Issuu on Google+

RECENT MEDIA COVERAGE Q4 2011

Prepared by:


Best Gear of 2011

We reviewed a lot of great gear in this past year. Of all the things we tried and used hiking, camping, running, skiing and fishing, there were some definite standouts. All of the products on our Best Gear of 2011 list met GearGuide’s criteria for delivering value, performance and elegance in design. Without further ado, here’s GearGuide’s Best Gear of 2011:

Footwear:


Approach Shoe – La Sportiva Boulder X Sticky, tough wearing, comfortable – and boasting an unconventional La Sportiva lacing system – the Boulder X is an outstanding approach shoe. See review.

Multisport Shoe – Scarpa Epic We don’t usually use the word sleek when commenting about outdoor footwear, but that is what the Scapa Epic is. Frankly, it looks too sleek and fashionable to deliver the the required performance. But the Scarpa Epic does. See review

Minimal Running Shoe – Saucony Mirage With the Mirage, Saucony delivered a great lightweight trainer. It provides just enough cushion and control to make those used to a more traditional shoe feel right at home while still easing into the minimalist movement. See review. Thanks for reading GearGuide. And thanks for commenting, following, liking and otherwise supporting us during the past year.


For sale are Saucony Jazz Originals. A fairly rare shoe that can be used for anything, really: Running, sports, daily wear, etc. these are a sz 10 and a vnds; They have only been worn once lightly. Meet ups in the san gabriel and surrounding areas. OFFER UP!


Saucony ProGrid Guide 5 Published by MaderFist on Today, 03:03 AM

There are 3 basic keys to becoming a better athlete: proper nutrition, appropriate shoes, and constant motivation. Keeping your mind and body healthy will allow you to train more consistently and effectively, which makes you better. These weekly reviews aim to educate readers on product available to fulfill their key requirements.

Saucony ProGrid Guide 5 Last year Saucony looked at their overwhelming sucess with the Kinvara and decided to take a hard line on revolutionizing American running. Perhaps it was more a return to our roots rather


than a revolution, but the Guide 5 represents a major step toward more efficient and balanced running in the everyday training shoe. A commitment was made to reduce the heel-to-toe drop from 12mm to 8mm. The result is a shoe that encourages you to run with a mid-foot gait.

For the typical minimal running enthusiast you'll question "why should I run mid-foot? fore-foot striking is the best method." ...Not exactly. The human body is ill-prepared to handle the hard shock of landing on the heel, nor is it suited to handle the elastic loading of a true fore-foot strike. The most biomechanically efficient footstrike is mid-foot which reduces impact and protects the calves and achilles from elastic strain. This is where the 8mm drop of the Guide excells in design. The reduced drop makes you a little less likely to have the heel striking first, while giving you enough cushioning to protect your legs and feet. The mid-foot balance encourages you to engage your calves and foot muscles to stabalize and rebound while the foot is on the ground. This flexes the achilles is a pre-strained state instead of letting it snap tight like a bungie cord.

The result is more efficient running, which means faster training and reduced risk of injury from overtraining. Another plus, the sole is lighter and the mesh on the upper is opened up meaning the shoe is lighter in wieght and feel compared to its earlier models. A new compound in the cushioning means it won't feel pillowy soft like it used to but as you start putting weight down you feel the ProGrid engage and the cushioning is all there.

Of course the moderate medial posting has been retained so this shoe still provides the stability it always had. 85% of runners NEED some stability - maybe not a lot, but some. This shoe is in that middle-ground and could be a great choice for you. So go to your local specialty-running store and try it on. Jog around in it a little, then buy it because this is going to be a great training shoe for 2012.

*All past reviews are archived in my blog history. *The opinions expressed in my reviews are scientifically and pragmatically founded, but are solely my own and should not be taken as the position of the manufacturers, authors, or representatives of products/prints/companies reviewed by me


Bodega x Saucony 2012 Spring Elite Master Control 1 week ago ⋅ Style ⋅ by Chris Danforth ⋅ 1842 Views

New from Saucony and American boutique Bodega is this Spring Elite Master Control sneaker for 2012. Sharing not only common roots in Massachusetts but also an affinity for individualism, these two entities have teamed up on a low top shoe boasting a vividly colored exterior accepted by burgundy, blue and orange panels in combination with high quality suede. A gum sole with traction and perforated toe suitably accent this sneaker and add an athletic-minded sensibility. Expect a February release for this item.


Wednesday, December 21, 2011 Saucony Cortana Running Shoe Review

Saucony has done an excellent job diversifying their shoe offerings over the past year, filling out both the zero drop and 4mm drop niches. I’ve previously reviewed the Hattori, Kinvara, Mirage, Fastwitch 5, and Peregrine – that leaves the Saucony Cortana as the lone shoe among Saucony’s mainstream, lowdrop running offerings that I have yet to review. Truth be told, I’ve had the Cortana’s for quite some time, so this review is long overdue. The main reason, and I’ll openly admit this at the outset, is that the Cortana is simply a bit too much shoe for my taste. As always, recognize that this is simply my opinion based on my own personal running tastes, and that’s not to say that this shoe might not work for you (*disclosure: this shoe was a media sample provided to me free of charge by the manufacturer).


Saucony describes the Cortana as a shoe that “isn‘t much for tradeoffs between soft and responsive….Built with just a touch of guidance, full-length PowerGrid™ technology of the Cortana provides superior cushioning and the 4mm heel-to-toe offset provides a super-responsive, close-to-theroad ride.” When reading this description, the two words that in my opinion best describe the Cortana are “soft” and “cushioning.” I’m normally not one to complain about a shoe being a bit on the soft side – after all, I’m a long-time fan of the Saucony Kinvara and have run my two most recent marathons in that shoe. However, the Cortana feels just a bit too plush for me. Some of the sense of cushiness that comes with this shoe can be attributed to the memory foam insole – I am not a fan at all of a mushy insole like this. It may make the shoe feel amazingly comfortable for a try-on test in a shoe store, but it robs my feet of any sense of ground feel out on the road. Granted, it’s easy enough to just rip out the insole and replace it with one from another shoe, but since I’m reviewing the shoe as it’s sold, it’s worth noting my feelings about this. Actually, it’s quite possible to even just run in the shoe without any insole as there is a thin, soft layer of foam just below it. The memory foam insole on top of another layer of foam is just too much cushion for me.

On the positive side, with a stack height of 23mm in the heel and 19mm in the forefoot, the Cortana is middle-of-the road in terms of sole thickness, and the 4mm differential between heel and forefoot thickness falls right in my preferred zone for longer runs. Furthermore, the ample outsole should make this shoe plenty durable for folks who tend to grind up the sole of a shoe like the Kinvara quickly. Truth


be told, the sole itself is actually pretty nice, and would work well for someone needing a high-mileage trainer. My other main issue with the Cortana is the substantial upper. Again, it’s not that the upper is poorly designed or problematic, it’s just that I tend to like shoe uppers to only provide what is absolutely necessary – mainly to just keep my foot attached to the sole and to keep junk out. The upper of the Cortana is much more structured than most of my other shoes, particularly in the rear portion around the heel. There is a fairly stiff heel counter on the rear of the shoe, and plastic overlays cover the sides below the ankle. All of this material ads weight to the shoe, and at just under 11oz in a size 10 they are among the heaviest shoes I have run in in quite some time. In terms of fit, I have no major complaints. The fit is typical Saucony, very similar to the Kinvara, Mirage and so on. It’s by no means roomy, but there is enough space for my foot that the fit has never bothered me on the run.

