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SOUSSE


Table of contents

 

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    Sousse. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .     4 Understand. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Get in. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Get around. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . See. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Do. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Buy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Eat. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drink. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sleep. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stay safe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Get out. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . History. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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  Restaurants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8 Top Best Restaurants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8

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    Useful info. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .     9 Useful phrases. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9 Passport and Visa. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   10 Emergency numbers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11

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  References. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   12


Sousse

 

Sousse

Sousse

Understand Sousse is one of the older cities in Tunisia possessing an authentic medina, which has been declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It is a popular tourist destination, particularly with Russian, Serbs, Croats, British, German and East European people. Located on the coast it has good beaches and a clear turquoise sea.

Get in By plane The most convenient airport is Monastir which is to the south on the coast, 20 minutes away and frequently used by holiday charter flights; however Tunis is still easily accessible with numerous train and shared taxi options.

By train Sousse is on the main line from Tunis in the north down to Sfax and Monastir to the south. Because it is located in the centre of the railway network it is well placed to reach most of the rest of the network, even as far south as Gabes on the coast and Tozeur on the edge of the Sahara . Example fares from Tunis to Sousse are 12/10/6 dinars in Grand/1st/2nd class. Tunisisan railways are mainly for goods traffic with passenger traffic taking something of a back seat so don't expect to find yourself rattling along at 100 mph; 50 to 60 mph is more likely and the standard of the rolling stock (carriages) can be poor. That said rail services are generally reliable and above all are very cheap, even for the top class (Grand Classe Confort). They can be an excellent way to get about the country, just don't expect Pullman style travel. The national railway company, the S.N.C.F.T. has a workable website that includes timetables and fares although you will need some rudimentary french to navigate it as the english language option was "under construction" at the time of writing. Wikipedia has an article on Tunisian railways which includes a map showing network coverage.

By car Highway A1 connects Sousse with Tunis. A toll applies for using the highway. Additionally, Sousse is crossed by National Road 1 (RN1), connecting the city with the south of the country, and Libya. Roads are in very good condition. Additionally, a car ferry connects Sousse with Trapani in Italy once a week i the summer months. Please note that driving in Tunisia can be a very dangerous and harrowing

 

Sousse · Understand experience, with drivers rarely observing even basic rules of the road, accidents being extremely frequent.

By bus Buses (car) connect the city with most other parts of Tunisia. Additionally, there is a louage (shared-taxi) service covering the entire country. The far bus station (Gare Routiere) is located in some distance to the west of the Medina at the Souk El Ahad ("Camel Market") - the City bus station is located next to the Medina in the town center). Prices are slightly lower than those of second class train tickets, but many buses do not have air conditioning.

By boat Car ferries and express boats connect Sousse with Trapani (only in the summer months, once a week for cars and passengers) and Mazara del Vallo via Pantelleria 3 times a week, only for passengers. It takes up to 7-8 hours to Trapani and 5 hours to Mazara del Vallo. Private boats and yachts can use the marina at Port El Kantaoui (a resort about 12 km north of Sousse).

Get around By taxi Taxis in Sousse have a bad reputation and the best advice is to agree a price before getting in and ensure that the price is not 'per person'. If you are unsure of what a reasonable price should be ask at your hotel reception. The taxis do have meters, but the drivers are often reluctant to use them; be firm and insist it is reset to the 0,310 Dinar (0.31 Dinar/310 Millim ) "Standing Charge" at the start of your journey. One favourite trick is to leave the previous fare on the meter so that it will be added to your fare before you even set off. ALWAYS check that the meter has been reset BEFORE setting off and that it is on the correct setting for the time of day. Between 9 PM and 5 AM rates are higher than daytime rates at 0,510 Dinar/km. However, many drivers have altered their meters, and use "special rates" for tourists. A typical daytime fare between Sousse and Kantaoui, with a proper meter, is about 4,100 Dinar, but, in most cases, with a "special rate" on the meter, the fare will be about 7 Dinar. You can, however, agree the fare before getting in the taxi. Expect to pay about 5,000 to 6,000 Dinar if you do. Taxis are yellow, and have a taxi license sticker on the windshield.


Sousse

 

See

Buy

All of Sousse's sights are located within the labyrinthine medina in the heart of the city.

Don't expect to have language issues as merchants speak almost anything common (French, English, Spanish, German...) - you can mix all languages if you want.

