith Formation Program SAT 10 results SRI Growth reports Minutes of meetings that discuss school improvement plans SLEs, rubrics and assessments of SLEs RenWeb

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CHAPTER 3 | QUALITY OF THE SCHOOL’S PROGRAM A. ASSESSMENT OF THE SCHOOL’S CATHOLIC IDENTITY The school is Catholic, approved by the Local Ordinary (Canon 803), provides authentic Catholic teaching, opportunities for community worship and participation in the sacraments, and promotes evangelization and service to the community. Santa Barbara Catholic School (SBCS) follows a mission and vision statement that manifests its commitment to educating the mind, heart and spirit of all its students. Over the years, the school has taken measures to strengthen its Catholic identity. In SY 2008-2009, the school adopted the curriculum standards set by the Archdiocese of Agana, including those for Religion. In SY 2010-2011, teachers were asked to identify the Catholic values relevant to their subject matter in their daily lesson plans. Most recently, the Office of Faith Formation was established in SY 2011-2012 to oversee the school’s faith formation program. Led by the Director of Faith Formation, the office plans, coordinates, and ensures that the mission and vision of SBCS are integrated in the faith life of the school and that these are actualized and lived out in the many school activities offered. The establishment of the Office of Faith Formation has enhanced the Catholic identity of the school and improved the faith and spiritual formation of the students, staff, and parents through the varied formation activities that it plans or oversees, e.g. retreats, liturgical celebrations, sacramental preparations, prayer services, service projects to the community. In preparation for its self-study for the WCEA Accreditation, a thorough process to review and update of the school’s mission and vision statements was done to strengthen its Catholic identity and integrate the core values of the Sisters of Mercy in the curriculum. In its day-to-day activities, SBCS provides numerous opportunities for grow in the faith. Every morning the entire school community begins with communal prayers led by student prayer leaders. They include personal and communal intentions of the school community such as; birthday blessings, the speedy recovery of those who are sick, the success of school activities, special intentions for the nation, Church and government, and other concerns of the community. Throughout the day, each class begins and ends with either basic formula prayers or Gospel reflections, Taize, student-made prayers, meditation through song and videos, and quiet reflection. Lunch periods also begin and end with prayer. As a sign of its Catholic identity and spirituality, the school uses signs, sacramentals, traditions and rituals of the Roman Catholic Church. Throughout the year, the school displays banners and decorations that beautify the campus and highlight the liturgical seasons of Advent, Lent, Christmas and Easter. In each classroom there are crucifixes and a prayer corners showing the images of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Our Lady of Mercy, Catherine McAuley, and/or their class patron saint. Furthermore, every prayer begins with the invitation to pray saying “The Sign of our Faith,” before making the actual gesture of the sign of the cross.

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The school also conducts religious activities that lead the members of the community in observing and celebrating the Catholic faith. These activities include monthly masses, communal prayer services, May Crowning, visits to the Blessed Sacrament, Stations of the Cross, Living Rosary, and processions in honor of Santa Barbara and the Immaculate Conception. The faculty, on their part, holds a prayer service every Tuesday morning during homeroom period. SBCS initiates the preparation of 3rd grade students for their First Holy Communion in coordination with the parish. The candidates for first Holy Communion start their preparation in 2nd grade through a series of basic catechism classes conducted by their homeroom and religion teachers. Additionally, the parents of the candidates are given seminars, catechism, and retreats to support their child’s spiritual development.

During the Advent and Lenten seasons, students are given the opportunity to receive the Sacrament of Reconciliation. They also participate in school-wide practices like “Silent Wednesday” during Lent, “Acts of Kindness”, and others. Fifth to 8th grade students also experience spiritual retreats facilitated by a team from the Office of Faith Formation. Retreat opportunities are provided for faculty, staff and parents as well to give them venues for personal, relational, and spiritual growth. As a member of the Catholic Episcopal Conference of the Pacific (CEPAC), SBCS’ curriculum is grounded and faithful to the teachings of the Roman Catholic Church. SBCS provides outreach community services conducted by the students with the assistance of their teachers. Most of these services are integrated in class projects such as the annual Walk for Life and Prolife rallies, Quarter Quest Bottles, Thanksgiving Food Drive, donations for the needy and victims of calamities, gift-giving during Christmas, visits to the elderly and sick, beach and park cleanups, etc. National Junior Honor Society (NJHS) members tutor students who need academic assistance and participate in the annual Lifeworks, Guam Out of the Darkness Walk. Faculty and staff have also participated in an outreach program to the low income families living at the Gil Baza subdivision, popularly referred to as “Zero-Down community.” SBCS acknowledges and recognizes the important role of parents in the holistic formation of the students. It establishes and strengthens a strong active partnership between faculty and parents by providing communication through RenWeb and regular parent-teacher conferences. Monthly Parent-Teacher Organization (PTO) meetings serve as a venue for discussing and addressing concerns that involve not only the students’ welfare but also faith issues. Additionally, the Office

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of the Faith Formation has provided spiritual formation for the parents through retreats, prayer services, and catechism classes. Parents also untiringly attend and involve themselves in school-wide activities by volunteering their services as teacher assistants during the weekly Faculty prayer services, coaches and/or “team moms” during sports events, during the annual 5K Fun Run, UN Day celebration, Ice Cream Festival, school plays, Chamorro Day celebration, field trips, class parties, and the like. Outside school, some faculty members are active in socio-civic activities like parish ministries, rendering service to the Catholic Schools Office, giving talks, workshops, and retreats. In its efforts to educate the school community to be better stewards of the earth’s resources, at SBCS every Thursday is “Energy Saving Day.” As a way of conserving energy and power in the school, all air conditioners are shut off during the first period of the day. Faculty, staff, students and parents have participated in tree-planting activities with 350.org, a global grassroots movement to solve the climate crisis and push for policies that will put the world on track to get to 350 ppm of carbon dioxide. The school also joined the island-wide iRecycle Program, an aluminum recycling program created not only for the financial benefit of Guam’s schools but to promote aluminum recycling island wide. Coordinated by the Student Council, students collect aluminum cans and deposit them in the iRecycle bins on campus. The Student Council also collects newspapers and other used paper which is shredded and donated to farmers.

In an effort to meet the expectation that all Catholic School teachers must be certified as catechists, all faculty members are required to avail of opportunities provided for their ongoing faith formation. Annually, the faculty attends programs offered such as the Catholic Schools Week Educators Conference and the Catechetical Conference. They also participate in the Information For Growth (IFG) assessment offered by the National Catholic Educators Association (NCEA). In addition, retreats, seminars, workshops, and conferences are conducted to educate the faculty, students, and staff on various topics such as knowledge of Church documents. Members of the school community are expected to practice the Christian values of taking care of one’s physical, emotional, and social well-being and continuing to grow in faith by maintaining an active relationship with God. All teachers are expected to integrate the specific Catholic values being taught in their subject matter in their lesson plans. During class discussion, students are encouraged to reflect on values discussed and share their thoughts and ideas. When preparing quizzes, examinations, homework, or projects, teachers make an effort include items that manifest Catholic values. Inside the classroom, students show their values by performing the WCEA  ISL  2010  

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assigned tasks of being prayer leaders, class monitors, teacher assistants, and cafeteria cleaners. Furthermore, students freely apply Catholic values by observing basic school rules such as maintaining cleanliness, supporting anti-bullying campaign, attending and supporting school activities and projects. School personnel also serve in bringing the Good News into the total educational experience. Students recognize the essential roles of the staff in the duties that ensure that the school is running smoothly. These duties include: maintaining a clean and safe campus, assisting in providing meals in the cafeteria, cleaning the facilities, and monitoring the playground and waiting area before and after school. In surveys conducted in SY 2010-2011, 98 percent of parents and 100 percent of the students responded that they feel Catholic values are being instilled in their education. In SY 2011-12, parents indicated they were very satisfied with the Catholic Faith Formation and Catholic Identity of the school (Appendix C-2). Eighty five percent of students from 4th to 8th grade during the same school year said their Religion classes help them learn about their faith, while 77 percent said they are provided opportunities for Christian service (Appendix C-4). While much was accomplished in terms of Catholic Identity, SBCS realizes that there is still room for growth. 3 to 5 significant accomplishments of the school in the area of Catholic Identity that have had a positive impact on students learning and faith formation: • • • •

The establishment of the Office of Faith Formation that plans, oversees, and implements programs aimed at developing and forming the characters, values, culture, and spirituality of all the members of the school community The numerous faith formation activities offered to the students, teachers, and parents that have allowed them to grow in their faith and strengthened the Catholic identity of the school. The integration of Catholic values in all lesson plans The participation and high involvement of the students, faculty, and staff in school-wide religious activities, outreach programs, and advocacy efforts

1 to 3 goals to be accomplished in the area of Catholic Identity that will have a significant positive impact on student learning and faith formation: • •

Process the teacher certification of all faculty members Develop a comprehensive formation and service program for students, faculty, staff, and parents

Evidence: • Sacramentals and prayer corners on display in the classrooms • School routines that incorporate prayer throughout the day • Copy of the Faith Formation program of SBCS • Student service records • Student and staff outreach participation • SBCS website: pictures of formation activities, outreach and advocacy efforts

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B. DEFINING THE SCHOOL’S PURPOSE The school’s purpose is defined through the school’s mission statement, philosophy, measurable Schoolwide Learning Expectations, Arch/diocesan curriculum standards (local curriculum standards where Arch/diocesan standards don’t exist), and other governing authority expectations. In SY 2011-2012, Santa Barbara Catholic School (SBCS) reviewed and revised its Vision, Mission statements and the Schoolwide Learning Expectations (SLEs) which were last updated in SY 2005-2006. Formulated by the Leadership Team, and with input from its shareholders, the revised Vision and Mission statements reflect the school’s Catholic identity, its identity as a Sister of Mercy administered school, and highlight the collaborative nature of its relationship with the parents, parish, and the Archdiocese of Agana. This new mission statement calls for the SLEs to be put into concrete action. Students are Committed Christians through starting and ending all classes, lunch period and other activities with prayer, showing respect to each other in their words and actions, maintaining harmonious relationships with other students, and fulfilling assigned tasks. There are prayer corners and crucifixes in each classroom, and banners and displays celebrating the different liturgical seasons throughout the school. Monthly masses are held in the parish church with the Honor Choir singing, students reading scripture, and student altar servers assisting the priest. Catholic values are incorporated into lessons and expressed through student activities like reflections, projects, essay writing, and discussions. Stewardship of God’s creation is highlighted through participation in recycling projects and 350.org activities.

Students exhibit being Responsible Members of the Community by following the school rules and regulations. Parents have cited that the students at SBCS are generally well-behaved and respectful and that the faculty and staff are doing a commendable job molding them. The school also participates in several outreach and advocacy programs such as the annual Walk for Life and Pro-life rallies, 350.org activities, iRecycle projects, thanksgiving food-drives, fundraising (monetary and in-kind) for areas affected by natural disasters (e.g. the 2010 tsunami in Japan, typhoons and floods in the Philippines), and the Ateneo de Manila University’s Center for Educational Development (ACED) Clean Your Closet drive to benefit school children in the Philippines, among others. Eighth grade students also perform 30 hours of service for school, WCEA  ISL  2010  

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family, and church and community. National Junior Honor Society (NJHS) members offer tutoring to students who need assistance. Students also take turns as classroom and cafeteria cleaners, prayer leaders, as well as class and student organization officers. Mercy Club, Youth Crime Watch, NJHS, and Student Council are also service-oriented school organizations. Students are taught to become Effective Communicators through various activities such as small-group interactions, oral reports, question-and-answer sessions, peer- and self-evaluations, research papers, essay questions, public speaking, and classroom presentations. In many of these instances, the use of technology and multimedia is evident as students may present what they learned through online research, and creating charts or electronic presentations. The students work independently to come up with engaging and accurate results. The Christmas and Spring productions of the school are also great opportunities for students to sharpen their publicspeaking and public-relations skills. Middle school students lead daily school-wide prayers at the start and end of the day over the school’s intercom system or in the courtyard on Fridays. Students become Creative, Critical Thinkers through activities that allow them to observe, analyze, critique, evaluate, solve and value problem-solving situations. Students learn to appreciate God’s love and all His creation in Religion class, create literary works in Language Arts, discover patterns in Math, perform experiments and investigations in Science, identify cause and effect in Social Studies, learn how to care for their physical well-being in Physical Education, value different art and music forms in Art and Music, and acquire technology literacy skills in Computer class. They are asked to apply what they have learned to benefit society.

Teachers consistently observe and monitor the students’ behavior and performance to ensure that the SLEs are incorporated into the daily school life. SLEs are part of teachers’ daily lesson plans in an effort to highlight the SLE relevant to a particular lesson. Student achievement of the SLEs is seen through the different activities and work students complete every day. A formal rubrics for two of the SLEs, Committed Christians and Responsible Members of the Community, has been implemented this school year to replace the deportment grade on the report card. Rubrics for the two remaining SLEs are expected to be finalized within the year. The SLE rubrics, along with enrollment, academic promotion, dress-code and grooming, and discipline program are other governing authority expectations that can be found in the ParentStudent Handbook. An online copy is also available on the school’s website: sbcs.edu.gu. Parents are also informed of these expectations during the Back-to-School Night, New Parents’ Orientation, and the monthly Parent-Teacher Organization (PTO) meetings.

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Memos regarding school activities, schedules and other announcements are also disseminated via the school’s website, Facebook page, RenWeb, and emails or hard copies. Santa Barbara Catholic School is an elementary and middle school under the Archdiocese of Agana, and, thus, is canonically under the authority of the Archbishop. The daily operation, management, and financial supervision of the school are delegated authorities given to the Sisters of Mercy who are the administrators of the school. For proper accountability, the SBCS administration reports to the archdiocese through regular monthly principal and guidance counselor meetings with the Superintendent of Catholic Schools, and a monthly financial report to the Archdiocesan Finance Office. During his annual pastoral visit, the principal provides updates to the Archbishop of the school’s activities, achievements and goals for the year. Santa Barbara Catholic School Vision Statement Santa Barbara Catholic School is an elementary and middle school under the Archdiocese of Agana administered by the Sisters of Mercy in partnership with lay faculty and parents in response to the needs of the Church and community for Catholic education. Rooted in the Gospel and the values and traditions of the Sisters of Mercy, the school provides a holistic formation of the students’ mind, heart and spirit to empower them to face life’s challenges and opportunities. Santa Barbara Catholic School Mission Statement To realize our vision, our commitment is: • • •

To instill in our students the teachings of the Gospel with the emphasis on the values of compassion, justice, respect for the dignity of the human person and stewardship of the earth To foster a love of learning through a comprehensive curriculum that integrates technology and wide-ranging activities to develop the gifts and potential of each child To strengthen our school’s partnership with the parents, parish and community Santa Barbara Catholic School Schoolwide Learning Expectations (SLEs)

Upon completing the requirements of the school’s program of studies, Santa Barbara Catholic School students will be self-directed individuals who are: COMMITTED CHRISTIANS • Continuing to grow in faith by maintaining an active relationship with God • Living a moral conscience based on Catholic/Christian values • Respecting diversity, life, and God’s creation RESPONSIBLE MEMBERS OF THE COMMUNITY • Taking responsibility for words and actions • Selflessly serving the Church, school, and community

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CREATIVE, CRITICAL THINKERS • Applying knowledge and mastery of problem solving skills to make responsible decisions • Displaying the ability to apply learned strategies to real-life situations • Using technology responsibly in accomplishing various tasks EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATORS • Using oral, written, and creative forms of expression to clearly communicate ideas, information, and emotions • Communicating effectively through active listening • Utilizing current technology to enhance communication

3 to 5 significant accomplishments in the area of Defining the School’s Purpose that have had a positive impact on student learning: • • •

The revision of the school’s Vision and Mission statements and SLEs The implementation of a rubrics for the SLEs (Committed Christians and Responsible Members of the Community) The implementation of programs aimed at developing and forming the character, values, culture, and spirituality of the school community

1 to 3 goals that need to be accomplished in the area of Defining the School’s Purpose that will have a significant positive impact on student learning: •

Implement rubrics for the two remaining SLEs (Effective Communicators and Creative Critical Thinkers)

Evidence: • • • • • • •

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Organizational/Governance chart of SBCS Teacher lesson plans cross-referenced to curriculum standards and SLEs School displays of Mission, Vision statements and SLEs Tools to measure student achievement of SLEs Curriculum standards and standards based assessments Survey results of student and parent knowledge of SLEs SBCS website and Facebook page

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C. ORGANIZATION FOR STUDENT LEARNING TO SUPPORT HIGH ACHIEVEMENT OF ALL STUDENTS The organizational structures of the school focus on high achievement of all students, and communicate student progress to all shareholders. As an Archdiocesan school, Santa Barbara Catholic School (SBCS) is under the authority of the Archbishop of Agana, the pastoral leader responsible for the total educational mission of the Church on Guam. The school’s policies are aligned with those of the Archdiocese and are stated in the SBCS Faculty and Parent-Student Handbooks. The Leadership Team, faculty, and staff review these handbooks annually and revise them accordingly. In the absence of a school board, these policies are discussed with faculty and staff during orientation, and with the parents and students at the start of each school year, as well as throughout the year at monthly PTO meetings and regularly during homeroom periods. The Pastor, as the spiritual leader of the parish community, provides guidance to the school through regular monthly masses, sacraments and school visits during important events. He is assisted by parochial vicars during special feasts, workshops and retreats. In support of the parish’s CCD program, the school facilities are utilized on Saturday mornings. The Principal and Vice Principal manage all aspects of school life, most especially the promotion of its Catholic identity, the teaching-learning process and ongoing school improvements. The administration empowers faculty and staff by delegating responsibilities according to expertise and experience. In SY 2008-2009, the school instituted the Leadership Team; composed of the Principal, VicePrincipal, Director of Curriculum and Grants, Guidance Counselor, and all department chairs. The Office of Faith Formation was organized during SY 2011-2012 and its director was included in the Leadership Team. The Team assists the administration in the school’s processes of decision-making, planning, and implementation. They meet on a regular basis, often before faculty meetings. Additionally, the Principal, Vice-Principal, Director of Curriculum and Grants, and Director of Faith Formation meet weekly. The Director of Curriculum and Grants oversees the curriculum program to ensure that goals are met. The Director works with department chairs to evaluate textbooks and supplemental materials. Furthermore, the monitoring of long-range plans, daily lesson plans, quarterly exams, and RenWeb gradebooks is also a responsibility of the Director. Other responsibilities include scheduling, faculty observations, managing Title V-A grants, and providing instructional support for teachers in their respective areas. The Guidance Counselor responds to the educational, personal, social and developmental needs of the students. The counselor also coordinates and administers annual standardized tests and assessment tests for new students. Teachers also make referrals to the counselor regarding individual student needs in academics and behavior. When needed, the Guidance Counselor refers students to appropriate community resources and other special program services with the WCEA  ISL  2010  

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Guam Department of Education. The counselor conducts activities and/or group lessons to help maintain the well-being of the student body. The counselor’s office also coordinates Catholic high school recruitment and career day presentations. These presentations help students choose the high school most appropriate for their aspirations. The behavior modification program, C.H.O.I.C.E., is also administered by the counselor. The Director of Faith Formation works with the administration to promote the Catholic identity of the school. A formation team helps design and implements retreats and various formation activities. Catechist certification, weekly prayer services, retreats and service/outreach opportunities and other formation activities are provided for the faculty. Student and parent formation, regular liturgical celebrations, sacramental preparation and reception, schoolwide prayer services, retreats and service/outreach opportunities are also provided. Department chairs oversee the implementation and evaluation of the archdiocesan curriculum standards and areas for improvement as indicated by SAT 10 results or by student performance are addressed at monthly meetings. Upcoming events, best practices, and teacher collaboration are also discussed. The Systems Administrator and Assistant Systems Administrator oversee the management of RenWeb, the school’s web-based data management system, maintenance and acquisition of equipment and technology resources and the school website (sbcs.edu.gu). They provide teacher training for the use of this technology and make recommendations for improving the school’s technological capability to facilitate student learning. Teachers are assigned subjects based on their degree, work experience, personal background, and area of specialization in order to fully utilize their expertise. Teachers are tasked with supervisory duties as homeroom teachers and advisors for different student organizations. They also take leadership roles in different school events and fundraisers that help achieve the SLE’s outside of the classroom. Some of these events are Chamorro Day, United Nations Day, Catholic Schools Week, Royal Court, May Crowning, Living Rosary, Stations of the Cross, and Christmas and Spring productions.

SBCS administration prioritizes faculty and staff development by providing increased funding for various workshops and conferences both on and off-island, as well as providing in-house teacher and staff training and formation. Funding for such events is provided in part by the Msgr.

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Zoilo Camacho Endowment Fund established in SY 2008-. 2009. The Endowment was formally launched to raise funds for tuition assistance and faculty development. Students have benefitted from an increase of knowledge and input from their teachers who apply new techniques and classroom innovations in their teachings. Listed below are several conferences attended regularly by faculty: • • • • •

Archdiocesan Catechetical-Liturgical Conference Annual Catholic Schools Week Conference University of Guam’s Language Arts Conference International Reading Association (IRA) National Catholic Educational Association Conferences (NCEA)

In recent years, staff development has increased and focused on the growing needs of the school, most especially in the areas of formation, technology, Language Arts and Math. Teachers are sent to different off-island conferences in their areas of expertise. Some of these areas are: • • • • • •

Mercy Elementary Education Network (MEEN) Mercy Secondary Education Association (MSEA) National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Conference International Society for Technology In Education (ISTE) Conference NCEA Education Law Symposium IRA Annual Convention

The past two years have seen an overall increase in the number of students scoring in the upper 50th percentile of the SAT 10. This can be largely attributed to teachers actively putting into practice varied methodologies and strategies learned from professional development sessions they have attended. The use of instructional technology has especially grown, with all classrooms having access to the Internet, a computer, and a multimedia projector. Assessment of Catechesis/Religious Education (ACRE) scores have also shown SBCS students scoring above parish national levels. The school liturgist is currently completing his Certification in Youth Ministry Studies from the Center for Ministry Development, Gig Harbor, Washington in cooperation with the Division of Pastoral Ministries of the Archdiocese of Agana. The Director of Faith Formation is completing her Masters Degree in Catholic School Administration at the University of San Francisco under the school’s sponsorship. In-house workshops for teachers include training in all the WCEA  ISL  2010  

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technologies and programs the school uses, assessment and classroom management, and seminars regarding pertinent issues that affect the students like bullying, responsible use of technology and respect for life and dignity of the human person. Retreats at the beginning and middle of the school year and weekly prayer meetings nourish the spiritual life of faculty and staff. Through the years, the school has been blessed with committed, talented and dedicated lay teachers, some of whom have been empowered to take on administrative responsibilities, greatly assisting the principal in the day-to-day operation of the school. The Parent-Student Handbook expressly states the discipline program of the school. It lists the rules and regulations that must be followed, rights and responsibilities of students and parents, as well as exemplary behaviors of an SBCS student and consequences for violations of rules and regulations. The faculty is empowered to enforce disciplinary actions necessary including oneon-one sessions with the student/s concerned and reporting the behavior to the parents through the planner, RenWeb, email or phone call, and/or conference with parents. If the case is a serious one, it is referred to the Guidance Counselor and/or the Principal and Vice-Principal. In SY 2012-2013, SBCS implemented the C.H.O.I.C.E. Program, the new behavior modification program adopted by the Catholic Schools Office. This program aims to help students be accountability for their behavior and make more responsible choices in the future. The provision of a safe, healthy and nurturing environment is one of the school’s top priorities. Surveyed parents have commented positively on the welcoming and family-oriented atmosphere they and their children experience in school (Appendix C-2). The clean surroundings, wellmaintained restrooms, the symbols of faith present in the surroundings, and the welcoming ambience are some of the common things that visitors first notice when they walk in the campus. Environment safety provisions, policies and procedures are in place: bomb, earthquake and fire drills, visibility of escape routes per room, clearly marked crosswalks and parking areas, a new lift, a public address system that has an emergency call button in every room, an alarm system, and a visitor-sign in system. Students are supervised by a responsible adult/s at all times: faculty, staff, administration, or parent volunteers.

The school employs a wide range of strategies to ensure that parental and community involvement is integrated in the school’s support system for students. The most efficient and effective means SBCS uses to communicate with parents and the community regarding

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schoolwork, school events, student achievement and progress is through RenWeb and the school’s website. However, because RenWeb is a recently added online data management and communication tool provided for the teachers, students, and parents, continued technology training to maximize its use needs to be addressed. Other means of communication that additionally help parents and teachers monitor student progress are quarterly report cards, progress reports, parent-teacher conferences, student planners, teacher notes, phone calls and emails, SAT 10 home reports, unsatisfactory reports, and student work folders/binders. PTO meetings, school assemblies and school/class bulletin boards are used to inform the community of developments in the school. Other media such as radio, television, SBCS Facebook page, newspaper and church bulletins are also utilized. 3 to 5 significant accomplishments in the area of Organization for Student Learning that have had a positive impact on student learning: • • • • •

The provision of a safe, nurturing, clean and welcoming school environment The organized and effective system of communication between the school and home via RenWeb, school’s website, etc. The empowerment and training of teachers to assume administrative and leadership positions An increased budget for faculty and staff development An increasing trend in SAT 10 percentile scores in the past two years and the above average ACRE scores The establishment of the Msgr. Zoilo Camacho Endowment Fund

1 to 3 goals which need to be accomplished in the area of Organization for Student Learning that will have a significant positive impact on student learning: • •

Monitor the implementation of and compliance with the revisions in the Parent-Student Handbook, most recently the addition of the C.H.O.I.C.E. program Continue technology training for the faculty, staff and parents in the effective and optimum use of RenWeb as a means of communication between teachers and parents.