On a final note, the MSRP for the Saucony Cortana is $145, though it can be found for less than that at some on-line retailers. This is a pretty hefty price tag when the Kinvara can often be found for half that price. The question would be whether the Cortana offers double the durability of the Kinvara, which seems like a realistic possibility given the more extensive outsole on the Cortana. Nonetheless, $145 is a pretty steep price to pay for a running shoe unless you’re really sure that it’s the right shoe for you. Summary The Saucony Cortana is clearly a shoe designed to appeal to the runner who likes all of the cushy bells and whistles in a running shoe, and is willing to pay for it. For me, the cush is a bit too much, and I’d rather pay less for less shoe (e.g., the Mirage or the Kinvara among Saucony’s offerings). Granted, the Cortana may turn out to be a bit more durable than the Kinvara, but I don’t suspect it will be that much


of an improvement over the Mirage – the latter has an MSRP of $100 so it’s still considerably cheaper. If you like a plush shoe with a fairly substantial and supportive upper, then the Cortana would probably serve you just fine, it’s just not the right shoe for me. The Saucony Cortana is available for sale at Running Warehouse.


Back in May we previewed two colorways in the Saucony Elite Master Control, which were actually a collaboration with Boston-based boutique Bodega. Now we’re learning that the two have teamed up once again to craft another version of the shoe. For this go round, the shoe features a suede construction that blends blue, red and orange hues, along with minimal hints of grey. Finishing off the look is a white midsole and gum rubber outsole. Look for these to drop in February.


Saucony PowerGrid Cortana Main Review Saucony PowerGrid Cortana has structured cushioning. It is a training shoe with 4mm of drop which is light and responsive with a bit of support. It was Runner’s World Best Debut 2011.


2011 Holiday Gift Guide for Runners By the Editors of Active.com • Active.com

Whether you want to add to your wishlist or need help crossing some runners off your list, this holiday gift guide for runners can help you hit the shops and sites with confidence. Use these gift ideas to make your list, check it twice, and find the perfect presents for the runners in your life.

Shoes Since runners are advised to kick their kicks every 300 to 500 miles, a new pair of running shoes can go a long way (literally) and might be just what your runner needs. Running styles and fits will vary, so it's important to know what to look for. Some runners will need a more supportive shoe while others may want to go more minimalist. Saucony's ProGrid Guide 5 ($100) and the Adidas adiPURE Trainers ($90) are just a couple of the newest lightweight shoes on the market.


Bodega x Saucony Elite Master Control By Jesse Sosa | Dec 19, 2011 | 12:26 pm | Permalink

Continuing their partnership with Saucony, Boston-based sneaker shop Bodega hooks us up with fresh colorups of the classic Master Control. Having already worked with this model earlier this year, Bodega saw it fit to bring the model back for another run. Unlike its previous collab with Saucony using the Master Control, Bodega opted to take a no-holds barred route by dressing the runner in a multi-colored premium suede upper and presenting it on a smooth gum outsole. Expect these to hit select retailers in Feburary. [via Freshngood]


Bodega x Saucony Master Control – Spring 2012 xxCoreyxx | December 20, 2011 | Comments (0)

Bodega is demonstrating strength in numbers with their new collection from Saucony. This time coming with the lesser known Master Control model, the Massachusetts boutique revitalizes the 90′s running shoe to a point of popular demand. Top quality multi-color suede blocking hits the upper with a perforated toe and gum sole to add to the Master Control’s new found appeal. The Spring 2012 Elite Collection release is geared for February so stay tuned for more updates.


Saucony 2012 Spring GRID 9000 Elite 2 weeks ago ⋅ Style ⋅ by Alex Maeland ⋅ 453 Views

As the Saucony Elite collection continue its stateside expansion, the latest Bodega x Saucony GRID 9000 Elite for Spring 2012 sees its first preview through Crooked Tongues. The Bostonbased boutique’s latest iteration of the ’90s silhouette provides the pair with a tonal suede block treatment throughout its heavily paneled upper – a colorway choice that is vaguely reminiscent of the shop’s various past Nike and Reebok collaborations. Amidst the mostly tan composition, subtle hints of blue are seen throughout with a charcoal Huarache-esque neoprene sock liner. Premium materials, a well orchestrated color palette, and a classic silhouette make this February 2012 drop one to mark your calendars for.


INSIDE: Quiksilver has profit on tax benefit, sees momentum sustained in 2012. John Horan’s Deep Intelligence looks into the crystal ball to see ahead to next year.

VOLUME 3, NUMBER 49 DECEMBER 19, 2011

Adidas reaffirms outlook for 2012, with momentum in U.S., Russia and China. Holiday shopping: seems to be coming in late as NRF revises forecast upward. Under Armour sets deal to use NBA players in uniforms. Lifestyle Footwear market shows strong growth in 2011. Miscellaneous Tariff Bill may come up early next year. Import forecast is revised downward on slow economic recovery. Judy Spies: Columbia. Athlete’s Corner  Big 5 Sporting Goods  Boot Barn  BSN Sports  REI  Zappos  Callaway Golf  Lafuma Group  Poler Stuff  Rossignol  Sherbrook  Soles4Souls  Warnaco  Adams Golf  Adidas America  Brooks Sports  Icon Health & Fitness  Nike  Surefire. Obituary: Rose Huff. In September, Saucony signed New York Giants linebacker and recent cancer survivor Mark Herzlich to a multiyear endorsement deal. As part of the agreement, he is acting as a Saucony spokesperson and is supporting the brand’s “Find Your Strong” marketing campaign that encourages consumers to find their personal “strong” through running. To learn more about Herzlich’s inspirational story and to see what Saucony has in store for Fall 2012, visit the e-vent department. Photo by Matt Caputo, courtesy of Saucony, Inc.

INDUSTRY NEWS AND ANALYSIS FOR RETAILERS From the Editorial Team of Sporting Goods Intelligence


Bodega x Saucony GRID 9000 Elite Saucony and Bodega certainly have a synergy, and whether it’s based on shared Massachusetts roots or not, every collaboration that sneaker fans get from these two has cohesive appeal, whether from a strong theme influence, or just unique color schemes matched to construction blends that speak to understated quality. Saucony fans have had a wealth of Bodega collaborations to choose from over the past year, with the release of a Master Control collection, and a Spring 2011 collection featuring the Jazz 91 and the Shadow 6000. Now the Boston-based boutique has teamed up with Saucony on a release of the GRID 9000 Elite – a shoe that brings classic Saucony running construction together with an ACG-like modular panel construction. A relatively dialed-back color palette is well balanced by a mix of texture and textiles, with emphasis on a premium suede upper, a neoprene sockliner, and a gum brown sole. Truly solid, and an item for both collaboration connoisseurs and those looking for a Saucony that has a bit of an outdoorsy throwback aesthetic. The shoe will be available February 2012; check back for details, and check out images after the jump. via: Crooked Tongues.


Saucony Shadow 90

Saucony is a nice sneaker to switch up from your normal collection, and with its neutral upper with bright accents the Shadow is a good look. The upper is equipped with durable materials made up of a mix of mesh, nylon, and suede. Multiple colorways are available now with plenty of sizes to choose from. Sale price: $51.99 Free Shipping! (Reg. price: $65) Available internationally? Yes


Bodega x Saucony GRID 9000 Elite December 14, 2011 | Saucony and Bodega are back at it and it seems that the boutique really knows their way around the brand’s catalog. This time they employ the Saucony GRID 9000 Elite under their agenda in a brown based suede upper with licks of blue adding a bit of color. A nylon toe box and funky texturized heel really help this one to stand out in the mix successfully as a shoe to watch in 2012. Bodega x Saucony GRID 9000 Elite February 2012


Saucony Grid 9000

December 13th, 2011 - Written by J.Slade

Looking forward to February 2012, Crooked Tongues gives us a glimpse at a runner from the early 90s, the Saucony Grid 9000. Graced with a mostly tonal brown suede upper, the model is set with premium materials to help further the silhouettes aesthetic. Borrowing a page from the Nike Huarache, the model features a black nylon-styled sock liner that compliments the black stripe over the ankle. Touches of blue highlight different areas of the shoe, leaving the gum bottom to date the model, but also give it just the right amount of nostalgia. A runner then and a runner now, look for this Saucony Grid 9000 to hit retail in February 2012.


