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JAKARTA


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    Jakarta. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .     4 Understand. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4 Get In. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5 Get Around. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6 See. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   10 Do. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   13 Buy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   13 Eat. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   14 Drink. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   15 Sleep. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   15 Stay Safe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   16 Stay Healthy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   16 History. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   17

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  Restaurants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   19 Top Best Restaurants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19 Top Italian. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   19 Top Asian. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   19

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  Useful info. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   21 Currency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Useful phrases. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Passport and Visa. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emergency numbers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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    Maps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .     24   References. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   31


Jakarta

 

Jakarta

Jakarta

Understand Jakarta is the capital and largest city of Indonesia, located on the northwest of the island of Java. Jakarta is the country's economic, cultural and political center and the most populous city not only in Indonesia but in Southeast Asia as a whole. Despite of the heavy traffic and heavy pollution the city is filled with exciting nightlife and vibrant shopping areas. The city is also the center and melting pot of Indonesian culture which might be the thing for you to enjoy Jakarta.

Jakarta Skyline

One excellent surprise you'll find in Jakarta is that once you past the taxi drivers who offer their services at the airport and really meet the locals, you will find that the people are among the most friendly, hospitable, and helpful people you'll find on earth, if you keep away from the midi-bus drivers who are notorious for being the harshest on earth. However, understand that Jakarta being a melting pot, you are guaranteed to meet people from all sorts of characters. Jakarta may initially seem a bit overwhelming, but if you can overlook the pollution and indulge in her charms, you can discover what is also one of Asia's most exciting, most lively cities. There is plenty to do in Jakarta, from cosmopolitan shopping at the many luxurious shopping centers to one of the hippest nightlife scenes in Southeast Asia. When you arrive at city, you will feel the heavy air fills your lung. Jakarta being where it is, the humidity level can be as awful as >80%. This is what causes most of the discomfort. Expect to sweat and feel tired more easily when you are at the city, but the good news is your skin will be better moisturized. Just make sure that you wear 100% cotton clothing up to your arm for maximum comfort.

History The port of Sunda Kelapa dates to the 12th century, when it served the Sundanese kingdom of Pajajaran near present day Bogor. The first Europeans to arrive were the

 

Jakarta · Understand Portuguese, who were given the permission by the Hindu Kingdom of Pakuan Pajajaran to erect a godown in 1522. Control was still firmly in local hands, and in 1527 the city was conquered by Prince Fatahillah, a Muslim prince from Cirebon, who changed the name to Jayakarta. By the end of the 16th century, however, the Dutch (led by Jan Pieterszoon Coen) had pretty much taken over the port city, and the razing of a competing English fort in 1619 secured their hold on the island of Java. The Dutch razed the old Jayakarta port during their conquest and rebuilt the town with dutch style of town planning, fort and canals. Under the name Batavia, the new Dutch town became the capital of the Dutch East Indies and was known as the Queen of the East. During these times the town flourishes as the center of the Dutch East Indies Trading Company and grow radpidly, and during this time as well that Chinese and Eurasian population grew within the city. In order to keep order and control the Dutch banned the native Javanese to live within the walled part of the city while encouraging Chinese immigrant to flock the commercial walled city with its canal. It is also known that after the Dutch conquest of Malacca, significant number of Portuguese decent people from Malacca were taken as captive to Batavia and they live in area called Kampung Tugu. The old Batavia which were planned in Dutch planning and canal were not doing so well, in fact the canal itself became breeding ground for mosquitoes. The city center became unhealthy and filthy and the city were nicknamed The Cemetry of the Europeans, this is also the reason why the city grew more in land. In 1740, Chinese slaves rebelled against the Dutch. The rebellion was put down harshly with the massacre of thousands of Chinese slaves. The remaining Chinese slaves were exiled to Sri Lanka. In 1795, the Netherlands were invaded and occupied by France, and on March 17, 1798, the Batavian Republic, a satellite state of France, took over both VOC debts and assets. But on August 26, 1811, a British expedition led by Lord Minto defeated the French/Dutch troops in Jakarta, leading to a brief liberation and subsequent administration of Indonesia by the British (led by Sir Stamford Raffles of Singapore fame) in 1811-1816. In 1815, after the Congress of Vienna, Indonesia was officially handed over from the British to the Dutch government. In the early 1800s most canals were filled in, the town was shifted 4 km inland and the Pearl of the Orient flourished once again. In the 18th century, more than 60% of Batavia's population consisted of slaves working for the VOC. The slaves were mostly engaged to undertake housework, while working and living conditions were generally reasonable.


Jakarta

 

The name Jakarta was adopted as a short form of Jayakarta when the city was taken over by the Japanese in 1942. After the second world war, the Indonesian Declared their independence in koningsplein which is today's Merdeka Square. The Indonesian war of independence followed after the second world war, with the capital briefly shifted to Yogyakarta after the Dutch attacked. The war lasted until 1949, when the Dutch accepted Indonesian independence and handed back the town, which became Indonesia's capital again.

25 December : New Year

Since independence Jakarta's population has sky rocketed, thanks to migrants coming to the city in search of (illusive) wealth. The entire Jabotabek (Jakarta-Bogor-Tangerang-Bekasi-Depok) metropolitan region (now officially Jabodetabekjur last census count (2010) was 28 million people, a figure projected to have hit 30 million already. The official name of the city is Daerah Khusus Ibukota Jakarta Raya (DKI Jakarta), meaning Special Capital City Region.

The main differences are in the loan words, Malay was more influenced by the English language, while Indonesian was more influenced by the Dutch language.

Climate

Soekarno Hatta International Airport, at Tangerang, Banten. All international and nearly all domestic flights land here 20 km (12 mi) to the northwest of the city. The counter intuitive airport code comes from Cengkareng, a district near the airport. During the rainy season the road to and from Cengkareng was prone to flooding but this problem has now been alleviated with the building of an additional raised, dual carriageway, toll road between the city and Cengkareng. If you don't have non-stop options between your origin city and Jakarta, try connecting via Singapore or Kuala Lumpur as there are more than a dozen flights a day between these cities and Jakarta.

Jakarta has a tropical monsoon climate according to the Koppen climate classification system. Despite being located relatively close to the equator, the city has distinct wet and dry seasons. The wet season in Jakarta covers the majority of the year, running from November through June. The remaining four months forms the city’s dry season. Located in the western part of Java, Jakarta’s wet season rainfall peak is January with average monthly rainfall of 389 millimeters (15.3 in), and its dry season low point is September with a monthly average of 30 mm (1.2 in).

Holidays 1 January : New Year's Day 14 January : Birth of the Prophet 31 March : Day of Silence 18 April : Good Friday 1 May : Labor Day 14 May : Buddha's Birthday 26 May : Ascension of the Prophet 29 May : Ascension Day 28 June : Puasa 8 August - 9 August : Day after Ramadan 17 August : Independence Day 15 October : Feast of the Sacrifice 25 November : Islamic

 

Jakarta · Get In

Talk The sole official language is Indonesian, known in that language as Bahasa Indonesia. The Indonesian language has adopted a number of loan words from Arabic, Dutch, and Sanskrit. It is similar to Malay (spoken in Malaysia, Brunei and Singapore), and speakers of both languages can generally understand each other.

Get In By Plane

The Soekarno Hatta airport has three terminals, further split up into sub-terminals, which are really just halls in the same building. Terminal 1 (A-B-C). Used by domestic airlines except Air Asia, Mandala, Garuda. Terminal 2. All international airlines with notable exception of AirAsia (D-E), domestic Garuda flights (F). Terminal 3 (Low Cost Carrier Terminal). The newest and nicest of the bunch, Pier 1 serves all Air Asia and all Mandala/Tiger Airways flights. Other low cost carriers may switch to this terminal as well check the airline's website if in doubt. A free but unreliable shuttle bus runs between the terminals if you're in a hurry, it's a safer bet to take a taxi, although they may ask for a rather steep for the service (not entirely unjustified, as half of this goes to paying their parking fees), however it should really be a metered ride. If you have time, though, it's not a problem to wait for the next one just ask the airport staff where it stops and what it looks like (yellow color, normally). Also, be sure to know which terminal you will disembark from.


Jakarta

 

Visas on arrival (VoA) are available at the airport, see the main Indonesia article for the details of the rules. If possible, provide an exact payment and ignore any requests for any additional fees. ATMs and currency exchange services are available in the baggage claim hall, and Terminal D has a left luggage service. The Visa on Arrival is payable in cash or by a credit card. The nearest ATM is past the customs area, so if you don't have cash, you will need to be escorted to the ATM and back. Although it is possible to pay for a VoA using my credit/debit card it is a slower process and may not be available at times, so cash is best. Please also remember to carry exact change as sometimes the officials may cause problems. Sometimes immigration officers may ask for a bribe to provide you with a visa. Please avoid paying this bribe as you'll have to pay another one while leaving the country. Also it is good to note that even at the airport hardly anyone speaks fluent English here.