Evidence: • • • • • • •

5-Year Strategic Plan RenWeb Brochures, school website, SBCS Facebook page, and other marketing strategies Minutes from meetings (Department, Faculty, Leadership, Administration, PTO) Copies of school communications (from Administration, Faculty, PTO) Parent-Student Handbook Faculty Handbook

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D. DATA ANALYSIS AND ACTION TO SUPPORT HIGH ACHIEVEMENT OF ALL STUDENTS The school uses educationally sound assessment processes to collect data. The school disaggregates and analyzes student performance data and uses the analysis as a basis for instructional/curricular improvement. Santa Barbara Catholic School (SBCS) has been collecting SAT 10 data for each individual student and for each grade level from SY 2006-2007 to present (Exhibit B). The data shows percentile ranking and scaled scores over the years. It also shows how many students are scoring above or below the 50th percentile rank, and how many have gained in terms of percentile rank or scaled score. At the start of each school year, the data is presented to the faculty so that trends can be seen. Subject areas that need focus are identified and teachers concerned plan accordingly. Students who show below average performance or whose scores are declining are also taken note of. A summary of how the school is performing is also presented to the parents during Back-to-School night. Based on SAT 10 data collected over the years, it was decided in SY 2007-2008 to focus on Language Arts and Mathematics. Scholastic Reading Inventory/Reading Counts! was incorporated into the Language Arts curriculum in SY 2007-2008 to increase student interest in reading and improve reading skills. Students take an online test at the beginning of the year to determine their reading Lexile measure, and then an average of two quizzes a quarter to track their progress. Due to server problems, student data from school years 2008-2009 were lost, but data from school years 2010-2013 show that reading Lexile measures have generally increased for majority of the students. Two teachers were sent to the 2008 Lexile National Reading Conference & Quantile Symposium in San Antonio to aid in the program’s implementation. In SY 2009-2010, MyWritingWeb was introduced, a three-year program funded through Title V-A to help students write more and improve basic skills needed to become better writers. Due to procurement problems, MyWritingWeb was not available in SY 2011-2012. In SY 2011-12 two teachers were sent to the 57th Annual International Reading Association (IRA) Convention in Chicago. A second Computer Lab equipped with 28 MacBooks, 25 of which were acquired through Title V-A funding, was opened in SY 2008-2009. The lab was intended for student use in Language Arts and Mathematics classes from 6th to 8th grade. In SY 2010-2011, the lab was opened to 4th and 5th grade for MyWritingWeb and Math classes. This granted Language Arts classes two periods each week to access computers for reading and writing activities. The chair of the Math Department was sent to Washington, DC for the Annual National Council of Teachers in Mathematics (NCTM) Conference and Exposition in April 2009. A presentation of strategies and techniques learned was shared with the faculty at the start of SY 2009-2010. The school also chose to pilot Singapore Math with one first grade class in SY 2009-2010 and one second grade class in SY 2010-2011. However, no improvement was noted as a result of the program so it was discontinued.

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Science and Social Science SAT 10 scores have been fluctuating over the last four years. Because these are core subject areas, additional resources have been purchased through school, local, and federal funding. Updated textbooks for Math in the primary grades and textbooks for kindergarten Science were purchased in SY 2009-2010 through local funds from the Guam Public School System (GPSS). Math books for 3rd to 5th grades and Science books for 1st to 8th grades were purchased by school funds in SY 2010-2011. Updated literature textbooks for middle school and Social Studies textbooks for kindergarten through 6th grade and 8th grade were acquired through additional local funds from GPSS in SY 2011-2012. SBCS has been granted Title V-A funding since 2008. The following have been purchased using these funds: 60 laptops, six interactive whiteboards, five document cameras, three printers, 16 multimedia projectors, 30 iPads, 17 book carts, 330 student whiteboards, 125 dictionaries, eight Science Kits, numerous library books, and several more equipment and resources for use in Language Arts, Math, Science and Social Studies. Two multimedia projectors were donated by the class of 2009. The Language Arts department’s annual READVENTURE fundraising has raised funds for classroom libraries, classroom computers, additional online quizzes for Scholastic Reading Counts!, and BrainPOP, an animated curriculum that engages students, supports educators, and bolsters achievement.

In SY 2010-2011, the school purchased a one year license to a SAT 10 online practice from Bright Education that students could access in school or at home. In SY 2011-2012, it was decided that 3rd grade students would not have a separate answer document during the SAT 10 to see if the method of test-taking is a factor in performance. The data collected for the past four years show that majority of the students score in the 50th percentile or higher. However, a significant number are also scoring in the bottom quartile in certain subtests (Appendix B-3). There are no consistent trends as scores continually fluctuate, but the past two school years (SY 10-11 and SY 11-12) have seen an overall increase in the number of students scoring in the upper 50th percentile. This increase seems to indicate that the steps taken by the school have been effective.

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Percentage of Students Scoring in the Upper 50th Percentile SAT 10 Subtest

SY 08-09

SY 09-10

SY 10-11

SY 11-12

Reading

52%

64 % (+12)

56% (-8)

61% (+5)

Mathematics

64%

59% (-5)

62% (+3)

65% (+3)

Language

62%

60% (-2)

49% (-10)

56% (+7)

Science

67%

57% (-10)

64% (+7)

72% (+8)

Social Science

62%

50% (-12)

63% (+13)

70% (+7)

Complete Battery

70%

62% (-8)

67% (+5)

69% (+2)

Factors that could have hindered student performance can be attributed to (a) a change to the 2007 norms from the 2002 norms in SY 2009-2010; (b) administering the SAT 10 too early in the school year when not all material has yet been covered; (c) a disconnect between what is being tested, what is taught and what students experience; (d) less formal classroom instruction due to school activities like play rehearsals and other seasonal celebrations; and (e) a need for additional professional development to respond to student needs. The increase in SAT 10 scores seen in SY 2011-2012 can be attributed to (a) greater teacher awareness of student SAT 10 scores leading to a more concerted effort to ensure learning is achieved; (b) moving the test dates to later in the school year; and (c) additional resources and training obtained over the years. Allowing 3rd grader students to answer on the SAT 10 booklet itself seems to have helped as their scores increased in all areas in SY 11-12. Another standardized assessment that the school uses is the Assessment of Catechesis/Religious Education (ACRE). Administered every two years to the 5th and 8th graders, the ACRE helps evaluate the religious program in schools and parishes. The latest results from SY 2011-2012 show that our 5th and 8th graders scored higher compared to the parish national averages (Appendix B-6). Because the assessment occurs every two years there is no comparative data available for each cohort that takes it. In addition to the SAT 10 and ACRE, teachers at SBCS utilize various assessments to gather data on student progress and achievement and help guide curriculum planning and instruction. Teachers assign projects, research work, oral presentations, portfolios, diagnostic tests, self- and peer-evaluation, as well as quizzes, unit tests and quarter exams. SRI and MyWritingWeb provide growth reports that track a student’s progress in terms of his reading and writing skills. In SY 2011-2012, the Math department piloted the Money Island program, sponsored by Bank of Guam, in grades 6 to 8 to help with financial literacy skills. During the school year, RenWeb allows teachers to see different student reports that show, aside from a student’s individual scores, the class average, grade distribution per class, and missing or incomplete assignments. This allows teachers to better track student progress and inform both parent and student if intervention is needed. It also gives the teacher a general picture of the

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class’ performance. The school has also recently moved into electronic copies of a student’s cumulative record utilizing RenWeb and teachers can soon have online access and view a student’s academic progress from one grade level to the next. Varied teaching strategies are used in the classroom to ensure different learning styles and different levels are met. Teachers employ traditional lecture/discussion, whole class activities, group or paired work, games, technology, songs, videos, and other methods in their teaching. Students who need assistance are given additional time and aids like note cards and manipulatives. Tutorials are offered after school hours and peer tutors, usually National Junior Society members, may be assigned. During this time, additional instruction, extra time to do assignments and remediation are done. In SY 2009-2010, a weekly library period for all classes was implemented. Subsequently in SY 2012-2013, the library was made available after school hours. Teachers also set aside time either after school or during the day to meet as a team to discuss particular students who are not fulfilling their potential. Cases are sometimes brought the Guidance Counselor for review of the need for Special Education services. Students excelling in class are challenged with higher level lessons and activities. An Honors Math program is in place offering Pre-Algebra for 7th grade and Algebra 1 for 8th grade. The Language Arts department is also looking into the possibility of offering an Honors Program in middle school.

Teachers are encouraged to attend professional development opportunities offered by the Archdiocese, the University of Guam, Guam Community College and other local institutions, and by becoming members in professional organizations like the IRA and NCTM. Attendance in off-island conferences and workshops such as the NCEA, NCTM, IRA and ISTE are also funded by the school. During the monthly department and faculty meetings, time is set aside for the sharing of best practices learned by those who have attended these conferences. Parent-surveys indicate that they are highly satisfied with the education provided by the school. Surveys also indicate that parents feel that SBCS effectively prepares their children for high school. Reports from various high schools indicate that SBCS alumni have a reputation for being high-achievers and well-disciplined students. There is also a 100% acceptance rate for SBCS graduates applying to Catholic high schools. Many alumni have gone on to graduate with top honors in their respective high schools.

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For the last five years, SBCS enrollment has averaged 450 students (Appendix B-1). Notably, enrollment in the middle school has been quite stable. In addition to SBCS’s reputation for high academic standards and up to date technology, parents have also elected to enroll their children “due to safety issues” at the public schools. Students have transferred out of SBCS for various reasons, the three most prominent being financial difficulties, relocation of families, and unspecified personal issues. SBCS then faces the challenge of reaching out to those needing financial aid and addressing the issues that have been brought up. To help maintain enrollment, additional funding sources need to be established in order to offer financial aid. There is also a need for constant review of school policies, teaching methods and assessments. Teachers need continual professional development in order to the address diverse learning styles and needs of today’s students. 3 to 5 significant accomplishments in the area of Data Analysis and Action that have had a positive impact on student learning: • • • • •

More focus on Language Arts and Math (e.g., updated textbooks, mobile lab, interactive whiteboards, professional development) The use of RenWeb to provide updates to parents, students and teachers regarding student performance and other information. Above average ACRE scores An increasing trend in SAT 10 percentile scores over the past two years 100% acceptance rate for those applying to Catholic high schools

1 to 3 goals which need to be accomplished in the area of Data Analysis and Action that will have a significant positive impact on student learning: • • •

More focus on underachieving students More opportunities for professional development and growth Develop a tuition and financial assistance model that will maximize and sustain an adequate level of enrollment as stated in the Strategic Plan

Evidence: • • • • • • • • • •

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Appendix B SAT 10 scores and analysis (Exhibit B) ACRE test results Quarter exams based on curriculum standards Formative tests Summative tests Class/subject grade distribution summary Long Range Plans Lesson Plans List of professional development attended

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E. SLES AND STANDARDS-BASED CURRICULUM TO SUPPORT HIGH ACHIEVEMENT OF ALL STUDENTS The school provides a challenging, comprehensive and relevant curriculum for each student that results in achievement of the Schoolwide Learning Expectations, Arch/diocesan curriculum standards (local curriculum standards where Arch/diocesan standards don’t exist), and other governing authority expectations. All students make acceptable progress toward clearly defined and measurable Schoolwide Learning Expectations, Arch/diocesan curriculum standards (local curriculum standards where Arch/diocesan standards don’t exist), and other governing authority expectations. Santa Barbara Catholic School (SBCS) has been using the Archdiocesan curriculum standards for its core subjects (Religion, Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies) since SY 20082009 and since SY 2010-2011 for Art, Music, Computer and Physical Education. These standards are identified in the different subject long range plans which teachers update every year. Along with the school’s Mission, Vision and SLEs, they are the basis for lesson plans, instruction and assessment. Based on the survey given to parents in SY 2011-2012, an average of 85 percent of the parents rated all subjects as effective or highly effective, with 87 percent saying the academic demands are just right. In the survey’s open-ended responses, many parents also noted that SBCS effectively prepares their children for high school (Appendix C-2). At the beginning of every school year, faculty and staff review the Mission, Vision and SLEs. Teachers are expected to identify the standards and SLEs they are targeting in their lesson plans as well in their long range plans. Beginning SY 2010-2011, the inclusion of Catholic values in daily lesson plans was implemented. Teachers also meet by department to discuss concerns, plans and developments in their subject areas. Teachers of consecutive grade levels also find time to discuss what was covered the previous school year to determine if the current teacher can move on to the next level. Welcome letters from each student’s teacher are also given to parents at the start of the school year to communicate the expectations and requirements for a particular subject and grade. Teachers also spend the first few days of the school year going over the Parent-Student Handbook, SLEs, classroom routines, and teacher-student expectations in their classes. Throughout the course of the year, teachers employ different assessment methods to determine if curriculum standards and SLEs are being met. Teachers utilize class discussions, quizzes, chapter/unit tests, quarterly exams, individual and group projects, journals, reflection papers, and self- and peer-evaluations, among others, to assess not just achievement of curriculum standards but also of SLEs. Students’ grades are regularly updated on RenWeb to show academic progress. Parent-teacher conferences are scheduled twice a year. Aside from this, parents and teachers also communicate through emails, phone calls and notes. SAT 10 and Assessment of Catechesis/Religious Education (ACRE) scores also provide input of how well SBCS students perform compared to their peers.

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In terms of Catholic formation, teachers make it a point to include Catholic values in their daily lessons. Daily prayers, monthly masses, service-oriented projects, and community prayer services are some examples of faith formation activities done in school. Reconciliation and First Holy Communion candidates and their parents attend retreats in preparation for the sacraments. With the creation of the Office of Faith Formation in SY 2011-2012, students from 5th to 8th grade are also able to experience grade-level retreats. If students are not performing at their expected level, teachers schedule parent meetings to assess problems and come up with strategies that will help improve performance. The homeroom teacher and Guidance Counselor are also informed so they can help follow-up the student’s progress. Regular communication between school and home through RenWeb, emails, phone calls, teacher notes and the student planner is essential in order for growth to occur. The rubric for deportment was updated in SY 2010-2011 to include a moderately satisfactory (MS) rating. This rating was included for students whose conduct was not satisfactory, yet not grave enough to merit a needs improvement (NI). Deportment grades are given every quarter and measure a student’s achievement of two SLEs: Committed Christians and Responsible Members of the Community. A copy of the rubrics is included in the Parent-Student Handbook. As with academic grades, teachers are expected to be in constant communication with parents regarding a student’s conduct in school. The SLEs have undergone review and revision in SY 2011-2012. Changes in the descriptors were done to make them more focused, understandable and relevant for the students. The leadership team also formalized the rubrics for the two SLEs used in deportment grades and this was presented to the faculty, students and parents at the start of SY 2012-2013. Rubrics for the remaining two SLEs are expected to be formalized this year. All classrooms have the SLEs clearly posted in places to highlight their importance in student life. In the survey given to students in grades four to eight, seventy eight percent of the students indicated that their teachers connected the lessons to the SLEs (Appendix C-4). Seventy three percent of surveyed parents stated they are aware of the SLEs (Appendix C-2).

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To further assist teachers in implementing the standards and SLEs, the school provides funding for professional development. Teachers are highly encouraged to attend workshops and conferences offered by the Archdiocese of Agana, the Catholic Schools Office, University of Guam, Guam Community College and other local establishments. Opportunities to attend offisland training are also provided. In-house training is conducted by invited resource speakers and qualified faculty members. Although SBCS has shown improvement in SAT 10 scores over the past two years, the school realizes that a significant percentage of its students are still scoring in the bottom quartile. Ideally, the school would like to see all of its students scoring above the 50th percentile. To meet this goal, additional professional development and implementation of learned strategies are needed. Strengthening the home-school partnership is also essential since there has to be consistent reinforcement and follow-up.

3 to 5 significant accomplishments in the area of Acceptable Progress by All Students that have had a positive impact on student learning: • • • •

The inclusion of Catholic values in teacher lesson plans Student retreats offered to grades 5 to 8 The adoption of Archdiocesan curriculum standards (SY 2008-2009 and SY 2010-2011) Updated Deportment rubrics measuring two SLEs

1 to 3 goals which need to be accomplished in the area of Acceptable Progress by All Students that will have a significant impact on student learning: • •

Approved rubrics for the remaining two SLEs Improved SAT 10 scores for those scoring below the 50th percentile

Evidence: • Archdiocesan curriculum standards • Long Range Plans • Lesson Plans • Student reflections on SLEs • Student Deportment self-evaluation • Appendix C • SLE rubrics WCEA  ISL  2010  

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F. INSTRUCTIONAL METHODOLOGY TO SUPPORT HIGH ACHIEVEMENT OF ALL STUDENTS The staff applies research-based knowledge about teaching and learning in the instructional process. Assessment is frequent and varied, integrated into the teaching/learning process, and informs curriculum planning. Santa Barbara Catholic School (SBCS) integrates Catholic values in its entire curriculum, including the co-curricular and extra-curricular activities programs. The school’s Mission and Vision Statements and Schoolwide Learning Expectations (SLEs) guide the students’ daily activities. The administration, teachers and staff are expected to serve as role models of the Catholic faith and its values. One hundred percent of the surveyed staff stated that there is a spirit of Christian community among faculty, parents, and students (Appendix C-1). Ninety two percent of parents indicated that SBCS provides an atmosphere where Christian values and attitudes are emphasized and practiced. Ninety one percent of these parents also said that SBCS’ mission and philosophy statements indicate integration of the Roman Catholic faith into all aspects of school life (Appendix C-2). Eighty four percent of students from 4th to 8th grade similarly stated that the teachers support the development of their faith and ninety seven percent of students from Kindergarten to 3rd grade said they learn about being Catholic in school (Appendix C-3 and C-4). Since SY 2010-2011, Catholic values have been included in the daily lesson plans. Teachers make it a point to teach the content of their subject, as well as point out important values and behaviors related to the instruction. As part of their classes, students are also assigned projects focusing on service, stewardship, compassion, generosity and social justice. Eighty percent of students from 4th through 8th grade say that the school provides them with opportunities to learn from each other. Students engage in various co-curricular and extra-curricular activities that allow the incorporation of Catholic values beyond the classroom setting. Students can join in numerous organizations such as, Academic Challenge Bowl (ACB), Art Club, Dance Club, Garage Band, Honor Choir, Interscholastic Sports, MATHCOUNTS, Math Olympiad, Mercy Club, National Junior Honor Society (NJHS), Robotics Club, Student Council (STUCO), Yearbook, and Youth Crime Watch (YCW). SBCS presents two major productions involving the entire student body each school year. Members of the community are involved as actors, dancers, chorus members, directors, choreographers, and production crew. Students are also invited to participate in contests sponsored by various community organizations such as PBS Kids, Veterans Commission, UOG Isla Center for the Arts, and the Red Ribbon Committee, among others. Involvement in these activities allows students to interact with peers from other classes, grade levels or schools. They also learn the values of cooperation, teamwork, fair play and service. These plays and contests showcase student talents and appreciation of their gifts by sharing them with others. The

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importance of these extra-curricular activities is illustrated by eighty percent of the 4th through 8th grade students surveyed stating that they are important (Appendix C-4). Thirty six instructional staff in SBCS have either undergraduate or graduate degrees (Appendix A-3). All are highly encouraged to continue their professional growth through attendance in different workshops and conferences offered on or off-island. The Archdiocese of Agana, University Of Guam, Guam Community College, and Guam International Reading Association (IRA) are some local institutions that regularly offer opportunities for professional development. A majority of these opportunities are often subsidized by the school. Membership in professional organizations like the Guam IRA and National Council of Teachers in Mathematics (NCTM) is also promoted. In-service sessions during monthly faculty and departmental meetings are also provided by invited resource speakers or qualified faculty. Through these activities, teachers are expected to hone their skills and update their knowledge in their respective subject areas. In an effort to meet the expectation that all Catholic School teachers must be certified as catechists, all faculty members are required to avail of opportunities provided for their ongoing faith formation. All teachers are expected to present their lessons in a manner in which students can relate. Diverse instructional techniques such as question-and-answer, role-playing, songs, games, dances, rewards/incentives, positive reinforcement, outdoor activities like nature walks and investigations, field trips, hands-on activities, cooperative learning, individual and group projects, literary circles, one-on-one sessions, reading logs, journal writing, incorporating pop culture, foldables, prayer experiences, videos, multimedia presentations, and the widespread use of technology are just some of the strategies being used in class. These strategies try to ensure that different learning needs and styles are addressed. Students have expressed in surveys that they learn better if lessons are made more enjoyable and relevant to them.

In addition to the standardized SAT 10, different formative and summative assessments are also used to measure achievement of standards and SLEs. Teachers employ traditional and nontraditional practices: homework, worksheets, written quizzes, quarter exams, student observations, exit cards, student presentations, peer- and self-evaluations, practical tests, reflection papers, research papers, and projects, to assess lea ning. Furthermore, interactive whiteboards, multimedia projectors and laptops, as provided by Title V-A, and online portals are some technological resources utilized by our teachers. WCEA  ISL  2010  

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Title V-A has also provided numerous classroom resources such as book carts, student whiteboards, Science Kits, Math manipulatives, globes, wall maps, and reference books that teachers can use to enhance students’ learning experiences. Language Arts teachers monitor student reading progress through online tests provided by Scholastic Reading Counts! (SRC!) and Scholastic Reading Inventory (SRI). These are two reading programs that aim to improve comprehension, vocabulary, and fluency skills. The test results help teachers to plan achievable reading goals. Accommodations, such as giving more time to finish an assignment, modifying tests and quizzes, allowing the use of certain aids like note cards or calculators, reading questions aloud, among others, are also provided for students who require assistance. Based on the results of these various assessments, teachers determine the effectiveness of a lesson, and identify individuals who may need special attention. Teachers are able to refer students to the Guidance Counselor for evaluation for services from Guam’s DOE Special Education and a Child Study Team is formed to address the student’s situation. With the rapid growth of technology, and the diverse needs of students in today’s society, SBCS recognizes the importance of continuing to update such resources as: technology, textbooks, instructional materials, equipment, etc. Teachers will need to continue to be innovative in their teaching and assessment to correctly measure student achievement, thus the need for additional professional development. SBCS supports continued teacher enhancement of instructional knowledge and methodologies through staff development opportunities that improve student learning and academic achievement. 3 to 5 significant accomplishments in the area of Curriculum and Instruction that have had a positive impact on student learning: • The widespread use of instructional technology • Title V-A acquisitions • Co-curricular and extra-curricular activities that allow the incorporation of Catholic values beyond the classroom setting • The implementation of Scholastic Reading Inventory/Reading Counts! 1 to 3 goals which need to be accomplished in the area of Curriculum and Instruction that will have a significant impact on student learning: • More forms of assessment • Additional professional development on instructional methodology, technology and assessment Evidence • Student work aligned to standards and/or SLEs • Samples of summative assessments aligned to the standards/SLEs • Samples of formative assessments aligned to the standards/SLEs • In-Depth Studies • Staff Development Program • Use of Federal Program funds • Integration of technology into the instructional process

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G. SUPPORT FOR STUDENT SPIRITUAL, PERSONAL, AND ACADEMIC GROWTH Within the school’s community of faith, students have opportunities to participate in support services and activities to assist them in accessing the curricular and co-curricular programs to achieve the Schoolwide Learning Expectations, Arch/diocesan curriculum standards (local curriculum standards where Arch/diocesan standards don’t exist), and other governing authority expectations. Parents have expressed that they prefer SBCS because of its Catholic education. Faith and values are integrated and evident in the community’s daily living and students have expressed that they feel safe. They believe that the school is a caring environment where the administrators, faculty, staff and parents do all they can to help them achieve the SLEs. The following support services contribute to this regard: The Office of Faith Formation was established in SY 2011-2012 to ensure a vibrant faith life in the community and that all activities would be guided by the school’s mission and vision. It coordinates and conducts faith formation activities such as the Information for Growth (IFG) assessment for the faculty, monthly liturgical celebrations, biannual confessions, Catholic Schools Week activities, school-wide and archdiocesan events and prayer services, retreats for students, faculty and staff, sacramental preparation for parents, catechist certification, opportunities for service, and collaborating with other Mercy Schools via the Mercy Charism Group. The Office of Faith Formation has also served the Archdiocese by designing and conducting its Lenten Retreat in March 2012. The impact of faith formation can be seen in the overall high scores of the 5th grade and 8th grade students in the Assessment of Catechesis/Religious Education (ACRE), and the positive feedback from parents and other schools regarding our alumni. The Health Counselor’s Office provides: First Aid, Annual Immunization Survey, Health Information Dissemination, Pediculosis Inspection, Public Health Services, and Sight and Hearing Tests. The Health Counselor also coordinates with the American Red Cross for the annual renewal and training of teachers, coaches and staff in life-saving techniques such as the abdominal thrust and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). Events that foster well-being have also been offered in coordination with varied local agencies to promote National Red Ribbon Week, and the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse in Youth for Youth conferences. Guidance Counseling Services offer classroom lessons primarily on character education and bullying prevention. Other topics are addressed as needed, including individual and group counseling. While SBCS offers SPED services, it is limited and differs from year to year depending on DOE's budget for outsourcing. Teachers have had some training from representatives of DOE on giving accommodations and modifications to special needs students (hearing and speech impaired, ADHD). However, the school sees the need for more training in WCEA  ISL  2010  

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this area to better service these students. The guidance counselor also leads child study teams, conducts student observations, provides academic guidance, oversees the administration of standardized tests such as the Brigance Test for new enrollees, the Assessment of Catechesis/Religious Education (ACRE) for 5th and 8th grade, and the Stanford Achievement Tests (SAT 10). By collaborating with government agencies such as the Office of the Attorney General, Guam Army National Guard, and the general community, the counselor has facilitated character-building sessions like Responsible Use of Technology, Anti-Bullying Campaign and multiple Career Days. In SY 2011-2012, the SBCS guidance counselor also served the Archdiocese by taking a lead role in designing the C.H.O.I.C.E. Program, a behavior modification program for Archdiocesan elementary and middle schools. SBCS reinstated the Rainbows For All Children program in SY 2010-2011. Rainbows is a support group for students in grades K-8 who are grieving the loss of a loved one, are living in single-parent households, or in blended families. SBCS offers an Extended Care Program from 3:00 - 5:30 p.m. to accommodate the busy schedules of our families. Faculty, or peer tutors from the 8th grade assist participating students with their schoolwork. On designated days, they can access library resources to do research and other assignments. Students are also provided with snacks and playground time. The school has upgraded the Library’s facilities and resources. Through the years, Title V-A grants and READVENTURE funds have enabled the library to augment its book collection and acquire six computers, an ink-jet printer, book carts and shelves. Donations from students, parents, faculty, and student organizations of books, DVDs, and audio books have also contributed to the library’s growth. Students from 4th through 8th grade participate in the Reading for Enjoyment and Development (R.E.A.D.) program facilitated by the librarian. As of SY 20122013, the library is open after school to students who need time to do research, schoolwork and borrow books. The primary purpose of the Athletic Program in SBCS is to promote the physical, mental, social, emotional and moral being of the students. It is our hope that the program will be a positive force in preparing our young people for an enriching and vital role in society. Physical Education classes are complemented by the Presidential Fitness Program and the Independent Interscholastic Athletic Association of Guam (IIAAG). IIAAG organizes the following sports: volleyball, basketball, soccer, rugby, and track and field. Parents and athletes are required to sign an agreement adhering to school’s athletic program guidelines provided by an Athletic Handbook. Student athletes must meet eligibility requirements. The Co-Curricular and Extra-Curricular Programs supplement classroom learning by providing opportunities in varied settings and instilling a positive attitude toward learning. Student Council (STUCO), the National Junior Honor Society (NJHS), Mercy Club, Youth Crime Watch (YCW) and Boy Scouts of America help build character, service, and develop life and leadership skills. These groups offer activities such as peer tutoring, recycling, beach cleanups, tree-planting and other 350.org activities, participation in the Department of Youth Affairs’

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Youth Conferences, National Red Ribbon Celebrations and suicide prevention walk, visit to the infirmed sisters at the Mercy Care Center and bake sales for the benefit of Catholic Social Services. Students learn to appreciate life, other people and themselves and give back to others what they learn.