FN FEATURES ATHLETIC SKETCH PREVIEW

Shades of Fall SKETCH: COURTESY OF BRAND

Clean lines, bold colors and lower profiles top the list of traits designers drew up for fall ’12. Here, the latest version of SAUCONY’s minimal Kinvara running style takes shape.

DECEMBER 12, 2011 |

)13LQGG



| 11

30


STARTING LINES What’s next for athletic? Direct from the designers, Footwear News presents fall ’12 sketches and renderings of upcoming looks. High on technology and style, these bold designs forecast big fashion for fall. BY JENNIFER ERNST BEAUDRY

CL Gilberto CLAE

I wanted something that was a little more sporty but that still had a casual feel to it. The suede toe, that has to do with me playing soccer with my kids on a Sunday.” FILA Coastal

Sung Choi, founder & creative di

This shoe expands the Skele-Toes line for river activities, with drainage and a sidewall wrap that’s a little more aggressive.” Mark Eggert, director of footwear design

PF FLYERS Center Hi Knit

The concept for the collection was ‘Home Alone,’ a classic winter American movie, a movie people can connect with.” James Reed, footwear designer

12 |

| DECEMBER 12, 2011

)13LQGG



30


S

RE

)13LQGG



30


STARTING LINES

ADIDAS Adipure Trainer 360

In this shoe, we have a bootie that goes all the way through the shoe and is soft and flexible. There are 360 degrees of movement within the shoe, even down to the outsole.� Rob Lee, creative director

)13LQGG



30


ASICS Gel-Lyte33

The new F.A.S.T. 6-millimeter drop from heel to forefoot is similar to our racing flats, which is what encourages the athlete to run more on the mid- to forefoot and to run fast.” Brice Newton, product marketing manager for running footwear

K-SWISS Vertical Tubes Calimari

What we are doing is creating a way to expand the Tubes story. Instead of the tubes running horizontally, we created vertical tubes. When you have the shoe on, it’s a super-flexible product from heel to toe.” Mark Sheehan, director of performance footwear

BROOKS Glycerin 10

The [screen-printed] detail [on the forefoot] was born from a graphic on a road bike wheel.” Indrajith Gunasekara, footwear designer

DECEMBER 12, 2011 |

)13LQGG



| 15

30


INSIDER ON DEADLINE Ă— FN Spy + Top Stories

All About Eve the ball drop in Times Square. This year we end

but it also has a dose of shoe power. Making a

up taking Sam [played by Duhamel] with us because his car broke down. It made me giggle

cameo in the film is Marchez Vous YS designer

that the three [actors] who play my kids were

Yeardley Smith, alongside a slew of actors such

[so] excited to meet ‘Lisa Simpson.’ She might

as Sarah Jessica Parker, Zac Efron and Jessica

have been 8 years old for the past 23 years, but [Lisa] is a force to be reckoned with.�

Biel. Here, the voice of Lisa Simpson sounds off

Any actors you were excited to work with?

on her time filming with

“Garry Marshall is a wonderful director and part

the A-listers.

of his gift is efficiency, so I was only on set for

What was a standout

two days. But I was dying to meet Bon Jovi, Robert De Niro, Sofia Vergara, Halle Berry,

moment for you during

Hilary Swank, Michelle Pfeiffer ... OK, pretty

filming?

much everyone else who’s in the movie, but

“All my [scenes] were with Josh

not in my scene.�

Duhamel and he’s as dreamy as you hope he is.�

Did you wear your Marchez Vous YS shoes in the scenes?

How would you describe your char-

“Sadly, no. But I like to think it’s only because

acter in the movie? “I play Maude, wife of Pastor Edwin (Sean O’Bryan). We have three kids and every year we drive the

we didn’t have inventory yet when I [filmed] Yeardley Smith

in February. However if we had the shoes, I do believe Maude would’ve rocked a pair of Marchez Vous Blue Mylene’s with her wooly

RV down to Manhattan to watch

Heel Thing

tights and corduroy skirt.�

gown from scratch, but luckily, engaged Vena Cava co-designer Lisa Maycock has her own design studio. “I have an idea in mind but haven’t begun the design yet,� she said of the gown for her June wedding to Jeff Halmos (half of another design duo, Shipley + Halmos) in Tivoli, N.Y. As for the shoes, Maycock is looking elsewhere. “I’ll probably buy those,� she said, adding that she has a particular style in mind for that, too. “I love the transparent, barely there effect. In high school I bought these clear plastic heels at a thrift store and I’m kind of loving that look again.� So will the couple go into business together after they walk down the aisle? “We’ll see about that,� she said. — With contributions from Gerald Halmos and Flores and Regina Maycock Smith Popp

FN Spy

Although she’s well along in her pregnancy, Jessica Simpson isn’t trading in her stilettos anytime soon. “I’m actually very uncomfortable in flats,� the soon-to-be-mom told Spy at a recent event at Dylan’s Candy Bar in New York, where she appeared with sister Ashlee Simpson. “Most of the time I’m in heels because they feel a lot better on my feet.� So will the songstress-turneddesigner be rushing Jessica around in heels during Simpson the holidays? Quite the opposite, actually. “I’m going to relax and spend a lot of time with the family,� she said. “This is my last Christmas without a little kid running around.�

Blushing Bride Call it a fairy tale wedding. Not every woman gets to design her wedding

GOT TIPS FOR FN SPY? Email kristen_henning@condenast.com 8|

BY JENNIFER ERNST BEAUDRY

NEW YORK — Saucony is taking a major stand on minimalism. Inspired by its success in the minimal and ultra-lightweight running categories, the brand has introduced new versions of two key styles: the Triumph and Guide. And next month, Saucony will release an update of its Hurricane shoe. All the styles feature new midsole/outsole configurations that reduce the traditional 12-millimeter heel-to-toe drop to 8 millimeters. The move makes Saucony one of the first major running brands to apply minimalist tenants to its mainline product. Despite all the buzz around the barefoot concept, most vendors have confined their minimal shoes to a dedicated category. And Saucony President Richie Woodworth acknowledges there’s risk involved. “The world went off its axis around toning. We can’t let the world go off its axis in lightweight running,� he said. “There has to be real authenticity and real credibility in the shoes you bring to market. There has to be a reason and a rationale that supports that technology.� The products are part of Saucony’s push to take share in a running market that has seen big changes in the rise of minimalism. While overall sales have grown for the brand — by 2010, it had doubled its 2006 business — the fastest-growing category has been lightweight and minimal. In a third-quarter earnings call, parent company Collective Brands Inc. reported Saucony had taken the No. 1 position in lightweight and minimal sales for the running specialty channel — a significant upgrade to the brand’s overall position in independent stores. And that makes the launches significant, Woodworth said. While stripped-down styles such as the Kinvara and the Hattori target efficient runners, the new midsole (which actually adds some padding

Richie Woodworth

under the forefoot) is meant for runners who want to transition to a forefoot or midfoot strike. And, he added, the brand’s research and run-test feedback suggest that the 8-millimeter height is more comfortable even for runners who plan to maintain their traditional gait, letting Saucony reach more mainstream audiences. Retailers said the brand should benefit from that plan. “I’m very excited about the new focus,� said Matt Lucas, CEO of the Dallas-based Luke’s Locker running specialty chain. The reception to the new models has been “very positive,� he said, though time will tell if the changes will be enough to boost the brand’s market position, which is now fifth or sixth in sales. Of course, there’s more evolving at Saucony than just product. In June, Collective Brands announced that CEO Matt Rubel had left the company and that the board would undertake a strategic review of the business as a whole. In the subsequent months, speculation has focused on a potential sale of Collective’s high-performing assets, Saucony among them. Woodworth said the company is definitely expecting a shakeup. “Clearly, they’re doing a strategic review and something’s going to change. But what that is, we don’t know,� he said. “Saucony has been through this a couple of times and the employees are veterans at it, so it doesn’t ruffle their feathers too much. We can keep our focus, which is our job.�

PHOTOS: SMITH: GETTY IMAGES; POSTER: COURTESY OF NEW LINE CINEMA; SIMPSON: JOHN AQUINO; HALMOS/MAYCOCK: COURTESY OF DESIGNER; WOODWORTH: MEGHAN JONES COLANGELO

Let the countdown to 2012 begin. The movie “New Year’s Eve� may have a star-studded cast,

Saucony Gets Low, Aims High

| DECEMBER 12, 2011

)13LQGG



30


Saucony Epic Run Jacket and Protection Glove Monday, December 12, 2011

As fall approaches I need to adjust to running in colder temperatures and with the time change, earlier darkness. I tend to run residential neighborhoods but my runs require frequent street crossings near busy roads. While I exercise caution I still carry a good bit of fear that I will end up sweaty road kill. Recently I received the Saucony Epic Run Jacket and Protection Glove (Disclaimer: These were provided as review samples by the manufacturer). I have included a lovely picture of my daughter Anna and I at a recent Turkey Trot with me wearing the jacket. The color is Saucony’s ViziPro which is incredibly bright in daylight but practically glow in the dark at night. The jacket and gloves also come with small clip on led lights, one for the right shoulder of the jacket the other for the top of the right glove. These charge through USB connections; very cool feature. I now feel much more visible and safer in my night runs. The Saucony Epic Run Jacket is very light but provides a nice level of wind break and warmth. I have worn it as a third layer in 30 degree temps and as a second layer in 40 degree temps. In both cases I was comfortably warm without a lot of sweat buildup. The jacket has two side zip pockets and one chest pocket designed for electronics. The waist has pulls in the pockets to draw in the bottom of the jacket. The Saucony Protection Glove provides similar warmth and while they were a bit sweaty after awhile I felt they retained their ability to provide warmth. They are extremely light and thin and allow for some tactile ability, although I did remove them to get in and around my pack. All and all I really like the Saucony Epic Run Jacket and Protection Glove. The material could not be brighter and both provide more visibility. And the level of warmth and comfort is


wonderful. And, bottom line, I feel very cool in them and therefore will wear them frequently. Highly recommended! Posted by Chris Johnson


 6DXFRQ\ VSRQVRUHG D VHPLQDU RQ 1HZ $QJOHV RQ 5XQQLQJ WKDW IHDWXUHG OHJHQGDU\ FRDFK 'U -DFN 'DQLHOV  (GGLH -RKQVRQ RI$ 6QDLOŇ‹V 3DFH  -HII -RKQVRQ 1LNHŇ‹V VHFRQG HYHU HPSOR\HH PDNHV WKH +DOO RI )DPH  *HWWLQJ LQ WKH PRRG DW %DOHJDŇ‹V)HDWKHUZHLJKWSDUW\0DUN5RXVH5XQQHUV+LJKŇŠ17UL &KULV*ULIĂ€Q)RRWEDODQFH/XNH0DFGRQDOG$HURELFV)LUVWDQG $O&DQWOD\5XQQHUŇ‹V&KRLFH$QGUHZ:KHDWLQJZKRLQGXFWHG -HII -RKQVRQ RI 1LNH LQWR WKH +DOO RI )DPH  -RKQ DQG 6XH *DOODJKHUDW7KH3XPD6RFLDO&OXE-D\QH$VSDQ$5XQQHUŇ‹V6RXO  7KH &UHZ IURP 6KXŇ‹V  7KRP %XUOHVRQ RI $WKOHWLF $QQH[ DWKLVLQGXFWLRQWRWKH+DOORI)DPH/LVD/DX]RQZLWK:DON 5XQ  0RUH &DQDGD ZLQV DQ L3DG IURP &DURO$PUDQL RI %DOHJD 5DQG\6WHSVWUHWFKHVDW7KH,QGLH.

7

8

Number 1 choice in timers and pedometers. Your customers rely on your expertise. With Robic, you can offer them the largest selection of the most reliable timers and pedometers available. Most popular brand among independent running stores No mass merchants or direct sales





25 years supplying the best products 99.96% reliability rating Attention-grabbing packaging Easy, reliable fulďŹ llment and support





Sold ONLY through leading specialized merchants like you. www.robictimers.com 1.800.336.6756



ÂŽ

TIMERS AND PEDOMETERS

For Champions at Every Level


The List: Gifts from $100 to $300

Johnny Andrews This Saucony running top has a pocket for your iPod, an LED light for running in the dark and DryLete fabric to keep you warm and dry ($74.99). Add the Saucony glove-mittens with rechargeable LEDs ($39.99) at Fleet Feet, 278 THF Boulevard in Chesterfield, 504 Old Smizer Mill Road in Fenton and 3813 Mexico Road in St. Charles. 1. FULLY LOADED: This Saucony running top has a pocket for your iPod, an LED light for running in the dark and DryLete fabric to keep you warm and dry ($74.99). Add the Saucony glove-mittens with rechargeable LEDs ($39.99) at Fleet Feet, 278 THF Boulevard in Chesterfield, 504 Old Smizer Mill Road in Fenton and 3813 Mexico Road in St. Charles. 2. COMPLETE SET: Find handmade wool accessories by Julie Sindon ($50 each, hat and scarf) and by other local and national artists in silk, cotton, cashmere and wool at Craft Alliance Gallery, 6640 Delmar Boulevard. 3. WAKE UP: The USB Playback Wake-up Light/Alarm Plus uses light and sound to wake you ($169.99) at Amazon.com.


4. WATCH TV ANYWHERE: Hauppauge's new "Broadway" allows users to watch live TV on the iPhone, iPad, Android, PC and Mac. It is compatible with cable and satellite TV ($199) at hauppauge.com and amazon.com. 5. LIFE OF THE PARTY: This holiday season, be the hostess with the mostess with this contemporary, expandable Rocket bar. It has a metal frame, a tempered frosted glass top and a tinted plastic front ($250) at Good Works, 6323 Delmar Boulevard. 6. HARD COVER: The Stacked Books Cabinet can be used as an end table and looks great with traditional or modern pieces ($129.99) at Slumberland Furniture, 4265 Rusty Road, and 8355 Veterans Memorial Parkway, O'Fallon, Mo. 7. SUN BLOCK: These sleek Wiley X Active Series sunglasses are perfect for outdoor activities where a snug fit is essential ($150) at Bass Pro Shops, 1365 South Fifth Street, St. Charles. 8. MENSWEAR TREND: This military-inspired women's jacket by Insight will add flair to any pair of pants, skirt or dress ($178.95) at Marta's Boutique, 9208 Clayton Road. 9. TRUE HORNS: This handcrafted metal canister topped with a cow horn makes a statement on a bar or counter ($216) at Joy Tribout Interior Design, 9719 Clayton Road in Ladue. 10. WEIGHING IN: Add a Southwest touch with these statues ($100 for the pair) at Giddyup Jane, 9670 Clayton Road in Ladue. 11. ALL ABOARD: This hand-painted Teamson Kids desk is perfect for your little Thomas the Train fan ($151.99) at kohls.com. 12. ALL EYES: Give your iPhone camera a boost with the Lens Dial's three lenses — wide angle, fisheye and telephoto — all in a slim aluminum jacket with two tripod mounts. To switch between lenses just rotate the disc ($249) at photojojo.com. 13. THROWBACK: The Riddell full-size "TK" suspension helmet features the two-bar facemasks as worn on-field during the '60s, '70s and '80s ($159.99) at riddell.com/fanshop. 14. TIGHT HOLD: The classic money clip is a twisted cable-inspired piece by David Yurman ($250) at Neiman Marcus, Plaza Frontenac. 15. TOOL FOR EVERYTHING: The Ridgid JobMax Corded Multi-Tool Kit offers 25 percent more power than other leading multitools and accepts all popular multitool accessories ($129) at Home Depot.


