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Waysof seeing The Sax Institute

Space gallery, Sydney 26 April — 2 May 2018 Proudly supported by the Macquarie Group Foundation


Published by the Sax Institute Level 13, 235 Jones Street Ultimo NSW 2007 P +61 2 9188 9500 F +61 2 9188 9501 E communications@saxinstitute.org.au W www.saxinstitute.org.au Š Sax Institute 2018 All material and work produced by the Sax Institute is protected by copyright. Enquiries about any use of this publication and the material in it can be sent to communications@saxinstitute.org.au Publication date: April 2018


Contents The Sax Institute

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Introduction by Emeritus Professor Virginia Spate

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Thanks and acknowledgements

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Fred Cress AM 6 Janet Dawson

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HonorĂŠ Daumier

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Anne Ferguson

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Rod Holdaway

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Merrick Fry

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Peter Jones

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Tim Kyle

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Jan King

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Frank Littler

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Peter Powdich AM 19

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The Sax Institute We all recognise the value of a fresh perspective in finding new ways to frame and address complex issues. Great works of art do this. Many companies have built their business model on it. At the Sax Institute, we do this too. Health budgets are always stretched. Policymakers face a daunting task in ensuring budgets are spent in the most effective ways. Which treatments have the greatest benefits? And how do we know the choices we make are the right ones? The Sax Institute was founded 16 years ago with a simple mission: “To improve health and wellbeing by driving the use of research in policies, programs and services.” We want Australians to enjoy the best health, and we are passionate about ensuring decisions on funding and treatments are based on the best evidence. Sometimes that evidence is easy to find, and easy to interpret. More commonly, it is neither. The Sax exists to bridge the divide between research and policy – helping researchers to ask the questions policymakers and the public need answered, and to ask them in ways most likely to influence real-world decisions. It sounds simple, but in fact it is complicated. We want those who make decisions to know what works – and what doesn’t – when designing policies, programs and services in health and social care. We want them armed with the right knowledge from research, when they need it. And we are experts at bringing the best minds together so this can happen quickly and effectively.

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The Sax directly contributes to a more robust evidence base, and better application of evidence, in other ways. Our renowned 45 and Up Study, one of the world’s biggest with 260,000 participants, is shedding new light on healthy ageing. We are about to unlock more of the study’s potential by collecting tens of thousands of blood samples from participants – allowing us to trace the links between genes and health in new and life-changing ways. Here and in other areas, including mental health and Aboriginal health, our teams apply new thinking – new ‘ways of seeing’ – to the difficult health and social issues involved. As an independent not-for-profit organisation, we work hard to ensure our limited funds are spent wisely. Your support and the support of the distinguished Australian artists featured in this exhibition, whose own artistic vision allows us to see other aspects of life in new and interesting lights, will help us to maintain and accelerate our work in these vital areas. We are very grateful to our wonderful donor artists, and to the Macquarie Group Foundation which has generously hosted this exhibition. We are also very grateful for the support of the Hunter Valley Wine and Tourism Association, and the region’s outstanding wineries, as well as to our other generous supporters listed on page 5. We hope that you enjoy the artworks by these talented artists, and that you feel inspired to support our work to ensure we continue to make a positive difference to the health of Australians.

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Introduction Emeritus Professor Virginia Spate writes: This stimulating collection is a rare opportunity to see work from some of Australia’s most celebrated artists. The exhibition is remarkable for its breadth and the quality of work. I am pleased to donate three Daumier lithographs – Impressions de Vendanges (1857), Emotions Champêtres (1855) and Wine Shop (1858) – to this exciting exhibition. Honoré-Victorin Daumier (1808-1879) was a prolific French caricaturist, painter and sculptor, especially renowned for his cartoons and drawings satirising 19th-century French politics and society. He was a brilliant painter but had to spend most of his time creating immediate satirical reflections for newspapers to support his family. But these too are brilliant. Nowadays, these works are in considerable demand and link his approaches to the concerns of today. It is always risky to attempt to re-create the past, just as it is to predict the future. But I can’t help but think that Daumier would have felt at home with Australia’s many excellent satirical artists and cartoonists who continue the necessary task of puncturing pomposity and exposing hypocrisy. The exhibition it is a wonderful tribute to Australian art past and present. I commend it to you, and am pleased to see the generosity of the artists in supporting the important work of the Sax Institute.

Virginia Spate is an art historian and Professor Emeritus at the Power Institute, University of Sydney. She was born in the UK and settled in Australia in 1951. She was appointed Power Professor of Fine Art at the University of Sydney in 1978. She has published on artists John Olsen, Tom Roberts, Monet and Degas, and received the Mitchell Prize (1992) and a Centenary Medal (2001) for services to Australian society and the humanities. She received one of France’s highest honours when she was made a Chevalier de L’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres in 2004.