Another activity offered by STUCO is the Alternative Class Program; which offers marmar and rosary making, cooking, and health and fitness classes like yoga and Zumba, among others. Students also participate in various academic challenges, such as the Math Olympiad, MATHCOUNTS, Island-wide Science Fair, Academic Challenge Bowl, Scripps Spelling Bee, Geography Bee, Money Island, PBS Essay writing contest, poster making contests, and other island-wide contests. SBCS students frequently achieve top honors in these competitions. (Exhibit C) In SY 2011-2012, three new organizations were created: the Robotics Club, Garage Band, and Dance Club.

SBCS has a noted reputation for excelling in the performing arts. All students are given the opportunity to experience and participate in different aspects of the Visual and Performing Arts Programs and apply what they learn in their classes. They are involved in everything from the audition process to production work, and performing on stage. Students who wish to participate must first obtain academic clearance from their teachers. The school has produced value-laden plays and helps students learn generosity and mercy by sharing their talents, gifts and the values with others. Students from other private and public schools are invited to watch WCEA  ISL  2010  

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the matinees at reduced ticket prices. Matinees have also been attended by members of a group home for mentally and physically disabled adults. Excerpts from the plays have been performed for the elderly in the St. Dominic’s Senior Care Center, for the children in the Pediatric Unit at Guam Memorial Hospital and patients in the Skilled Nursing Unit. As part of one of the Christmas plays, new toys were collected by the student body to be sent as gifts to the poor children of Payatas, a mission area of the Sisters of Mercy in the Philippines. Staging of these musicals are partly funded by a grant from the Guam Council on the Arts and Humanities Agency. (Exhibit C)

In the Honor Choir, students have the opportunity to develop and use their talents for school events, for the Church in school-wide liturgical celebrations, as well as outreach activities such as co-hosting a concert that helped raise $10,000 in 2009 for Typhoon Ondoy victims in the Philippines. The Garage Band and the Dance Club, established in SY 11-12, have also given students a setting to hone their talents and help enhance prayer services and celebrations, participate in school plays and other SBCS school-wide events. The Art Club provides the students artistic and aesthetic development in photography, sculpture, and painting. Summer Programs offer remedial classes, enrichment in reading and math, and various sports clinics. Following the success of the STUCO sponsored Alternative Class Programs beginning SY 10-11 and the Catholic Schools’ Week 2012 Youth Camp, in 2012 a second track of enrichment programs called District 12 was created, to help students develop holistically, offering alternative classes in leadership, health and nutrition, dance, group dynamics and robotics among many others.

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As expressed in the school’s WASC 2007 Action Plan and strengthened in the 2010-2011 FiveYear Strategic Plan, the school has been upgrading equipment, technological capabilities and resources through Title V-A grants and school funds. Since SY 2007-2008, Title V-A grants have funded a second Computer Lab, computers, printers, laptops, projectors, interactive whiteboards, document cameras, iPads, Science DVDs and Kits, book carts, globes, student whiteboards, library books, and numerous other resources for Language Arts, Math, Science and Social Studies. The Language Arts department has incorporated the Scholastic Reading Inventory/Scholastic Reading Counts!, and until recently, MyWritingWeb, into its curriculum. These are online reading and writing programs that help evaluate and track a student’s progress. Other programs and resources used by the teachers are the Spartans Connect for online journaling, Shepherd software for Social Studies, Bank of Guam’s Money Island in Math and other learning websites such as Busted Halo, USCCB.org for Religion and BrainPOP. RenWeb, an Internet-based school management system fully implemented by SBCS in SY 2008-2009 helps shareholders communicate, manage and plan lessons, grades, and other processes vital to school life. Teachers have attended technology training sessions with the systems administrator or online conferences regarding the use of new programs and technologies. They also collaborate regarding the use of these resources and technologies for integrated classroom presentations, schoolwork and projects using various tools such as Google Drive, Prezi, PowerPoint, Opera and iMovie. Internet may be accessed in all parts of the campus. Videos pertinent to lessons may be viewed online through learning websites and DVDs. Through a grant given by the Department of Public Health and Social Services Child Care Development Fund (CCDF), the pre-K students have the use of a computer, different learning software, a listening center, puppets, reading books and manipulatives. A technology plan was initially developed in 2009 by a committee composed of SBCS teachers and parents. However, the draft created was tabled due to a lack of personnel to coordinate the process. Moreover, other pressing needs emerged that required the school’s attention. The school’s Strategic Plan includes reviving the technology committee in order to review and improve the technology plan. The school employs a wide range of strategies to ensure that parental and community involvement are integrated in the school’s support system for students. A strong camaraderie exists among school personnel, parents and the community. Parents, grandparents and extended family are present in SBCS events such as PTO meetings, sports events, faith experiences like masses, processions and school-wide prayer services, and fundraisers as participants and parent volunteers. They volunteer to watch the students on Tuesdays during faculty prayer service, serve as den leaders, chaperones, hosts for field trips and parties, and speakers for career days and show-and-tell. They participate as make-up benefactors, performers, artists, painters, prop and set makers, stage builders, technical and security crews, marketing and ticketing volunteers during plays.

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Strong parental support is also evident in the sports programs. Many parents are involved as volunteer coaches, and as “team moms/dads.” Parents are often seen providing food and drinks for the athletes during practices and game times. The presence of families is very strong in events such as Mercy Day, Ice Cream Festival, Chamorro Day, 5K/2K Fun Run, UN day, the Diamond Jubilee celebration, Spring and Christmas productions, Royal Court, Catholic Schools Week activities, Immaculate Conception and Santa Barbara Fiesta processions, Respect for Life and other prayer rallies. Parental support for fundraisers and outreach activities is equally noteworthy. Car washes, bake sales, canned goods drives for Catholic Social Services and the Santa Barbara Parish soup kitchen, and donations to the poor and victims of global natural disasters are just some of these activities.

The community leaders are a strong source of school support. The Mayor’s Office generously helps in the logistics for special events, supports school projects and participates in special school activities. The students serve the village by helping paint the bus stop near the school and conducting park and church clean-ups during Catholic Schools Week. Corporate as well as family businesses support student learning and safety. Bank of Guam has been a major benefactor of SBCS for over 30 years. They have provided financial support for the many endeavors the school undertakes such as the annual spring productions and 5K Fun Run/Walk Fundraiser. For the past eight years, Hawaiian Rock Products’ sponsorship of the Newspapers in Education (NIE) program has provided students copies of the Pacific Daily News. In SY 2011-2012, they also donated materials and services for paving the school’s south parking lot. Other businesses who have contributed to SBCS over the decades are Asia Pacific Airlines, Pacific Sign Shop, Mobil Oil Guam, Forex among others.

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3 to 5 significant accomplishments in the area of Support for Spiritual, Personal, and Academic Growth that have had a positive impact on student learning: •

• • •

The faith formation of the whole community, teachers, parents, and students, as seen through masses, retreats, sacramental preparation and reception, and integration with classes, cocurricular activities, events and daily life is deliberate and purposeful The strong, vibrant, varied and mission-conscious co-curricular and extra-curricular activities that contribute to the holistic development of the students The integration of technology and programs in the curriculum, communications, and management of the school An active partnership with parents, community and businesses in school activities as well as fundraising activities

1 to 3 goals which need to be accomplished in the area of Support for Spiritual, Personal, and Academic Growth that will have a positive impact on student learning: • •

Finalize and implement an approved technology plan Although opportunities exist for developing the many gifts and talents of the students, more teacher training is needed to help students with special needs

Evidence: • Health forms • Counselor referral forms • Play booklets and videos • List of Organizations (co- and extracurricular) and Rosters • ACRE results • SAT 10 results • Library upgrades • Pictures of activities: sports, formation, events, organizations

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• • • • • • •

Technology plan draft Lists of winners in the science fair, art, essay and other contests Video/brochure of SEP District 12 NCLB management plan and quarterly reports Athletic Handbook Parent-Student Handbook Photos showing parental involvement

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H. RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT TO SUPPORT HIGH ACHIEVEMENT OF ALL STUDENTS The pastor, principal, and school board develop, implement, and monitor resources and plans to ensure and support high achievement of all students of the Schoolwide Learning Expectations, Arch/diocesan curriculum standards (local curriculum standards where Arch/diocesan standards don’t exist), and other governing authority expectations. To ensure the sustainability of the school program and to support high achievement of the SLEs and Archdiocesan curriculum standards for all students, Santa Barbara Catholic School uses proper bookkeeping and accounting procedures to create, implement, and monitor the financial situation of the school. The school uses the approved chart of accounts adopted by the Archdiocese of Agana, using the Peachtree Complete Accounting software. Monthly financial reports are prepared by the school’s accountant and submitted to the Catholic Schools Office and the principal for review and proper oversight. To ensure quality business and accounting practices, the following responsibilities are assigned to the school’s business office personnel: Accounts Receivable Clerk • • • • • • •

Receives registration and tuition fees, school store sales, collections from classes and school organizations, sports clubs, fundraising activities, and others Issues official receipts for all collections made Reconciles accounts at the end of the day Deposits collections to the bank on a daily basis Generates an aging report for customer statement notification Prepares and updates the customer ledger Provides timely statement/reminders for delinquent tuition accounts

School Accountant • • • • • • •

Verifies/approves vendor invoices processed Verifies, approves, reconciles cash collections against recorded transaction Prepares annual budget with the administrators and monitors it during the year Prepares monthly financial report required by the Archdiocese of Agana Prepares SBCS faculty and staff payroll semi-monthly Maintains an updated book of accounts: general ledger, cash receipts, cash disbursement, payroll, bank reconciliation Maintains on-line banking transactions between the school and the bank.

By availing of Bank of Guam’s online banking services, the school has been able to increase organization, transaction convenience, and efficiency in the following areas: • •

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• • • •

Account summary of checking, savings, and loan accounts Daily download of bank balance Transfer of money between savings and checking accounts Transaction, adjustment, and reconciliation of all accounts

In SY 2011-2012 the cost of educating a child to set tuition and justify the fundraising efforts of the school was explored and adopted as a way to quantify the value of the education that students receive at SBCS. By quantifying the cost of education for each student SBCS was able demonstrate to shareholders how money is being spent and the school is better able justify its need for fundraising events. This information was disseminated to parents on Back to School night and in PTO meetings. Parents can clearly see the value of the education that is being provided at an affordable rate. The school’s operation is tuition-driven, thus, budget planning is significantly dependent on the school’s enrollment. The school has tapped on other sources of income and funding to ensure the availability of appropriate resources to support the school program and achievement of the Schoolwide Learning Expectations of the students. They include the following: • • • • • • •

Title V-A grants Cafeteria rental Extended Care program Fund-Raising activities Summer Class program Donations Grants from Guam Council on the Arts and Humanities Agency (CAHA)

In SY 2008-2009, the SBCS launched the Msgr. Zoilo Camacho Endowment Fund after it received a financial donation from the estate of the late Msgr. Zoilo Camacho, former pastor emeritus of Santa Barbara parish. Donations from benefactors and money raised from several fundraising activities have since been deposited in the Endowment Fund which was established to support tuition assistance and faculty development. A major action plan from the last accreditation process in 2007 was the development and implementation of a school-wide Strategic Plan. A strategic planning committee, composed of the Leadership team of the school, Sisters of Mercy, parents, alumni, and business leaders in the community, was organized and an outside consultant assisted the school in designing the planning process beginning in SY 2009-2010. In SY 2010-2011, after several meetings and consultations, the strategic plan of SBCS for the next five years was completed. One of the major recommended strategies in the area of finance that was immediately implemented by the school was to conduct a financial audit. In November 2011, the school hired the services of Ernst and Young Accounting Firm to formally begin the process of the school’s audit. To ensure that other resources (human, instructional, physical) are sufficient to sustain the school program and carry out the school’s purpose and student achievement of the SLE’s, the school has committed to the continuous development and improvement of these resources.

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Human Resources SBCS believes that its faculty and staff are its most vital resource. Therefore, careful consideration is taken in hiring only the most competent, qualified, and dedicated staff members. In the hiring process, aside from an applicant’s educational competence, an applicant’s moral values and beliefs are major considerations. The school’s Catholic identity, charism of the Sisters of Mercy, and the teacher’s role in furthering its mission are seriously discussed with an applicant during the interview process. Letters of recommendation from former employers and/or colleagues are reviewed. To nurture, support, and encourage the continuing educational development and ongoing formation of the faculty and staff, the school has increased its budget for professional development programs and technological workshops for on-island and off-island training. The Office of Faith Formation was established in school year 2011-2012 to oversee the faith formation program of the students as well as the faculty and staff. SBCS is proud of its faculty and staff members who willingly and generously share their talents and expertise not only with the school community but also with the Archdiocese. In particular, the school’s Director of Curriculum, Systems Administrator, Director of Faith Formation, Guidance Counselor, and Health Counselor have, in one way or another served as consultants, committee members, retreat facilitators, or an information technology consultant for the Archdiocese of Agana. In school year 2010-2011, one of the faculty members was recognized as the recipient of the Archbishop Anthony Apuron’s Servus Tuus Teacher of the Year. The awardee was chosen above all other candidates from Catholic schools throughout the Archdiocese. Instructional and Technological Resources The school continually upgrades its technology pertaining to network and telephony services, e.g. Internet bandwidth upgrade, VOIP (Voice-Over Internet Protocol) telecom services, and school-wide access to Wi-Fi services. Internet security has been upgraded with open DNS (domain name system) technology for web filtering. In SY 2008-2009, SBCS introduced a sophisticated student information system by acquiring the services of RenWeb, a web-based school management software that provides students, teachers, administrators and parents with an integrated database for accessing grades, lesson plans, homework, announcements, calendars, progress reports, report cards, transcripts and more---accessible anytime, anywhere via the Web. In SY 2011-2012, SBCS was the recipient of a grant from the Department of Public Health and Social Services to directly link the SBCS student health records with DPHSS. SBCS has previously used the E-Rate grant program for telecommunications and Internet charges from its service providers. Unfortunately, the school failed to follow through with its application for subsequent school years due to a change of personnel and lack of trained personnel to manage the process. A plan to revive the technology committee that will review and improve the current technology plan, drafted in 2009, is included in the school’s Strategic Plan.

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Since SY 2007-2008, the school has actively applied for and was granted Title V-A funding to acquire new textbooks, instructional resources, library books, multimedia projectors, interactive whiteboards, and additional laptops for use by the teachers and students in the library and classrooms. In SY 2008-2009, through a grant from Title V-A, middle school Language Arts and Mathematics classes started using a second Computer Lab in the school equipped with 25 MacBook computers and a charging cart. SBCS facilities provide a safe environment conducive to learning. Since the last accreditation visit, the school opened of Our Lady of Mercy Hall in 2007. SBCS’ newest building houses the cafeteria, five new classrooms, and a lift. The cafeteria contains a much improved and spacious eating facility for the students, complete with a built-in audio system, Internet access, restrooms, a water fountain and sink. Decorated with vibrant pictures, scripture passages and student work, it accommodates twice as many students and is used for other school functions. The new first floor classroom with a restroom is now home to the Pre-Kindergarten class and the other four new classrooms are 7th and 8th grade homerooms. Since its opening, the cafeteria has also become a multi-purpose venue used for PTO meetings and play rehearsals, among others.

In SY 2008-2009, a beautiful outdoor stage used for morning prayers, flag raising and other events was constructed. A donation from the Class of 2009 was used to help build the stage. In the same school year, the P.E. locker rooms for boys and girls were renovated for better ventilation and optimal use by students during P.E. classes as well as sports events. In SY 2011-2012, the students’ waiting area in the South side of the campus was renovated to better accommodate students who are waiting for their rides after school. From 2007 to present SBCS has invested in new wireless microphones, professional lapel microphones, lighting equipment, and a soundboard for use in school productions, assemblies, and prayer services. A major goal identified in the area of resources in the school’s strategic plan is to develop and implement a master plan for building, grounds utilization, maintenance, and an information technology infrastructure.

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3 to 5 significant accomplishments of the school in the areas of Resource Management and Development that have had a positive impact on student learning: • •

• • •

The construction and opening of Our Lady of Mercy Hall, housing 5 new classrooms, the cafeteria, a lift, and new bathrooms for the students in SY 2007-2008. The development and completion of the Strategic Plan of Santa Barbara Catholic School in 2010 which addresses multiple areas in the school’s operation, including resource and finance, and presents a comprehensive plan for the next five years A consistent and proactive approach in applying for grants through Title V-A that has resulted in significant technological and learning resources received by the school The ongoing financial audit of the school Investment of the school in its technological infrastructure particularly the use of RenWeb’s student information system

1 to 3 goals, which need to be accomplished in the area of Resource Management and Development that will have a significant positive impact on student learning: • •

Employ an E-rate consultant to assist the school in applying for E-rate funding for technology services and improvements Address the priority areas identified in the Strategic Plan relative to Resource and Finance.

Evidence: • • • •

58   b

Financial reports, tuition schedules, etc. Strategic Plan for the school Cost per child computation Examples of alumni involvement with the school

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CHAPTER 4 | ACTION PLAN A. DESIGN AND ALIGNMENT OF THE ACTION PLAN WITH THE SELF STUDY FINDINGS The Action Plan addresses the school’s critical goals to enhance student learning that supports high achievement of all students of the Schoolwide Learning Expectations, Arch/diocesan curriculum standards (local curriculum standards where Arch/diocesan standards don’t exist), and other governing authority expectations. List of Significant Accomplishments •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

The institution of the Office of Faith Formation that oversees, plans, and implements programs aimed at developing and forming the characters, values, culture, and spirituality of all the members of the community (3A) The numerous faith formation activities offered to the students, teachers, and parents that have allowed them to grow in their faith and strengthened the Catholic identity of the school (3A) The integration of Catholic values in lesson plans (3A, 3E) The participation and high involvement of the students, faculty, and staff in liturgies, prayer services and rituals. (3A) The revision of the school’s Vision and Mission statements and SLEs. (3B) The implementation of a rubrics for the SLEs Committed Christians and Responsible Members of the Community (3B) The provision of a safe, nurturing, clean, and welcoming school environment (3C) The organized and effective system of communication between the school and home via RenWeb and the school’s website (3C) The empowerment and training of lay teachers with expertise and commitment to Catholic education (3C) An increased budget for Faculty and Staff Development as well as faith formation activities (3C) An increasing trend in SAT 10 percentile scores in the past two years and the above average ACRE scores (3C) The establishment of the Msgr. Zoilo Camacho Endowment Fund (3C) More focus on Language Arts and Math (e.g., updated textbooks, mobile lab, interactive whiteboards, professional development) (3D) The use of RenWeb to provide updates to parents, students and teachers regarding student performance and other information (3D) Above average ACRE scores (3D) The increasing trend in SAT 10 percentile scores over the past two years (3D) A 100 percent acceptance rate for those applying to Catholic high schools (3D) Student retreats offered to grades 5 to 8 (3E) The adoption of Archdiocesan curriculum standards in SY 2008-2009 and SY 2010-2011 (3E) Updated Deportment rubrics measuring two SLEs (3E) The widespread use of instructional technology (3F)

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Chapter  4  |  Action  Plan  

• • • •

• • • •

• • •

Title V-A acquisitions (3F) Co-curricular and extra-curricular activities that allow the incorporation of Catholic values beyond the classroom setting (3F) The implementation of Scholastic Reading Inventory/Reading Counts! (3F) The faith formation of the whole community as seen through masses, retreats, sacramental preparation and reception, and integration with classes, co-curricular activities, events and daily life, is deliberate and purposeful. (3G) The strong, vibrant, varied and mission-conscious co-curricular, sports events, school productions, and faith formation activities that contribute to the holistic development of the students (3G) The integration of technology and programs in the curriculum, communications, and management of the school (3G) An active partnership with parents, community and businesses in school activities as well as fundraising activities (3G) The construction and opening of Our Lady of Mercy Hall, housing 5 new classrooms, the cafeteria, a lift, and new bathrooms for the students in SY 2007-2008 (3H) The development and completion of the Strategic Plan of Santa Barbara Catholic School in 2010 which addresses multiple areas in the school’s operation, including resource and finance, and presents a comprehensive plan for the next five years (3H) A consistent and proactive approach in applying for grants through Title V-A that has resulted in significant technological and learning resources received by the school (3H) The ongoing financial audit of SBCS (3H) The investment of the school in its technological infrastructure particularly the use of RenWeb’s student information system (3H)

List of Significant Goals • • • • • • • • • • • • •

60   b

Process the teacher certification of all faculty members (3A) Develop a comprehensive formation and service program for students, faculty, staff, and parents (3A) Implement rubrics for the two remaining SLEs (Effective Communicators and Creative Critical Thinkers) (3B, 3E) Monitor the implementation of and compliance with the revisions in the Parent-Student Handbook (3C) Continue technology training for the faculty, staff and parents in the effective and optimum use of RenWeb as a means of communication between teachers and parents (3C) More focus on underachieving students (3D) More opportunities for professional development and growth (3D) Develop a tuition and financial assistance model that will maximize and sustain an adequate level of enrollment (3D) Improved SAT 10 scores for those scoring below 50th percentile (3E) More forms of assessment (3F) Additional professional development on instructional methodology and assessment (3F) Finalize and implement an approved technology plan (3G) Although opportunities exist for developing the many gifts and talents of the students, more teacher training is needed to help students with special needs. (3G)

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Chapter  4  |  Action  Plan  

• •

Employ an E-rate consultant to assist the school in applying for E-rate funding for technology services and improvements (3H) Address the priority areas identified in the Strategic Plan relative to Resource and Finance (3H)

List of Critical Goals 1. Design a professional development plan on instructional methods, evaluation of teachers, and the incorporation of technology in the curriculum. Teachers are critical in the learning process. Therefore emphasis must be placed on programs and teaching methods that work. Through innovative teaching styles that incorporate technology in the teaching-learning process, teachers will achieve demonstrable strides towards a successful curriculum that will have an impact on student learning. Through a formal evaluation (evaluative and summative), the administration will be able to chronicle the impact and influence made by teachers on the academic, social, and emotional growth of the students placed in their charge. 2. Create a program to continue to improve SAT 10 scores of students across the board. The school’s focus on improving SAT 10 scores among its students has gained momentum in the last three school years. SBCS has utilized additional activities to assist the students in preparing for the annual standardized test. For instance, in SY 2010-2011, on-line practice tests from Bright Education that students can access in school or at home were introduced. Printable practice tests were also purchased from the same company and teachers have been using these up to the present. Then, in SY 2011-2012, 3rd graders were allowed to answer on the booklet itself instead of on a separate answer document. Teachers have also been creating various assessments similar in structure to those found in the SAT 10 to familiarize students with the test. These and other approaches by the teachers to motivate and prepare the students in taking the SAT 10 need to be reviewed and analyzed as there may be more appropriate test-preparation measures that may be beneficial and effective for the students. 3. Strengthen the faith formation and service programs for students, faculty, staff, and parents. With the establishment of the Office of Faith Formation in SY 2011-2012 and the appointment of a Director of Faith Formation, Santa Barbara Catholic School made faith formation a high priority, ensuring that it is infused in the curriculum from K4 through 8th grade. SBCS believes that faith formation is a continuous and lifelong process and must involve the cooperation and support of the parents who are the primary educators of their children in the Catholic faith. With this goal, SBCS seeks to create an environment where students can experience a sense of community and are encouraged to learn the truths of the Catholic faith, celebrate the Sacraments, identify with and embrace the charism of the Sisters of Mercy, and grow closer in a personal relationship with Our Lord Jesus Christ. This goal seeks to provide the students and their families with the tools necessary for living this vision

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Chapter   4  |  Action  Plan  

of a vibrant Catholic faith life through retreats, service projects, various prayer experiences, catechesis, immersion experiences, and others. 4. Develop a tuition and financial assistance model that will maximize and sustain an adequate level of enrollment. This goal is a recommended strategy in the Finance section of the school’s Strategic Plan. It has been observed that a major reason for families leaving Santa Barbara Catholic School is the families’ inability to cope with the financial responsibility, especially tuition fee payments. 5. Finalize and implement an approved Technology Plan. The technology plan of SBCS was initially developed in 2009 by a committee composed of SBCS teachers and parents. A draft was created but was tabled in subsequent years due to a lack of personnel to overview the process. Additionally, other priorities surfaced that required the school’s attention. A plan to revive the Technology Committee that will review and improve the 2009 draft is included in the school’s Strategic Plan.