By Train Information about train tickets from PT Kereta Api (Persero) is available on the Web for easier booking. In Jakarta, you can buy your tickets in the major stations up to 90 days in advance or you can log in on its website to get code booking and pay either in the stations or many Indomaret and Alfamart stores with no additional fee, certainly you can go directly to the stores to buy ticket without code booking. In the stations beware of ticket touts! They will offer their wares even to people waiting in the queues in front of the ticket sales points. You should expect to pay 50-100% more if you do so, and you could find that your coach hasn't any empty seats anyway. The safest and nicer way is online booking and then go to the stores. Most travel agents will also be happy to sell you train tickets to any destination. Simply order the tickets, pay (preferably) in cash and later in the day they will be delivered to your hotel. Jakarta has several train stations. Stasiun Gambir. The current main station for long distance passengers in Jakarta is the Gambir station, located in Central Jakarta, just east of the Monas. Eksekutif (AC) and some bisnis (non-AC) class trains arrive at this station. Most trains from big cities in Java (Purwokerto, Yogyakarta, Solo, Semarang, Malang and Surabaya) arrive in late afternoon or evening. Stasiun Pasar Senen. Cheaper trains without air-conditioning generally use the Pasar Senen station located two blocks east of Gambir. Beware that the location is rife with crime, although the station itself has been spruced up recently. Anyway, these ekonomi trains are not really suggested for tourist travel they are slow and poor facilities.

 

Jakarta · Get Around Stasiun Jatinegara. Most trains arriving in Jakarta also stop at Jatinegara station in the eastern part of the city, giving better access to the eastern and southern parts of the city. Stasiun Kota. Jakarta Kota station is located in the old part of the city, and serves as the departure point for commuter trains and some trains to Merak. It is an interesting Art Deco style building that is currently being restored.

By Bus Passengers from other cities arrive in bus terminals such as Rawamangun (East Jakarta) Kampung Rambutan (Southeast Jakarta), Pulo Gadung (East Jakarta), Kali Deres (West Jakarta) or Lebak Bulus (South Jakarta). You'll need to speak at least functional Indonesian to manage, and the terminals are notorious for muggers and pickpockets, so observe the safety precautions.

By Boat The national ferry company, PELNI, and other sealines, operate passenger services to destinations across the archipelago from Tanjung Priok port in the North of the city. Some smaller speed boats, particularly to the Thousand Islands (Pulau Seribu), depart from Ancol also on Jakarta's north shore.

Get Around By Train Commuter trains in Jakarta connect the city center with outlying regions, namely Tangerang, Bekasi, Depok, Bojonggede, Bogor and Serpong. Commuter services operate (first train departing Bogor to Jakarta) and (last train leaving Jakarta for Bogor). With subsidize from government, since July 1, 2013 the commuter train ticket is cheaper with up to 5 stations and then for additional every 3 consecutive stations. Government wants to attract other moda passengers to use trains. E-ticket is implented with closed system and who are not tap when someone in will be charge for the longest route fare. No more economy non-AC train, all with AC and trains will be added continuously to accomodate the passengers. People who are sitting on the roof is limited or no more. Vendor stalls in the stations have been demolished to create steril area in the stations. It is best not to carry valuables on the train, but if you do, keep then secure, and preferably in front of you. Wallets kept in the hip pocket are vulnerable.


Jakarta

 

Commuter services operate over these lines: Central line : JAKARTA KOTA - Jayakarta - Mangga Besar - Sawah Besar - JUANDA - GAMBIR - GONDANGDIA - Cikini - Manggarai - Tebet - Cawang - Duren Kalibata - Pasar Minggu Baru - Pasar Minggu - Tanjung Barat Lenteng Agung - Universitas Pancasila - Universitas Indonesia - Pondok Cina - DEPOK BARU - DEPOK - Citayam - BOJONGGEDE - Cilebut - BOGOR Central line : Angke - Duri - TANAHABANG - Karet Manggarai and continuing to BOGOR Tangerang line : JAKARTA KOTA - Kampung Bandan Angke - Duri - Grogol - Pesing - Kembangan - Bojong Indah - Rawabuaya - Kalideres - Poris - Batuceper - Tanahtinggi - TANGERANG Tangerang line : MANGGARAI - SUDIRMAN - Karet TANAHABANG - Duri and continuing to TANGERANG Serpong line : JAKARTA KOTA - Kampung Bandan Angke - Duri - TANAHABANG - Palmerah - Kebayoran Pondokranji - Sudimara - Rawabuntu - SERPONG Serpong line : MANGGARAI - SUDIRMAN - Karet - TANAHABANG and continuing to SERPONG Bekasi line : TANAHABANG - Karet - Manggarai - Jatinegara - Klender - Buaran - Klenderbaru - Cakung Rawabebek - Kranji - BEKASI Bekasi line : JAKARTA KOTA - Jayakarta - Mangga Besar Sawah Besar - JUANDA - GAMBIR - GONDANGDIA - Cikini - Manggarai - Jatinegara and continuing to BEKASI Bekasi line : JAKARTA KOTA - Kampungbandan - Rajawali - Kemayoran - PASAR SENEN - Gang Sentiong - Kramat - Pondokjati - Jatinegara and continuing to BEKASI Station names written with CAPITALS are regular express stops. Several express trains (and semi-express trains) stop at other stations only at certain times outside the rush hours. All trains other than the expresses do not stop at Gambir station, the main station in Jakarta, so this might be a problem for those arriving from other regions and wanting to continue to other stations. The choice is to take an express train to the nearest station and continuing by other forms of transport, or taking a taxi to Juanda station, located a few hundred meters north of Gambir, close enough if you wish to walk. If coming from Jalan Jaksa area, another option is just to walk to Gondangdia (next one south of Gambir) station, it's just 5-10 minutes walk to the left from the southern end of Jaksa. Remember there are no ekonomi class anymore for commuter lines. Riding the ekonomi class outsides the commuter lines is not advisable crime and sexual harassment are known to happen inside packed trains (during rush hours some people even travel on the roof, despite the obvious danger of overhead wires!). During the non-rush hours, though, economy train travel is quite an interesting experience. It is a tour of Jakarta's darker side, with peddlers offering every imaginable ar-

 

Jakarta · Get Around ticle (from safety pins to cell-phone starter kits), various sorts of entertainment, ranging from one person orchestras to full sized bands, and a chance to sample real poverty you are riding a slum on wheels. Just remember to keep an eye on your belongings all the time, do not flash valuables if you have any, and, if you have a bag, hold it in front of you (that's what many locals also do in these trains).

By Busway The Transjakarta Busway (in Indonesian known as busway or TJ) is modern, air-conditioned and generally comfortable, although sometimes service can be spotty (they have a knack of going to the depot for service and refueling at the same time during the rush hours). Do note that the bus service is quite unreliable resulting in waiting time for a bus up to 1 hour especially during rush hours. There are twelve lines operational as of mid-February 2013. Line 1: Blok M - Masjid Agung - Bundaran Senayan Gelora Bung Karno - Polda Metro - Benhil - Karet - Setia Budi - Dukuh Atas - Tosari - Bundaran Hotel Indonesia - Sarinah - Bank Indonesia - Monas - Harmoni - Sawah Besar - Mangga Besar - Olimo - Glodok - Kota Line 2: (to Harmoni) Pulo Gadung - Bermis - Pulomas ASMI - Pedongkelan - Cempaka Timur - Rumah Sakit Islam - Cempaka Tengah - Pasar Cempaka Putih - Rawa Selatan - Galur - Senen - Atrium - RSPAD - Deplu - Gambir I - Istiqlal - Juanda - Pecenongan - Harmoni Central Busway (to Pulo Gadung) Harmoni Central Busway - Balai Kota - Gambir II - Kwitang - Senen - Galur - Rawa Selatan - Pasar Cempaka Putih - Cempaka Tengah - Rumah Sakit Islam - Cempaka Timur - Pedongkelan - ASMI - Pulomas - Bermis - Pulo Gadung Line 3: (to Kalideres) Harmoni Central Busway Pecenongan - Juanda - Pasar Baru - Juanda - Pecenongan - Jelambar - Indosiar - Taman Kota - Jembatan Gantung - Dispenda - Jembatan Baru - Rawa Buaya - Sumur Bor - Pesakih - Kalideres (to Harmoni Central Busway) Kalideres - Pesakih - Sumur Bor - Rawa Buaya - Jembatan Baru - Dispenda - Jembatan Gantung - Taman Kota Indosiar - Jelambar - Harmoni Central Busway Line 4: Pulo Gadung - Pasar Pulo Gadung - Tugas - Pertamina - Telkom - Tarakanita - Sunan Giri - Ikip - Kehakiman - BPKP - Utan Kayu - Pasar Genjing - Pasar Pramuka - Matraman - Manggarai - Pasar Rumput - Halimun Dukuh Atas Line 5: Kampung Melayu - Pasar Jatinegara (to Kampung Melayu) - Kebon Pala - Slamet Riyadi - Tegalan - Matraman - Salemba UI - Kramat Sentiong NU - Palputih Senen - Departemen Keuangan - Budi Utomo - Golden Truly - Lautze - Kartini - Jembatan Merah - Mangga Dua Square - WTC - Ancol Line 6: Ragunan - Departemen Pertanian - SMK 57 Duren Tiga - Pejaten - Buncit Indah - Warung Jati Indah - Imigrasi - Mampang Prapatan/Hero - Kuningan Timur - Depkes - Patra Kuningan - Pasar Festival - Kuningan -


