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PITBULL’S HISTORY AND WHY THEY DON'T GET ADOPTED. Did you know every year 1.2 million dogs are put to sleep and 40% of them are pit bulls? Many people see them as dangerous due to their bad history and rap that they were given, which is why many Pitbulls do not get adopted and looked at the same as other dogs. Pitbull roots are taken back to Ireland and England. Pitbulls were used for many things, especially for the farmers. People did bull baiting and dog fighting for their satisfaction. They were seen to be violent to society. When bull baiting and dog fighting fell out it caused many Pitbulls to get a bad history that was left behind. “However​, ​one personality trait of the Pitbull breed is determination. Whatever Pitbulls do, they do it with a great deal of enthusiasm​,​”​ said Robin Rock from myths and facts about Pitbulls. There are different breeds that specialize in these three different skills. In the late 19th and 20th century, Pitbull Apologia, also known as the “nanny dog” was used to protect the family but mainly to protect the farmer’s kid's while the Americans worked in the fields. This breed was specialized to protect the family they were known to. Later on, the specialty's on this breed came to an end because, experts would say that this breed was very friendly to strangers, given the fact that they were nanny dogs. A dog that is supposed to protect from strangers. The blue American Pitbull terrier also known as a catch dog used their scent to catch animals like cattle and hogs. Also, to drive livestock. Catch dogs would let their trainer/handler know when they would catch these animals by howling. Many people would use this breed for hunting bigger animals because of the excellent scent of smell. In the early 1800s in England, bulldogs and terriers were crossbred and were forced to attack bulls and bears due to the satisfaction of the people. This was called bull baiting. It was then outlawed in 1835, following this law, dogfighting was developed by a group of both rich and poor people. Gambling on Pit bulls on which dog would beat the other dog, possibly until the other was dead. Later on, in the early 1840s dogfighting arrived in the United States, but it wasn't such a success. It wasn't until 1976 that it became illegal in all states. 40% out of 1.2 million sheltered dogs are Pitbulls being put down because no one wants to adopt such a “vicious and dangerous” dog. “In reality, the Pit bull is just as capable of being a loyal best friend to mankind as any other breed, just like those breeds, a Pitbull needs guidance and training in order to become a man's best friend and not the beast it is often portrayed as,” said Bully Max from the “Most Feared And Misunderstood Dog Breed.”Now because of the old background history that was left for them, people would rather leave them in a shelter to get put down.

Savannah perez feature article rough draft  
Savannah perez feature article rough draft  
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