Action Plan for Santa Barbara Catholic School Goal #1: (from Chapter 3-D and 3-F) Design a professional development plan on instructional methods, evaluation of teachers, and the incorporation of technology in the curriculum. Rationale for this Goal: Continued professional development in instructional methodology, regular evaluation of teachers, and the training in the use of technology, will influence and improve student achievement. It will also keep teachers up-to-date on new research about student learning, emerging technology tools for the classroom, new curriculum resources, and more. This goal is aligned with the SBCS Strategic Plan’s priority on curriculum development. Alignment with mission, philosophy, SLEs: Our goal is aligned with the School’s SLEs in that knowledge gained by teachers will translate to students who apply what they have learned to solve problems, use technology responsibly and enhance communication in accomplishing various tasks. Strategy #1

Activities

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Conduct professional development workshops and formative and summative evaluation of teachers in the classroom. 1. Professional Development seminars 3 times a year, i.e. beginning of the school year; first quarter and third quarter 2. Technology training as needed e.g. use of interactive whiteboards, electronic presentations, creating websites, etc.

Santa  Barbara  Catholic  School  

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Chapter  4  |  Action  Plan  

 

Cost or Resources & Sources Person(s) Responsible For Implementation

Process For Monitoring

Baseline Assessment

Ongoing Assessment

3. Monthly Faculty and Departmental Meetings 4. Formative and Summative evaluations of teachers. $5,000/year Invited speakers and presenters; Director of Curriculum, Systems Administrator, Master teachers as mentors Principal, Vice-Principal, Director of Curriculum, Director of Faith Formation, Systems Administrator • attendance roster in professional development meetings • departmental meetings • leadership team meetings • lesson plans • regular observations by Administration, Director of Curriculum • pre and post conferences with teachers • peer-to-peer observations • SAT 10 scores • Report card grades • Current teacher evaluation form • Long range plans and lesson plans that show implementation of effective, creative, and innovative teaching strategies that focus on student learning • Pre- and post-conferences for classroom observations.

Timeline Start/Stop

SY 2013-2014

Process for Communicating to Shareholders

• • • •

Strategy # 2

Activities

Cost or Resources & Sources

WCEA  ISL  2010  

PTO meetings departmental meetings faculty meetings correspondence with parents via RenWeb, email and website

Assess the teachers’ use of and integration of technology in the teaching-learning process. 1. Professional development seminars 3 times a year, i.e. beginning of the school year; first quarter and third quarter 2. Technology training as needed e.g. use of interactive whiteboards, electronic presentations, creating websites, etc. 3. Technology assessment of teachers for their portfolio and professional development documentation. 4. Informal and formal observation of classes $5,000/year Invited speakers and presenters; Director of Curriculum, Systems Administrator, Master teachers as mentors

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Chapter   4  |  Action  Plan  

Person(s) Responsible For Implementation

Process For Monitoring

Baseline Assessment

Ongoing Assessment

Principal, Vice-Principal, Director of Curriculum, Director of Faith Formation, Systems Administrator • attendance roster in professional development meetings • departmental meetings • leadership team meetings • lesson plans • regular observations by Administration, Director of Curriculum • pre and post conferences with teachers • SAT 10 scores • Current use of and integration of technology in teaching • ISTE’s National Educational Technology Standards and Performance Indicators for Teachers • Long range plans and lesson plans that show increased use and integration of technology in teaching and learning activities • Pre and post conferences for class observations.

Timeline Start/Stop

SY 2013-2014

Process for Communicating to Shareholders

• • • •

PTO meetings departmental meetings faculty meetings correspondence with parents via RenWeb, email and website

Goal # 2 (from Chapter 3-E) Create a program to continue to improve SAT 10 scores of students across the board. Rationale for this Goal: While the past two school years have shown an overall increase in the number of students scoring in the 50th percentile of higher, steps that have been taken by the school need to be more intentional and consistent. Alignment with mission, philosophy, SLEs: This goal is aligned with the school’s SLE’s by applying knowledge and mastery of problem solving skills and communicate effectively through active listening. Strategy #1

Activities

64   b

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Analyze and review the effectiveness of the current curriculum programs and activities offered by the school that have been adopted to improve SAT10 scores in the past 3 years 1. Create an individualized data base of SAT 10 scores for all students 2. Form a curriculum committee composed of elementary and middle school teachers and supervised by the Director of Curriculum. Santa  Barbara  Catholic  School  

WCEA  ISL  2010  

 


Chapter  4  |  Action  Plan  

Cost or Resources & Sources Person(s) Responsible For Implementation Process For Monitoring

Research materials, Director of Curriculum Principal, Vice-Principal, Director of Curriculum, Guidance Counselor, Systems Administrator • Regular meetings of curriculum committee • Leadership team meetings • Departmental meetings • Faculty meetings

Baseline Assessment

Analysis of SAT 10 scores

Ongoing Assessment

Data from research conducted by Curriculum team

Timeline Start/Stop

SY 2013-2014

Process for Communicating to Shareholders

• • • •

Strategy #2

Activities Cost or Resources & Sources Person(s) Responsible For Implementation

Process For Monitoring

Leadership team meetings PTO meetings Faculty meetings Correspondence with parents via RenWeb, email, and website

Provide students with multiple pathways to learning based upon individual student learning styles and needs. 1. Conduct an assessment of student learning styles and intelligences 2. Attend professional development addressing multiple intelligences and learning styles $5,000/year Research materials, Director of Curriculum, Guidance Counselor, invited speakers and presenters Principal, Vice-Principal, Director of Curriculum, Guidance Counselor, Systems Administrator • attendance roster in professional development meetings • departmental meetings • leadership team meetings • faculty meetings • lesson plans • classroom observations

Baseline Assessment

Analysis of SAT 10 scores

Ongoing Assessment

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Data from student assessment of learning styles and intelligences Santa  Barbara  Catholic  School  

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Chapter   4  |  Action  Plan  

• •

Lesson plans that show teachers addressing multiple intelligences and learning styles Pre- and post-observation conferences with teachers

Timeline Start/Stop

SY 2013-2014

Process for Communicating to Shareholders

• • • •

PTO meetings departmental meetings faculty meetings correspondence with parents via RenWeb, email, and website

Goal # 3 (from In-Depth Study) Explore the feasibility of honors classes for middle school and remedial classes for the elementary level in Language Arts Rationale for this Goal: SBCS currently does not offer a formal program to specifically target those who need remediation and those who are already excelling in Language Arts. The school would like to evaluate its resources and capabilities of implementing a curriculum that will cater to and support their learning needs. Alignment with mission, philosophy, SLEs: Our goal is aligned with the School’s Mission of offering “… a comprehensive curriculum that integrates technology and wide-ranging activities to develop the gifts and potential of each child” and Vision “to empower them to face life’s challenges and opportunities.” Furthermore, it is also aligned with the SLEs of forming Creative Critical Thinkers and Effective Communicators.

Strategy # 1

Create a Language Arts committee that will study the feasibility of an honors class in middle school and remedial classes in the elementary level

Activities

1. Regular committee meetings 2. Attend professional development on gifted and talented and struggling students

Cost or Resources & Sources

$5,000/year research materials, Director of Curriculum, Guidance Counselor, Language Arts Department, invited speakers and presenters

Person(s) Responsible for Implementation

Director for Curriculum, Language Arts Department

Process for Monitoring

• •

Baseline Assessment

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regular reports to the administration faculty meetings

current SAT 10 scores, report card grades Santa  Barbara  Catholic  School  

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Chapter  4  |  Action  Plan  

Ongoing Assessment

findings of Language Arts committee

Timeline Start/Stop

SY 2014-2015

Process for Communicating to Shareholders

• • • •

Leadership team meetings PTO meetings faculty meetings correspondence with parents via RenWeb, email, and website

Action Plan Timeline Month / Year August 2013

Goal #1 Design a professional development plan on instructional methods, evaluation of teachers, and the incorporation of technology in the curriculum.

Strategy or Activity Provide professional development training on technology use.

September 2013

see above

Faculty to fill up a “Technology in Teaching and Learning” form as a record of how technology is being infused within the teaching and learning activities.

October 2013 and March 2014

see above

Provide professional development training on educational topics determined by Principal and Director of Curriculum

WCEA  ISL  2010  

Cost

Person Responsible Principal, Director of Curriculum, Systems Administrator

Other To be done during the faculty orientation workshop

Systems Administrator

stipend for invited speaker

Santa  Barbara  Catholic  School  

Principal and/or designated faculty

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Chapter   4  |  Action  Plan    

Month / Year OctoberNovember 2013

see above

Summative Evaluation of teachers

SY 13-14

see above

Professional development workshops - onisland and offisland

August 2013

b

see above

Strategy or Activity Formative Evaluation of teachers

JanuaryFebruary 2014

Month / Year June-July 2013

68  

Goal #1

Goal # 2 Create a program to continue to improve SAT 10 scores of students across the board. see above

September 2013

see above

September 2013

see above

September 2013 to

see above

Page  

Strategy or Activity Create an individualized data base of students’ SAT 10 scores. Conduct an assessment of student learning styles and intelligences Report re: assessment of learning styles and intelligences Establish a curriculum team

Cost

Registration fees, travel and accommodation fees Cost mmm

Regular meetings of Santa  Barbara  Catholic  School  

Person Responsible Principal, Vice-Principal, Director of Curriculum, Director of Faith Formation Principal, Vice-Principal, Director of Curriculum, Director of Faith Formation Principal, Director of Curriculum or designated faculty

Other Every year

Every two years

Every year

Person Responsible Director of Curriculum; Guidance Counselor

Other Updated yearly

Director of Curriculum; Guidance Counselor

Every year

Director of Curriculum; Guidance Counselor Principal, Vice-Principal, Director of Curriculum, Director of Finance Director of Curriculum,

Every year

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Chapter  4  |  Action  Plan  

Month / Year April 2014

Goal # 2

September see above 2013 to April 2014 May 2014

see above

SY 13-14

see above

Month / Year May 2014

Goal # 3

Strategy or Activity curriculum team Monthly departmental, faculty, and leadership team meetings Report from curriculum team re: findings Attend professional development addressing multiple intelligences and learning styles Strategy or Activity Create a Language Arts committee

Explore the feasibility of an honors class for middle school and remedial classes for the elementary level in Language Arts September see above Regular 2014 to meetings of April 2015 Language Arts committee SY 14-15 see above Attend professional development on gifted, talented and struggling students May 2015 see above Report from Language Arts committee

WCEA  ISL  2010  

Cost

Registration fees

Cost

Registration fees

Santa  Barbara  Catholic  School  

Person Responsible Curriculum Committee members Principal, Vice-Principal, Director of Curriculum

Other

Principal, Director of Curriculum Principal, Director of Curriculum, designated faculty

Person Responsible Principal, Vice-Principal, Director of Curriculum

Other

Director of Curriculum, Language Arts Department Principal, Director of Curriculum, designated faculty Director of Curriculum, Language Arts Department Page  

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Chapter   4  |  Action  Plan    

B. CAPACITY TO IMPLEMENT AND MONITOR THE ACTION PLAN The school demonstrates the capacity to implement and monitor an Action Plan that ensures high achievement of all students of the Schoolwide Learning Expectations, Arch/diocesan curriculum standards (local curriculum standards where Arch/diocesan standards don’t exist), and other governing authority expectations. Similar to the strategic planning process used in SY 2010-2011, the road map for the next five years is set and the school is ready for its implementation. Santa Barbara Catholic School relies on its shareholders’ sense of ownership, support, and commitment to the Action Plan that has been decided after more than a year of working on the self-study process. The school will continue to appropriately involve shareholders in the implementation of the Action Plan through the involvement and collaboration of people responsible in the goals identified. When the school received a 6R Accreditation from the last WASC visit in 2007, the action plans adopted were used as the school’s guide in ensuring that the right direction and priorities were set. In light of new developments during its implementation, the action plans were slightly revised in the mid-term report in SY 2009-2010 to reflect progress made. A priority action plan from the previous accreditation that had a major impact upon the current self-study was the development of a process to design and implement a school-wide strategic plan that identifies growth areas and needs of the school. Completed in the Fall of 2011, the strategic plan addresses multiple areas of the school’s operation, i.e. purpose, governance, curriculum, finances, and enrollment and marketing. The current self-study utilized the strategic plan as a major resource and served as a “reference for action” for balanced decision-making, implementation of strategies, and for the continued growth and development of the school. The three goals formulated in this current self-study distinctly focus on improving student learning via faculty development and evaluation of teachers, the use of technology, and review and analysis of curricular programs and activities to improve SAT 10 scores. Since these goals are critical in enhancing the learning of all students, it is important that an accountability system for monitoring the accomplishment of the plan be established. This system will also ensure that the timeline set for the action plan is followed. Regular communication with parents via RenWeb, emails, face-to face meetings, PTO meetings, as well as faculty, department and leadership team meetings where updates and analysis will be reported and/or discussed will be given utmost importance. In monitoring the action plan relative to professional development and evaluation of teachers, the school commits to quality teacher evaluation by providing meaningful feedback and appropriate support and resources. The impact of the action plan will be evaluated: through a proactive analysis of the yearly SAT 10 results, through an evaluation of individual workshops and experiences, by its effect on individual teachers, and through improved teaching-learning experiences in the classroom resulting from staff development training. In accomplishing the Action Plan in the area of professional development of teachers, the school intends to employ in-house faculty and the services of outside consultants who are experts in their fields. While considering the implementation of the action plan, including resource allocation and financial factors, no major impediments are anticipated. Upon completion of the ongoing audit, the school will be able to make the best decision in terms of designating funds for the action plans adopted.

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Appendix  A  |  School  Profile    

Appendix A-1 School Profile – Basic Information Santa Barbara Catholic School School Name

K4 to 8th grade Grades

(671) 632-5578 School Phone

274 W. Santa Barbara Ave Ste A Address

Dededo City

GU 96929 State Zip

Sr. Jeanette Marie Pangelinan Principal

sjmp@sbcs.edu.gu E-mail address

Rev. Fr. Paul Gofigan Pastor

Public School District

Sr. Jeanette Marie Pangelinan Director of Education for Religious Community in School 274 W. Santa Barbara Ave Ste A Address

Sisters of Mercy of the Americas South Central Community Religious Community

Dededo City

Does your school have a school board? If yes, is it an advisory body or a governing body? Who is the chair/president?

(671) 632-2384 Home Phone

GU 96929 State Zip ___ Yes [ X ] No ___ Advisory ___ Governing

__________________________________________

Do you have a Preschool Program?

[ X ] Yes

What are the hours of operation?

___ No

7:50 a.m. to 2:50 p.m.

Do you have an Extended Day Program?

[ X ] Yes

What are the hours of operation?

3:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

What are the fees?

$120/month including snacks

How many families participate?

13 families

___ No

For which grades do you have waiting lists? 8th grade (SY 2012-2013) Do you have an approved Technology Plan?

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Santa  Barbara  Catholic  School  

___ Yes

[ X ] No

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Appendix  A  |  School  Profile  

Appendix A-2 School Profile – Current Enrollment Information GRADE LEVEL Pre-K K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Total ETHNIC GROUP Chamorro Chinese Filipino Japanese Korean Multi-Racial Palauan Polish Taiwanese Vietnamese Total

School Year 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012

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MALE

FEMALE

TOTAL

10 22 21 21 16 16 19 22 22 22 191 (43%)

13 27 29 24 20 26 21 32 26 40 258 (57%)

23 49 50 45 36 42 40 54 48 62 449

CATHOLIC

NON-CATHOLIC

TOTAL

33 283 89 1 1 1 408 (91%)

1 4 13 2 2 17 1 1 41 (9%)

34 (7.6%) 4 (0.9%) 296 (65.9%) 2 (0.4%) 2 (0.4%) 106 (23.6%) 1 (0.2%) 1 (0.2%) 1 (0.2%) 2 (0.4%) 449

Number of Graduates Boys / Girls 52 48 57 46 58

Number applying to Catholic high schools Boys / Girls 35 44 26 26 27

Number accepted by Catholic high schools Boys / Girls 35 44 36 26 27

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Appendix  A  |  School  Profile    

Appendix A-3 School Profile – Instructional (Teaching) Staff Name

Grade Subj.

Catholic/ NonCath. Catholic

Teaching Certificate

Highest Degree

Professional EducatorSecondary

BA Secondary Education; MA Credits AB Interdisciplinary Studies; MA Catholic Educational Leadership (ongoing) BS Elementary Education (Special Ed); BS Commerce (Marketing) AB Interdisciplinary Studies

Total Yrs. Exp. 10

Exp. this school 5

23

13

F

5

5

F

11

3

M

M/F

Abad, Brenda Rose

7 -8 Language Arts

Alcantara, Bernadette

7-8 Religion

Catholic

Badong, Clara

4 Language Arts; 4, 6 Science

Catholic

Balance, Delson

5-7 Religion

Catholic

Cabe, Jenice

2 Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies 1-4 Physical Education

Catholic

Current Student General Course

5

5

F

Catholic

23

6

F

Camaganacan, Louella Catolos, Grace Cena, Julius Cesar

K4 Aide

Catholic

BS Education Major in Physical Education BA Psychology

14

5

F

K Aide

Catholic

11

8

F

6-7 Math; 4-8 Art

Catholic

4.5

3

M

Cepeda, Karl

7 Language Arts; 5-8 Music 1 Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies 7-8 Math, 3-5 Music (1st semester); currently on leave

Catholic

Computer Secretarial BA Anthropology and Psychology Minors in Fine Arts and Sociology BA Communication and Fine Arts/Music BS Elementary Education

5

5

M

39

26

F

7

4.5

F

5 Science; 4-5 Social Studies 5-8 Math

Catholic

34

23

F

10

5

F

Calumaya, Evangeline

Damian, Erlina Diaz, Maria Dolores

Dizon, Vicky Flor Elomina, Rizalina

WCEA  ISL  2010  

Catholic Catholic

Catholic

Certificate in Youth Ministry (ongoing)

Certificate in Teaching

Bachelor of Music in Piano Performance; BS Nursing; Diploma in Mathematics Teaching (ongoing) AB Education; MA units in Education BS Math; AA Early Childhood Education

Santa  Barbara  Catholic  School  

F

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Appendix  A  |  School  Profile  

Name

Grade Subj.

Catholic/ NonCath. Catholic

Fernandez, Madeleine

K Art; K-2 Music; K Physical Education

Gonzales, Barbara

1 Religion; 1 Art

Catholic

Guevara, Joyce Legaspi, Glorilyn

4 Religion, Math, Science K4 Religion, Language Arts, Math, Science, Music, PE 6-8 Science

Catholic

2 Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies 5 Language Arts

Catholic

1 Math, Art

Catholic

5-8 Physical Education 3 Language Arts, Math, Science

Catholic

Nelson, Timothy

Math 7-8

Catholic

Padios, Cecilia

2 Religion; 3 Social Studies; 2-3 Art; K-1 Computer 6-8 Social Studies

Catholic

K Aide; on maternity leave

Catholic

Limjap, Lolita

Lumanog, Elizabeth Mansfield, Stephanie Miranda, Gerry Lyn Ara Mojas, Rafael Navasca, Trinidad

Pangelinan, Margarita Perez, Ederly

Teaching Certificate

Certificate in Education

Catholic

Exp. this school 10

5

6

F

17

5

F

7

3

F

27

12

F

32

13

F

BA Psychology minor in Communication BS Elementary Education

4

1

F

6

3

F

Bachelor in Physical Education BS Elementary Education; MA units BA Math and Secondary Education; MA units in Administration and Supervision BA Business Management

24

3

M

36

25.5

F

10

4 mos

M

12

12

F

Bachelor of Liberal Arts (Political Science) Bachelor in Elementary Education

3

3

F

7

1

F

BS Elementary Education; MA Education / Administration and Supervision (CAR) BS Commerce (International Business) BS Tourism BA Elementary Education with units in Early Childhood Education BS Education; MA units in Science Education; MA units in Science and Technology BS Elementary Education

Catholic

Catholic

NonCatholic

Catholic

Total Yrs. Exp. 33

Highest Degree

Certificate in Teaching

M/F F

 

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Appendix  A  |  School  Profile    

Name Ramos, Victoria Roxas, Kristine

Salas, Rellieta

Grade Subj. K Religion, Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies 6 Language Arts

Catholic/ NonCath. Catholic

Catholic

3 Religion, Math, Language Arts, K Religion, Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies 8 Honors Math

Catholic

Suplido, Joel Raymund Suplido, Luz

2-8 Computer

Catholic

5 Language Arts

Catholic

Valdeavilla, Mary Ann Yanger, Grace

K Aide

Catholic

1 Religion, Language Arts, Science, Social Studies

Catholic

Scavetta, Teresita Suplido, Arleen-Doris

WCEA  ISL  2010  

Catholic

Catholic

Teaching Certificate

Total Yrs. Exp. 35

Exp. this school 31

BA Theater Arts Major in Playwriting and Directing; MA in Language and Literacy Education (ongoing)

10

4.5

F

BS Elementary Education AA Child Development

32

13

F

23

23

F

BS Physics; MA and MS units in Teaching Math BS Management

21

8

F

19

11

M

MA units in Teaching and Supervision BS Nursing; MA units in Nursing BA Elementary Education; MA units in Special Education

47

15

F

3 months 21

3 months 9

F

Highest Degree BS Elementary Education

Certificate in Teaching ESL; Certificate in Theater Arts Major in Performance

Santa  Barbara  Catholic  School  

M/F F

F

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Appendix  A  |  School  Profile  

Appendix A-4 School Profile – Support (non-teaching) Staff

 

Hours per day Worked 8

Days per year worked 5 days/wk

Years Worked at this school 13

8

200

25

8

220

8

Vice Principal

8

5 days/wk

21

Mansfield, Stephanie

Guidance Counselor

8

5 days/wk

1

Mararac, Marie Mina, Abegail Mojas, Rafael Ocampo, Romeo Pangan, Honorio Jr.