Jakarta

 

Kuningan Madya - Menara Duta - Latuharhari - Halimun - Dukuh Atas Line 7: Kampung Rambutan - Tanah Merdeka - Makro - Rumah Sakit Harapan Bunda - Pasar Induk Kramat Jati - Terminal Cililitan - Mayjen Sutoyo - UKI - Bakornas Narkoba RI - Rumah Susun - Gelanggang Remaja - Depkeu - Kampung Melayu Line 8: Tomang-Grogol 2- Jelambar-Indosiar-Kedoya Green Garden-Kedoya Assiddiqiyah-Duri Kepa-Kebun Jeruk-Kelapa Dua Sasak-Pos Pengumben-RS Medika-Permata Hijau-Simprug-Pasar Kebayoran Lama-Kebayoran Lama Bungur-Tanah Kusir-Pondok Indah MallPondok Indah South-Pondok Pinang-Lebak Bulus Line 9: Pinang Ranti - Taman Mini Garuda - Pasar Kramat Jati - Cililitan - Sutoyo BKN - Cawang UKI - Cawang BNN - Cawang Ciliwung - Cikoko Stasiun Cawang - Tebet BPKM - Pancoran Tugu - Pancoran Barat - Tegal Parang - Kuningan Barat - Gatot Subroto Jamsostek - Gatot Subroto LIPI - Semanggi - Senayan JCC - Slipi Petamburan - Slipi Kemanggisan - S. Parman Harapan Kita - S. Parman Central Park - Grogol 2 - Latumeten Stasiun KA - Jembatan Besi - Jembatan Dua - Jembatan Tiga - Penjaringan - Pluit Line 10: Cililitan - Cililitan PGC - Sutoyo BKN - Cawang UKI - Sutoyo Cawang - Panjaitan Penas - Kebon Nanas Cipinang - Prumpung Pedati - Stasiun Jatinegara - Utan Kayu Ramawangun - Pramuka BPKP 2 - Kayu Putih Rawasari - Pulomas Pacuan Kuda - Cempaka Putih - Yos Sudarso Cempaka Mas - Yos Sudarso Kodamar - Sunter Kelapa Gading - Plumpang Pertamina - Walikota Jakarta Utara - Permai Koja - Enggano - Tanjung Priok Line 11: Kampung Melayu - Pulogebang Line 12: Pluit - Tanjung Priok Unlike Jakarta's other buses, busway buses shuttle on fully dedicated lanes and passengers must use dedicated stations with automatic doors, usually found in the middle of large thorough fares connected to both sides by overhead bridges. The system is remarkably user friendly by Jakartan standards, with station announcements and an LED display inside the purpose built vehicles. Grab onto a handle as soon as you enter the bus as they move away from the stop suddenly and quickly.

By Bus It's advisable to refrain from using other buses for intracity travel, stick with taxis as they are safer. If you're feeling adventurous, while air conditioned buses (Mayasari or Patas AC). Some buses have a box at the front next to the driver where you can pay your fares, while others employ a man or a kondektur who will personally collect the fares from passengers. Cheaper yet are mikrolet (mini-buses) and angkot (small vans) that ply the smaller streets and whose fares vary from depending on the distance, but good luck figuring

 

Jakarta · Get Around out the routes. You pay the fare directly to the driver after getting off. You may need to spare coins before boarding the bus, since there is on-board entertainment and other distractions. On a typical day, you may find street musicians singing unplugged versions of Indonesian and Western pop songs asking for donations at the end of the performance, and street vendors, one after another, trying to sell almost everything, from ballpoint pens and candies to boxed donuts and health goods. If you do happen to be travelling in a bus, refrain from sitting or standing at the back area of the bus as this is where muggers find their prey. Always keep an eye on your belongings and be alert at all times as pickpocketing occurs. Note that buses do not run according to any schedule or timetable. Sometimes a bus may take a while to come, in other circumstances it is possible that two of the same bus routes may come together and these drivers will definitely drive aggressively to get more passengers. They do not stop at any particular bus stop and can stop just about anywhere they like. If you want to get off, simply say kiri (to the left) to the kondektur or just knock on the ceiling of the bus for three times (be sure that the driver hears your thumping), and the bus driver will find a place to drop you. An additional tip to a light from these buses is to use your left foot first to maintain balance and try to get down as quickly as possible as they do not fully stop the bus. Also note that seats in these buses are built for Indonesians who are typically shorter and more slender and agile than people with a larger build such as Caucasians and Africans. Non-Indonesians might find the seats in these buses to be confining and uncomfortable. List of bus terminals in Jakarta: Blok M (South Jakarta), Lebak Bulus (South Jakarta), Pasar Minggu (South Jakarta), Grogol, Kota, Kalideres (West Jakarta), Manggarai (South Jakarta), Pulogadung (East Jakarta), Rawamangun (East Jakarta), Kampung Melayu (East Jakarta), Kampung Rambutan (South Jakarta), Tanjung Priok (North Jakarta), Senen (Central Jakarta).

By Car Rental cars are available, but unless you are familiar with local driving practices or lack thereof, take reputable taxis. If you're from a foreign country, it is not recommended to rent a car and drive on your own. The chaotic and no-rules traffic will certainly give you a headache. Renting a car with a driver is a much better idea. The price of fuel in Indonesia is relatively low due to the application of subsidies by the central government. Pertamina outlets supply gasoline (bensin) (petrol) diesel fuel (solar) is cost per/liter. Non-subsidised prices for products


Jakarta

 

such as Pertamax (RON 92 Pertamax high-octane gasoline are higher, RON 95 Pertamax Plus (diesel fuel) prices at outlets operated by Shell, Mobil and Petronas are similar. Toll roads circle the city and are faster when the traffic is good, but are very often jammed themselves. The drainage systems of major roads are poorly maintained and during the rainy season from Dec-Feb major roads may be flooded, leading to even worst traffic congestion than normal. Finding parking places in residential areas can be difficult due to the narrow roads. Paid parking is easy to find in shopping malls, offices and the like per/hr. Street parking often requires to payment to a parking attendant.

By Taxi Most visitors opt to travel by taxi, which is cheap and occasionally even fast. There are a multitude of taxi companies of varying degrees of dependability. Taxis are widely available and usually easily hailed off the street in a matter of seconds however demand often exceeds supply during periods of heavy rain and weekday peak hours. If you absolutely need to be somewhere during rush hour (i.e. the airport) it is a good idea to make alternative transportation arrangements. Alternatively the Express group is fast overtaking Blue Bird's reputation as best taxi firm in Jakarta. Unlike Blue Bird, Express requires a minimum of three years experience at another Jakarta taxi firm from its drivers. As a result, Express drivers generally know their way around the city better than the often newly arrived Blue Bird drivers. Metered fares are slightly cheaper flagfall (including the first kilometer)and additional for every subsequent 100 meters or minute stuck in traffic. Taxis parked near train/bus stations, tourist attractions, and hotels often refuse to use the meter and quote silly prices (especially from foreigners) in this case, it's a good idea to walk away a bit, then hail a passing Blue Bird or Express taxi. Carry plenty of small denomination notes to pay fares as there is no guarantee that drivers will have any change. When paying, it is usual to round up, on a longer trip, if the service has been good, allow 10% for the tip and again, round up to the nearest Rp. Keep the doors locked and the windows closed when travelling in a taxi, as luxury items or a bag can be an attractive target when stuck in a traffic jam or traffic light. Avoid using the smaller taxi companies especially if you are alone, and try to know the vague route the driver might well take you a roundabout route to avoid traffic, but you will know the general direction.