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Thanks and acknowledgements This exhibition could not have occurred without the support of our wonderful donor artists. Special thanks go to Shemara Wikramanayake, Chair of the Macquarie Group Foundation, and to Helen Burton, Director of the Macquarie Group Collection. We also thank guest speaker Elizabeth Bryan AM. In addition, there are many others we would like to thank the many corporations, organisations and individuals who have generously given time, financial help or other assistance to support this exhibition: • Brian McGuigan AM • Allan Moss AO • Irene Moss AO • Jerome Scarborough – Scarborough Wines • Chris Tyrrell – Tyrrell’s Wines • Macquarie Group Foundation • Oaks Cypress Lakes Resort • Hunter Valley Wine & Tourism Association

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Aspirations (7), 1999 Ink on paper 35 x 26 cm

Fred Cress AM Works by renowned Australian artist Fred Cress (1938–2009) have been shown in galleries from New York to London and his paintings hang in all the major public institutions in Australia. He began his career as a figurative artist, the style for which he is best known, then switched to abstract work in the late 1960s. In 1988, Cress won the Archibald Prize and the People’s Choice award for his portrait of fellow artist John Beard, marking his return to figurative work. His themes are concerned with human relationships, dilemmas and the uncomfortable truths of the human condition.

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Bonnie and Dusty (@ Scribble Rock), 2011 Pastel on paper 68 x 97cm

Janet Dawson Janet Dawson is one of Australia’s most accomplished living artists. In 1973, she became the third woman to win the Archibald Prize for her portrait Michael Boddy Reading, a portrait of her husband — the actor and playwright Michael Boddy. Dawson was the subject of a survey exhibition at the National Gallery of Victoria in 1979 and a retrospective of her work, The Drawings of Janet Dawson: 1956 to the Present, was presented by the National Gallery of Australia in 1996. A major survey of her work, Janet Dawson Survey 1953–2006, was presented by Bathurst Regional Gallery and toured widely. Janet Dawson is represented in all major public collections in Australia and international collections including the Royal Society, London. Her ‘Red Cabbage’ series of charcoal and pastel drawings was purchased by the National Gallery of Australia in 1996. For further works by Janet Dawson visit: http://www.stelladownerfineart.com.au/artists-works/janet-dawson

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Emotions Champêtres (Rustic Feelings), 1855

Translation: “I have to watch how the grapes ripen... I haven’t seen this for donkey’s years.” Lithograph from Le Charivari (436:2824) 28 x 23 cm

[Wine Shop], 1858

Translation: “This year the wine is actually wine... Hurry up and buy some — I can’t guarantee that will always be the case.” Lithograph from Le Charivari (581:3088) 28 x 23 cm

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Impressions de Vendanges (Scenes From Harvest Time), 1857 Translation: “What — you’re going in there with bare feet?!” “Well, we mustn’t use our patent leather shoes!” Lithograph from Le Charivari (581:2820) 28 x 23 cm

Honoré Daumier The “Michelangelo of caricature”, Honoré Daumier (French, 1808–1879) famously satirised France’s bourgeoisie and justice system, and masterfully exposed the misery of the masses through the emerging medium of lithography. Daumier often published his caricatures in newspapers and magazines of the period. These included Le Charivari (a word meaning cacophony or hullaballoo), which was an illustrated daily magazine published in Paris from 1832 to 1937, and which in 1841 became the inspiration for London’s Punch magazine. Daumier contributed regularly to Le Charivari for more than 40 years and was credited with a good share of the magazine’s success. These three works are from original editions of the magazine and have been generously donated by Emeritus Professor Virginia Spate.

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Drift, 2012 Mixed media 17 x 48 x 29 cm

Anne Ferguson Anne Ferguson, one of Australia’s finest living sculptors, is represented in many collections in Australia and the US. Her commissions include those for St Peter’s Church, Cremorne; Parliament House, Canberra; the Australian Women’s Service Memorial, Australian War Memorial; St Patrick’s Cathedral, Parramatta; Peter Baume Medical School, ANU; and the Sandakan Memorial at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra. She received the Art Gallery Society of NSW Sculpture Prize in 2007.

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Sydney Symphony Orchestra Rehearse Alan Holley’s ‘A Shaft of Light’, 2017 Oil on polyester 95.1 x 137cm

Rod Holdaway Rod Holdaway has exhibited in several solo exhibitions and numerous group exhibitions, including being selected three years in a row for the Dobell Prize for Drawing (2007, 2008, 2009). In 2010, Holdaway was a finalist in the Kedumba Drawing Award and he has previously had work selected for the Redlands Westpac Art Prize, Mosman Art Prize and the Waverly Art Prize. His work is represented in corporate and private collections in Australia, New Zealand, Germany and Ireland. For further works by Rod Holdaway visit: http://www.stelladownerfineart.com.au/artists-details/rodholdaway https://equeduart.com/category/art/

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Jewellery Box, 2015 Mixed media 18 x 14 x 28cm

Quinces with Bonsai (Chinese figure), 1997 Charcoal on paper 56 x 76cm

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Girls Jumping, 1990 Acrylic on cotton duck 33 x 45cm

Merrick Fry Merrick Fry is a painter and sculptor. He won the Jackson Smith Sculpture Prize and is a recipient of the Visual Arts Board Grant New York Studio residency. He was selected for the George’s Art Prize, Melbourne and received the National Art School Drawing award in 1972. His work can be found in many institutions in Australia, including the Australian National Gallery in Canberra. For further works by Merrick Fry visit: https://www.merrickfry.com/