Great Mosque. A surprisingly tranquil place despite its location in the middle of the city. Built c. 850 AD, this mosque is simple and austere in the Aghlabite style, no decoration whatsoever aside from a string of angular Arabic and curved arches. Even the prayer room is covered in reed mats instead of the usual carpet. You must be properly dressed to enter, but green wraps can be rented for a token fee to cover up. Mosaic Museum, in the gently crumbling old kasbah on the edge of the medina. The Traditional Tunisian House. This charming little museum located just within the old city walls some 200 yards north of the main bus terminal is the home of a long standing Tunisian family that has now become a museum with the passing of the last family member. The property centers on a open courtyard from which access to all the rooms can be gained, including bedrooms for the first and second wife and, in turn, to the children's rooms. All are delightfully fully furnished, with some curtains dating back 200 years, and with German clocks imported from the 1800's. The house is complete with a tower, orginally used to watch the stars for the onset of Ramadan, from which views over Sousse can be gained. Ribat. Whilst not as impressive or extensive as the Ribat in Monastir this fortified holy site is a worthwhile visit and served as home to a branch of Islamic warriors very similar in nature and creed as the Hospitaller Knights that lived in Rhodes. Climbing to the top of the watch tower affords you fantastic views over the Medina. TND 5 to enter; 1 more to take photos. Catacombs

Do Play golf. There is no golf course in Sousse, but one in Kantaoui and two in Monastir Walking around the fishing boats at the port is a pleasant way to spend time, and families with children may wish to take a trip on one of the 'pirate' ships which offer fishing and other nautical activities.

 

Sousse · See

Medina including the souk located in the center of the city. The old section of the city containing the local bazaar, expect to haggle or barter. Soula Centre just outside the souk has fixed prices, it is useful to establish values before bargaining in the souk (of course there is no fun). Everything is pretty cheap, but merchants won't hesitate to quote outrageous prices, so haggling is necessary. Take it all light-heartedly though and have fun whilst haggling. Obviously, there is a large quantity of counterfeit designer goods available in the Medina. Don't waste your and their time if you don't intend to buy anything and if you are only interested in taking a look, make it clear from the beginning. Say nicely and with a smile that you are not interested or that you don't have any money left. However don't feel obliged to buy if you can't agree a price. Don't keep thinking about the price after you buy something. Think on the good deal that you have made and the price that you would've paid in your home country.

Eat Two people can have a nice meal for around 10 dinars or less (depends on the place), but prices are generally low. For this you don't have to negotiate prices.

Mid-range Restaurant Libo; excellent fish restaurant by the port, opposite the 'pirate' ships. TND 15 for a spiced and grilled fish fresh from the port, a reasonable TND 2.1 for a beer.

Drink Drinking tap water is generally not harmful - some people and almost all tourists prefer, though, to use the bottled water that you can find everywhere (very cheap, for around 0,200-0,400 TND for 1/2 liter, 0,300-0,650 for 1.5 liter). Non-carbonated (non-sparkling) water is the most popular, and is called "mineral water". Carbonated water is available as well, but you must specifically ask for water with gas (eau avec gaz) or Garci (the most popular brand).


Sousse

 

Expect to find a Coke for around 0,800 to 1,5 TND (depends if in a supermarket or hotel).

Stay safe

The favorite beverage of the locals is tea, with many tea based specialties being available at the many cafes and restaurants around town. A favorite amongst locals is the au menthe (tea with mint leaves and sugar) and the aux ammandes (tea with crushed almonds and almond essence). Most locals will drink it while smoking from the chicha (the local name for a hookah). Expect to be offered tea while buying things of relatively high value (over 60-70 dinar) from shops in the souk.

There's no danger on walking alone at any time. Most streets are very busy till late night. Respect the locals and you will be respected. Crime is nearly non-existent, even if some of the neighborhoods of the city may look shabby or feel dangerous.

Being a city in a Muslim country, alcohol may be rather hard to find and quite expensive, because of little demand. Some cafes and stores will sell wine and beer, since many locals also drink these beverages. Expect to pay 2-3 dinar for a 0.3 bottle of local beer (invariably Celtia brand), and 2-12 dinar for a bottle of local wine in a store (double in a bar). Hard alcohol is very hard to find and extremely expensive (more expensive than even in the Nordic Countries), since most locals avoid it. Your best bets are hotel bars (3-6 dinar for 50 ml of vodka or gin) and Magasin General supermarkets (state owned stores, the only ones authorized to sell hard liquor - one is located on 7 November avenue, near the Sousse Palace hotel). A bottle of gin or whiskey is about 80-120 dinar. No alcohol is sold on Fridays.

Sleep Don't compare the category directly to european hotels. Expect to take a star (or even two) from these hotels. 4/5 star hotels are recommended.

Budget Hôtel Gabes. 12 Rue de Paris, in the Medina. TND 7.5 for a spartan single room; but good location and trustworthy staff.