 

Jakarta · Get Around By Bajaj The Jakartan equivalent to Thailand's tuk-tuk is the bajaj (pronounced bahdge-eye), orange mutant scooters souped up in India into tricycles that carry passengers in a small cabin at the back. They're a popular way to get around town since they can weave through Jakarta's interminable traffic jams much like motorbikes can. Although slow, boneshaking (suspension is not a feature in a bajaj), hot (locals joke about the natural A/C) and the quick way to breathing in more exhaust fumes than you ever thought possible, riding around in these little motor bugs can really grow on you. The old version 2 cycles of Bajaj is gradually being changed by CNG version which eco-friendly, quieter and more convinience for your bone. There are no set prices, bajaj drivers are happy to overcharge visitors, and can often ask double or even more of what you would pay by meter in air-conditioned Blue Bird taxi (obviously, the normal price should be less than even for a cheaper variety of taxi). Locals who regularly use the bajaj know what a typical fare should be and are happy to tell you. Also, since bajaj aren't allowed on some of the larger roads in Jakarta, your route may well take you through the bewildering warren of backstreets. Try to keep an eye on what direction you're going, because some unscrupulous bajaj drivers see nothing wrong with taking the scenic route and then charging you double or triple the price.

By Ojek If you're poking around narrow back streets, or just in such a hurry that you're willing to lose a limb or more to get there, then Jakarta's motorcycle taxis (ojek) might be the ticket for you. Jakarta's ojek services consist of guys with bikes lounging around street corners, who usually shuttle short distances down alleys and roads but will also do longer trips for a price. Agree on the fare before you set off. And insist on a helmet, and wear it properly. No need to make it more insanely dangerous than it already is. The ojek drivers will insist you're safe with them and that they'll drive carefully, but this has little to do with reality. Foreigners are likely to be asked for more, but generally ojek drivers will accept the proper fare if you insist on it, unless they see you really need to use their service, such as if you're in a hurry but there's a huge traffic jam so using a taxi or bus will be too slow. In November 2011, Ojek with argometer is called Taxijek has launched in Jakarta and is provided with company's driver identity card, a helmet for passengers, disposable shower caps to wear underneath and an extra raincoat. The fee is cheaper than the non-argometer ojeks make dri-


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vers of non-argometer ojeks jealous, moreover the Taxijek can enter the gate of elite housing complexes to pick up passengers due to Taxijek have special driver identity cards.

Jakarta · See Jakarta, symbolizing the fight for Indonesia. It is the national monument of the Republic of Indonesia, built to commemorate the struggle for Indonesian independence.

On Foot As a rule, walking around the center of Jakarta is neither fun nor practical, especially for the disabled traveler you may find the city a true challenge due to poor maintenance of pavement and missing sidewalk. With the exception of a few posher areas, sidewalks are crowded with pushcart vendors, drivers disregard pedestrians and crossing streets can be dangerous. On many busy streets there are no pedestrian crossings, so it's best to latch onto a local and follow them as they weave their way through the endless flow of cars, you may found yourself waiting for hours if you decided to wait for one of them to stop for you on pedestrian crossing. If you use pedestrian bridges, watch out for wonky steps and holes, and also look out for motorcycles and bicycles that often use the bridge illegally. Despite this horrible habits of the inhabitants, the downtown area itself does have adequate sidewalks, you may find yourself faster taking the path on foot than traveling by vehicles, there are few recommended guide for you to explore the city: 1) Kota Tua - pedestrian friendly square, you can walk in these area and explore the sight of dutch colonial charm that were once center of the colonial seat. 2) Pasar Minggu - a pedestrian friendly zone market, that exist since the colonial era 3) Sudirman-Thamrin corridor - the downtown itself have nicely done paved pedestrian footpath for eager explorer all the way through rasuna said, there's available wifi too! 4) Monas and Kebon Sirih area - the city square is pedestrian friendly zone, and the surrounding area have several attraction such as president palace to old colonial churches

Monumen Nasional Jakarta, Indonesia at night

Construction began in 1961 under the direction of President Sukarno. Monas was opened to the public in 1975. It is topped by a flame covered with gold foil. The entrance to Monas is located around 100 meters away to the northern side of the monument. Visitors enter by steps down to a tunnel which leads back towards the base of the Monas. There is a ticket office at the end of the tunnel. Tickets allow access to the National History Museum display of dioramas as well as several other parts of the area. Tickets for access to the observation desk cost another fee for adults (mid-2012) and may be purchased at a second booth after passing through the hall showing the diorama display. It is best to go early and proceed directly to the lift to the observation tower. The lift has a capacity of perhaps 160 people per hour so long queues build up quickly. The other parts of the monument, including the dioramas in the hall below the Monas, can be viewed later.

Istiqlal Mosque

5) Car Free Day - the city center enclosed itself from motor vehicle, this is the moment you can find yourself walking on the road of the city from Thamrin to Monas area, the busway service would still be running in the enclosed zone for travellers to reach their destination.

See National Monument The National Monument or simply Monas is a 433 ft (132 meter) tower in the center of Merdeka Square, Central

 

Istiqlal Mosque

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Jakarta · See

Istiqlal Mosque, or Masjid Istiqlal, (Independence Mosque) in Jakarta, Indonesia is the largest mosque in Southeast Asia and has the highest capacity. This national mosque of Indonesia was built to commemorate Indonesian independence and named Istiqlal, an Arabic word for independence. The mosque was opened to the public 22 February 1978. Within Jakarta, the mosque is positioned next to Merdeka Square and the Jakarta Cathedral.

Textile Museum The Textile Museum (Indonesian: Museum Tekstil) houses a collection of textiles from various islands in Indonesia. The museum is located in Jakarta, Indonesia. Wisma 46 Kota BNI-Maybank

The tower is located on a 15 ha lot in the downtown city. It has a floor area of 140,028 m². The tower contains 23 elevators which can reach speeds of 360 mpm in the super high speed models. Wisma 46 is equal 184th tallest existing building in the world. When measured up to the roof, the tower is 228 m tall and when measured up to the lower roof, it is only 200 m tall.

The front view of the Textile Museum.

The building of Textile Museum was built in the early 19th century. Initially the building was a private house of a Frenchman. The building was later sold to Abdul Aziz Al Mussawi al musa Khadim, a Turkish consulate for Batavia. In 1942, the building was sold again to Karel Cristian Cruq. The building had been used as the headquarter of Barisan Keamanan Rakyat (Front of People Safety) during the struggle for independence period. Later in 1947, the building was owned by Lie Sion Phin who rented it to the Department of Social Affairs which modified it into an institution for aged people. Afterwards the building was handed over to the city's government and on June 28, 1978 the building was inaugurated as the Textile Museum by Madame Tien Soeharto.

The tower is a cuboid concrete tower rising 200 m before a sleek glass tower rises out of it before culminating in a curved spire. The glass tower has a totally glass exterior unlike the tower it rises from which has a concrete exterior with square windows. This pattern of square windows is disturbed three times by long rectangular windows. The building's design is described as modern and late-modernist.

Merdeka Square Merdeka Square (Indonesian: Medan Merdeka or Lapangan Merdeka) is a large square located in the center of Jakarta, Indonesia. Measuring one square kilometer in area, if the surrounding fields within the Merdeka Square are included, it is considered the largest square in the world or one of the largest.

Wisma 46 Wisma 46 is the tallest building in Indonesia. It is a 250m tall (roof height) skyscraper located in the Kota BNI-Maybank complex in Central Jakarta, Indonesia. The 48 storey office tower was completed in 1995 under the design by Zeidler Roberts Partnership (Zeidler Partnership Architects) and DP Architects Private Ltd.

 

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At its center stands the National Monument, often called Monas (Monumen Nasional). The paved plaza surrounds the monument often host national events such as military and float parades, as well as civic demonstrations. The square is a popular destination for Jakartans for sports and recreation especially on weekends. It is surrounded by important government buildings such as the Merdeka Palace, the National Museum of Indonesia, the Supreme Court and various governmental ministries. During the colonial Dutch East Indies era the square was called Koningsplein (King's square). Merdeka is the Indonesian or Malay word for freedom or independence.

Indonesia Museum

Jakarta · See Ragunan Zoo Ragunan Zoo is a 140-hectare (350-acre) zoo located in Pasar Minggu, South Jakarta, Indonesia. It is home to over 270 species of animals, 171 species of flora, and employs over 450 people. Many of the animals are endangered and threatened from all parts of Indonesia and the rest of the world. There are a total of 3,122 animal specimens including birds. Laid out in a lush tropical setting, such indigenous animals as the komodo dragon, orangutan, tapir, anoa, sumatran tiger, banteng wild ox and various brightly colored birds are given ample room. The zoo is located in South Jakarta and easily accessible through the Jakarta Outer Ring Road and Transjakarta busway network.