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Mount Ku Ring Gai, from the ‘Interrupted View’ series, 2012 Giclée print 60 x 90 cm

Peter Jones Peter Jones was born in New Zealand and has resided in Australia since 1977. He works in painting, photography, video and sculpture, often combining properties of different mediums in one work. Peter has exhibited widely in Australia, Indonesia, Malaysia, France and the US. The Jeffrey Leder Gallery in New York has included his art work in the group shows ‘International Painting in NYC’ (2012) and in ‘Reductive’ (2012). He has held competitive residencies at the Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris and the Visual Arts and Craft Board Studio in Carcoar, NSW. He was a finalist in the Wynne Prize, Paddington National Landscape Prize and NSW Plein Air Prize. His work has been featured in Art and Australia and Imprint.

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Excess Baggage, 2011 Polyester resin and timber 277 x 190 x 130 cm

Tim Kyle

Tim Kyle is a Sydney-based sculptor whose monumental treatment of the human figure is at once psychological and laconic. To Kyle, “the human condition is what concerns me most: response to the inane but trying to remain humane, when people say ‘No’, but you want to hear ‘Yes’, underdogs who fail again and again, war and pieces of peace.” Worked in clay then cast in epoxy resin, Kyle’s robust grey figures are regular finalists in Sculpture by the Sea and the Wynne Prize, which he won in 2003. Large-scale public works can be seen in New Acton, ACT and his work is held in many important public and private collections. For further works by Tim Kyle visit: http://www.defiancegallery.com/artworks.php?artistID=45Tim-Kyle

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Trommel, 2015 Waxed steel 30.5 x 37 x 15.5 cm

Cave of Forgotten Dreams, 2015 Waxed steel and bone 14.5 x 13 x 5.5 cm

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Triad, 2012

Waxed steel and slate 41 x 19 x 30 cm

Jan King Jan King has been a practising sculptor for more than 40 years. She is known for her sculptures made from waxed and painted steel, which she exploits to its full potential to create fluid and lyrical works that contradict our expectations of this material. Her work is represented in many collections across Australia including Macquarie Bank, Clayton Utz, Art Bank, a number of universities and Liverpool and Woollahra Councils. King won the Woollahra Sculpture Prize in 2002 and has been awarded travel grants from the Australia Council (Visual Arts Board Studio Grant, New York.) and the Omi International Arts Centre, New York (Art Omi Creative Grant). For further works by Jan King visit: http://www.janking.net/

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Semaphore Octopus, 2017 Oil on board 76 x 60cm

Frank Littler Frank Littler is interested in the way that popular culture and religious culture can sometimes blend with a hybrid of images. A Sydney-based painter, he has had numerous solo and group exhibitions throughout Australia. His works are featured in many collections, including the Australian National Gallery in Canberra, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Brisbane and the National Gallery of Australia. Frank is represented by Watters Gallery, Sydney, where he has exhibited since 1974. For further works by Frank Littler visit: https://wattersgallery.com/artist/frank-littler-2/

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The Blue Chenille, 1966

Mixed media (Paint and various timbers) 33 x 37 x 10 cm

Peter Powditch AM Peter Powditch is a renowned painter and a leader in Australian pop art. He was the winner of the 1972 Sulman Prize and his work can be found in the collections of most state-run institutions in Australia, including the Australian National Gallery in Canberra, the Parliament House Collection and the Art Gallery of NSW. He is a recipient of the Georges Invitation Art Prize and many other prestigious prizes; he was awarded an honorary fellowship by the National Art School. For further works by Peter Powditch visit: http://www.defiancegallery.com

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Support our work Help us improve the health of all Australians We want more research to make a real-world difference. Can you help us do it? We want those who make decisions to know what works — and what doesn’t — when they’re designing policies, programs and services in health and social care. We want them armed with the right knowledge from research, when they need it. And we think that bringing the best minds together from the fields of research, policy and practice will give Australia the best chance of meeting its most pressing health and social challenges. You can have a stake in shaping this better future for Australia.

Become a corporate supporter The Sax Institute welcomes supporters from the corporate and philanthropic sectors. We are grateful to the many corporations, organisations and individuals who have already generously given time, funding or other support. To find out more or make a donation, visit: https://www.saxinstitute.org.au/about-us/donate

Our credentials We are a non-profit, public-good organisation with a high-profile, independent Board with strong public-sector governance expertise. We’re staffed by highly-skilled researchers, analysts and staff with strong policy credentials who understand how to work with governments and other public-sector organisations. The Sax Institute is registered with the Australian Taxation Office as an Income Tax Exempt Charity: Charitable Fund Raising Authority No: 24513. All donations over $2 are tax deductible.

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Ways of seeing  

The Sax Institute is holding an art exhibition, called ‘Ways of Seeing’, from Thursday 26 April to Wednesday 2 May, featuring artworks gener...

Ways of seeing  

The Sax Institute is holding an art exhibition, called ‘Ways of Seeing’, from Thursday 26 April to Wednesday 2 May, featuring artworks gener...

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