Accountant

8

243

19

Qualifications (degree, certification, etc.) AB Interdisciplinary Studies; MA Catholic Educational Leadership (ongoing) BS Education major in Home Economics BS Medical Technology (undergraduate units) AB Interdisciplinary Studies; MA Catholic Educational Leadership BA Psychology minor in Communication BS Commerce

Accounting Clerk Athletic Director Maintenance

8

5 days/wk

1

BS Accounting

8

5 days/wk

3

8

225

14

Bachelors in Physical Education Vocational Courses

Systems Administrator

8

5 days/wk

5

Pangelinan, Sr. Jeanette Marie

Principal

8

5 days/wk

21

Piana, Miriam Reyes, Jonathan

Health Counselor Assistant Systems Administrator

8

184

14

8

5 days/wk

6 mos

Name Alcantara, Bernadette Catabay, Margaret Gabales, Maria Concepcion Gaite, Sr. Maria Rosario

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Assignment Director of Formation and Student Activities Library K-3; Extended Care Maintenance

Santa  Barbara  Catholic  School  

BS Computer Science; MS Information Technology; Master of Information Systems (ongoing) BA Elementary Education; MA Catholic Educational Leadership BS Nursing 7 years Enterprise Support; A+ Certified WCEA  ISL  2010  

 


Appendix  A  |  School  Profile    

Roso, Madson Roxas, Kristine

Maintenance

Hours per day Worked 8

Library 4-8

8

5 days/wk

4.5

BA Theater Arts Major in Playwriting and Directing; MA in Language and Literacy Education (ongoing); Certificate in Teaching ESL; Certificate in Theater Arts Major in Performance

Ruback, Martha Suplido, Arleen-Doris

Maintenance

8

218

2

Director for Curriculum and Grants Secretary

8

5 days/wk

8

8

5 days/wk

3

General Course in Education BS Physics; MA and MS units in Teaching Math Associate Degree in Secretarial Science

Name

Varela, Joycelyn

Assignment

Days per year worked 145

Years Worked at this school 8 mos

Qualifications (degree, certification, etc.) Vocational Courses

   

 

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Appendix  A  |  School  Profile  

Appendix A-5 School Profile – Participation in IDEA Under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Local Education Agencies (LEAs) are responsible for locating, identifying, evaluating (“child find”) and developing an individual education program (IEP) for any child living within the district’s boundaries, including children enrolled in private and religious schools, who may have a disability (e.g., hearing, speech, sight, physical and mental impairments; emotional disturbances and learning disabilities, etc.) at no cost to the child’s parents. Child find is a component of IDEA that requires states to identify, locate, and evaluate all children with disabilities, aged birth to 21, who are in need of early intervention or special education services. 1. Has your LEA carried out this “child find” requirement in your school? ü Yes ___ No 2. If yes, how many children were actually identified as having a disability? 6 active and 3 pending 3. If No, have you ever requested the LEA to do a “child find?” and had that request denied? N/A 4. Of those children identified with a disability, how many have had a formal Instructional Service Plan (ISP) developed by the LEA? All have ISPs. 5. Of those children currently enrolled in your school and having an ISP with specified services identified, how many are receiving? GDOE SPED is able to provide direct services. NO specified services SOME specified services ü All Specified services _____ 6. Of those children with disabilities currently enrolled in your school, how many are receiving the specified services in your school? 3 . 7. How many are receiving those services at a public school or neutral site? 6 . 8. For those receiving services at a public school or a neutral site, is transportation being provided at no cost to the child’s parents? N/A . 9. How many of the children identified as eligible for services through ‘child find’ transferred to the public school? 0 . 10. How many of the children identified eligible for services through ‘child find’ chose to remain in your school and forego receiving the specified services? 1 . 11. How many children with disabilities, who applied to your school within the past three years, were unable to attend because your school does not offer services that meet their specific needs? 0 .

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Appendix  A  |  School  Profile    

Appendix A-6 School Profile – Participation in Federal Programs

Note: Santa Barbara Catholic School participates in Federal Programs but only through Title V-A funding. Title I, Part A – Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged 1. How many students are eligible for Title IA services? _______ 2. How many students are receiving Title IA services? _______ 3. What services are being offered at your school for Title IA students? Title II, Part A – Teacher and Principal Training and Recruiting Fund 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

What is your per-pupil allocation for Title IIA services? $____________________ per child. What is your total Title IIA allocation for School Year ____-____? $_________________ Have you developed/filed an approved Title IIA Staff Development plan? ___ Yes___ No Attach a copy of your staff development plan to this section. If you don’t have a staff development plan, describe the staff development in-services you will be requesting.

Title II, Part D – Enhancing Education Through Technology 1. What is your per-pupil allocation for Title IID services? $____________________ per child. 2. What is your total Title IID allocation for School Year ____-____? $_________________ 3. How will you be using these resources? Title III, Part A – English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement and Academic Achievement 1. Are you using any funds/services for Title III for your students? 2. If Yes, please describe the services that you provide/are provided.

___ Yes___ No

Title IV, Part A – Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities 1. What is your per-pupil allocation for Title IVA services? $___________________ per child. 2. What is your total Title IVA allocation for School Year ____-____? $_________________ 3. How are you using these funds? Title IV, Part B – 21st Century Community Learning Centers 1. Is your LEA participating in this program? ___ Yes___ No 2. How many students do you have that are a part of the target population for this program? ___ 3. Describe the services that are provided for your target population.

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Appendix  A  |  School  Profile  

Appendix A-7 School Profile – Standardized Testing Program (NPR) Reading 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

2 62 73 72 62 74 76

nd

3 48 58 56 42 31 55

rd

4 46 54 48 47 43 51

th

5 44 49 47 40 49 34

th

6 50 59 54 49 59 60

th

7 59 57 61 53 57 58

th

8 58 60 59 57 57 55

Math 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

2 72 77 76 79 84 87

nd

3 53 53 58 54 49 77

rd

4 48 50 53 51 53 53

th

5 40 39 47 46 60 51

th

6 31 39 47 50 43 44

th

7 53 46 62 58 58 46

th

8 55 57 58 60 58 54

Language 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

2 65 60 57 48 68 66

nd

3 59 49 59 53 31 56

rd

4 57 46 44 51 26 33

th

5 58 49 56 48 51 45

th

6 53 67 59 58 58 58

th

7 59 66 68 60 58 66

th

8 56 59 65 60 53 57

Science 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

2 80 77 75 85 87 93

nd

3 66 59 65 54 52 70

rd

4 66 60 63 52 54 57

th

5 54 50 62 39 52 48

th

6 64 56 63 54 67 58

th

7 60 57 56 52 55 57

th

8 55 52 65 60 55 69

Soc Science 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Basic Battery 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

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nd

2 80 77 75 85 87 93 nd

2 65 71 72 68 74 75

rd

3 65 55 64 39 34 62 rd

3 55 59 61 51 42 65

th

4 68 67 67 52 53 58 th

4 51 54 53 52 48 51

th

5 50 54 52 47 71 50 th

5 49 48 54 49 55 47

Santa  Barbara  Catholic  School  

th

th

th

th

th

6 50 52 47 44 76 48

7 59 58 65 60 74 66

th

8 65 62 54 55 70 59

th

7 56 57 62 46 52 57

th

8 58 60 62 55 56 56

6 48 55 54 54 56 55

th

th

WCEA  ISL  2010  


Appendix  A  |  School  Profile    

Appendix A-8 School Profile – Staff Development Program In the following section, outline your staff development plans. Usually, a professional development focus will run for several years, be associated with In-Depth Studies, involve the entire faculty, be connected with your Action Plan, and have an impact on improving student learning. Staff Development for:

2007 - 2008

Theme: Language Arts Curriculum Improvement

Activities/Cost: 2008 Lexile National Reading Conference and Quantile

$ 4,000.00

Symposium

Staff Development for:

2008 - 2009

Theme: Mathematics Curriculum Improvement

Activities/Cost: 2009 National Council of Teachers in Mathematics Annual

$ 3,500.00

Conference and Exposition 2009 National Catholic Educational Association Convention

$ 2,500.00

and Exposition

Staff Development for:

2009 - 2013

Theme: Administrative Training for Lay Personnel

Activities/Cost: University of San Francisco Institute for Catholic Educational $ 23,492.00 Leadership Program

Staff Development for:

2009 - 2010

Theme: Catholic Identity and Curriculum

Activities/Cost: 2010 National Catholic Educational Association Convention

$ 5,000.00

and Exposition

Staff Development for:

2010 - 2011

Theme: Technology in Education

Activities/Cost: 2011 International Society for Technology in Education

$ 5,500

Conference

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Appendix  A  |  School  Profile  

Staff Development for:

2010 - 2011

Theme: Catholic Identity and Curriculum

Activities/Cost: 2011 National Catholic Educational Association Convention

$ 5,000.00

and Exposition

Staff Development for:

2011 - 2012

Theme: Administrative Training for Lay Personnel

Activities/Cost: National Catholic Educational Association Educational

$ 2,500.00

Law Symposium

Staff Development for:

2011 - 2012

Theme: Language Arts Curriculum Improvement

Activities/Cost: 2012 International Reading Association National Conference

$ 3,500.00

                           

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Appendix  A  |  School  Profile    

WCEA  ISL  2010  

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This  page  is  intentionally  left  blank.  


Appendix  B  |  Data  Analysis  

Appendix B-1 Grade Enrollment Over Time Year 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

PK

K 55 51 50 47 56 53 65 55 56 49

25 23 27 20 23

1 55 54 52 54 44 60 41 51 51 50

2 44 59 59 54 52 47 54 42 40 45

3 43 39 38 55 54 51 48 46 41 36

4 40 50 50 52 54 56 42 47 39 42

5 32 41 38 42 47 48 56 36 48 40

6 66 49 48 52 59 48 58 60 51 54

7 54 55 53 51 48 55 44 58 59 48

8 39 50 49 46 52 48 57 46 58 62

Total Pre-K to 8 Enrollment Over Time 2003 2004 2005 351 428 448 % increase / decrease +22% +5%

2006 438 -2%

2007 453 +3%

2008 466 +3%

2009 491 +5%

2010 488 -1%

2011 468 -4%

2012 463 -1%

2013 449 -3%

Total  Enrollment   Number  of  Students  

600   453   466   428   448   438  

500   400  

491   488   468   463   449  

351  

300   200   100   0   2003   2004   2005   2006   2007   2008   2009   2010   2011   2012   2013   School  Year  

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Appendix  B  |  Data  Analysis    

Appendix B-2 FINANCES Per Pupil Cost Over Time (Monthly) Year Amount % Increase

2007 424

2008 435 2.59%

2009 440 1.15%

2010 450 2.27%

2011 457 1.56%

2012 466 1.97%

2011 375 1.35%

2012 380 1.33%

2011 82%

2012 82%

2011 61,000

2012 47,588.87

First Child’s Tuition Over Time (Monthly) Year Amount % Increase

2007 355

2008 362.50 2.11%

2009 365 0.69%

2010 370 1.37%

Tuition As a Percent of Per Pupil Cost Year %

2007 84%

2008 83%

2009 83%

2010 82%

Budget Surplus/Deficit (Bottom Line) Year $

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2007 -59,400

2008 20,000

2009 2010 119,623.42 121,492.14

Santa  Barbara  Catholic  School  

WCEA  ISL  2010  


Appendix  B  |  Data  Analysis  

Appendix B-3 Analysis of Test Results: Comparison with Diocesan Data 2011 - 2012

Number of Students in Spring ‘12

Reading 75th-99th %ile

2 22

3 9

4 8

5 5

6 13

7 18

8 11

K-8 86

School 25.7%

Diff N.A.

Diocese % N.A.

Dio. # N.A.

50th-74th %ile

9

9

10

12

15

20

23

98

29.3%

N.A.

N.A.

N.A.

25th-49th %ile

6

18

16

13

14

15

17

99

29.6%

N.A.

N.A.

N.A.

1st-24th %ile

3

5

5

18

8

6

7

52

15.5%

N.A.

N.A.

N.A.

Total Students

40

41

39

48

50

59

58

335

N.A.

For the groups in each grade, what are the weakest areas of performance in this subject area? 3 4 5 6 7 8

interpretation (44%), informational (39%), critical analysis (24%), thinking skills for reading comprehension (24%) multiple meaning words (26%), initial understanding (26%), informational (23%), critical analysis (21%), strategies (21%) multiple meaning words (40%), informational (38%), initial understanding (35%), critical analysis (35%), thinking skills for reading comprehension (35%) informational (22%), synonyms (20%), thinking skills for reading vocabulary (20%), multiple meaning words (18%), critical analysis (18%), strategies (18%) critical analysis (29%), synonyms (24%), strategies (24%), functional (15%) synonyms (26%), context clues (22%), strategies (16%)

Data from SY 2011-2012 SAT 10 Reading results show that more than half (55%) of the student population from grades 2 to 8 are in the upper 50th percentile and the remaining 45 percent are in the lower 50th percentile. Majority (29.6%) belongs to the 25th-49th percentile and minority (15.5%) is in the bottom quartile. Second graders have the highest percentage (55%) of students in the top quartile and fifth graders have the highest percentage (37.8%) in the bottom quartile. The bottom three areas that need the most improvement are indicated in the table above. Most grade levels have more than three listed because they tied in the terms of the percentage of students scoring below average. The process cluster “Critical Analysis” is a common area for improvement for grades 3 to 7. 20101 - 2012 Number of Students in Spring ‘12 5 6 7 8 K-8 Language Arts 2 3 4

Diocese N.A.

Dio. #

75th-99th %ile

21

10

1

8

14

30

14

98

29.3%

Diff N.A.

50th-74th %ile

8

16

11

16

18

14

22

105

31.3%

N.A.

N.A.

N.A.

25th-49th %ile

7

9

13

12

13

8

17

79

23.6%

N.A.

N.A.

N.A.

1st-24th%ile

4

6

14

12

5

7

5

53

15.8%

N.A.

N.A.

N.A.

Total Students

40

41

39

48

50

59

58

335

WCEA  ISL  2010  

School

Santa  Barbara  Catholic  School  

N.A.

N.A.

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Appendix  B  |  Data  Analysis     For the groups in each grade, what are the weakest areas of performance in this subject area?  

3 persuasive (29%), composing (17%), editing (17%), thinking skills (15%) 4 persuasive (46%), prewriting (44%), composing (28%) thinking skills (24%), composing (18%), editing (18%), narrative (16%), informative (16%), 5 persuasive (16%) 6 persuasive (26%), thinking skills (22%), pre-writing (18%) thinking skills (24%), composing (18%), editing (18%), narrative (16%), informative (16%), 7 persuasive (16%) 8 informative (22%), prewriting (21%), composing (17%), thinking skills (17%)   In the Language subtest for SY 2011-2012, a slightly bigger percentage of students (60.6%) from grades 2 to 8 are in the upper 50th percentile and the remaining 39.4 percent are in the lower 50th percentile. Majority (31.3%) is in the 50th-74th percentile and minority (15.8%) is in the bottom quartile. Second graders have the highest percentage (52.5%) of students scoring in the top quartile and fourth graders have the highest percentage (35.9%) in the bottom quartile. The bottom three areas that need the most improvement are indicated in the table above. Most grade levels have more than three listed because they tied in the terms of the percentage of students scoring below average. All grade levels except 8th grade show “Persuasive” as an area for improvement. The process cluster “Thinking Skills” is a common area of improvement for all grade levels except fourth grade.   2011 - 2012 Number of Students in Spring ‘12 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 K-8 School Diff Diocese Dio. # Math 75th-99th %ile

29

23

6

12

7

11

15

103

30.7%

N.A.

N.A.

N.A.

50th-74th %ile

7

6

16

13

13

18

21

94

28.1%

N.A.

N.A.

N.A.

25th-49th %ile

3

9

13

12

16

16

9

78

23.3%

N.A.

N.A.

N.A.

1st-24th%ile

1

3

4

11

14

14

13

60

17.9%

N.A.

N.A.

N.A.

Total Students

40

41

39

48

50

59

58

335

N.A.

  For the groups in each grade, what are the weakest areas of performance in this subject area?  

number facts (15%), geometry and measurement (10%), mathematics connections (10%), 3 thinking skills (10%), computation with decimals (10%), patterns/relationships/algebra (7%), computation in context (7%) computation with decimals (18%), computation with whole numbers (15%), estimation 4 (13%), reasoning and problem solving (13%), computation in context (13%), thinking skills (13%) 5 computation in context (44%), computation with decimal (40%), thinking skills (38%) 6 computation in context (36%), number sense and operations (34%), decimals (32%) data statistics and probability (44%), computation with fractions (34%), number sense and 7 operations (31%) computation with fractions (36%), number sense and operations (31%), data statistics and 8 probability (24%)

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Appendix  B  |  Data  Analysis  

In Mathematics, SY 2011-2012 SAT 10 results show that 58.8% of students from grades 2 to 8 are in the upper 50th percentile and the remaining 41.2% are in the bottom 50th percentile. Majority (30.7%) belongs to the top quartile and minority (17.9%) is in the bottom quartile. Second graders have the highest percentage (72.5%) of students in the top quartile and sixth graders have the highest percentage (28%) in the bottom quartile. The bottom three areas that need the most improvement are indicated in the table above. Most grade levels have more than three listed because they tied in the terms of the percentage of students scoring below average. Computations, whether decimal, fraction, whole number, etc., is a content cluster for improvement in all grade levels. 2011 - 2012 Soc. Studies

Number of Students in Spring ‘12 2

3

4

5

6

7

8

K-8

School

75th-99th %ile

32

12

8

9

10

28

18

117

50th-74th %ile

5

14

15

15

14

15

22

25th-49th %ile

3

12

14

14

15

11

1st-24th%ile

0

3

2

10

11

Total Students

40

41

39

48

50

34.9%

Diff N.A.

Diocese N.A.

Dio. # N.A.

100

29.9%

N.A.

N.A.

N.A.

10

79

23.6%

N.A.

N.A.

N.A.

5

8

39

11.6%

N.A.

N.A.

N.A.

59

58

335

N.A.

For the groups in each grade, what are the weakest areas of performance in this subject area? 3 geography (20%), history (17%), determination of cause/effect (17%), thinking skills (7%) 4 history (31%), determination of cause and effect (13%), economics (10%) history (40%), determination of cause/effect (38%), organization, summary and interpretation 5 of information (25%) geography (38%), organization, summary and interpretation of information (32%), history 6 (26%) application of knowledge/comprehension (14%), history (8%), geography (8%), political 7 science (8%), determination of cause/effect (8%) history (19%), determination of cause/effect (17%), political science (14%), economics 8 (14%), thinking skills (14%) Social Studies SAT 10 data for SY 2011-2012 show that 64.8 percent of students from grades 2 to 8 are in the top 50th percentile and the remaining 35.2% are in the bottom 50th percentile. Majority (34.9%) is in the top quartile and minority (11.6%) is in the bottom quartile. Second graders have the highest percentage (80%) of students in the top quartile and sixth graders have the highest percentage (22%) of students in the bottom quartile. Noteworthy is the zero percentage of second graders in the bottom quartile. The bottom three areas that need the most improvement are indicated in the table above. Most grade levels have more than three listed because they tied in the terms of the percentage of students scoring below average. “History” is a content cluster that is an area of improvement for all grade levels.

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Appendix  B  |  Data  Analysis     2011 - 2012 Science

Number of Students in Fall 11 2

3

4

5

6

7

8

K-8

School 35.8%

Diff N.A.

Diocese N.A.

Dio. # N.A.

75th-99th %ile

32

16

9

6

13

19

25

120

50th-74th %ile

5

13

16

18

18

21

18

109

32.5%

N.A.

N.A.

N.A.

25th-49th %ile

3

10

8

17

13

12

13

76

22.7%

N.A.

N.A.

N.A.

1st-24th%ile

0

2

6

7

6

7

2

30

9.0%

N.A.

N.A.

N.A.

Total Students

40

41

39

48

50

59

58

335

N.A.

  For the groups in each grade, what are the weakest areas of performance in this subject area?   3 life science (26%), constancy (23%), earth science (19%), nature of science (19%) 4 nature of science (23%), physical science (19%), constancy (19%), earth science (17%) 5 nature of science (42%), constancy (25%), models (19%) 6 nature of science (19%), models (12%), thinking skills (8%) earth science (19%), nature of science (19%), models (19%), life science (17%), physical 7 science (17%), form and function (9%) 8 earth science (37%), nature of science (17%), constancy (15%)   SAT 10 date for SY 2011-2012 in Science show that 68.3 percent of students in grades 2 to 8 are scoring in the top 50th percentile and the remaining 31.7% are in the bottom 50th percentile. Majority (35.8%) is in the top quartile and minority (9%) is in the bottom quartile. Second graders have the highest percentage (80%) of students in the top quartile and fifth graders have the highest percentage (14.6%) of students in the bottom quartile. Again, second graders have no one scoring in the bottom quartile. The bottom three areas that need the most improvement are indicated in the table above. Most grade levels have more than three listed because they tied in the terms of the percentage of students scoring below average. The content cluster “Nature of Science” shows up as a weak area in all the grade levels while the process cluster of constancy is a common area of improvement for all grade levels, except 6th and 7th grade. Overall, majority of SBCS students are scoring in the upper 50th percentile, which is the average to above average performance. Teachers have been made aware of the weakest areas of performance during their In-Depth Curriculum meetings and have adjusted instruction accordingly to address this need. It is hoped that in the coming years, students at SBCS will show an improvement in their SAT 10 performance.

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Appendix B-3 School Average Scaled Scores for each Grade Reading Total Class of

2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012

Gr 2 Ave SS

642 641 613 622 605

2011-2012 2nd to 3rd Gain

-3 2 -4 23

Gr 3 Ave SS

638 615 618 628 629

6.9

Ave Growth

3rd to 4th Gain

30 18 9 0

Gr 4 Ave SS

644 637 637 628 634

14.0

4th to 5th Gain

7 20 16 7

Gr 5 Ave SS

644 657 644 642

12.6

5th to 6th Gain

26 37 24

Gr 6 Ave SS

683 681 666

29.2

6th to 7th Gain

7 12

Gr 7 Ave SS

688 678

9.2

7th to 8th Gain

15

Gr 8 Ave SS

693

14.9

AVE Gain for this Group

Class Grade in 20112012

(2.7) 15.6 7.1 19.6 14.8 14.6

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

14.3

Students from the classes of 2012 to 2017 have generally shown a yearly increase in their scaled scores for Reading for the past five years, although there was a decrease from 2nd to 3rd grade for the classes of 2015 and 2017. The class of 2014 shows the most overall gain and the class of 2017 shows the least. The biggest gain occurs from 5th to 6th grade and the smallest gain is from 2nd to 3rd grade. Language Total Class of

2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 Ave Growth

Gr 2 Ave SS

620 622 592 594 580

2011-2012 2nd to 3rd Gain

-1 9 19 31

19.7

Gr 3 Ave SS

621 601 613 611 603

3rd to 4th Gain

17 -3 17 11 10.6

Gr 4 Ave SS

618 610 628 614 615

4th to 5th Gain

23 11 19 13 16.6

Gr 5 Ave SS

633 639 633 628

5th to 6th Gain

10 15 19 14.7

Gr 6 Ave SS

649 648 647

6th to 7th Gain

16 11 13.5

Gr 7 Ave SS

664 658

7th to 8th Gain

13 13.4

Gr 8 Ave SS

671

AVE Gain for this Group

Class Grade in 20112012

(0.9) 13.1 13.1 17.3 15.4 14.0

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

14.6


There is also a general yearly increase in Language scales scores for the students of classes 2012 to 2017, although the classes of 2015 and 2017 have again shown a decrease from 3rd to 4th grade and 2nd to 3rd grade, respectively.. The class of 2014 shows the most average gain and the class of 2017 shows the least. The biggest gain is from 2nd to 3rd grade and the smallest gain is from 3rd to 4th grade. Math Total Class of

2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012

2011-2012 Gr 2 Ave SS

643 634 613 612 572

2nd to 3rd Gain

22 6 0 46

Gr 3 Ave SS

656 619 612 618 611

17.3

Ave Growth

3rd to 4th Gain

14 22 10 11

Gr 4 Ave SS

4th to 5th Gain

633 634 628 622 620

14.3

22 37 22 19

Gr 5 Ave SS

5th to 6th Gain

656 665 644 639

25.0

-2 18 24

Gr 6 Ave SS

6th to 7th Gain

663 662 663

13.4

15 19

Gr 7 Ave SS

7th to 8th Gain

677 682

16.9

11

Gr 8 Ave SS

693

10.9

AVE Gain for this Group

Class Grade in 20112012

21.8 10.1 14.7 22.8 16.5 18.2

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

16.4

Students from the classes of 2012 to 2017 have also shown a general yearly increase in their Mathematics scaled scores for the past five years, although the class of 2015 showed no increase from 2nd to 3rd grade. The class of 2014 shows the most average gain even though it showed a decrease from 5th to 6th grade. The class of 2016 shows the least gain. The biggest gain appears from 4th to 5th grade and the least from 7th to 8th grade. Social Studies Total Class of

2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 Ave Growth

 

Gr 2 Ave SS

670 648 640 636 602

2011-2012 nd

2 to 3 Gain

rd

-12 -33 -27 25

(11.7)

Gr 3 Ave SS

636 607 609 627 617

rd

3 to 4 Gain

33 26 2 19 19.9

th

Gr 4 Ave SS

640 635 629 636 637

th

4 to 5 Gain

12 38 4 -4 12.5

th

Gr 5 Ave SS

647 667 640 633

th

5 to 6 Gain

-13 22 13 7.2

th

Gr 6 Ave SS

654 662 646

th

6 to 7 Gain

14 18 16.2

th

Gr 7 Ave SS

676 664

th

7 to 8 Gain

19 18.9

th

Gr 8 Ave SS

683

AVE Gain for this Group

Class Grade in 20112012

(12.3) (0.1) 3.7 12.9 14.9 11.5

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

8.6


Not all students from the classes of 2012 to 2017 have shown an average increase in their scaled scores for Social Studies these past five years. The classes of 2016 and 2017 show a decrease, although the latter by less than one point. Both groups showed the decrease from 2nd to 3rd grade. Two other groups, the classes of 2012 and 2014, have also shown a decrease from 4th to 5th grade and 5th to 6th grade, respectively, although their average gain is positive. All other classes also show a positive average gain. The class of 2013 has the most average gain and the class of 2017 shows the least. The biggest gain appears from 3rd to 4th grade and the least from 2nd to 3rd grade, with the latter showing a negative growth for the last three years. Science Total Class of

2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 Ave Growth

2011-2012 nd

Gr 2 Ave SS

2 to 3 Gain

670 648 640 636 602

-1 -10 -10 32

4.00

rd

Gr 3 Ave SS

647 630 626 634 629

rd

3 to 4 Gain

13 15 2 9 9.65

th

Gr 4 Ave SS

643 641 636 638 634

th

4 to 5 Gain

5 13 -1 13 7.45

th

Gr 5 Ave SS

646 649 637 647

th

5 to 6 Gain

th

16 35 11 20.67

Gr 6 Ave SS

665 672 658

th

6 to 7 Gain

-3 13 5.00

th

Gr 7 Ave SS

669 671

th

7 to 8 Gain

15 14.7

th

Gr 8 Ave SS

686

AVE Gain for this Group

(1.3) 1.3 3.3 15.8 10.0 12.9 8.65

Class Grade in 20112012

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Except for the class of 2017, all classes from 2012 to 2017 show an average gain in their Science scaled scores for the past five years. The class of 2013 shows two years of decrease, from 4th to 5th grade, and from 6th to 7th grade. The class of 2014 has the most average gain and the class of 2017 has the least. The biggest gain appears from 5th to 6th grade and the least from 2nd to 3rd grade. As with Social Science, Science has shown negative growth for the past three years. Overall, the scaled scores of SBCS students show a general increase, indicating a growth in terms of their learning as they move from one grade level to the next. The class of 2017 shows the least gain, all negative except in Math. This seems to be a trend as second graders advance to the third grade and the school has taken steps to address this issue. Also, only two years worth of data have been collected for this class so the trend can still change. The class of 2014 seems to be a very good class, having the highest average gain for most subject areas. Teachers have to make sure they are properly challenged and motivated as they progress from year to year.