The Indonesia Museum (Indonesian: Museum Indonesia), is an anthropology and ethnological museum located in Taman Mini Indonesia Indah (TMII), Jakarta, Indonesia. The museum is concentrated on arts and cultures of various ethnic groups that inhabit Indonesian archipelago and formed the modern nation of Indonesia. The museum is a richly decorated building in Balinese architecture, it houses traditional and contemporary arts, crafts and traditional costumes from the different regions of the nation. If tourist wants to take a picture with their camera, a ticket pass must be given to the counter in the first floor. If handicam, different cost. However, it is free to take pictures with cellphones. Front gate of the Ragunan Zoo

Special attractions for the children include a Children's Zoo, playground and rides, along with the Sunday events of elephant ride, pony cart and boat rides on Ragunan lake. Watching the orangutans on their daily tour of the zoo grounds in a pony cart. Restaurant facilities and picnic shelters are available for visitors convenience as well as stands for purchasing souvenirs of the zoo.

Jakarta Cathedral

The richly decorated Balinese gate of Indonesia Museum.

The theme of first floor exhibit is Bhinneka Tunggal Ika (Unity in Diversity). It features traditional formal dress and wedding costumes of 27 provinces of Indonesia (Indonesian provinces from 1975 to 2000). The exhibit also displays Indonesian artforms, such as various types of dances, wayang and gamelan, also the painted glass map of Indonesia. The exhibit displays the rich diversity of Indonesian people and culture and also celebrate the pluralism of Indonesia, formed from different languages, traditions, religions, cultures, and customs of Indonesian people.

 

Jakarta Cathedral (Indonesian: Gereja Katedral Jakarta) is a Roman Catholic Cathedral in Jakarta, Indonesia, which is also the seat of the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Jakarta, currently Archbishop Ignatius Suharyo Hardjoatmodjo. Its official name is Gereja Santa Maria Pelindung Diangkat Ke Surga (from Dutch, De Kerk van Onze Lieve Vrouwe ten Hemelopneming, in English: The Church of Our Lady of Assumption). This current cathedral was consecrated in 1901 and built in the neo-gothic style, a common architectural style to build churches at that time. The Jakarta Cathedral is located in Central Jakarta near Merdeka Square and Merdeka Palace, it is stood right in the front of Istiqlal Mosque.

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Jakarta · Do abundant in residential areas, and can be crowded with players, onlookers and vendors, especially on weekend afternoons. In these casual games, anyone can simply ask to jump in or relax. Drifting. (ie, Slot cars) There's a drifting circuit on top of Mal Artha Gading (MAG) Karaoke. One of the main entertainment program in Asia. With the most popular chains spread throughout Jakarta, such as Inul Vista (Sarinah, Plaza Semanggi, Kelapa Gading, etc), Happy Puppy (La Piazza, etc), and NAV (Kelapa Gading, etc). 6 person per room. The word keluarga means family in Indonesian. That term differentiates the family type karaoke from the potentially more risque variety.

Cathedral in Jakarta

The plan of the cathedral took the form of a cross with a length of 60 meters and 10 meters wide, plus 5 meters on each aisle. It is a cathedral because it contains the cathedra, the throne of bishop. The main entrance of the building is facing west. At the center of the main portal stands a statue of Our Lady Mary while on top of the portal there is a sentence written in Latin: Beatam Me Dicentes Omnes Generationes which means All generations shall call me blessed. Besides, there is a large round stained glass Rozeta Rosa Mystica, which is the symbol of Mother Mary.

Do Cinema. Movie theatres are a more affordable escape. Beware of the heavy hand of the Indonesian censor though. The price of popcorn and drinks are exorbitant. Several other cinemas also show Indian, Chinese and Indonesian movies. And the lesser ones also exhibit Indonesian B-Movies with erotic themes (still heavily censored). The largest chain of cinemas in Indonesia are 21 group, Blitz Megaplex and Cineplex21. Fitness center. Large hotels provide free fitness center for guests. Some hotels have sauna, spa, tennis court and jogging track. They are also available in shopping malls. Golf. Golf is the number one pastime of the upper class in Indonesia. It is relatively cheap by Western standards. Bowling. Most alleys are found in shopping malls. Guest can rent bowling shoes etc. The length of the lanes are 32 ft. Football. (ie, Soccer) It is not advisable to watch any live football match in Jakarta, because the Jakmania, Persija Jakarta's ultras often turn into rioters when facing Persitara's North Jak and Persib's Viking. During and after certain soccer games, foreign tourists should also not go near the Lebak Bulus Stadium, the site of similar feats by lesser teams. Jakarta also has plenty choices of Futsal fields in many areas. Dirt and grass makeshift fields are

 

Badminton. As one of the powerhouses in badminton, Jakarta has a multitude of badminton courts, ranging from the national venues at the Senayan Complex to the suburban halls which cater to both futsal and badminton. Most of them have wood-panel flooring, and are maintained in reasonably good condition. Lighting is strictly functional and is below par in comparison with standard badminton halls. The best way to find a playing venue (and players) is to post a request on badminton central, the global badminton forum. It has a lot of members from Indonesia who would be happy to provide directions to a local hall. People play almost every evening so, walk in, strike up a conversation with the group's captain, and expect to be accommodated in their group for the evening's session. If the captain refuses payment it is polite to buy the players a round of soft-drinks (teh-botol is a good choice). Be warned that it is common for Indonesians to eat, smoke, drink and nap by the side of the court. So, watch your footing!

Buy If you're stopping in Jakarta, consider buying an extra suitcase, because there's lots of good shopping to be done. You can buy good used suitcases at Jalan Surabaya and you can see or but another good used things such as old gramophone plates or other 'antiques'. Shopping Malls: Despite the crushing poverty exhibited in many parts of the city, Jakarta has a large number of giant, glittering malls it is recorded that the entire city itself have more than 100 shopping malls. Note that, for imported goods, prices in many of the more expensive stores can be much higher than what would be charged in the same shops in other countries. The up-market and prestigious malls in Jakarta are the centrally located near the HI roundabout As general the city lacks a vibrant shopping street unlike its neighboring Bukit Bintang or Orchard Road, however

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things have slightly improved rescently. Jalan Dr Proffesor Satrio (or simply Satrio Road) is a planned shopping belt in Jakarta, an area at Kuningan, Central Jakarta where you can find upscale to low malls, adjacent to each other. Markets: In addition to malls, there are also numerous extremely large shopping centers, quite a few of which can be found in the Mangga Dua (Two Mangoes) area. These include the huge ITC, Pasar Pagi Mangga Dua and the gigantic WTC (Wholesale Trade Center) Mangga Dua, massive indoor markets with hundreds upon hundreds of shops selling everything at wholesale prices, including fake branded items and pirated movies/DVDs.

Jakarta · Eat Sop iga sapi, beef spare rib soup that takes a simple Dutch dish and piles on Indonesian spices. Soto betawi, coconut milk broth with beef tendons, intestines, tripe.

When you shop in those places, you can always bargain the price. As general rule, you should start the bargain with half from the initial offered price. Tanah Abang and Pasar Baru in Blok M are hugely popular among Malaysian tourists, it is a cheap bargain hunt good shopping complex that offers you low priced wholesale clothing and other amneties. Antique shop: If you are looking for some antique product such as local handicrafts, Indonesian traditional batik, wayang golek (Javanese puppets), you can go to Jalan Surabaya in Central Jakarta where you can find many antique shops along this street. Pasaraya Grande shopping mall at Blok M, South Jakarta has one dedicated floor for all Indonesian antiques and handicrafted goods. Pasar Seni at Ancol is the center of paintings and sculpture, you can ask the painters to make you as the model for your paintings. Sharinah Department Store one of the oldest in town, a place where you can buy traditional Batik and clothing, Craftgoods, antiques as well as luxurious crafted precious gems under one roof.

Kerak telor, omelette from egg cooked with glutinous rice and served with shredded coconut and a dried shrimp topping.

Jakarta Gem Center: (JGC) Rawa Bening, Jl Bekasi Barat (just in front of Jatinegara station). JGC is the biggest central of gems and precious stones in Indonesia, even Asia. It is located in Jl.Bekasi Barat, just right in front of Jatinegara train station, making it very strategic and convenient as tourist spot. There are more than 1,330 stalls selling various kinds of gemstones, crystals, rings, stones, fossils, even to antiques and mystical items. After undergoing total renovation in 2010, JGC has developed rapidly and is always crowded with local and international visitors. Each day visitors can reach more than 1,000 people. The place is relatively clean and safe, modern, has sufficient parking lot, and made up of 4 floors.