Scientists kick off debate over barefoot running 

December 9, 2011 10:50 am ET

By Kate Kelland, Health and Science Correspondent LONDON (Reuters) - Despite the cold and many other potential hazards, naked from the ankle down is the way Anna Toombs likes it, and she gets plenty of catcalls in the street as a result. The 35-year-old co-founder of the personal training company Barefoot Running UK says she's lost count of the times people yell "where are your shoes?" as she and partner David Robinson negotiate London's parks and pavements to indulge their passion and train their clients. "People give you a lot of weird looks," says Robinson. They are also getting a lot of inquiries. A surge of interest in "natural," or barefoot, training has seen runners around the world kick off their archsupporting, motion-controlling, heel-cushioning shoes and try to feel the ground beneath their feet. Top scientists -- from sports physicians to podiatrists to evolutionary biologists -- are jumping in too. At a recent sports science conference in London, hundreds of participants, many of them shod but a few daringly barefooted, flocked to a two-hour long discussion about the merits or otherwise of running without shoes. "It's a really polarized debate -- there are what you might call the barefoot evangelicals on one side and the aggressive anti-barefoots on the other," says Ross Tucker, an expert in exercise physiology at South Africa's University of Cape Town and a middle- and long-distance running coach. BORN TO RUN? The current barefoot trend has its roots in the book "Born to Run," by Christopher McDougall. In it, he tells of time spent with Mexico's Tarahumara tribe who can run huge distances barefoot, often very fast, apparently without suffering the injuries that plague many keen runners in the developed world.


The debate centers on whether running in shoes with cushioned heels and supportive structures changes the way people move so dramatically that it's more likely to cause injuries. Proponents of barefoot running say the natural way is more likely to prompt a runner to land on the padded and springy part of the foot, toward the front, rather than strike the ground with the heel as many shod runners do. In a study published in the scientific journal Nature last year, Daniel Lieberman, an evolutionary biology professor at Harvard University, sought to find out how our ancestors, who ran and hunted for millions of years in bare feet or simple moccasins, coped with the impact of the foot hitting the ground. Lieberman and colleagues from Britain and Kenya studied runners who had always run barefoot, those who had always worn shoes and runners who had abandoned shoes. They found that barefoot endurance runners often land on the fore-foot before bringing down the heel, while shod runners mostly rear-foot strike, prompted by the raised and cushioned heels of modern running shoes. IMPACT In a series of analyses, they found that even on hard surfaces, barefoot runners who fore-foot strike generate smaller "collision forces" -- less impact -- than rear-foot strikers in shoes. Barefoot runners also had a springier step and used their calf and foot muscles more efficiently. Lieberman, who spoke at the conference after an early-morning barefoot run along the banks of London's Thames, is keen to stress that the scientific evidence on whether barefoot running is better in terms of injuries is still very unclear. "A lot of people are arguing on the basis of passion, anecdote, emotion or financial gain -- but what's quite true is there are no good data saying whether it's better for you or worse for you," he said. Having said that, he has already voted with his feet. As has fellow biology professor Daniel Howell, who teaches human anatomy and physiology at Liberty University in the United States. Howell, dubbed the "Barefoot Professor" by his students after he began living his life 95 percent shoefree, admits he's an extremist. He's spent almost all of the past six years in bare feet, he's run thousands of miles in all weathers and across many terrains without footwear, and he refers to shoes rather suspiciously as "devices." "Barefoot is the natural condition. It's the most natural way to be," he told the conference. "Walking and running are extremely complicated from a biomechanical perspective ... and if you add a device to your foot, it alters it." "When you put on a device, it changes the way you stand, the way you walk and the way you run. Those changes are unnatural, and generally negative."


SHOES, OR DEVICES? While it's true that almost all modern athletes use running shoes in international sporting competitions, a few barefooters have been trailblazers for the cause. Back in 1960 Ethiopia's Abebe Bikila, one of the world's greatest Olympic marathon runners, won the first of his consecutive gold medals without shoes, covering the 26.2 miles in 2 hours, 15 minutes and 17 seconds. And in 1984, South African barefoot runner Zola Budd set a track world record when she ran 5,000 meters in 15 minutes and 1.83 seconds. Simon Bartold, a sports podiatrist and international research consultant for the sports brand Asics, says most athletes, amateur or otherwise, should stick to wearing shoes. "I'd come down pretty heavily in favor of footwear," he said. "It does offer some real protection and some real performance advantages over barefoot." Still, Asics and other big running shoe brands like Nike, New Balance and Saucony see no reason to be excluded from this new and potentially lucrative form of the sport just because it's about running in bare feet. A nifty rebranding of the trend to "natural" or "minimalist" running has opened up a potential new market in "barefoot running shoes" that promise to be the closest thing to wearing nothing at all. For Howell, even minimalist shoes are a step too far. "For most people, under most circumstances, most of the time, barefoot is the healthiest and most natural way to be," he said. Toombs, whose clients often come to her with injuries or illnesses that are restricting their movement, is concerned that scientific rows about the biomechanics of foot strikes, and efforts by sports brands to cash in, are robbing barefoot running of its best bits. Formerly an enthusiastic shod runner, she says training without shoes is partly about getting back to nature, but it's also about learning a better way to run, using the body's bounce and balance to improve form and reduce impact. "With barefoot running ... each time my foot strikes the ground, it lands slightly differently," she told Reuters. "In other words it's adjusting to what's underneath it." "I'm constantly scanning the terrain, dodging rougher areas and taking a much more meandering line, which works different sets of muscles. It's almost like dancing. But the moment I put shoes on, most of that sensitivity is gone."


Scientists kick off debate over barefoot Running Friday, December 09, 2011 9:40 a.m. EST

By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Despite the cold and many other potential hazards, naked from the ankle down is the way Anna Toombs likes it, and she gets plenty of catcalls in the street as a result. The 35-year-old co-founder of the personal training company Barefoot Running UK says she's lost count of the times people yell "where are your shoes?" as she and partner David Robinson negotiate London's parks and pavements to indulge their passion and train their clients. "People give you a lot of weird looks," says Robinson. They are also getting a lot of inquiries. A surge of interest in "natural," or barefoot, training has seen runners around the world kick off their arch-supporting, motion-controlling, heel-cushioning shoes and try to feel the ground beneath their feet. Top scientists - from sports physicians to podiatrists to evolutionary biologists - are jumping in too. At a recent sports science conference in London, hundreds of participants, many of them shod but a few daringly barefooted, flocked to a two-hour long discussion about the merits or otherwise of running without shoes. "It's a really polarized debate - there are what you might call the barefoot evangelicals on one side and the aggressive anti-barefoots on the other," says Ross Tucker, an expert in exercise physiology at South Africa's University of Cape Town and a middle- and long-distance running coach. BORN TO RUN? The current barefoot trend has its roots in the book "Born to Run," by Christopher McDougall. In it, he tells of time spent with Mexico's Tarahumara tribe who can run huge distances barefoot, often very fast, apparently without suffering the injuries that plague many keen runners in the developed world. The debate centers on whether running in shoes with cushioned heels and supportive structures changes the way people move so dramatically that it's more likely to cause injuries. Proponents of barefoot running say the natural way is more likely to prompt a runner to land on the padded and springy part of the foot, toward the front, rather than strike the ground with the heel as many shod runners do. In a study published in the scientific journal Nature last year, Daniel Lieberman, an evolutionary biology professor at Harvard University, sought to find out how our ancestors, who ran and hunted for millions of years in bare feet or simple moccasins, coped with the impact of the foot hitting the ground. Lieberman and colleagues from Britain and Kenya studied runners who had always run barefoot, those who had always worn shoes and runners who had abandoned shoes. They found that barefoot endurance runners often land on the fore-foot before bringing down the heel, while shod runners mostly rear-foot strike, prompted by the raised and cushioned heels of modern running shoes. IMPACT In a series of analyses, they found that even on hard surfaces, barefoot runners who fore-foot strike generate smaller "collision forces" - less impact - than rear-foot strikers in shoes. Barefoot runners also had a springier step and used their calf and foot muscles more efficiently. Lieberman, who spoke at the conference after an early-morning barefoot run along the banks of London's Thames, is keen to stress that the scientific evidence on whether barefoot running is