Mid-range Hôtel de Paris. Spotlessly clean if rather austere hotel near the main entrance to the medina. Small singles from TND 13. Abou-Nawas Boujaafar(4-Stars). Great food and services. Thalasso center with an interior (30'C, salt water) pool, another outside and private beach. 3 restaurants. Deco from the 80's but not expensive. 5 minutes away from the medina and near all transportations.

 

Sousse · Sleep

Expect some hassle in the souk (medina) and this is most normal. Merchants always try to show their goods/shops and see what you like. You have to get into the spirit to enjoy, always be nice and have a smile on your face. Even if sometimes annoying, this is absolutely not dangerous. Women may want to avoid the red light area in the north west of the medina, reached through two overlapping walls which screen that street from the rest of the medina. Single women walking alone may be stared at, but, again, this is not dangerous, but rather a curiosity of some local men. Most people who come up and speak English to you in the streets will be hoping to sell you something, no risk but end the conversation quickly to avoid them getting indignant when you dont buy, a simple 'non, merci' should suffice.

Get out Roman Amphitheatre in El Jem (or El Djem), approx 70km due south of Sousse which is better preserved than that at Rome. It was the location for some of the filming in Gladiator. Port El Kantaoui purpose built tourist resort featuring a marina. Said to be both fake and 'touristy', nonetheless caters well for tourist's needs with a good range of restaurants and bars. It has a zoo, but the one at Figuiera is better, and a water park. Friguia Zoo near the town of Enfidha Well cared for animals. Although not in an authentic setting, see lions and elephants in Africa! Sahara Explorer Two day, one night "safaris" to the south of the country can usually be arranged via Tour Companies, local Travel Agents or hotel receptions. Three day, two night "safaris" are usually arranged via local Travel Agents or hotel receptions. Essentially they are tourist adventures to the edge of the desert which may include, variously, visits to El Djem and its Roman amphitheatre, Berber Arab cave dwellings, the Chott el Jerid - a massive salt lake - and a sunset camel ride in the Sahara amongst other attractions. The three day, two night "safaris" are generally the less frantic of the two and allow more time to look around at leisure.


Sousse

 

History

Sousse · History in the centuries after Islam's wars of conquest. Today it is considered one of the best examples of seaward-facing fortifications built by the Arabs. Its ribat, a soaring structure that combined the purposes of a minaret and a watch tower, is in outstanding condition and draws visitors from around the world. These days, Sousse, with a population of more than 540,000, retains a medieval heart of narrow, twisted streets, a kasbah and medina, its ribat fortress and long wall on the Mediterranean. Surrounding it is a modern city of long, straight roads and more widely spaced buildings.

A mosaic depicting Medusa in the Museum of Sousse.

In the 11th century B.C., the Phoenicians founded Hadrumetum. The city allied itself with Rome during the Punic Wars, thereby escaping damage or ruin and entered a relatively peaceful 700-year period under the Pax Romana. Livy tells us that Hadrumetum was the landing place of the Roman army under Scipio Africanus in the second Punic War. As part of Bonifacius's revolt against Constantinople, the Vandals were invited in and they took Hadrumetum in 434 CE and renamed the town Hunerikopolis. During the Vandalic War Justinian retook the town in 534 CE and restored its Roman name. In the 7th century A.D. Arab-Islamic armies conquered what is now Tunisia and rapidly spread Arab culture across what had been a thoroughly Romanized and Christianized landscape. The Arabs seized the city, which in the aftermath of Rome's fall was but a remnant of its former self. They renamed the city Sûsa and within a few decades elevated it to the status of the main seaport of the Aghlabid Dynasty. When the Aghlabids invaded Sicily in 827, Sûsa was their main staging ground. In the centuries that followed, as Europe gained technological ascendancy and began pushing back at Islam, Sûsa was briefly occupied by the Normans in the 12th century, was later more thoroughly occupied by the Spanish, and in the 18th century was the target of bombardments by the Venetians and the French. The French called the city Sousse. Despite the turmoil around it, Sousse's character had retained the solidly Arabian look and feel it had assumed

 


Restaurants

 