Kerak telor

Ketoprak, rice roll, tofu, bean sprout, crackers in peanut sauce.

Eat You can find Jakartan versions of many dishes, often tagged with the label betawi (Indonesian for Batavian).

 

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Jakarta · Drink and sweet, but let the grounds settle to the bottom of the cup before you drink it. Last and least, no travel guide would be complete without mentioning the infamous kopi luwak, coffee made from beans which have been eaten, partially digested and excreted by the palm civet (luwak), but even in Indonesia this is an exotic delicacy for a small pot of brew. Islam is the religion of the majority of Indonesians, but alcohol is widely available in most areas, especially in upscale restaurants and bars. Public displays of drunkenness, however, are strongly frowned upon and in the larger cities are likely to make you a victim of crime or get you arrested by police.

Ketoprak

Bubur Dingin, lit. Cold Pouridge with beef sweet soup Nasi uduk, rice cooked in coconut milk similar to nasi lemak, served with choices of various toppings such as fried chicken, beef, fried shalots sambal.

In staunchly Islamic areas such as Acehalcohol is banned and those caught with alcohol can be caned.

Sleep The travel agencies at Jakarta's airport can have surprisingly good rates for mid-range and above hotels. Star ratings are reserved for midrange and better hotels, while budget places have Melati rankings from 1-3 (best). Tax and service charge of 21% are usually added to the bill. Backpacker hostels can be found in Jalan Jaksa, which is close to Gambir Station (to the east) and Sarina (to the west) with the Trans-Jakarta busway. Clean, air-conditioned rooms with own bathroom.

Nasi uduk

Nasi ulam, rice cooked in coconut milk served with fried minced beef, sweet fried tempe, many other toppings, cucumber, and sambal (chilli sauce). Your stomach may need an adjustment period to the local food due to many spices locals used in their cooking.

Drink Fruit juices, jus for plain juice or if served with ice are popular with Indonesians and visitors alike, although the hygiene of the water used to make them can be dubious. In addition to the usual suspects, try jus alpokat, a surprisingly tasty drink made from avocadoes, often with some chocolate syrup poured in! Indonesians drink both coffee (kopi) and tea (teh), at least as long as they have had vast quantities of sugar added in. An authentic cup of Java, known as kopi tubruk, is strong

 

Jakarta has more than its fair share of luxury hotels, and after the prolonged post-crash hangover new ones are now going up again. Many remain good value by world prices, but opulent lobbies do not always correspond to the same quality in the room. For stay of a month or more, monthly rental rooms (called kost) and apartments are a good alternative to budget and mid-range hotels, respectively. Fully-furnished rooms (with TV, A/C, large bed, hot shower, kitchen outside) can be rented. In most cases, rental fee already includes electricity and water usage, often there are additional services included like laundry, Internet access, breakfast, etc. There are cheaper rooms as well but those are usually small, without window, and the furniture includes just bed or even nothing. Also, some cheaper places are exclusively for either men or women (no opposite sex tenants or visitors allowed) many others allow couples to stay together but only if they're legally married. Check on this before committing to rent. For apartments (one or more rooms + private kitchen + often balcony). Cheaper rates can be obtained in some places which are oriented to the long-term rental (6

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months or 1 year minimum). However, there maybe same limitations as for cheaper rooms. Once again, check before committing.

your awareness then simply providing a snack or beverages contain a substance to make you groogy and unconciousness. You often become an easy target of such crime if you looks a newcomers or looking naive so be careful.

Stay Safe

There are also many case of school, motor gank and neigbourhood fighting which are not uncommon involving everybody surrounding who are pass in between the scene.

Criminal problem become more serious in the last 10 years. Although most of the criminal case are pickpocket and bag snatching which are usually done by act and run. However, there are increasing number of more serious criminality such as mugging by group with intimidation using the weapon, even using assembled gun sometimes and they become more ruthless with the victim lately and sometimes they are not hesitate to hurt or kill if they think it cause a resistance from the victim. Another unsafe area are usually on the traffic light in some certain area during the night time, usually there are some street beggar, unemployement and even holdlum. Organized criminals player sometimes operate on the streets (especially at traffic lights) without fearing crowds. Be on your guard in crowded places such as markets, because pickpockets often steal wallets and cell phones. Keep a close eye on your valuables and choose your transportation options carefully, especially at night. Business travellers need to keep a close eye on laptops, which have been known to disappear even from within office buildings. For all-night party excursions, it may be wise to keep your cab waiting the extra cost is cheap and it's worth it for the security. Lock your car doors and windows, and show no cell phones or wallets on the dashboard. If the theft is done by stealth, often simple catching the thief in the act will cause him to run away. Indonesians rarely ignore for any case of crime with foreigner. please ask for help (Tolong!). For intimidation such as robberies, simply giving them an object of value will usually satisfy the thief, who will leave without further ado. There is also a lot of scam such as playing act as a staff or salesperson providing an interesting promo package or lottery which is usually a complicated trick with the ending of riding over you (sometimes by hipnotize) to an ATM. The con artist is then free to withdraw the money from your account. Other mode are They approach you in the terminal or in the public place and offering you a ride or leading you to a ride usually to the unofficial van or car with the fake license plate number. They also put some fake woman passanger to convince you as a safe riding but actually. There would be ended with a kidnapping or simply mugging you inside after they run to the far place and they will throw you away thereafter. Another popular trick are they pretending as a someone recognize you, usually become a friendly person and try to make a simple chat or talk with the intention to distract

 

Jakarta · Stay Safe

The tips to avoid those case are always exert general precaution with the surrounding area, knowing the place that you are there or your destination, avoid walking alone in the dark, devoid, slum area, avoid bring any eye catching valuable things, dress moderately, go anywhere with people only if you know them, never trusting the unknown people, make sure asking information to the right person especially if you are tourist, and report any crime on you to the nearest police station although it is rarely solving the problem. If you carry a large amount of money (including passports etc), keep this more safely secured. Also avoid large group concentration Most Indonesians are very protective of their neighbors. In many neighborhoods, a thief caught by the local residents will be punished traditionally before being taken to police. Most local neighborhoods employ their own security. If you stay locally, it is better you get to know your surrounding neighborhood.

Stay Healthy There are three sources of tap water in Jakarta: 1) from drinking-water company, 2) from deep artesian wells, and 3) from shallow wells. Water from source #1 and #2, originally are drinkable when it leaves the source, but some pipes maybe ill-maintained. And there is no way for you to know if the source of your water is not from source #3 or not (unless if you ask). Hence, to be on the safe side, always drink bottled water, or boil your water before drinking it. Never drink tap water directly. In Depok and Bogor boiled tap water is considered drinkable, but in most areas of Jakarta, make your tea and coffee from bottled water. If buying bottled water from a street vendor always check the tamper proof seal is intact. In the coastal areas of Jakarta, such as North Jakarta, the water quality is even worse and if you have a bak mandi in your bathroom using the water from shallow well, adding one capfull of Detol to the 100 to 200 litres of water may be a good idea. To the south eg, South Jakarta, Depok and Bogor, the water quality is better but still don't drink it unboiled. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), Jakarta is the 3rd most polluted city in the world after Mexico City and Bangkok.

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Jakarta

 

During the rainy season (December, January, and February), lower parts of Jakarta (mostly those to the north) are often flooded, turning the lower parts of Jakarta into Little Venice or Jakarta's Venice because of the roads changing into canals that resemble Venice, Italy. Thanks to the completion of East Flood Canal, much of the water is channeled directly to the sea without a chance of passing through the central part of the city.

History Pre-colonial era The area in and around modern Jakarta was part of the fourth century Sundanese kingdom of Tarumanagara, one of the oldest Hindu kingdoms in Indonesia. Following the decline of Tarumanagara, its territories, including the Jakarta area, became part of the Kingdom of Sunda. From 7th to early 13th century port of Sunda is within the sphere of influence of Srivijaya maritime empire. According to the Chinese source, Chu-fan-chi, written circa 1200, Chou Ju-kua reported in the early 13th century Srivijaya still ruled Sumatra, the Malay peninsula, and western Java (Sunda). The source reports the port of Sunda as strategic and thriving, pepper from Sunda being among the best in quality. The people worked in agriculture and their houses were built on wooden piles. The harbour area became known as Sunda Kelapa and by the fourteenth century, it was a major trading port for Sunda kingdom. The first European fleet, four Portuguese ships from Malacca, arrived in 1513 when the Portuguese were looking for a route for spices. The Kingdom of Sunda made an alliance treaty with Portugal by allowing the Portuguese to build a port in 1522 in order to defend against the rising power of the Sultanate of Demak from central Java. In 1527, Fatahillah, a Javanese general from Demak attacked and conquered Sunda Kelapa, driving out the Portuguese. Sunda Kelapa was renamed Jayakarta, and became a fiefdom of the Sultanate of Banten which became a major Southeast Asia trading center. Through the relationship with Prince Jayawikarta from the Sultanate of Banten, Dutch ships arrived in Jayakarta in 1596. In 1602, the English East India Company's first voyage, commanded by Sir James Lancaster, arrived in Acehand sailed on to Banten where they were allowed to build a trading post. This site became the centre of English trade in Indonesia until 1682. Jayawikarta is thought to have made trading connections with the English merchants, rivals of the Dutch, by allowing them to build houses directly across from the Dutch buildings in 1615.