better in terms of injuries is still very unclear. "A lot of people are arguing on the basis of passion, anecdote, emotion or financial gain - but what's quite true is there are no good data saying whether it's better for you or worse for you," he said. Having said that, he has already voted with his feet. As has fellow biology professor Daniel Howell, who teaches human anatomy and physiology at Liberty University in the United States. Howell, dubbed the "Barefoot Professor" by his students after he began living his life 95 percent shoe-free, admits he's an extremist. He's spent almost all of the past six years in bare feet, he's run thousands of miles in all weathers and across many terrains without footwear, and he refers to shoes rather suspiciously as "devices." "Barefoot is the natural condition. It's the most natural way to be," he told the conference. "Walking and running are extremely complicated from a biomechanical perspective ... and if you add a device to your foot, it alters it." "When you put on a device, it changes the way you stand, the way you walk and the way you run. Those changes are unnatural, and generally negative." SHOES, OR DEVICES? While it's true that almost all modern athletes use running shoes in international sporting competitions, a few barefooters have been trailblazers for the cause. Back in 1960 Ethiopia's Abebe Bikila, one of the world's greatest Olympic marathon runners, won the first of his consecutive gold medals without shoes, covering the 26.2 miles in 2 hours, 15 minutes and 17 seconds. And in 1984, South African barefoot runner Zola Budd set a track world record when she ran 5,000 meters in 15 minutes and 1.83 seconds. Simon Bartold, a sports podiatrist and international research consultant for the sports brand Asics, says most athletes, amateur or otherwise, should stick to wearing shoes. "I'd come down pretty heavily in favor of footwear," he said. "It does offer some real protection and some real performance advantages over barefoot." Still, Asics and other big running shoe brands like Nike, New Balance and Saucony see no reason to be excluded from this new and potentially lucrative form of the sport just because it's about running in bare feet. A nifty rebranding of the trend to "natural" or "minimalist" running has opened up a potential new market in "barefoot running shoes" that promise to be the closest thing to wearing nothing at all. For Howell, even minimalist shoes are a step too far. "For most people, under most circumstances, most of the time, barefoot is the healthiest and most natural way to be," he said. Toombs, whose clients often come to her with injuries or illnesses that are restricting their movement, is concerned that scientific rows about the biomechanics of foot strikes, and efforts by sports brands to cash in, are robbing barefoot running of its best bits. Formerly an enthusiastic shod runner, she says training without shoes is partly about getting back to nature, but it's also about learning a better way to run, using the body's bounce and balance to improve form and reduce impact. "With barefoot running ... each time my foot strikes the ground, it lands slightly differently," she told Reuters. "In other words it's adjusting to what's underneath it." "I'm constantly scanning the terrain, dodging rougher areas and taking a much more meandering line, which works different sets of muscles. It's almost like dancing. But the moment I put shoes on, most of that sensitivity is gone."


Scientists kick off debate over barefoot Running Friday, December 09, 2011 9:40 a.m. EST

By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Despite the cold and many other potential hazards, naked from the ankle down is the way Anna Toombs likes it, and she gets plenty of catcalls in the street as a result. The 35-year-old co-founder of the personal training company Barefoot Running UK says she's lost count of the times people yell "where are your shoes?" as she and partner David Robinson negotiate London's parks and pavements to indulge their passion and train their clients. "People give you a lot of weird looks," says Robinson. They are also getting a lot of inquiries. A surge of interest in "natural," or barefoot, training has seen runners around the world kick off their arch-supporting, motion-controlling, heel-cushioning shoes and try to feel the ground beneath their feet. Top scientists - from sports physicians to podiatrists to evolutionary biologists - are jumping in too. At a recent sports science conference in London, hundreds of participants, many of them shod but a few daringly barefooted, flocked to a two-hour long discussion about the merits or otherwise of running without shoes. "It's a really polarized debate - there are what you might call the barefoot evangelicals on one side and the aggressive anti-barefoots on the other," says Ross Tucker, an expert in exercise physiology at South Africa's University of Cape Town and a middle- and long-distance running coach. BORN TO RUN? The current barefoot trend has its roots in the book "Born to Run," by Christopher McDougall. In it, he tells of time spent with Mexico's Tarahumara tribe who can run huge distances barefoot, often very fast, apparently without suffering the injuries that plague many keen runners in the developed world. The debate centers on whether running in shoes with cushioned heels and supportive structures changes the way people move so dramatically that it's more likely to cause injuries. Proponents of barefoot running say the natural way is more likely to prompt a runner to land on the padded and springy part of the foot, toward the front, rather than strike the ground with the heel as many shod runners do. In a study published in the scientific journal Nature last year, Daniel Lieberman, an evolutionary biology professor at Harvard University, sought to find out how our ancestors, who ran and hunted for millions of years in bare feet or simple moccasins, coped with the impact of the foot hitting the ground. Lieberman and colleagues from Britain and Kenya studied runners who had always run barefoot, those who had always worn shoes and runners who had abandoned shoes. They found that barefoot endurance runners often land on the fore-foot before bringing down the heel, while shod runners mostly rear-foot strike, prompted by the raised and cushioned heels of modern running shoes. IMPACT In a series of analyses, they found that even on hard surfaces, barefoot runners who fore-foot strike generate smaller "collision forces" - less impact - than rear-foot strikers in shoes. Barefoot runners also had a springier step and used their calf and foot muscles more efficiently. Lieberman, who spoke at the conference after an early-morning barefoot run along the banks of