Restaurants · Top Best Restaurants

Restaurants

Restaurants

Top Best Restaurants Escargot

price   $20 - $29 place   87, route de la Corniche, Sousse 4000, Tunisia

Queen

price   $19 - $24 place   AVENUE TAIEB MHIRI, Sousse 4000, Tunisia

Restaurant Cafe Seles

cuisine   Tunisian place   Rue Abounawas 42, Sousse 4000, Tunisia

Farmers Steakhouse cuisine   European price   $21 - $24

Restaurant du Peuple cuisine   Tunisian

El Ons

cuisine   Tunisian

Food Hut

cuisine   Tunisian place   Corniche | Abdelhamid el Khadi, Sousse 4022, Tunisia

Le bonheur

price   $4 - $6 place   Sousse, Tunisia

LEGEND'S SPORTS CLUB

price   $26 - $101 place    AVENUE TAIEB MHIRI COMPLEXE TEJ MARHABA, Sousse, Tunisia

the saloon

cuisine   American place   Sousse, Tunisia

K-West Coffee Shop cuisine   Coffee Shop

El Soffra

cuisine   Tunisian

Caracas Restaurant

cuisine   International, Italian, Tunisian place   Rue Ali Belhaouane, Sousse, Tunisia

Cafe Lella Beya cuisine   English

La Daurade

cuisine   Mediterranean

 


Useful info

 

Useful info · Useful phrases

Useful info

Useful info

Useful phrases English

Good morning Good afternoon Good evening How are you? Long time no see Pleased to meet you Good luck Good luck Cheers! Bottoms up! Down the hatch! Mud in your eye! Bon appetit! Enjoy your meal! (frm) Enjoy! Tuck in! Get stuck in! Eat already! (inf/slang) Happy eating! Get your laughing gear round this! (inf/slang) Bon appetit! Enjoy your meal! (frm) Enjoy! Tuck in! Get stuck in! Eat already! (inf/slang) Happy eating! Get your laughing gear round this! (inf/slang) Bon voyage / have a good journey

Arabic

Bon voyage / have a good journey Bon voyage / have a good journey Excuse me How much is this? / How much does this cost? How much is this? / How much does this cost? Please Please Please Thank you Thank you very much Thank you kindly Thanks a lot Many thanks Thanks Cheers Ta (used mainly in northen England) You're welcome Don't mention it My pleasure No problem No probs Not a problem No worries No big deal Where's the toilet / lavatory / bathroom / restroom / powder room / gents/ladies? Where's the loo / bog / dunny / little boys'/girls' room? (inf/slang) Where's the toilet / lavatory / bathroom / restroom / powder room / gents/ladies? Where's the loo / bog / dunny / little boys'/girls' room? (inf/slang) Have a nice day Have a nice day Would you like to dance with me? Please say that again Please speak more slowly Can you please write it down? Can you please write it down? How do you say ... in english? Leave me alone! Leave me alone!

 

(ṣbah lkẖīr) ‫ريخلا حابص‬ (mselkẖīr) ‫ريخلا ءاسم‬ (mselkẖīr) ‫ريخلا ءاسم‬ ‫( ؟كلاح فيك‬f. kayfa ḥālik / m. kayfa ḥālak) (lam naraka mundhu muddah) ‫ةدم ذنم كرن مل‬ (metšerrfīn) ‫نيفرشتم‬ (hazz sa'eed) ‫!ديعس ظح‬ (bit-tawfīq) ‫!قيفوتلاب‬ may you eat with health - (bil-'áfya) ‫!ةيفاعلاب‬ (bil hana wish shifa'!) ‫ !ءافشلا و انهلاب‬response - (allah yihanneek/i) ‫كيّنهي هللا‬ (bil-hanā' wa ash-shifā') ‫ ءافشلاو ءانهلاب‬/ ‫ افشلاو انهلاب‬may you have your meal with gladness and health (tirooh wa tigi bis salaama!) ‫ !ةمالّسلاب يجيت و حورت‬response - (allah yisallimak/yisallimik) ‫كمّلسي هللا‬ happy journey (riḥlah saʿīdah) ‫ ةديعس ةلحر‬successful journey (riḥlah muwaffaqah) ‫قفوم ةلحر‬ Have a peaceful trip (ṭṭreq ssalama) ‫ةمالسلا قيرط‬ (smeh līya) ‫!يل حمسا‬ f - (bikam hādihi?) ‫ \ ؟هذه مكب‬m - (bikam hādhā?) ‫؟اذه مكب‬ (bshhal?) ‫لاحشب‬ (low samaht) ‫تحمس ول‬ (mīn fāḍlīkā) ‫كلضف نم‬ ('afak) ‫كافع‬ (shukran) ‫( ﺍﺮﻜﺷ‬shukran bezzef) ‫فازب اركش‬

(bla zhmīl) ‫( بجاو يلع اركش ال ليمج الب‬la shukran ʿla wazhb) (wään il-hhammám?) ‫ ؟ماّمحلا نيو‬where is the place of relaxing? = (wään bäät ir-ráhha?) ‫؟ةحاّرلا تيب نيو‬ (fīn kein lbīt lma?) ‫؟ءاملا تيبلا ناك نيف‬