 

Jakarta · History Colonial era When relations between Prince Jayawikarta and the Dutch deteriorated, Jayawikarta's soldiers attacked the Dutch fortress. Prince Jayakarta's army and the English were defeated by the Dutch, in part owing to the timely arrival of Jan Pieterszoon Coen(J.P. Coen). The Dutch burned the English fort, and forced the English to retreat on their ships. The victory consolidated Dutch power and in 1619 they renamed the city Batavia. Commercial opportunities in the capital of the Dutch colony attracted Indonesian and especially Chinese immigrants. This sudden population increase created burdens on the city. Tensions grew as the colonial government tried to restrict Chinese migration through deportations. Following a revolt, 5,000 Chinese were massacred by the Dutch and natives on 9 October 1740 and the following year, Chinese inhabitants were moved to Glodok outside the city walls. The city began to move further south as epidemics in 1835 and 1870 encouraged more people to move far south of the port. The Koningsplein, now Merdeka Square was completed in 1818, the housing park of Menteng was started in 1913,  and Kebayoran Baru was the last Dutch-built residential area. By 1930 Batavia had more than 500,000 inhabitants, including 37,067 Europeans.

The former Stadhuis of Batavia, the seat of Governor General of VOC. The building now serves as Jakarta History Museum, Jakarta Old Town area.

During World War II, the city was renamed from Batavia to Jakarta (short form of Jayakarta) by the Indonesian nationalists after conquering the city from the Dutch in 1942 with the help of the Japanese forces.

Independence era Following World War II, Indonesian Republicans withdrew from Allied-occupied Jakarta during their fight for Indonesian independence and established their capital in Yogyakarta. In 1950, once independence was secured, Jakarta was once again made the national capital. Indonesia's founding president, Sukarno, envisaged Jakarta as a great international city, and instigated large government fund-

17 


Jakarta

 

Jakarta · History

ed projects with openly nationalistic and modernist architecture. Projects included a clover-leaf highway, a major boulevard (Jalan MH Thamrin-Sudirman), monuments such as The National Monument, Hotel Indonesia, a shopping center, and a new parliament building. In October 1965, Jakarta was the site of an abortive coup attempt in which 6 top generals were killed, precipitating a violent anti-communist purge in which half-a million people were killed, including many ethnic Chinese, and the beginning of Suharto's New Order. A monument stands where the generals bodies were dumped. In 1966, Jakarta was declared a special capital city district (daerah khusus ibukota), thus gaining a status approximately equivalent to that of a state or province. Lieutenant General Ali Sadikin served as Governor from the mid-60's commencement of the New Order through to 1977, he rehabilitated roads and bridges, encouraged the arts, built several hospitals, and a large number of new schools. He also cleared out slum dwellers for new development projects some for the benefit of the Suharto family and tried to eliminate rickshaws and ban street vendors. He began control of migration to the city in order to stem overcrowding and poverty. Foreign investment contributed to a real estate boom which changed the face of the city. The boom ended with the 1997/98 East Asian Economic crisis putting Jakarta at the center of violence, protest, and political maneuvering. After 32 years in power, support for President Suharto began to wane. Tensions reached a peak in when four students were shot deadat Trisakti University by security forces, four days of riots and violence ensued that killed an estimated 1,200, and destroyed or damaged 6,000 buildings. Much of the rioting targeted Chinese Indonesians. Suharto resigned as president, and Jakarta has remained the focal point of democratic change in Indonesia. Jemaah Islamiah-connected bombings occurred almost annually in the city between 2000 and 2005, with another bombing in 2009.

 

18 


Restaurants

 

Restaurants · Top Best Restaurants

Top Italian

Restaurants

Restaurants

Top Best Restaurants Hacienda-Mexican Bar and Grill cuisine   Mexican

Dapur Babah

place   Jalan Veteran 1, Jakarta, Indonesia

Seribu Rasa

cuisine   Asian place   Jl. Agus Salin No. 128, Jakarta, Indonesia

Samara: Satay and Wine Resto

cuisine   Middle Eastern price   $59 - $251 place    Jl. Kebon Sirih, Jakarta-Pusat, Jakarta, Indonesia

Sushi Tei

cuisine   Japanese price   $9 - $29

Lara Djonggrang

cuisine   Asian place   Cik Di Tiro 4, Jakarta, Indonesia

C's. Grand Hyatt

cuisine   Indonesian price   $38 - $295 place   Jalan M. H. Thamrin Kav. 28-30, Jakarta 10350, Indonesia

Blue Elephant Royal Thai Cuisine

cuisine   Thai price   $13 - $21 place   Jl. Cut Meutia No. 2 | Menteng, Jakarta 10340, Indonesia

Waroeng Shanghai Blue 1920

cuisine   Chinese, Fusion, Indonesian price   $6 - $11 place   Jln. Kebon Sirih Raya No. 79 (JAKPUS), Jakarta, Indonesia

sumire japanese restaurant

place   grand hyatt hotel, Jakarta, Indonesia

Bakmi GM

price   $4 - $11 place   Pondok Indah Mall 1 & 2, Jakarta, Indonesia

Sopra Ristorante cuisine   Italian

Satoo

cuisine   International price   $19 - $39 place   Hotel Shangrila | JL. Jend. Sudirman Kav. 1, Jakarta 10220, Indonesia

Lyon at Mandarin Oriental, Jakarta

cuisine   French place   Jalan M.H. Thamrin | PO BOX 3392, Jakarta 10310, Indonesia

Beautika

cuisine   Indonesian price   $3 - $8 place   Jl. Hang Lekir 1, Jakarta, Indonesia

Fjl

price   $11 - $36 place    jl.kemang raya no.25, Jakarta 12730, Indonesia

PEPeNERO Cucina Italiana

price   $11 place    Plaza Pondok Indah 2 | Block BA 25 - 26, Jakarta, Indonesia

Izzi Pizza

place   Menara Kuningan, Lower ground | Jl. HR Rasuna Said Blok X-7 Kav.5, Jakarta, Indonesia

Chees Cake Factory

place   Tebet, Jakarta, Indonesia

Birdcage

price   $101 place   Jl.Wijaya 13, Jakarta, Indonesia

The Spaghetti House

price   $2 - $12 place   Jln. Asia Afrika No. 8 Plaza Senayan 2nd Floor #201C, Jakarta, Indonesia

avenue a pizza

place   plaza semanggi (persis sampingnya SOHO), Jakarta, Indonesia

Pizza Boutique

price   $4 - $11 place   Jln. Suryo No.20, Jakarta, Indonesia

Pasta Matrix

place   Jl. Metro Pondok Indah, Jakarta Selatan EXPIM2, Jakarta, Indonesia

Pizza e Bierra

place   HR Rasuna Said Setiabudi One Building, Jakarta, Indonesia

Top Asian Lara Djonggrang

cuisine   Asian place   Cik Di Tiro 4, Jakarta, Indonesia

Seribu Rasa

cuisine   Asian place   Jl. Agus Salin No. 128, Jakarta, Indonesia

Blue Elephant Royal Thai Cuisine

cuisine   Thai price   $13 - $19 place   Jl. Cut Meutia No. 2 | Menteng, Jakarta 10340, Indonesia

Pancious

cuisine   American, Asian, Asian fusion, Dessert, Pasta price   $11 place   Pacific Place lt. 5, Plaza Indonesia lt. 5, MKG 5 GF, MTA lt. 3, Senayan City lt. 5, Jakarta 12210, Indonesia

Waroeng Shanghai Blue 1920 cuisine   Chinese, Fusion, Indonesian

 

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Restaurants

 

Restaurants · Top Asian

price   $4 - $9 place   Jln. Kebon Sirih Raya No. 79 (JAKPUS), Jakarta, Indonesia

satoo

cuisine    Sushi, Seafood, Pasta, Japanese, International, Indonesian, Indi price   $19 - $41 place   shangri-la hotel, Jakarta, Indonesia