London's Thames, is keen to stress that the scientific evidence on whether barefoot running is better in terms of injuries is still very unclear. "A lot of people are arguing on the basis of passion, anecdote, emotion or financial gain - but what's quite true is there are no good data saying whether it's better for you or worse for you," he said. Having said that, he has already voted with his feet. As has fellow biology professor Daniel Howell, who teaches human anatomy and physiology at Liberty University in the United States. Howell, dubbed the "Barefoot Professor" by his students after he began living his life 95 percent shoe-free, admits he's an extremist. He's spent almost all of the past six years in bare feet, he's run thousands of miles in all weathers and across many terrains without footwear, and he refers to shoes rather suspiciously as "devices." "Barefoot is the natural condition. It's the most natural way to be," he told the conference. "Walking and running are extremely complicated from a biomechanical perspective ... and if you add a device to your foot, it alters it." "When you put on a device, it changes the way you stand, the way you walk and the way you run. Those changes are unnatural, and generally negative." SHOES, OR DEVICES? While it's true that almost all modern athletes use running shoes in international sporting competitions, a few barefooters have been trailblazers for the cause. Back in 1960 Ethiopia's Abebe Bikila, one of the world's greatest Olympic marathon runners, won the first of his consecutive gold medals without shoes, covering the 26.2 miles in 2 hours, 15 minutes and 17 seconds. And in 1984, South African barefoot runner Zola Budd set a track world record when she ran 5,000 meters in 15 minutes and 1.83 seconds. Simon Bartold, a sports podiatrist and international research consultant for the sports brand Asics, says most athletes, amateur or otherwise, should stick to wearing shoes. "I'd come down pretty heavily in favor of footwear," he said. "It does offer some real protection and some real performance advantages over barefoot." Still, Asics and other big running shoe brands like Nike, New Balance and Saucony see no reason to be excluded from this new and potentially lucrative form of the sport just because it's about running in bare feet. A nifty rebranding of the trend to "natural" or "minimalist" running has opened up a potential new market in "barefoot running shoes" that promise to be the closest thing to wearing nothing at all. For Howell, even minimalist shoes are a step too far. "For most people, under most circumstances, most of the time, barefoot is the healthiest and most natural way to be," he said. Toombs, whose clients often come to her with injuries or illnesses that are restricting their movement, is concerned that scientific rows about the biomechanics of foot strikes, and efforts by sports brands to cash in, are robbing barefoot running of its best bits. Formerly an enthusiastic shod runner, she says training without shoes is partly about getting back to nature, but it's also about learning a better way to run, using the body's bounce and balance to improve form and reduce impact. "With barefoot running ... each time my foot strikes the ground, it lands slightly differently," she told Reuters. "In other words it's adjusting to what's underneath it." "I'm constantly scanning the terrain, dodging rougher areas and taking a much more meandering line, which works different sets of muscles. It's almost like dancing. But the moment I put shoes on, most of that sensitivity is gone."


In searching the publicly accessible web, we found a webpage of interest and provide a snapshot of it below. Please be advised that this page, and any images or links in it, may have changed since we created this snapshot. For your convenience, we provide a hyperlink to the current webpage as part of our service.

KWGS: Scientists kick off debate over barefoot running (2011-12-09)

Inside NewsRoom

Page 1 of 3

Science

StudioTulsa Local & Regional What's New? In Focus Today US World Business Science Arts & Culture Weather The Economy Project

Search NewsRoom Search

b c d e f g

Search KWGS

Advanced Search

Tools Email the Newsroom RSS Feeds

http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kwgs/news.newsmain/article/6/0/1883825/Science/Scientists.kick.off.debate.over.barefoot.ru... 12/9/2011


KWGS: Scientists kick off debate over barefoot running (2011-12-09)

Page 2 of 3

5

Scientists kick off debate over barefoot running (2011-12-09)

Robinson and Toombs run barefoot in a park in south London

(REUTERS) -

By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Despite the cold and many other potential hazards, naked from the ankle down is the way Anna Toombs likes it, and she gets plenty of catcalls in the street as a result. The 35-year-old co-founder of the personal training company Barefoot Running UK says she's lost count of the times people yell "where are your shoes?" as she and partner David Robinson negotiate London's parks and pavements to indulge their passion and train their clients. "People give you a lot of weird looks," says Robinson. They are also getting a lot of inquiries. A surge of interest in "natural," or barefoot, training has seen runners around the world kick off their archsupporting, motion-controlling, heel-cushioning shoes and try to feel the ground beneath their feet. Top scientists - from sports physicians to podiatrists to evolutionary biologists - are jumping in too. At a recent sports science conference in London, hundreds of participants, many of them shod but a few daringly barefooted, flocked to a two-hour long discussion about the merits or otherwise of running without shoes. "It's a really polarized debate - there are what you might call the barefoot evangelicals on one side and the aggressive anti-barefoots on the other," says Ross Tucker, an expert in exercise physiology at South Africa's University of Cape Town and a middle- and long-distance running coach. BORN TO RUN? The current barefoot trend has its roots in the book "Born to Run," by Christopher McDougall. In it, he tells of time spent with Mexico's Tarahumara tribe who can run huge distances barefoot, often very fast, apparently without suffering the injuries that plague many keen runners in the developed world. The debate centers on whether running in shoes with cushioned heels and supportive structures changes the way people move so dramatically that it's more likely to cause injuries. Proponents of barefoot running say the natural way is more likely to prompt a runner to land on the padded and springy part of the foot, toward the front, rather than strike the ground with the heel as many shod runners do. In a study published in the scientific journal Nature last year, Daniel Lieberman, an evolutionary biology professor a Harvard University, sought to find out how our ancestors, who ran and hunted for millions of years in bare feet or simple moccasins, coped with the impact of the foot hitting the ground. Lieberman and colleagues from Britain and Kenya studied runners who had always run barefoot, those who had always worn shoes and runners who had abandoned shoes. They found that barefoot endurance runners often land on the fore-foot before bringing down the heel, while shod runners mostly rear-foot strike, prompted by the raised and cushioned heels of modern running shoes. IMPACT In a series of analyses, they found that even on hard surfaces, barefoot runners who fore-foot strike generate smaller "collision forces" - less impact - than rear-foot strikers in shoes. Barefoot runners also had a springier step and used their calf and foot muscles more efficiently. Lieberman, who spoke at the conference after an early-morning barefoot run along the banks of London's Thames is keen to stress that the scientific evidence on whether barefoot running is better in terms of injuries is still very unclear. "A lot of people are arguing on the basis of passion, anecdote, emotion or financial gain - but what's quite true is there are no good data saying whether it's better for you or worse for you," he said.

http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kwgs/news.newsmain/article/6/0/1883825/Science/Scientists.kick.off.debate.over.barefoot.ru... 12/9/2011


KWGS: Scientists kick off debate over barefoot running (2011-12-09)

Page 3 of 3

Call us: (918) 631-2577 or (888) 594-5947 toll free See us: The University of Tulsa, Kendall Hall 150, 800 S. Tucker Drive, Tulsa, OK 74104 Public Radio Tulsa™ is a listener-supported service of The University of Tulsa

http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kwgs/news.newsmain/article/6/0/1883825/Science/Scientists.kick.off.debate.over.barefoot.ru... 12/9/2011


FEATURE-Scientists kick off debate over barefoot running 09 Dec 2011 09:30 Source: reuters // Reuters By Kate Kelland, Health and Science Correspondent LONDON, Dec 8 (Reuters) - Despite the cold and many other potential hazards, naked from the ankle down is the way Anna Toombs likes it, and she gets plenty of catcalls in the street as a result. The 35-year-old co-founder of the personal training company Barefoot Running UK says she's lost count of the times people yell "where are your shoes?" as she and partner David Robinson negotiate London's parks and pavements to indulge their passion and train their clients. "People give you a lot of weird looks," says Robinson. They are also getting a lot of inquiries. A surge of interest in "natural", or barefoot, training has seen runners around the world kick off their arch-supporting, motion-controlling, heel-cushioning shoes and try to feel the ground beneath their feet. Top scientists -- from sports physicians to podiatrists to evolutionary biologists -- are jumping in too. At a recent sports science conference in London, hundreds of participants, many of them shod but a few daringly barefooted, flocked to a two-hour long discussion about the merits or otherwise of running without shoes. "It's a really polarised debate -- there are what you might call the barefoot evangelicals on one side and the aggressive anti-barefoots on the other," says Ross Tucker, an expert in exercise physiology at South Africa's University of Cape Town and a middle- and long-distance running coach. BORN TO RUN?