(youm sa'eed) ‫ديعس موي‬ ‫ابيط اموي كل ىنمتا‬ >m (hal tuħibb an tarqus̱?) ‫> ؟صقرت‬ ‮نأ‬ ‮ْبحت‬ ‮له‬f (tuħibbina ʔan tarqus̱ī?) ‫؟يصقرت‬ ‮لأ‬ ‮نيْبحت‬ ('awwedha 'afak) ‫كافع اهدوع‬ (takallam bibuṭ' min fadlak/ik) ‫كلضف نم ءطبب ملكت‬ (mumkin tiktibuh/tiktibeeh?) ‫؟هبتكت نكمم‬ (ktebha līya) ‫يل اهبتك‬ ‫ ةملك لوقت فيك‬... ‫( ؟ةيبرعلاب‬kayfa taqūlu kalimah ... bil-'arabīyah?) f - (idrukkini) ‫ ينيكرتا‬m - (idrukni) ‫ينكرتا‬ (ʿteinī ttīsaʿ) ‫!عاسيتلا ينيطع‬


Useful info

 

Useful info · Passport and Visa

English

Arabic

Help! Fire! Stop! Call the police! Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

(ʿṭeqnī!) ‫!ينقتع‬ (lʿafīya!) ‫!ةيفاعلا‬ (wqef!) ‫!فقو‬ (ʿayyeṭ ʿla lbūlīs) ‫!سيلوبلا يلع طيع‬ ‫( ةديدجلا ةنسلا لولح و داليملا ةبسانمب يناهتلا لمجأ‬ajmil at-tihānī bimunāsabah almīlād wa ḥilūl as-sanah al-jadīdah) (fiṣḥ sa'īd) ‫ ديعس حصف‬Christ has risen (el maseeh qam) ‫ماق حيسملا‬ rsp - Truly he has risen (haqan qam) ‫ماق ًاقح‬

Happy Easter

Passport and Visa  

Passport required

Australian British Canadian Other EU USA

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Return ticket required Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Visa required Yes No No No/1/2 No

Passports: To enter Tunisia, a passport valid for six months after return date is required by all nationals referred to in the chart above. Visas: Visas for Tunisia are not required by nationals referred to in the chart above for stays of up to three months, with the following exceptions: (a) nationals of Australia who do need a visa; (b) nationals of the Czech Republic, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland and Slovakia (1) travelling on a recognised package holiday do not require a visa. However, if travelling independently a visa is required; (c) nationals of Cyprus (2) do need a visa. Note: Visas are not required by all nationals referred to in the chart above if transit passengers, provided they hold valid onward or return documentation and do not leave the airport or ship. Visa note: Nationals not referred to in the chart are advised to contact the embassy to check visa requirements for Tunisia. Types and cost: Short-stay visa: £20. Validity: Short-stay is usually valid for stays of up to three months. For up-to-date lengths of stay, contact nearest consulate. Application to: Consulate (or consular section at embassy). Working days: Approximately three weeks, for both postal and personal applications.

 

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Useful info

 

Useful info · Emergency numbers

Emergency numbers Police: 197 Medical: 190 Fire: 198 Notes: National guard – 193.

 

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References

 

References ·

Reasonable care has been taken in creating this personalized travel guide by combining information from the sources identified under the section 'references'. However, the information is provided 'as is' and there is no warranty about the information in the guide being accurate, complete or up to date. To the maximum extent permitted under applicable law, all liability arising from the use of this guide will be denied. Verifying critical information (like visas, health and safety) before you travel is recommended. References

References

Sousse data is from Wikitravel,  urls: –  http://www.wikitravel.com This page was last edited at 16:48, on 10 January 2011 by Anonymous user(s) of Wikitravel. Based on work by Jani Patokallio, Wikitravel user(s) Burmesedays, ChubbyWimbus, Tatatabot, WTDuck2, Xanthar and Valtteri, Anonymous user(s) of Wikitravel and others. City info data is from Wikipedia,  urls: –  http://www.wikipedia.com Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. See Terms of use for details. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization. Events data is from Eventful,  urls: –  www.eventful.com Weather data is from Norwegian Meteorological Institute and the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation yr.no,  urls: –  http://www.yr.no/place/Tunisia/Sousse/Hammam_Sousse/ Currency data is from Xavier Finance Api,  urls: –  http://finance.xaviermedia.com/ Maps data is from Yahoo Local Maps, OpenStreetMap, Qype,  urls: –  http://maps.yahoo.com –  http://www.openstreetmap.org –  http://www.qype.com

 

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Travel Guide | Sousse, Tunisia