Appendix  B  |  Data  Analysis    

Appendix B-4 Data Results for the Bottom Quartile of SAT 10 Sub-Tests The number listed is a % of the total class. Bold indicates 15-24% Orange indicates 25-32% Red indicates 33% or more Reading Year

Sub-Test Word Study Skills

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 5-year average Year

Sub-Test Reading Vocabulary

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 5-year average Year

Sub-Test Reading Comprehension

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 5-year average

3

4

5

6

7

8

19 18 31 38 10 23.2

33 17 26 22 5 20.6

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

3

4

5

6

7

8

7 32 23 40 12 22.8

23 14 26 33 28 24.8

11 21 32 19 42 25.0

17 17 22 14 16 17.2

6 7 16 22 17 13.6

6 15 23 4 17 13.0

3

4

5

6

7

8

9 16 25 28 26 20.8

29 18 26 31 17 24.2

20 19 27 22 38 25.2

15 19 21 5 10 14.0

8 14 18 22 8 14.0

2 8 16 4 7 7.4

Data from SAT 10 for SY 07-08 to SY 10-11 show an increasing number of students scoring in the bottom quartile for 3rd, 4th, and 7th grade in all Reading sub-tests, and then a marked decrease in SY 11-12. For 5th, 6th, and 8th grade, there was an increase in the number of students scoring in the bottom quartile. Fifth grade is an area of concern since it shows a sharp increase in the number of students scoring in the bottom quartile.

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Language Year

Sub-Test Prewriting

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 5-year average Year

Sub-Test Composing

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 5-year average Year

Sub-Test

3

4

5

6

7

8

20 18 31 60 10 27.8

24 28 21 46 44 32.6

31 21 27 19 31 25.8

10 13 14 7 18 12.4

15 20 25 34 14 21.6

10 13 23 22 24 18.4

3

4

5

6

7

8

17 11 17 45 22 22.4

37 29 24 46 28 32.8

13 10 29 31 31 22.8

8 15 17 27 32 19.8

13 9 9 17 14 12.4

18 7 26 26 17 18.8

3

4

5

6

7

8

35 22 27 40 17 28.2

14 12 17 35 26 20.8

16 21 5 8 13 12.6

7 4 14 3 12 8.0

15 16 14 16 3 12.8

6 2 12 7 5 6.4

Editing 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 5-year average

Data for SAT 10 for SY 11-12 show that there was a general decrease in the number of students scoring in the bottom quartile for most grade levels, with third grade showing the most improvement. Fourth, fifth, and sixth grade show more students scoring in the bottom quartile in the Composing subtest. Fourth and fifth grade also show more students scoring in the bottom quartile in Prewriting. Editing seems to be a strong area for grades 5 to 8 as the data show the fewest percentage of students, and a lower average of those scoring, in the bottom quartile.

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Appendix  B  |  Data  Analysis    

Mathematics Year

Sub-Test Problem Solving

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 5-year average Year

3

4

5

6

7

8

19 22 23 15 7 17.2

20 14 24 21 10 17.8

29 36 29 19 17 26.0

36 21 17 25 30 25.8

17 15 14 24 18 17.6

16 25 14 20 22 19.4

3

4

5

6

7

8

4 8 19 26 7 12.8

18 9 17 17 10 14.2

36 30 21 13 27 25.4

32 19 21 19 26 23.4

31 9 14 28 22 20.8

8 13 11 11 24 13.4

Sub-Test Mathematics Procedures

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 5-year average

Data from SAT 10 for SY 07-08 to SY 11-12 show 5th and 6th grades are areas of concern as they have the highest 5-year average of students scoring in the bottom quartile. Although 5th grade numbers have generally been improving, the percentage of 6th graders scoring in the bottom quartile has been increasing. Eighth grade has also shown more students scoring in the bottom quartile.

Science Year

Sub-Test

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 5-year average

3

4

5

6

7

8

11 8 23 19 5 13.2

12 3 19 15 15 12.8

24 6 36 19 15 20.0

19 8 12 8 12 11.8

10 17 20 22 12 16.2

16 4 7 7 3 7.4

Data for SAT 10 for SY 07-08 to SY 11-12 show a decreasing number of students scoring in the bottom quartile for most grade levels. Except for 4th and 6th grade, all show fewer students in the bottom quartile during the 2012 SAT 10 testing compared to the previous year.

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Social Science Year

Sub-Test

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 5-year average

3

4

5

6

7

8

11 8 33 30 7 17.8

8 14 21 21 5 13.8

27 23 23 11 21 21.0

22 28 33 10 22 23.0

10 3 11 19 8 10.2

10 19 14 22 14 15.8

Data from SAT 10 for SY 07-08 to SY 11-12 show a decreasing number of students scoring in the bottom quartile of the Social Science subtest in grades 3, 4, 7 and 8. Grades 5 and 6 showed an increase in SY 11-12.

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Appendix  B  |  Data  Analysis    

Appendix B-5 Analysis of Disaggregate Test Results The following graphs show how the class of 2013 (this year’s graduating class) scored over the years in the core subtests of Reading, Mathematics, Language, Science and Social Science.

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Appendix  B  |  Data  Analysis    

  Girls generally outperform the boys, except in Science. Mathematics is the weakest area of performance for both boys and girls. Fifth grade is also the time when the scores are at their lowest.

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Appendix  B  |  Data  Analysis  

Appendix B-6 ACRE Results Analysis Level 1: Grade 5 General Data Average Grp Average National Average Parish National Average

SY 09-10 73 (+5) 71 (0) 61

SY 11-12 71 (-2) 71 (0) 61

Percent of Students Scoring at Indicated Level Level SY 06-07 Advanced 5% Proficient 55% Needs Improvement 40%

SY 09-10 11% (+6) 75% (+20) 14% (-26)

SY 11-12 17% (+6) 56% (-19) 27% (+13)

Test Results Domains 1-God 2-Church 3-Liturgy & Sacraments 4-Revelation & Scriptures 5-Life in Christ 6-Church History 7-Prayer/Religious Practice 8-Faith Literacy

SY 06-07 86 60 64 78 62 51 61 74

SY 09-10 89 (+3) 69 (+9) 69 (+5) 82 (+4) 59 (-3) 69 (+18) 72 (+11) 75 (+1)

SY 11-12 89 (0) 58 (-11) 70 (+1) 78 (-4) 65 (+6) 76 (+7) 60 (-12) 72 (-3)

SY 06-07 78 63 63 66

SY 09-10 83 (+5) 69 (+6) 63 (0) 75 (+9)

SY 11-12 79 (-6) 70 (+1) 66 (+3) 67 (-8)

Pillars 1-Creed 2-Liturgy & Sacraments 3-Morality 4-Prayer

SY 06-07 68 71 no data

Based on data collected from the past three years of ACRE testing, fifth graders have shown inconsistent results. The group average as of SY 09-10 showed an increase, but SY 11-12 showed a decrease. In both years, however, the group average is above the national parish average. There is a consistent increase in the number of students scoring in the advanced level, but SY 11-12 showed a decrease in those scoring in the proficient level and an increase among those who need improvement. Overall, a total of 73% of the fifth graders are either at the proficient or advanced levels.

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Appendix  B  |  Data  Analysis     Comparison with National and Parish Averages (Domains)

 

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Appendix  B  |  Data  Analysis  

In SY 06-07, the 5th graders mostly scored below the national average in almost all domains. No data on the parish average is available to make a comparison. In SY 09-10, 5th graders from SBCS consistently scored higher than the parish average in all domains and scored higher in five out of eight domain compared to the national average. In SY 11-12, the 5th graders scored higher than the national average in three out of the eight domains, and higher than the parish average in seven out of the eight domains.

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Appendix  B  |  Data  Analysis     Comparison with National and Parish Averages (Pillars)

 

  There is no data available for comparison for SY 06-07, but 5th graders in SY 09-10 and SY 1112 scored above the parish average in all pillars. They also scored higher than the national average in two out of four pillars and tied in one during SY 09-10. In SY 11-12, they scored higher in one pillar, and tied in two.

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Appendix  B  |  Data  Analysis  

Comparison Over Time (Level 1)

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Appendix  B  |  Data  Analysis     Level 2: Grade 8 General Data Average Grp Average National Average Parish National Average

SY 09-10 78 (-3) 71 (0) 60

SY 11-12 81 (+3) 72 (+1) 60

Percent of Students Scoring at Indicated Level Level SY 06-07 Advanced 27% Proficient 67% Needs Improvement 6%

SY 09-10 43% (+16) 42% (-25) 15% (+9)

SY 11-12 31% (-12) 59% (+17) 10% (-5)

Test Results Domains 1-God 2-Church 3-Liturgy & Sacraments 4-Revelation & Scriptures 5-Life in Christ 6-Church History 7-Prayer/Religious Practice 8-Faith Literacy

SY 06-07 81 83 87 82 86 73 84 68

SY 09-10 85 (+4) 84 (+1) 81 (-6) 79 (-3) 78 (-8) 68 (-5) 80 (-4) 71 (+3)

SY 11-12 90 (+5) 87 (+3) 80 (-1) 84 (+5) 81 (+3) 75 (+7) 76 (-4) 71 (0)

SY 06-07 73 84 83 87

SY 09-10 77 (+4) 79 (-5) 76 (-7) 82 (-5)

SY 11-12 80 (+3) 79 (0) 78 (+2) 86 (+4)

Pillars 1-Creed 2-Liturgy & Sacraments 3-Morality 4-Prayer

SY 06-07 81 71 no data

Results from the past three years of ACRE testing for the eighth graders show maintenance of their general performance. The group average as of SY 11-12 has increased compared to the previous test year and is still above both national and parish averages. The percentage of students scoring in the proficient level has gone down from SY 09-10, but there has been an increase in the number of students scoring in the proficient level and a decrease in the percentage scoring in the proficient level. Overall, there are fewer students who need improvement, and a total of 90% are either proficient or advanced. Although the group average has gone up, there has been a decrease in two domains, Liturgy & Sacraments and Prayer/Religious Practice.

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Comparison with National and Parish Averages (Domains)

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Appendix  B  |  Data  Analysis    

  For all three school years, SY 06-07, SY 09-10, and SY 11-12, the 8th graders have consistently scored higher when compared to both parish and national averages.

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Comparison with National and Parish Averages (Pillars)

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Appendix  B  |  Data  Analysis    

  For all three school years, SY 06-07, SY 09-10, and SY 11-12, the 8th graders have consistently scored higher when compared to both parish and national averages.

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Appendix  B  |  Data  Analysis  

Comparison Over Time (Level 2)

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Appendix  C  |  Surveys  

Appendix C-1 School Surveys – Staff Survey Religious Instruction/Faith Formation There is a spirit of Christian community among faculty, parents, and students. The Catholic faith is clearly a priority among administration and staff. Prayers are said at various times throughout the school day. Traditions of the Catholic faith are taught in every grade. Religion certification and renewal is essential to every teacher. Staff have multiple opportunities for personal faith formation and growth

HE

E

SE

IE

69%

31%

-

-

76%

24%

-

-

90% 88% 63%

10% 12% 33%

4%

-

61%

37%

2%

-

HE

E

SE

IE

51%

47%

2%

-

71%

29%

-

-

55%

31%

10%

4%

63%

37%

-

-

69%

31%

-

-

Parental Involvement Parents are supportive and helpful to the teachers. The communication among administration, faculty, and parents is good. Parents participate in fundraising activities and other school sponsored events.

HE 55%

E 43%

SE 2%

IE -

49%

49%

2%

-

63%

35%

2%

-

School Environment and Safety Disaster drills are held regularly. I understand my responsibility for student safety in and outside the classroom. My classroom has a pleasant, welcoming, Catholic environment. The positive environment enables teachers to be role models for the students.

HE 53%

E 37%

SE 10%

IE -

84%

16%

-

-

78%

22%

-

-

80%

18%

2%

-

School Management/Principal I have an adequate voice in decisions that affect my area of responsibility. I understand and support the mission and philosophy of the school. I have a clear, written job description. I understand the importance of the SLEs as an outgrowth of the mission and philosophy. I base my instruction upon curriculum standards.

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Appendix  C  |  Surveys  

Discipline/Student Behavior The student discipline policy treats everyone fairly and justly. Student discipline is handled evenly and fairly for all students.

HE 59% 59%

E 37% 37%

SE 4% 4%

IE -

Staff Development I receive regular and periodic formal evaluations that contribute to my growth as an educational professional. I get the support I need to do my job effectively. I have the appropriate materials/equipment to do my job effectively. I have access to the technology I need to effectively prepare my students for high school and beyond.

HE

E

SE

IE

51%

43%

4%

2%

65%

31%

4%

-

69%

29%

2%

-

71%

24%

2%

2%

HE 84% 86% 76%

E 16% 14% 24%

SE -

IE -

School Reputation The school receives positive publicity. The school has a good reputation in the community I contribute to the good reputation of the school

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Appendix  C  |  Surveys  

Appendix C-2 School Surveys – Parent Survey Please indicate the grades in which your children are enrolled: Grade Level %

PreK

K

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

6%

16%

31%

27%

13%

15%

17%

10%

13%

13%

note: People may select more than one grade level, so percentages may add up to more than 100%. How many years have your children attended this school? No. of Years %

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

22%

15%

7%

20%

12%

9%

4%

8%

3%

1%

Do you have children who have previously graduated from the school? Yes: 19%

No: 81%

If yes, how well do you feel they were prepared for high school? (a more detailed list can be found at the end of this survey) Prepared: 91%

Not Prepared: 9%

Please rank the reasons you send your children to this school. #1 is your most important reason for sending your child. You may add other reasons in the space provided. Rank # Academic Excellence Catholic Faith Formation Catholic Values Discipline Location Safe Environment Other: please see the end of this survey

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1 56% 15% 11% 3% 8% 4% 3%

2 17% 35% 17% 12% 8% 9% 2%

Santa  Barbara  Catholic  School  

3 10% 13% 38% 16% 10% 7% 5%

4 8% 12% 13% 41% 11% 11% 4%

5 2% 11% 9% 14% 23% 31% 9%

6 7 6% 3% 12% 3% 7% 3% 6$ 3% 26% 7% 31% 4% 13% 77%

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Appendix  C  |  Surveys  

Curriculum and Instruction How would you rate the education your children are receiving in the following subjects: (HE = Highly Effective; E = Effective; SE = Somewhat Effective; IE = Ineffective) Subject Religion Mathematics Language Arts Science Social Studies Computers Music Physical Education Art

HE 54% 45% 52% 49% 43% 60% 55% 48% 56%

E 36% 43% 38% 39% 42% 31% 38% 40% 37%

SE 8% 10% 9% 10% 13% 7% 7% 11% 6%

IE 2% 1% 1% 2% 1% 1% 1% 1%

Do you think the academic demands of the school on your child are: too much: 11%

too easy: 2%

about right: 87%

Do you think the homework demands of the school on your child are: too much: 19%

too easy: 4%

about right: 77%

Catholic Faith Formation My child/children is/are receiving a solid religious education in the following ways: Component Yes No Somewhat Providing an atmosphere in which Christian values and 92% 8% attitudes are emphasized and practiced. Teaching of basic facts of the faith 97% 3% Providing prayer opportunities 94% 1% 3% Providing Scripture experience 83% 1% 13% Teaching human development and Christian sexuality 61% 7% 19% Making holy days and the Church Year meaningful 92% 1% 6% Providing liturgies for children with student input 76% 5% 13% Providing preparation for the Sacraments of Reconciliation 85% 2% 6% and Eucharist Providing opportunities for parents to help their children 83% 2% 11% grow in faith Providing opportunities for parents to grow in their own 78% 6% 11% faith

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N/A 1% 1% 3% 13% 1% 7% 7% 3% 6%

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Appendix  C  |  Surveys  

Catholic Identity My child/children is/are receiving a solid religious education in the following ways: Component Yes No Somewhat The school has a mission statement and philosophy statement which indicate the integration of the Roman 91% 1% 5% Catholic Faith into all aspects of school life. The school provides regular opportunities for the school 92% 1% 6% community to experience prayer and the Sacraments. The school’s Religion curriculum is faithful to Roman 93% 1% 3% Catholic Church teachings. Teachers are certified as catechists by the Arch/diocese. 61% 5% 13% The school maintains an active partnership with parents whose fundamental concern is the spiritual and academic 74% 4% 15% education of their children. The school has a service-oriented outreach to Church and 75% 3% 13% the civic community. The school makes frequent use signs, sacramentals (e.g., rosaries, crucifixes, etc.), traditions and rituals of the 90% 1% 5% Roman Catholic Church. School personnel are actively engaged in bringing the Good 74% 4% 15% News of Jesus into the total educational experience.

N/A 3% 2% 2% 22% 7% 9% 4% 6%

Teachers and Staff Do you feel that the teachers and staff are easily accessible? Yes: 69%

No: 7%

Somewhat: 24%

Should the occasion arise, would you feel comfortable discussing a problem with the principal or faculty member? Yes: 87%

No: 1%

Somewhat: 12%

In our school, do teachers provide frequent feedback to students and parents concerning academic progress? Yes: 69%

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No: 6%

Somewhat: 26%

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School Environment Do you feel that the morale of students in our school is good? Yes: 82%

No: 2%

Somewhat: 16%

Do most of the students and teachers in our school respect each other and have good working relationships? Yes: 84%

No: 1%

Somewhat: 15%

Do most of the parents and teachers in our school respect each other and have good working relationships? Yes: 76%

No: 2%

Somewhat: 22%

Communications Do you read the school bulletin, email, website or RenWeb announcements? Yes: 83%

No: 1%

Somewhat: 16%

Do you feel that the school bulletin, email, website or RenWeb announcements keeps you informed of the school’s activities? Yes: 84%

No: 1%

Somewhat: 15%

Do your children inform you of school activities or problems? Yes: 69%

No: 2%

Somewhat: 29%

Plant and Facilities Is your school kept neat and clean for your children? Yes: 92%

No: 0%

Somewhat: 8%

Do you feel that your children are safe at your school? Yes: 85%

118

 

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No: 1%

Somewhat: 13%

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Appendix  C  |  Surveys  

Appendix C-3 School Surveys – Student Survey Grades K-3 I am in: Grade Level Percentage

Kinder 31%

I have been in this school: No. of Years 1 Percentage 32%

1 27%

2 21%

3 22%

2 24%

3 20%

4 24%

When I am at school, I feel:

J J Strongly Agree

J Agree

Neutral

L Disagree

L L Strongly Disagree

I am safe. I have fun learning. I like this school. I have choices in what I learn. I have time to pray. I learn about being Catholic My teacher treats me with respect. My teacher cares about me. My teacher gives me extra help. My principal cares about me. I am recognized for good work. The work I do in class makes me think. I am a good student. I can be a better student. I behave well at school. Students are treated fairly. Students are friendly. I have many friends. My family wants me to do well.

77% 71% 80%

17% 26% 16%

6% 2% 3%

1% 1% -

1% 1%

55%

32%

7%

2%

4%

79%

17%

3%

1%

1%

80%

17%

2%

-

1%

82%

15%

2%

1%

1%

84%

14%

2%

-

1%

76%

20%

2%

-

2%

80%

14%

5%

-

1%

67%

23%

8%

1%

1%

75%

17%

5%

1%

1%

61% 77% 49%

23% 18% 32%

14% 4% 15%

1% 2%

2% 2% 3%

78%

13%

8%

1%

1%

65% 76%

27% 13%

7% 8%

1%

1% 2%

86%

9%

3%

-

1%

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Appendix  C  |  Surveys  

Appendix C-4 School Surveys – Student Survey Grades 4-8 I am in: Grade Level Percentage

4 15%

I have been in this school: No. of 1 2 Years % 9% 10%

5 19%

5

6

7

8

9

9%

11%

16%

15%

10%

13%

7%

Participating in extracurricular activities is important to me. Students at this school respect other students who are different than they are. My Religion classes help me to learn about my faith. I have the opportunity to participate in school liturgies. Opportunities are provided for Christian service.

 

Page  

8 23%

4

I feel challenged in this school. I feel like I belong at this school. I feel like I am in charge of what I learn. I understand how to apply what I learn at school to real-life situations. The teachers encourage me to assess the quality of my work. I am treated with respect by the teachers. I am treated with respect by the principal. I am treated with respect by the other students in school. I find the work is challenging me. I feel successful in my classes. Doing well in school makes me feel good about myself. I am doing my best in school. Students at this school have opportunities to learn from each other.

b

7 23%

3

Statement

120

6 20%

Strongly Agree 29% 40%

Agree

Neutral

Disagree

48% 33%

21% 22%

2% 4%

Strongly Disagree 1% 1%

15%

36%

41%

5%

3%

30%

42%

24%

3%

1%

37%

42%

18%

2%

1%

36%

36%

21%

3%

3%

52%

30%

16%

1%

1%

14%

44%

34%

6%

1%

31% 24%

45% 38%

20% 34%

4% 4%

1%

57%

32%

10%

1%

-

44%

39%

16%

1%

-

39%

41%

16%

3%

1%

45%

35%

19%

-

1%

23%

38%

28%

10%

1%

56%

29%

10%

3%

2%

27%

41%

25%

4%

3%

32%

45%

20%

2%

1%

Santa  Barbara  Catholic  School  

WCEA  ISL  2010  


Appendix  C  |  Surveys  

My Teachers:

Strongly Agree 63% 64%

Agree

Expect students to do their best. 31% Expect me to do my best. 28% Are understanding when students 28% 36% have personal problems. Set high standards for achievement 33% 46% in their classes. Help me gain confidence in my 36% 41% ability to learn. Have confidence in me. 39% 36% Know me well. 24% 30% Listen to my ideas. 19% 40% Care about me. 37% 32% Make learning enjoyable. 34% 30% Are excited about what they teach. 24% 43% Give me individual attention when 20% 41% I need it. Challenge me to do better. 44% 37% Support the development of my 39% 45% faith. Talk about curriculum standards. 31% 41% Connect lessons to SLEs. 43% 35% Use test scores to alter lessons. 27% 45% In my classes, time is spent: All the Most of time the time Listening to the teacher talk. 24% 55% In whole-class instruction. 24% 43% Working in small groups. 11% 34% Reading. 16% 29% Answering questions from a book 22% 50% or worksheet. Working on projects or research. 15% 27% Doing work that I find meaningful. 22% 39% Using computers. 8% 13% I work well when: Strongly Agree Agree I am working on projects or 28% 42% research. The teacher is leading a discussion 33% 46% with the whole class I am working in a small group. 28% 40% I am working by myself. 23% 31%

WCEA  ISL  2010  

Neutral 5% 7%

Disagree Strongly Disagree 1% 1% -

26%

6%

4%

17%

2%

1%

19%

3%

1%

19% 32% 32% 23% 28% 27%

4% 8% 6% 5% 5% 4%

2% 6% 4% 3% 3% 2%

30%

4%

5%

18%

1%

-

14%

2%

1%

25% 19% 26%

2% 2% 2% Some of the time 20% 29% 44% 44% 24%

Neutral

Santa  Barbara  Catholic  School  

1% 1% 1% Rarely 4% 11% 11% 4%

45% 13% 29% 10% 50% 29% Disagree Strongly Disagree

27%

2%

1%

17%

3%

-

26% 33%

4% 8%

2% 5%

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Appendix  C  |  Surveys  

Appendix C-5 School Surveys – Pastor/Parent Association Officers Describe the role of the school in the parish community life. The uniforms of the school children become the mark of the parish within the wider community, i.e., the island and even the nation. The uniform, especially the children wearing them, reveals the active mission of the Parish. • The school plays a critical role in the formation of values, which eventually the child will emulate in his/her community • Very active •

Describe your role in helping to maintain and deepen the Catholic character and atmosphere (Catholic Identity) of the school. I (the Pastor) make it imperative that we celebrate the Mass at least once a month and that the school children are seen in the special parish celebrations, i.e., the feast of our Patroness, Santa Barbara. • As parents, we should reiterate and teach our children how to apply the Catholic scriptures in everyday life. • Very interested to do more… just the tip of the iceberg, scratch the surface •

Evaluate the teaching of Religion in your school in terms of: a. Amount of time given to the actual religious instruction b. Content of the program c. Theological/catechetical preparation of teachers d. Formation of responsible Catholics The teachers participate in the annual Archdiocesan Catechetical-Liturgical Conference as well as attend certification classes for catechesis and youth ministries • Religion forms a great part of a student at Santa Barbara. A lot of activities are interjected, the reason why the students grow up to be responsible Catholics • I believe the Religion Dept is very active in teaching not only the students but also the parents about the Catholic faith. The teachers I have encountered also seem to model and express the faith both in and out of the classroom • A – adequate; B – adequate; C – high; D – can improve •

Do you have any suggestions for improvements in any of these areas? I would suggest the pastor’s involvement in the approval of the script of the annual Christmas plays • Get families to play more active roles in the parish thru organizing more Catholic-centric family activities. • None at this time • During a meeting, a parent brought up a notion that no Catholic identity events for parents has taken place in quite a while; we need to address it fast. •

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Describe the pastor’s role in the hiring and termination of staff. None. It is key that the pastor has inputs on selection of staff as employees of Catholic schools should display the highest values as they are the best role models • I am not aware of his role at this time. • •

Describe the frequency and effectiveness of your communications with the principal. We communicate with each other at least once a month. The principal is quite hands-on, very visible and approachable to both students and parents which I believe is highly important. Since she is their ultimate “role model” as a religious person, the children do not shy away from the Catholic faith and its teachings. • Both Sr. Jeanette and Sr. Maria are approachable as administrators and both advocate for the well-being of the students and accomplishing what is best for the school community. • Very open and growing, as with the vice-principal. • •

Describe the role and function of the school board. • •

No comment If by school board you mean PTO (Parent-Teacher Organization), we are to act as representatives for our homeroom classes and bring forth parent concerns and help find ways to address them.