Din Tai Fung

cuisine   Chinese price   $4 - $11 place    Plaza Senayan Arcadia Ground Floor Unit X101-103 | Jln New Delhi No.8, Jakarta 10270, Indonesia

Pasta De Waraku

cuisine   Japanese place   Pondok Indah Mall 2 | Restaurant row, level 3, Jakarta, Indonesia

Izzi Pizza

cuisine   Asian, Italian place    Menara Kuningan, Lower ground | Jl. HR Rasuna Said Blok X-7 Kav.5, Jakarta, Indonesia

Ah Yat Seafood

cuisine   Asian, Chinese, Seafood price   $26 place    Asia Afrika Senayan (persis di dalam lingkungan golf senayan), Jakarta, Indonesia

 

20 


Useful info

 

Useful info · Currency

Useful info

Useful info

Currency The currency from Indonesia is the Rupiah (IDR). 1 IDR costs: Euro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00 EUR United States Dollar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00 USD Yen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.01 JPY Pound Sterling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00 GBP Czech Koruna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00 CZK Danish Krone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00 DKK Forint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.02 HUF Litas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00 LTL New Zloty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00 PLN Swedish Krona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00 SEK Swiss Franc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00 CHF Norwegian Krone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00 NOK Croatian Kuna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00 HRK Australian Dollar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00 AUD Canadian Dollar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00 CAD Yuan Renminbi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00 CNY Hong Kong Dollar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00 HKD Rupiah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.00 IDR Republic of Korean Won . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.09 KRW Ringgit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00 MYR New Zealand Dollar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00 NZD Philippines Peso . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00 PHP Singapore Dollar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00 SGD Baht . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00 THB Rand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00 ZAR

Useful phrases English

Welcome Hello Hello(on phone) Good morning Good afternoon Good evening Good night, Night night, Nighty Night, Good night, sleep tight, hope the bedbugs don't bite! Goodbye How are you? Reply Long time no see What's your name? My name is ... Where are you from?

 

Indonesian

Selamat datang Selamat siang Halo Selamat pagi Selamat siang Selamat sore Selamat malam Selamat tinggal (you're leaving) Selamat jalan (you're staying) Sampai jumpa lagi Apa kabar? Baik-baik saja, terima kasih. Bagaimana dengan Anda? Lama tidak berjumpa Siapa nama anda? Nama saya ... Anda berasal dari mana?

21 


Useful info

 

Useful info · Passport and Visa

English

Indonesian

I come from ... Pleased to meet you Good luck Cheers! Bottoms up! Down the hatch! Mud in your eye! Bon appetit! Enjoy your meal! (frm) Enjoy! Tuck in! Get stuck in! Eat already! (inf/slang) Happy eating! Get your laughing gear round this! (inf/slang) Bon voyage / have a good journey Excuse me Sorry How much is this? / How much does this cost? Please Thank you Thank you very much Thank you kindly Thanks a lot Many thanks Thanks Cheers Ta (used mainly in northen England) You're welcome Don't mention it My pleasure No problem No probs Not a problem No worries No big deal Where's the toilet / lavatory / bathroom / restroom / powder room / gents/ladies? Where's the loo / bog / dunny / little boys'/girls' room? (inf/slang) Have a nice day Get well soon Would you like to dance with me? I love you I don't understand Please say that again Please speak more slowly Can you please write it down? How do you say ... in english? Do you speak english? Yes, a little Leave me alone! Help!

Saya dari ... Senang bertemu dengan Anda Semoga Beruntung! Pro! Tos! Selamat makan!

Selamat jalan / Semoga selamat sampai tujuan Maafkan saya Maaf! Berapa harganya? Tolong Makasih ya (inf) Makasih (vinf) Terima kasihTerima kasih banyak (frm) KembaliSama-samaDengan senang hati Di manakah kamar kecil?

Semoga hari anda menyenangkan Semoga lekas sembuh! Bersediakah Anda berdansa dengan saya? Cinta kamu / Saya cinta kamu / Saya mencintaimu Saya tidak mengerti Bisa tolong diulangi? Tolong bicara pelan sedikit Tolong tuliskan Bagaimana cara mengatakan ... dalam bahasa Indonesia? Kamu bisa bicara bahasa indonesia? Ya, sedikit Biarkan saya sendiri! Tolong!

Passport and Visa  

Passport required

Australian British Canadian Other EU USA

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Return ticket required Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Visa required Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Passports: To enter Indonesia, a passport valid for at least six months from the date of entry is required by all nationals referred to in the chart above. Visas:

 

22 


Useful info

 

Useful info · Emergency numbers

Visas are also required by all nationals referred to in the chart above. Note: Nationals not referred to in the chart are advised to contact the embassy to check visa requirements for Indonesia. Visa note: All nationals referred to in the chart are eligible for a 30-day visa on arrival in Indonesia, which can sometimes be extended for another 30 days. For longer stays, or for non-touristic stays, nationals should apply for a visa in advance. To apply in advance nationals must: (a) have a passport valid for at least six months from the date of entry; (b) enter Indonesia through one of the main ports listed below: Airports: Adi Juanda (Surabaya), Adisutjipto (Yogyakarta), Adi Sumarno (Solo), El Tari (Kupang), Halim Perdanakusuma (Jakarta), Hassanudin (Makasar), Ngurah Rai (Denpasar), Polonia (Medan), Sam Ratulangi (Manado), Selaparang (Mataram), Sepinggan (Balik Papan), Soekarno Hatta (Jakarta), Sultan Syarif Kasim II (Pekan Baru) and Tabing (Padang); Seaports: Bandar Bintan, Selani Lagoi and Bandar Sri Udana Lobam (Tanjung Uban, Bintan), Batu Ampar, Marina Teluk Senimba, Nongsa, Sekupang and Batam Centre (Batam Island), Belawan (North Sumatera), Benoa (Island of Bali) Bitung (Sulawesi), Bitung (Sulawsi), Jayapura (Irian Jaya), Marina Teluk Senimba (Batam Island), Maumere (East Nusa Tenggara), Padang Bai (Bali), Pare-Pare (South Sulawesi), Sibolga (North Sumatera), Soekarno-Hatta (Makasar), Sri Bintan Pura (Riau), Tanjung Balai Karimun (Sumatera), Tanjung Mas (Semarang), Tanjung Priok (Jakarta), Teluk Bayur (Padang), Tenau (Kupang), Yos Sudarso (Dumai, Sumatra); (c) hold a valid/return ticket. Visitors who out-stay their visa will be fined US$20 per day. Visitors staying longer than 60 days risk large fines and may face deportation or imprisonment. Types and cost: A visa on arrival for Indonesia cosys US$25 (£16); and extension of stay for an additional 30 days also costs US$25 (£16).

Emergency numbers Police: 110 Medical: 118/119 Fire: 113 Notes: Search and rescue team – 115; Natural disaster – 129; Electricity – 123; Mobile phone and satellite phone emergency number – 112.

 

23 


Maps

 

Maps · Map index

Maps

Maps

Map index

 

24 


Maps

 

Maps · A0

A0

 

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Maps

 

Maps · A1

A1

 

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Maps

 

Maps · A2

A2

 

27 


Maps

 

Maps · B0

B0

 

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Maps

 

Maps · B1

B1

 

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Maps

 

Maps · B2

B2

 

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References

 

References ·

Reasonable care has been taken in creating this personalized travel guide by combining information from the sources identified under the section 'references'. However, the information is provided 'as is' and there is no warranty about the information in the guide being accurate, complete or up to date. To the maximum extent permitted under applicable law, all liability arising from the use of this guide will be denied. Verifying critical information (like visas, health and safety) before you travel is recommended. References

References

Jakarta data is from Wikitravel,  urls: –  http://www.wikitravel.com This page was last edited at 21:28, on 2 July 2011 by Anonymous user(s) of Wikitravel. Based on work by Claus Hansen, Khalid Abul Khayr, Vian, Dmitriy Baranov and Sarwa Gunawan, Wikitravel user(s) Felix505, Araichi and Roundtheworld, Anonymous user(s) of Wikitravel and others. City info data is from Wikipedia,  urls: –  http://www.wikipedia.com Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. See Terms of use for details. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization. Events data is from Eventful,  urls: –  www.eventful.com Weather data is from Norwegian Meteorological Institute and the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation yr.no,  urls: –  http://www.yr.no/place/Indonesia/Jakarta/Jakarta/ Currency data is from Xavier Finance Api,  urls: –  http://finance.xaviermedia.com/ Maps data is from Yahoo Local Maps, OpenStreetMap, Qype,  urls: –  http://maps.yahoo.com –  http://www.openstreetmap.org –  http://www.qype.com

 

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Travel Guide | Jakarta, Indonesia