How effective is the school board on supporting high achievement of all students? • •

No comment SBCS has n school board.

Describe the degree of parental involvement in the school. I have observed a high level of involvement of the parents, especially as their children receive the sacraments • Santa Barbara parents are very much involved in all activities, whether religious or nonreligious. This is ideal as there is a good collaboration formed, which helps parents do followup activities to reinforce Catholic values learned at school. • Parental involvement is extremely high. The school functions and is able to be seamless because of the parent volunteers. • During school activities, mid to high. For sports, high. For PTO, low. •

How effective are parents in supporting high achievement of all students? It is the parent’s role to provide a home environment which encourages learning. A home which is “academically stimulating” breeds high-achievers. When there is a home-school collaboration, I believe students will tend to succeed not only in school, but in life in general. • Parent involvement in the school is not just their presence on campus but also their involvement in helping students (their kids) to complete assignments. • I’d say mid to high. •

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Appendix  C  |  Surveys  

Describe how the school’s mission, philosophy, and Schoolwide Learning Expectations define the school’s purpose and are a lived reality of the school. The school’s participation in islandwide activities emulates the command of Jesus to go out and proclaim the Kingdom of God. • I believe SBCS students are a well-rounded breed and emulate SCBC’ mission of striving for excellence, building character, values, discipline, all in the Roman Catholic faith. • I’m sure every school’s mission should be in line with its purpose and should be a continuing lived reality toward success. •

Describe the role of the Pastor school board and parent association in an annual budget process. • •

The Pastor has no role in the budget process. Not aware of this process.

List the school’s most effective areas for supporting high achievement for students. The involvement of the faculty with each of their students is highly remarkable. An SBCS student, who has a strong foundation in religion and Catholic faith, tends to have more discipline, and therefore contributes to them being high achievers. • Students obviously strive for things such as the NJHS • The school plays and its teachers. • •

List the school’s greatest area for improvement Encourage the students to critically think and then articulate their thoughts in a very concise and comprehensible manner. Encourage the children to speak out. • A look into having more financial support, i.e., having the school lessen the burden on parents spending for activities like sports, graduation, field trips, etc. , I believe will help improve the enrollment numbers. • Increase of enrollment • Spiritual growth for parents •

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Appendix  C  |  Surveys  

Appendix C-6 School Surveys – Catholic Identity Assessment Guide MISSION AND PHILOSOPHY The mission statement clearly indicates the relationship of the school to its parent body (e.g., the parish or religious congregation). The mission statement and philosophy are prominently displayed in the front office, every classroom, and the parish offices. The mission statement and philosophy are included in relevant school documents such as handbooks, websites, etc. The mission statement and philosophy are often quoted in relevant school publications such as the parent/student/staff handbooks, school newsletters, registration materials, etc. The principal/admissions officer talks about the school’s mission and philosophy when interviewing prospective students and their families. The principal (and pastor) discuss the mission and philosophy of the school with prospective teachers, aides, employees, volunteers (especially coaches) etc. before hiring them/bringing them on board. Policy established by the school board is based upon, and quoted from the mission and/or philosophy. Strategic Plan/School Improvement Plan/Action Plan is based upon, and often quotes from the mission and/or philosophy. Parents and students, teachers and staff can paraphrase the mission statement if not quote it exactly.

WCEA  ISL  2010  

HE

E

SE

IE

NA

67%

33%

-

-

-

72%

28%

-

-

-

89%

6%

6%

-

-

72%

11%

17%

-

-

56%

33%

6%

-

6%

56%

33%

6%

-

6%

44%

44%

6%

-

6%

44%

28%

28%

-

-

6%

67%

28%

-

-

Santa  Barbara  Catholic  School  

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Appendix  C  |  Surveys  

PRAYER AND SACRAMENTS

HE

E

SE

IE

All children have the opportunity to attend Mass weekly.

39%

50%

6%

6%

All staff celebrate Mass with the children.

67%

22%

11%

-

94%

6%

-

-

78% 94%

17% 6%

6% -

-

89%

11%

-

-

89%

11%

-

-

44%

50%

6%

-

83%

-

17%

-

56%

28%

17%

-

83%

17%

-

-

72%

28%

-

-

89%

6%

6%

-

HE

E

SE

IE

NA

44%

56%

-

-

-

50%

33%

17%

-

-

83%

6%

11%

-

-

Children have the opportunity to celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation during Advent and Lent. Every class has a ‘prayer corner’ with religious imagery. Teachers pray with their students often during the day. Students experience a variety of prayer forms including memorized and spontaneous prayer. Students feel/are free to pray for special intentions (e.g., parents, family members, pets, etc.) Parents are responsible for teaching their children various memorized prayers as outlined by the school. Students have opportunities to experience some of the traditional forms of prayer and worship such as Benediction, Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament, Stations of the Cross, Rosary, etc. There are special prayer events throughout the year (e.g., blessing of animals, blessing of throats, etc.) The school has a special celebration to recognize its patron saint. Special attention is paid to the liturgical cycle of the church. Children are encouraged to attend Mass on the weekend.

CURRICULUM The school’s written curriculum includes Catholic values infused throughout ‘secular’ curricular areas (e.g., when discussing the American Civil War values of human rights and economic justice are central to the discussion). Reference to relevant Church documents is made throughout the curriculum. For example, reference could be made to U.S. Catholic Bishops Pastoral Letter on Racism, 1979 when talking about racism in society, or reference to Civility in Media, A Statement of the U.S. Catholic Bishops when talking about communications and the role of media in society. Religion textbooks that are used are in compliance with the Catechism of the Catholic Church and approved for use within the diocese by the Local

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Appendix  C  |  Surveys  

 

CURRICULUM Ordinary. Sacramental preparation is according to the guidelines of the Local Ordinary. The school uses a standards-based Religion curriculum that has been approved by the local Ordinary. The teachers understand the mission of the Church and make a special effort to educate the whole child, using a variety of teaching methods and strategies that help the student to “order the whole of human culture to the news of salvation.” (Gravissimum Educationis, Pope Paul VI, 1965 #8)

CATECHIST CERTIFICATION All teachers have current catechist certification according to local Arch/Diocesan norms, or are in the process of obtaining such catechist certification. Administration (pastor/priests and principal) provide ongoing faith formation activities for teachers as routine part of teacher in-service. Staff, as a staff, participate in annual retreat days and other activities that help build a faith community among the staff. Staff meetings include time for prayer and time for discussion about Religion, Catholic values, and the faith formation of the entire school community (parents, students, staff).

PARENTS AS THE PRIMARY EDUCATORS Parents are identified as the primary educators in appropriate school documents (e.g., mission statement, handbooks). The school provides formal opportunities for parents to learn about their role as primary educators. A formal, institutionalized part of annual parentteacher conferences is a discussion of the child’s spiritual growth and development. WCEA  ISL  2010  

HE

E

SE

IE

NA

67%

11%

17%

-

6%

89%

6%

6%

-

-

78%

22%

-

-

-

HE

E

SE

IE

NA

33%

39%

22%

-

6%

78%

6%

17%

-

-

83%

17%

-

-

-

72%

28%

-

-

-

HE

E

SE

IE

NA

50%

39%

11%

-

-

39%

39%

22%

-

-

56%

33%

11%

-

-

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Appendix  C  |  Surveys  

PARENTS AS THE PRIMARY EDUCATORS Administration encourages teachers to meet with parents outside of the annual parent-teacher conferences to discuss the faith formation activities of the school. Administration provides opportunities for parents to meet and talk about the faith formation of their children. Every newsletter contains one or more articles related to the faith formation of children. Parents are involved in the faith formation of their children, and their successes (e.g., helping children memorize prayers) is reported back to the parents.

SERVICE Service opportunities are rooted in Catholic values – that students and faculty provide service because that is a hallmark of Catholicism, not because it is a graduation requirement. Students are expected to complete a minimum number of service hours each year. Students are expected to provide a clearly defined portion of these service hours by providing service to their parish of registry. Service opportunities are organized by school staff and are age appropriate. Students voluntarily participate in service opportunities for which they receive no credit toward school-mandated service. Service opportunities are an overt expression of the Themes of Catholic Social Teaching (Life and Dignity of the Human Person; Call to Family, Community, and Participation; Rights and Responsibilities; Option for the Poor and Vulnerable; The Dignity of Work and the Rights of Workers; Solidarity; and Care for God’s Creation).

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HE

E

SE

IE

NA

33%

28%

39%

-

-

39%

61%

-

-

17%

33%

33%

-

17%

72%

11%

11%

6%

-

HE

E

SE

IE

NA

67%

28%

6%

-

-

83%

6%

11%

-

-

17%

61%

17%

-

6%

56%

39%

6%

-

-

22%

61%

17%

-

-

44%

50%

6%

-

-

Santa  Barbara  Catholic  School  

WCEA  ISL  2010  


Appendix  C  |  Surveys  

 

SIGNS AND SACRAMENTALS

HE

E

SE

IE

NA

Every classroom has clearly displayed crucifixes. Other religious imagery exists in classrooms and throughout the school. Quotations from Church documents (e.g., Gravissimum Educationis, To Teach as Jesus Did), inspired writers (e.g., Thomas Merton, Joan Chittister) etc. are found in handbooks, on bulletin boards, in lesson plans, etc. Students participate in a variety of traditions and rituals of the Church, e.g., May crowning, Advent Wreath prayers, daily Angelus, etc. Students have opportunities and are encouraged to participate in prayer, traditions and rituals.

100%

-

-

-

-

94%

-

-

-

6%

61%

33%

6%

-

-

89%

11%

-

-

-

100%

-

-

-

-

EVANGELIZATION

HE

E

SE

IE

NA

100%

-

-

-

-

89%

11%

-

-

-

78%

17%

6%

-

-

78%

11%

11%

-

-

72%

17%

11%

-

-

78%

17%

6%

-

-

61%

33%

6%

-

-

33%

61%

6%

-

-

33%

28%

17%

6%

17%

The principal builds a faith community that is welcoming, prayerful and makes a clear statement that this is a Catholic faith setting. Prayer permeates the school. It is not limited to morning announcements. Teachers bring Gospel values into their ordinary teaching experiences. The school provides ongoing opportunities for faith formation for students, parents and staff. Teachers realize that their first responsibility is to be attentive to their own relationship with Jesus Christ. In every religion class, the teacher attempts to connect faith with life. The teacher attempts to relate the moral, ethical or spiritual ramifications to each area of study. The school reaches out to parents to engage them in the religious formation of their children in every grade – not just sacramental preparation grades. Members of the school community (students, parents) reach out to the newly baptized through cards and gifts of welcome.

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Appendix  C  |  Surveys  

Top Three Open-Ended Responses to Staff, Parent, and Student Surveys (A complete listing is provided in a separate document.)

Appendix C-1 (Staff Survey) Religious Instruction/Faith Formation Improvements/Suggestions: Our Catholic faith is very strong in SBCS! I think that the religious instruction/faith formation has gained much attention and started to develop. I believe that a strong and better instruction and formation is well underway. • Sometimes staff are left at school to tend to parish CCD or other concerns during workshops or other formation programs. During Tuesday faculty prayer service, teacher aides are always left in the classrooms. • •

School Management/Principal Improvements/Suggestions: We need to improve on assigning and delegating work. There is just too much work for certain positions to handle. • Some people are being spread too thin handling too many responsibilities. • Suggest that a clear, written job description is provided • Can we update the faculty handbook? There are positions/roles currently existing that are not there. •

Parental Involvement Improvements/Suggestions: Parents/Guardians must check notebook of his/her child for teacher’s notation or comments on the completion of homework assignment. Also by checking the child’s notebook or work, they can see or extend help to the strength and areas of improvement. We would like some parents to respond to the email of teachers especially if the child’s performance in class is somewhat lagging behind. • Parental involvement is more obvious for the elementary school students. • Rules about parent presence in the school must be revisited. Right now, parents are free to roam the school any time and go inside classrooms especially before and after school. •

School Environment and Safety Improvements/Suggestions: •

Related to #3, parents and guests must not be allowed beyond certain points of the school. Discipline/Student Behavior

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Disciplinary policies should be reviewed periodically to remind parents, teachers, and students about school rules.

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Appendix  C  |  Surveys  

Staff Development Improvements/Suggestions: I would like to request for additional laptops with upgraded programs (Keynote/PowerPoint) in the mobile lab and accessible electrical sockets for a conducive learning environment. Also a document camera. Mobile Lab and main lab computers are already showing wear and tear. They can still be used but updated equipment would be welcome. • Delegation of extra-curricular responsibilities must be carefully studied so as to lessen stress and burnout on teachers as the school year progresses. •

Appendix C-2 (Parent Survey) What do you like best about the school? (94% responded) • academics and curriculum – 52% • Catholic identity – 29% • school community and culture – 26% What improvements would you like to see for the school? (75% responded) • facilities, notably a high school – 25% • faculty development – 23% • additional academic offerings – 22% What makes this school a Catholic school? (84% responded) • what it teaches (values, faith formation, etc.) – 91% • practices such as masses, prayers, etc. – 31% • governance and culture – 22% If improvement is needed (Curriculum and Instruction), please list your suggestions: (29% responded) • instructional methodologies – 31% • Math – 19% • Social Studies – 19% What do you think of the discipline in the school? (49% responded) • satisfied to very satisfied – 79% • more emphasis on bullying – 3% How could the school better communicate with you? (45% responded) • electronically – 50% • hard copy – 19% • phone call – 11%

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Appendix  C  |  Surveys  

What are the positive features of our physical plant and facilities? (42% responded) • upkeep – 63% • atmosphere and environment – 27% • safety – 22% What would you like to see improved? (40% responded) • security – 21% • additional facilities – 16% • upkeep – 16%

Appendix C-3 (Student Survey, K-3) What do you like about your school? • academics – 47% • school personnel – 27% • facilities – 25% What do you wish were different at this school? • nothing – 18% • swimming pool – 11% • bigger/larger playground – 10%

Appendix C-4 (Student Survey, 4-8) What do you like about your school? • programs & activities – 84% • school personnel – 79% • academics & curriculum – 70% What do you wish were different at this school? • academics – 38% • programs and activities – 37% • cafeteria food – 31%

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Appendix  N  |  In-­‐Depth  Study  (Religion)    

 

In-Depth Study

An In-Depth Study in Religion by Santa Barbara Catholic School 274-A W. Santa Barbara Ave., Dededo, GU 96929

Continuous School Improvement Focused On High Achievement Of All Students

SY 2012-2013

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Improving Student Learning for Catholic Schools Appendix E-1 Catholic Identity Ongoing Review “From the first moment that a student sets foot in a Catholic school, he or she ought to have the impression of entering a new environment, one illuminated by the light of faith and having its own unique characteristics. The Council summed this up by speaking of an environment permeated with the Gospel spirit of love and freedom.” The Religious Dimension of Education in a Catholic School, Congregation for Catholic Education, Rome, 1988 Accreditation Factor #3: Catholic Identity The school is Catholic, approved by the Local Ordinary (Canon 803), provides authentic Catholic teaching, opportunities for community worship and participation in the sacraments, and promotes evangelization and service to the community Year One: Refer to Chapter 3-A Year Two: The school assesses itself on Standards 2 and 7 ● Standard 2: The school provides regular opportunities for the school community to experience prayer and the Sacraments ● Standard 7: The school uses signs, sacramentals, traditions, and rituals of the Roman Catholic Church. Task 1: Survey Catholic Identity Practices The surveys on Catholic Identity from Appendix C yielded commendable results. Ninety percent of the staff rated SBCS as highly effective in the item “Prayers are said at various times throughout the day,” while the remaining ten percent gave the school an effective rating. In the item “Staff have multiple opportunities for personal faith formation and growth,” the school received a 61 percent highly effective, 37 percent effective, and two percent somewhat effective rating. Ninety-two percent of parents also agreed that SBCS “provides regular opportunities for the school community to experience prayer and the sacraments,” while 90 percent said that the school “makes frequent use of signs, sacramentals, traditions and rituals of the Roman Catholic Church.” Among the students, 96 percent of Kindergarten to 3rd grade students either agreed or strongly agreed that they had time to pray, while 68 percent of 4th to 8th grade students stated they had opportunities to participate in school liturgies. The survey on “Prayer and Sacraments” from Appendix C-6 yielded no ineffective ratings, with four items getting a seven percent somewhat ineffective rating. All other items were rated effective or highly effective. In the area “Signs and Sacramentals,” there was a 100 percent highly effective rating on the use of the crucifix in the classroom and on students having opportunities for prayer, traditions, and rituals. The survey also showed a 93 percent highly WCEA  ISL  2010  

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Appendix  N  |  In-­‐Depth  Study  (Religion)     effective rating on the existence of religious imagery in classrooms and throughout the school. Eighty three percent gave the school a highly effective rating on students being able to participate in a variety of traditions and rituals, with the remaining 13 percent giving an effective rating. Regarding the use of quotations from church documents, 67 percent said the school was highly effective, 27 percent effective, and seven percent somewhat effective. Still in Appendix C-6, the survey on “Evangelization” yielded 87 percent highly effective and 13 percent effective on the item asking if prayer permeates the school. There was also an 80 percent highly effective and 13 percent effective rating on the item about ongoing opportunities for faith formation among students, parents, and staff. No item got an ineffective rating. The NCEA ACRE (Assessment of Catechesis/Religious Education) also yielded good results in the areas of “Liturgy and Sacraments” and “Prayer/Religious Practices.” (see Appendix B-6) Fifth graders’ (Level 1) over-all group scores showed an increase in SY 09-10 and SY 11-12 in these two areas, and the group performance was above both national and parish averages. Eighth graders (Level 2) also consistently scored higher compared to national and parish averages. However, 8th graders have been showing a decrease in their scores over the past three testing years. Task 2: Write Summative Narrative The school provides many opportunities for the school community—students, faculty, administration, staff, and parents— to participate regularly in the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass and receive the sacraments. The Office of Faith Formation coordinates these feasts and facilitates all formation activities connected with the reception of the sacraments. Schoolwide masses are celebrated on various feasts important to the school and the Church such as the Mass of the Holy Spirit, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Easter, May Crowning, graduation, and others. The school also joins the parish during the feast of its patron saint, on Ash Wednesday, and the First Holy Communion Mass. Eighth graders in particular yearly lead in a parish Fatima Novena and Mass in October. On December 8, the school participates in the archdiocesan celebration of the Feast of the Immaculate Conception. The sacrament of reconciliation is offered to the school community during the seasons of Advent and Lent. Students in third grade are able to receive their first confession and first Holy Communion, together with students from upper grades who have previously been unable to do so. There have also been instances where the school assisted some its students in receiving the sacrament of baptism. These events are announced and celebrated during school assemblies. The Office of Faith Formation leads the community in schoolwide prayer services. These prayer activities incorporate different forms of prayer such as meditation, praying with scripture, songs, dances, mimes, etc., that allow students, faculty, and parents to experience different meaningful prayers during the annual Living Rosary, Stations of the Cross and Advent Prayer Services.

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Schoolwide prayer services are also held on special occasions such as the visits of the International Pilgrim Statue of Our Lady of Fatima, the Relics of St. Therese, the Relics of Passion, exposition of the Blessed Sacrament, and most recently, the novena in honor of St. Pedro Calungsod’s canonization.

The school prays as a community at the beginning and at the end of the day via the public address system. On Fridays, the school gathers at the courtyard for morning prayers and flag raising. During the morning prayers, saints’ feasts or Church feasts observed that day are announced and briefly explained. Prayer intentions are mentioned and formula as well as spontaneous prayers is recited. At the end of the day, the Act of Contrition is prayed. All classes begin and end with prayer. After lunch, the junior high classes pray the Angelus, Grace After Meals and Prayer for the Faithful Departed. In October and May, the rosary is recited daily in the mornings. Assemblies, events, sports meets and other meetings begin with prayer. Every Tuesday, the faculty gathers to pray together in the faculty lounge during homeroom time. During this time, parent volunteers supervise classes. Teachers take turn in preparing these prayer services. Members of the school community are able to experience various retreats and spiritual/theological talks. An annual recollection and retreat and catechetical/theological sessions during faculty meetings especially on the Year of the Faith are provided for the faculty. Classes from 5th to 8th grade have their own class retreats. Eighth graders also join other 8th graders from the archdiocese in another retreat. Sixth graders and their parents have a family conference with their counterparts from the other archdiocesan schools. Parents of first holy communicants and 8th graders are offered workshops and/or recollections. The school also has many signs and sacramentals that remind the school community about God. All classrooms have crucifixes and statues of the Blessed Mother. Schoolwide banners proclaim the different liturgical seasons. Pictures of the Divine Mercy, Our Lady of Mercy, Venerable Catherine McAuley, Santa Barbara, St. Pedro Calungsod, and other saints and holy people can be found in classrooms, hallways, and offices. Sacramentals to emphasize the season of the liturgical year being celebrated such as Advent wreaths, Christmas crèche, a large wooden cross in the school courtyard during Lent and Easter, and the Book of Remembrance in November, seasonal banners among others, also serve as reminders about our Catholic faith and traditions. WCEA  ISL  2010  

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Appendix  N  |  In-­‐Depth  Study  (Religion)     Members of the community participate in several processions and prayer rallies: Feast of Santa Barbara in December; Island-wide procession on December 8 in honor of the Immaculate Conception or Santa Marian Kamalen, patroness of Guam; October Respect Life Sunday; Archdiocesan Pro-life Rally; visits to the parish Blessed Sacrament Chapel throughout the year; Stations of the Cross at Santa Barbara Church during the Lenten season; annual pilgrimage of the First Holy Communicants and their parents to Our Lady of the Blessed Sacrament Church in Agana Heights. Additionally, the school annually celebrates the Feast of Our Lady of Mercy and prays the novena to Santa Barbara. During Christmas Mass, “Mangingi” (veneration of the Child Jesus) is observed. Silent Wednesdays and varied sacrifices and acts of kindness are practiced during Lent. These practices have led parents to rank SBCS’ Catholic formation and Catholic values as their second most important reason for sending their children to this school, academic excellence being their number one reason. Visitors to the school have also commented that they can see and sense that the school is Catholic in its practices and offerings. 1 to 3 significant accomplishments of the school that have had a significant positive impact on Catholic Identity: • The establishment of the Office of Faith Formation that plans, coordinates, and implements the

formation program for students, faculty and staff and parents.

• The opportunity for retreats and prayer workshops offered to faculty, staff, students, and

parents • The administration of the NCEA ACRE tests for Level 1 (Grade 5) and Level 2 (Grade 8) during SY 2006-07, 2009-10 and 2011-12 that have yielded excellent results. 1 to 2 goals that will have a significant positive impact on Catholic Identity: • To inculcate more deeply in the members of the SBCS community the Mercy values of

compassion, justice, respect for the dignity of the human person and stewardship of the earth

• To improve the existing formation programs for students, faculty and staff and parents by

institutionalizing and formalizing the Christian service learning/outreach component of these formation programs

Task 3: Plan The school has many activities and opportunities that promote the school’s Catholic identity. Catholic mission and identity is so interwoven in the fabric of SBCS life and can be evidenced in the many sacramentals in the school, the familial atmosphere in the SBCS community, the formation activities and programs in the school, and in the WCEA surveys and ACRE results.

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Although the school has provided faith formation activities for students, faculty and staff and parents in the past few years, the school needs to strengthen its Faith Formation program by inculcating more deeply in the members of the SBCS community the Mercy values and stewardship of the earth. It also needs to institutionalize and formalize the Christian service learning/outreach component of these formation programs. The Leadership Team has identified the service learning/outreach opportunities it deems appropriate for each grade level. The Science Department also has taken the lead to initiate activities in school to further the value of stewardship of the earth. The Office of Faith Formation will be responsible in implementing and monitoring the formation programs for students, faculty and staff and parents, to include the service learning/outreach component and deepening the Mercy values in the school curriculum, especially that of stewardship of the earth. The faculty will be informed through the Religion Department meetings, faculty meetings, emails and memos. These will be discussed with the parents through the Parent Teacher Organization meetings, Parent Teacher conferences, Back to School Night and other school community gatherings, school website and memos. The students’ respective Religion and Homeroom teachers will assist in implementing the student formation programs. Evidence: • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Video on class altars used for Living Rosary SY 11-12 Prayer services: PowerPoint presentations and handouts Faculty prayer services Liturgy Schedules Pictures of schoolwide prayer services and other religious activities Appendix C CSW activities Faculty Retreat and Recollection modules Family Retreat modules Stations of the Cross, Living Rosary pictures, scripts NCEA ACRE Test results Parent-Student Handbook’s List of Prayers recited in school Copy of Faith Formation Program

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In-Depth Study

An In-Depth Study in Language Arts by Santa Barbara Catholic School 274-A W. Santa Barbara Ave., Dededo, GU 96929

Continuous School Improvement Focused On High Achievement Of All Students

SY 2012-2013

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Preface The Language Arts Department of Santa Barbara Catholic School provides leadership and support for the development of literacy to impact student achievement. Our Language Arts educators teach the skills of reading, writing, and listening to include phonics, spelling, and multimedia lessons. Our department works jointly with parents and teachers to develop literate productive citizens. In order for Language Arts teachers to focus all our efforts and resources on successful student learning, a comprehensive, reliable examination of our department was necessary. We took a holistic perspective and considered what was of vital importance to support high achievement of all students. The Language Arts In-Depth Study consisted mainly of a team of faculty which included the department chair, language arts teachers, guidance counselor, and curriculum coordinator. The information provided to complete the study was a collaboration of faculty and administrators. The Language Arts In-Depth Study discusses topics to be addressed and considered as we plan to improve teaching and learning. These include: (1) analyzing curriculum assessment data; (2) using curriculum standards; (3) instructional methodology; (4) summary; and (5) action plan. All Language Arts teachers view the in-depth study as an instrumental guide to attain the goals stated in the study.

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TASK 1 – ANALYZING CURRICULUM ASSESSMENT DATA The school uses educationally sound assessment process to collect data. The school disaggregates and analyzes student performance data and uses the analysis as a basis for instructional/curricular improvement. SAT 10 Standardized test scores from the SAT 10 are one of several means used by Santa Barbara Catholic School to measure student achievement and learning. Scores from the past four years have shown that Language and Reading are the areas that need more focus. The table below shows that these two subtests have the least number of students scoring in the upper 50th percentile. Table 1: Percentage of Students Scoring in the Upper 50th Percentile SAT 10 Subtest

SY 08-09

SY 09-10

SY 10-11

SY 11-12

Reading

52%

64% (+12)

56% (-8%)

61% (+5)

Mathematics

64%

59% (-5)

62% (+3)

65% (+3)

Language

62%

60% (-2)

49% (-10)

56% (+7)

Science

67%

57% (-10)

64% (+7)

72% (+8)

Social Science

62%

50% (-12)

63% (+13)

70% (+7)

Among the different core subtests, Language and Reading are also the two areas showing the lowest number of students whose percentile ranks have increased over the past three years. Table 2: Percentage of Students Whose Percentile Rank Increased From the Previous Year SAT 10 Subtest

SY 09-10

SY 10-11

SY 11-12

3-Year Average

Reading

30%

50%

56%

46%

Mathematics

51%

44%

54%

50%

Language

41%

38%

59%

46%

Science

37%

48%

55%

47%

Social  Science

40%

50%

55%

48%

Since the last accreditation in SY 06-07, overall scores in Reading and Language have fluctuated, as shown by the graphs below.

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Figure 1:

Figure 2:

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Primary grades K to 2 have been averaging in the 62nd percentile and higher in Reading, equivalent to stanines of 6 and up (high average to above average). Kindergarten has a downward trend for the past three years while grades 1 and 2 have an upward trend with grade 1 scores consistently increasing. Kindergarten did not take the SAT 10 in SY 09-10. Reading scores for grades 3 to 5 have ranged from the 31st to the 58th percentile, equivalent to stanines of 4 to 5 (average). All three grade levels have shown a downward trend, but 3rd and 4th grades have shown an increase in SY 11-12. Middle school Reading scores have ranged from the 49th to the 61st percentile, equivalent to stanines of 5 to 6 (average to high average). For the past three years, 6th and 7th grade have shown an upward trend while 8th grade scores have been slowly decreasing. For SY 11-12, percentile ranks have gone up for all grade levels except Kindergarten, 5th grade, and 8th grade. All percentile ranks were above the 50th percentile last school year, except for 5th grade, which has been scoring below the 50th percentile for the past five years. Figure 3:

 

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Figure 4:

Language scores for 1st grade have been hovering in the high 60s to mid-70s for the past five years, equivalent to a stanine of 6 (high average), while 2nd grade has been showing a downward trend, with a low of 48, except in the past two years where the score has been in the upper 60s. Second grade stanines have ranged from 5 to 6 (average to high average). Language scores in 3rd to 5th grade have been showing a downward trend, except for an increase in 3rd and 4th grade last school year. The scores have ranged from 28 to 59, equivalent to stanines of 4 to 5 (average). Sixth grade Language scores have stayed at 58 for the past 3 years, while 7th and 8th grade have been showing a decrease except for last school year. Scores for middle school students have ranged from 53 to 68, equivalent to stanines of 5 to 6 (average to high average). Intermediate grades have consistently shown the lowest performance and a downward trend for the last five years. Data from Appendix B-3 also show that there is an increasing number of students scoring in the bottom quartile for these grades. The school, particularly the Language Arts department, is working to identify possible causes of the trend. In an effort to determine if the way tests were taken is a factor, last school year 3rd grade made a change from separate answer sheets to answering directly on the test booklet. The results showed a marked increase of scores in Reading, Language as well as all subtests. WCEA  ISL  2010  

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Scores for the past five years have also been disaggregated in terms of boys and girls. Girls generally perform better than the boys, but the boys show greater overall growth in Reading compared to the girls, with the gap between the two groups narrowing as the years progress. The gap in Language remains relatively constant. Table 3: SAT 10 Reading Scores, Boys vs. Girls School 2A 2B 3A 3B 4A 4B 5A Year 06-07 62 56 48 47 52 43

5B

07-08

70

68

58

55

53

51

51

46

08-09

66

64

56

53

51

48

48

09-10

60

61

45

42

49

44

10-11

71

65

36

36

47

11-12

73

64

54

50

49

6A

6B

7A

7B

48

58

49

45

42

51

40

48

49

52

42

32

8A

8B

51

56

49

57

56

46

50

58

52

61

53

58

56

53

56

8A

8B

key: A = girls, B = boys cells of the same color refer to the same group of students from one year to the next Table 3: SAT 10 Language Scores, Boys vs. Girls School 2A 2B 3A 3B 4A 4B 5A Year

5B

6A

6B

7A

7B

06-07

64

58

59

52

64

50

07-08

62

56

54

44

54

41

56

43

08-09

54

41

58

57

50

43

63

53

67

50

09-10

47

51

55

46

52

48

56

42

62

53

63

55

10-11

67

61

36

32

34

22

55

44

61

52

60

53

59

46

11-12

68

57

56

52

37

35

55

38

64

46

67

58

61

53

key: A = girls, B = boys cells of the same color refer to the same group of students from one year to the next Data from Appendix B-3.1 show that the weakest areas of performance in Reading vary from one grade level to the next, with “Critical Analysis” showing up as a common weakness for all except 8th grade. Weakest areas of performance in Language also vary from one grade level to the next, with “Thinking Skills” showing up as a common weakness from 3rd to 8th grade. “Editing” is a strength demonstrated by all grade levels.

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The data indicate that while there is room for improvement, there has been student growth, particularly in the past two years, as shown by the increase in the number of students scoring above the 50th percentile, and an increase in the number of students whose percentile ranks have gone up. Majority of students are scoring in the average range. Appendix B-3.2 shows that the classes of 2011 through 2016 have shown a yearly increase in their scaled scores for Reading and Language in the past five years. Data from Appendix B-4 also show that the number of students scoring in the bottom quartile has decreased. Parents have been informed of individual student scores through SAT 10 Home Reports provided for each student. During Back-to-School Night, students’ overall performance is presented to the school community. Individual conferences with parents have also been opportunities to discuss student performance. However, not many parents are familiar with terms like national percentile rank and stanine. Awareness of what these terms mean can lead to increased parental involvement and support for better student performance. Scholastic Reading Inventory/Reading Counts! Aside from the SAT 10, the Language Arts department also utilizes the Scholastic Reading Program: Scholastic Reading Inventory/Reading Counts! (SRI/RC!) and Scholastic Achievement Manager (SAM) to improve reading skills. Students take an SRI test at the beginning of the year to determine their reading Lexile measure, and an average of two times per quarter to track their progress. RC! quizzes are taken throughout the year to measure students’ understanding of the books they’re reading. Due to server problems, student data from SY 2008-2009 cannot be retrieved, but data from school years 2009-2013 show that reading Lexile measures have increased for majority of the students. Table 5: SRI Growth Summary Report (Reading Lexile Measures) Class of

SY 09-10 Start End

SY 10-11 Start End

SY 11-12 Start End

SY 12-13 Start Mid

Grade Level

2013

650

686 (+36)

863

928 (+65)

945

991 (+46)

1032

1067 (+35)

8th

2014

522

671 (+149)

705

804 (+99)

836

894 (+58)

940

975 (+35)

7th

2015

376

548 (+172)

614

621 (+7)

668

681 (+13)

760

803 (+43)

6th

2016

251

304 (+53)

432

457 (+25)

523

599 (+76)

663

686 (+23)

5th

2017

BR (48)

202 (+154)

193

386 (+193)

354

430 (+76)

541

584 (+43)

4th

BR (0)

180 (+180)

204

405 (+201)

454

465 (+11)

3rd

BR (0)

131 (+131)

247

287 (+40)

2nd

BR (0)

BR (0)

1st

2018 2019 2020

BR = Beginning Reader As with the SAT 10, parents are also provided with individual student growth reports, including a list of books appropriate for a student’s Lexile. Language Arts teachers discuss these measures with them and grade level expectations.

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SBCS’ Language Arts curriculum follows the standards set forth by the Archdiocese of Agana. There is a direct connection between these standards and items tested in the SAT-10. Data from standardized tests show that majority of students are performing at the average and above average levels. It is hoped that students will maintain, if not improve, their performance, with more students scoring at above average levels. Conclusion 1-2 significant accomplishments of the school in the area of Data Analysis and Action that have had a positive impact on student learning: • A more detailed and comprehensive analysis of SAT 10 data being presented to the faculty • More structured time given to Scholastic Reading Inventory/Reading Counts! through double periods in Language Arts and constant follow-ups on quarterly growth reports 1 goal which needs to be accomplished in the area of Data Analysis and Action that will have a significant positive impact on student learning: • An increase in the number of students whose percentile ranks show yearly progress

TASK 2 – USING CURRICULUM STANDARDS The school provides a challenging, comprehensive and relevant curriculum for each student that results in achievement of the Schoolwide Learning Expectations, Arch/diocesan curriculum standards (local curriculum standards where Arch/diocesan standards don’t exist), and other institutional and/or governing authority expectations. All students make acceptable progress toward clearly defined and measurable Schoolwide Learning Expectations, Arch/diocesan curriculum standards (local curriculum standards where Arch/diocesan standards don’t exist), and/or other governing authority expectations. After the implementation of Archdiocesan Curriculum Standards in SY 2008-09, Santa Barbara Catholic School has continued to strive in providing a challenging, comprehensive and relevant Language Arts curriculum for each student that results in achievement of these standards and Schoolwide Learning Expectations. SBCS’ Language Arts department offers a comprehensive and relevant curriculum in line with our SLEs through prayers at the beginning and end of every class, an overall sacramental environment and the inclusion of current world events in lessons. Curriculum Standards are the basis for all teachers' Long Range Plans and are required in weekly lesson plans, both of which are monitored by the Director of Curriculum. Teachers are also required to include Catholic values in their weekly lesson plans as they relate to the subject matter being taught. Language Arts Standards and Benchmarks for K-12 are used to measure and evaluate achievement in Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking, and Media Literacy. (Refer to Long Range Plans in Exhibit D) These Curriculum Standards further measure the SLEs of being Creative Critical Thinkers and Effective Communicators, while quarterly report cards include two deportment categories with clearly defined rubrics that measure being Responsible Members of the Community and Committed Christians.

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Scholastic Reading Inventory (SRI), Scholastic Reading Counts! (SRC!), SAT 10, and progress reports are additional tools teachers use to challenge students to achieve SLEs and Archdiocesan curriculum standards. All Language Arts teachers use SRI to determine students’ Lexile measure. This is a quarterly test that tracks Lexile growth and identifies those who have made progress and those who need improvement. SRC! measures a student's knowledge of specific books they have read for their required weekly reading. Students from 4th to 8th grade take both SRI and SRC! quizzes in the fully integrated SBCS Mobile Lab, also equipped with one of five interactive whiteboards. These classes have a structured mobile lab schedule allowing teachers to plan students’ test-taking times. Each teacher is allotted two class periods and the option of using the lab during available time slots. Students in 1st-3rd grade have the opportunity to use another computer lab designated for them on the first floor. Teachers assist the students in taking SRI tests during their computer class time and Kindergarten students complete SRI tests in one-on-one sessions with their Language Arts teachers. This type of computer access and computer schedule allows flexibility in lesson planning so that teachers can arrange for the best testing time for their students. The Language Arts department also holds an annual fundraiser known as READVENTURE. The goal of the fundraiser is to inspire our school community to support reading using DEAR, read alouds, or guest readers during the event. Students are encouraged to read for pleasure while collecting pledges from sponsors. Elementary students are required to read or "be read to" for a minimum of three hours while six hours are required of middle school students. The proceeds are used to reward the classes who have the most pledges by purchasing equipment for their classrooms, renewing the annual license for the Scholastic Reading Counts program, building classroom libraries by purchasing books, and providing professional development for our teachers. The improved Library program includes activities such as Book Buffets, Reading Buddies, Spooky Reading Camps, and Scrabble Parties to encourage a love of reading and vocabulary. These programs and activities provide a fun and interactive opportunity for students to immerse themselves in the reading experience. Another program SBCS used in our curriculum was MyWritingWeb. Funded through Title V-A, MWW was a web-based writing, editing and typing program that granted students access both in the classroom and at home. Aimed at improving student performance in these areas, MWW gave students a data base of writing prompts, paragraphs that needed editing and a typing game that challenged all skill levels. Though the program looked promising, it was discontinued after two years due to procurement problems, a difficulty in grading the essays and little to no growth or improvement. Feedback from both students and teachers was that the program was not very user friendly. Based on the data presented in Task 1, additional programs, activities, and newly incorporated technology in Language Arts have shown improvement toward essential reading components, and media literacy skills. However, further progress can still be made. There are still students WCEA  ISL  2010  

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who are not performing at grade level, especially in the areas of writing, listening and speaking. These areas need to be addressed. It has been recommended that more focused attention on struggling students is needed. Similarly, high achieving students can be challenged to do even better and further excel. Separate classes can be created to achieve this objective. Conclusion 1-2 significant accomplishments of the school in the area of Acceptable Progress by All Students that have had a positive impact on student learning: • Addition of programs and activities aimed at improving reading such as: Scholastic Reading Inventory Reading Counts!, READVENTURE, updated Library program 1 goal which needs to be accomplished in the area of Acceptable Progress by All Students that will have a significant positive impact on student learning: • Explore the feasibility of an honors classes for middle school and remedial classes for elementary

TASK 3 – INSTRUCTIONAL METHODOLOGY The staff applies research-based knowledge about teaching and learning in the instructional process. Assessment is frequent and varied, integrated into the teaching/learning process, and informs curriculum planning. At the start of each school year, teachers are provided with standardized test scores and assessment data to guide in the preparation of daily lesson plans and long range plans. All plans are aligned with the Archdiocesan Curriculum Standards and Schoolwide Learning Expectations. Teachers focus on processes that guarantee effective and differentiated instruction that result in increased knowledge, enhanced skills, and self-sufficiency for every student. Techniques appropriate for different levels and learning styles are implemented. To ensure that all students make progress toward SLEs and Archdiocesan curriculum standards, Individualized Service Plans (ISPs) are provided for those with special needs to help the child succeed academically throughout the school year. The school has made great efforts to provide faculty development to familiarize teachers with best practice strategies. Guest speakers are invited to share their area of expertise, faculty meetings and department meetings serve as venues for contributing best practice strategies. Teachers are sent to attend workshops and conferences both locally and off-island, and teachers participate in continuing education courses. Other professional development opportunities provided to Language Arts teachers include training from the Guam Department of Education, Special Education Division in the areas of accommodations/modification strategies and speech therapy, attendance in the Annual University of Guam’s Regional Language Arts Conference and membership in the International Reading Association and Guam International Reading Association. Teachers are also provided with subscriptions to professional journals. These opportunities given to the teachers over the past three years have helped us to become more proficient at teaching Language Arts.

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Our IT personnel also facilitate teacher training for the utilization of RenWeb, SRI, and SAM, the use of electronic presentations for class lessons, and overall technological support. Additionally, our IT personnel maintain subscriptions to RenWeb, online quizzes for SRC! and BrainPOP; an animated educational site for kids. Status notifications and updates are also provided on a regular basis to teachers and staff. The evidence of the impact on student learning from faculty development is apparent through increased test scores particularly in the Editing subtest of the SAT-10. In most areas of the SAT10, data show the trend has been at or above 50 percent in almost all areas of focus from Kindergarten to 8 grade. The results of the SRI tests have also shown growth in reading comprehension. The implementation of research-based teaching strategies in elementary classes such as Read Alouds (Identifying Similarities and Differences), Writing Workshops (Setting Objectives and Providing Feedback), and Class Novels (Questions, Cues, and Advance Organizers), and Digital Book Trailers (Cooperative Learning) at the middle school level have helped to improve students' academic achievement. The recent subscription to BrainPop, paid for with READVENTURE funds, is also a popular supplement that students and teachers can access both on and off campus. th

Lexile measures as seen in Task 1 have been increasing. This may be attributed to the Scholastic Reading Program. All Language Arts classes spend 20-40 minutes participating in DEAR or read alouds during the week. Students use a weekly Home Reading Log to record independent reading time, write a short summary of their reading, and draw a picture based on their idea of the story. Then, they take weekly or bi-weekly SRC! quizzes on the books they have read. Every four weeks, students take an SRI test. Reading comprehension strategies are practiced and tested regularly throughout the year. Continual contributions to this achievement in Lexile measures are establishing classroom libraries, utilizing computer labs, and generating reports from SAM; which provides communication with parents to ensure that they are also aware of their child’s progress. In an effort to support and enhance our methodologies and strategies, we anticipate more active participation in professional learning communities. Our faculty members are encouraged to be part of creating a shared vision for our students and use that vision to guide teaching and learning in the school. We also look forward to implementing more programs similar to Scholastic Reading Inventory wherein the results are monitored school-wide. This type of reliable assessment helps teachers to plan instruction and make accurate placement recommendations. Conclusion 1-2 significant accomplishments of the school in the area of Curriculum and Instruction to Support High Achievement of All Students that have had a positive impact on student learning: • The progress of students’ reading Lexile measures • The increased use of technology and technical support provided by the IT personnel WCEA  ISL  2010  

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1 goal which needs to be accomplished in the area of Curriculum and Instruction to Support High Achievement of All Students that will have a significant positive impact on student learning: • The increased participation in professional learning communities which will facilitate the sharing of best practices and strategies

TASK 4 – SUMMARY OF FINDINGS As a result of analyzing testing data, reviewing the curriculum standards and curriculum map, comparing current teaching strategies with best practices, and analyzing the effectiveness of staff development, Identify 3 to 5 significant accomplishments of the school that have had a positive impact on student learning: Since the last accreditation team visit, the Guidance Counselor and the Director of Curriculum annually complete a more detailed analysis of SAT 10 data and share their findings with the faculty at the start of every school year. This allows teachers to focus on areas of concern that may need special and targeted instruction and identify students' strengths. Reviewing SAT-10 data yearly can help teachers gauge the growth of individual students and particular classes as a whole. Another significant accomplishment is the addition of programs and activities aimed at improving reading which include: Scholastic Reading Program (SRC!, SRI, and SAM) READVENTURE, and an updated school Library program. This has resulted in increasing Lexile measures over the past four years. Title V-A acquisitions and equipment purchased through READVENTURE funds have been instrumental in promoting the increased use of technology in the classroom. The mobile lab, interactive whiteboards, laptops, multimedia projectors, audio speakers, iPads, and document cameras allow teachers to present lessons using technology applicable to the course content. Students, on their part, are able to use technology to create multimedia presentations and as aids in the learning process. Other curricular areas can replicate these accomplishments. They can also utilize programs similar to those in the Language Arts Department. For instance, Scholastic Math Inventory (SMI), the math counterpart for the language arts SRI program, may be incorporated by the Math Department. Additionally, other departments have the same access to the technological features of our school. Reading, writing, speaking, and listening are substantial skills that are essential to succeed in all school subjects. Student mastery of these skills will improve the scores of the different core subtests of the SAT 10. Identify which goal of the three already listed will have the greatest significant positive impact on student learning:

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Remedial programs offer scaffolding and structure to students who need more intensive instructional intervention and support to meet grade-level standards. The students’ ability to read and write with proficiency is a school priority. Moving them into advanced skills, where they are able to operate beyond their grade-level, is ideal. For students who have acquired these skills, the school may offer honors courses. The honors program gives students an opportunity to be exposed to a relevant and rigorous curriculum that further prepares them for high school and postsecondary education. We are confident that the school provides academic support for all students, regardless of their skill levels. However, the school must first determine if such programs are advisable. Thus, there is a need to explore the feasibility of an honors class for middle school and remedial classes for the elementary level in Language Arts. Having remedial and honors classes will help cater to students at different achievement levels. A more focused and individualized approach in the classroom will aid in student learning and achievement. If remediation is offered in the elementary grades, students can then be challenged to excel as they progress.

TASK 5 – ACTION PLAN Action Plan for Santa Barbara Catholic School Goal #3: (from In-Depth Study) Explore the feasibility of honors classes for middle school and remedial classes for the elementary level in Language Arts Rationale for this Goal: SBCS currently does not offer a formal program to specifically target those who need remediation and those who are already excelling in Language Arts. The school would like to evaluate its resources and capabilities of implementing a curriculum that will cater to and support their learning needs. Alignment with mission, philosophy, SLEs: Our goal is aligned with the School’s Mission of offering “… a comprehensive curriculum that integrates technology and wide-ranging activities to develop the gifts and potential of each child” and Vision “to empower them to face life’s challenges and opportunities.” Furthermore, it is also aligned with the SLEs of forming Creative Critical Thinkers and Effective Communicators. Strategy #1 Activities Cost or Resources & Sources

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Create a Language Arts committee that will study the feasibility of honors classes in middle school and remedial classes in the elementary level 1. Regular committee meetings 2. Attend professional development on gifted and talented and struggling students $5,000/year research materials, Director of Curriculum, Guidance Counselor, Language Arts Department, invited speakers and presenters

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Appendix  N  |  In-­‐Depth  Study  (Language  Arts)   Person(s) Responsible for Implementation Process for Monitoring Baseline Assessment Ongoing Assessment Timeline Start/Stop Process for Communicating to Shareholders

Director for Curriculum, Language Arts Department • •

regular reports to the administration faculty meetings

current SAT 10 scores, report card grades findings of Language Arts committee SY 2014-2015 • • • •

Leadership team meetings PTO meetings faculty meetings correspondence with parents via RenWeb, email, and website

 

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SBCS  TIMELINE:  http://sbcs.edu.gu/timeline-­‐sbcs-­‐history  


SANTA  BARBARA  CATHOLIC  SCHOOL   SY  2012-­‐2013  


Improving Student Learning - Self Study for Santa Barbara Catholic School