The current barefoot trend has its roots in the book "Born to Run", by Christopher McDougall. In it, he tells of time spent with Mexico's Tarahumara tribe who can run huge distances barefoot, often very fast, apparently without suffering the injuries that plague many keen runners in the developed world. The debate centres on whether running in shoes with cushioned heels and supportive structures changes the way people move so dramatically that it's more likely to cause injuries. Proponents of barefoot running say the natural way is more likely to prompt a runner to land on the padded and springy part of the foot, towards the front, rather than strike the ground with the heel as many shod runners do. In a study published in the scientific journal Nature last year, Daniel Lieberman, an evolutionary biology professor at Harvard University, sought to find out how our ancestors, who ran and hunted for millions of years in bare feet or simple moccasins, coped with the impact of the foot hitting the ground. Lieberman and colleagues from Britain and Kenya studied runners who had always run barefoot, those who had always worn shoes and runners who had abandoned shoes. They found that barefoot endurance runners often land on the fore-foot before bringing down the heel, while shod runners mostly rear-foot strike, prompted by the raised and cushioned heels of modern running shoes. IMPACT In a series of analyses, they found that even on hard surfaces, barefoot runners who fore-foot strike generate smaller "collision forces" -- less impact -- than rear-foot strikers in shoes. Barefoot runners also had a springier step and used their calf and foot muscles more efficiently. Lieberman, who spoke at the conference after an early-morning barefoot run along the banks of London's Thames, is keen to stress that the scientific evidence on whether barefoot running is better in terms of injuries is still very unclear. "A lot of people are arguing on the basis of passion, anecdote, emotion or financial gain -- but what's quite true is there are no good data saying whether it's better for you or worse for you," he said. Having said that, he has already voted with his feet. As has fellow biology professor Daniel Howell, who teaches human anatomy and physiology at Liberty University in the United States. Howell, dubbed the "Barefoot Professor" by his students after he began living his life 95 percent shoe-free, admits he's an extremist.


He's spent almost all of the past six years in bare feet, he's run thousands of miles in all weathers and across many terrains without footwear, and he refers to shoes rather suspiciously as "devices". "Barefoot is the natural condition. It's the most natural way to be," he told the conference. "Walking and running are extremely complicated from a biomechanical perspective ... and if you add a device to your foot, it alters it." "When you put on a device, it changes the way you stand, the way you walk and the way you run. Those changes are unnatural, and generally negative." SHOES, OR DEVICES? While it's true that almost all modern athletes use running shoes in international sporting competitions, a few barefooters have been trailblazers for the cause. Back in 1960 Ethiopia's Abebe Bikila, one of the world's greatest Olympic marathon runners, won the first of his consecutive gold medals without shoes, covering the 26.2 miles in 2 hours, 15 minutes and 17 seconds. And in 1984, South African barefoot runner Zola Budd set a track world record when she ran 5,000 meters in 15 minutes and 1.83 seconds. Simon Bartold, a sports podiatrist and international research consultant for the sports brand Asics, says most athletes, amateur or otherwise, should stick to wearing shoes. "I'd come down pretty heavily in favour of footwear," he said. "It does offer some real protection and some real performance advantages over barefoot." Still, Asics and other big running shoe brands like Nike , New Balance and Saucony see no reason to be excluded from this new and potentially lucrative form of the sport just because it's about running in bare feet. A nifty rebranding of the trend to "natural" or "minimalist" running has opened up a potential new market in "barefoot running shoes" that promise to be the closest thing to wearing nothing at all. For Howell, even minimalist shoes are a step too far. "For most people, under most circumstances, most of the time, barefoot is the healthiest and most natural way to be," he said. Toombs, whose clients often come to her with injuries or illnesses that are restricting their movement, is concerned that scientific rows about the biomechanics of foot strikes, and efforts by sports brands to cash in, are robbing barefoot running of its best bits. Formerly an enthusiastic shod runner, she says training without shoes is partly about getting back to nature, but it's also about learning a better way to run, using the body's bounce and balance to improve form and reduce impact.


"With barefoot running ... each time my foot strikes the ground, it lands slightly differently," she told Reuters. "In other words it's adjusting to what's underneath it." "I'm constantly scanning the terrain, dodging rougher areas and taking a much more meandering line, which works different sets of muscles. It's almost like dancing. But the moment I put shoes on, most of that sensitivity is gone." (Editing by Sonya Hepinstall)


Mark Herzlich of the New York Giants tackles Kahlil Bell of the of the Chicago Bears. Photo: Patrick McDermott/Getty Images Saucony, an athletic footwear and apparel brand headquartered in Lexington, said that former Boston College football star Mark Herzlich will act as a spokesperson for the brand and support its marketing message, “Find Your Strong.” Herzlich, who survived a rare bone cancer, is now a linebacker for the New York Giants pro football team. At Boston College, Herzlich was forced to sit out the entire 2009 season after being diagnosed with cancer. After treatment, he was back on the field in 2010, starting in all 13 games, Saucony noted. The “Find Your Strong” campaign seeks to inspire and engage consumers to “find their personal ‘strong’ through running,” Saucony’s press release said. The campaign launched in the spring and will continue throughout 2012. “At the core, the ‘Find Your Strong’ campaign is about realizing the amazing capacity of the human spirit to reach beyond what we sometimes think is impossible,” Chris Lindner, Saucony’s chief marketing officer, said in a statement. According to Lindner, “Mark’s personal journey perfectly represents this spirit.” Saucony is a subsidiary of Collective Brands Inc.


Scientists kick off debate over barefoot running By Kate Kelland, Health and Science Correspondent LONDON | Thu Dec 8, 2011 5:46am EST

(Reuters) - Despite the cold and many other potential hazards, naked from the ankle down is the way Anna Toombs likes it, and she gets plenty of catcalls in the street as a result. The 35-year-old co-founder of the personal training company Barefoot Running UK says she's lost count of the times people yell "where are your shoes?" as she and partner David Robinson negotiate London's parks and pavements to indulge their passion and train their clients. "People give you a lot of weird looks," says Robinson. They are also getting a lot of inquiries. A surge of interest in "natural", or barefoot, training has seen runners around the world kick off their arch-supporting, motion-controlling, heel-cushioning shoes and try to feel the ground beneath their feet. Top scientists -- from sports physicians to podiatrists to evolutionary biologists -- are jumping in too. At a recent sports science conference in London, hundreds of participants, many of them shod but a few daringly barefooted, flocked to a two-hour long discussion about the merits or otherwise of running without shoes. "It's a really polarised debate -- there are what you might call the barefoot evangelicals on one side and the aggressive anti-barefoots on the other," says Ross Tucker, an expert in exercise physiology at South Africa's University of Cape Town and a middle- and long-distance running coach. BORN TO RUN? The current barefoot trend has its roots in the book "Born to Run", by Christopher McDougall. In it, he tells of time spent with Mexico's Tarahumara tribe who can run huge distances barefoot, often very fast, apparently without suffering the injuries that plague many keen runners in the developed


world. The debate centres on whether running in shoes with cushioned heels and supportive structures changes the way people move so dramatically that it's more likely to cause injuries. Proponents of barefoot running say the natural way is more likely to prompt a runner to land on the padded and springy part of the foot, towards the front, rather than strike the ground with the heel as many shod runners do. In a study published in the scientific journal Nature last year, Daniel Lieberman, an evolutionary biology professor at Harvard University, sought to find out how our ancestors, who ran and hunted for millions of years in bare feet or simple moccasins, coped with the impact of the foot hitting the ground. Lieberman and colleagues from Britain and Kenya studied runners who had always run barefoot, those who had always worn shoes and runners who had abandoned shoes. They found that barefoot endurance runners often land on the fore-foot before bringing down the heel, while shod runners mostly rear-foot strike, prompted by the raised and cushioned heels of modern running shoes. IMPACT In a series of analyses, they found that even on hard surfaces, barefoot runners who fore-foot strike generate smaller "collision forces" -- less impact -- than rear-foot strikers in shoes. Barefoot runners also had a springier step and used their calf and foot muscles more efficiently. Lieberman, who spoke at the conference after an early-morning barefoot run along the banks of London's Thames, is keen to stress that the scientific evidence on whether barefoot running is better in terms of injuries is still very unclear. "A lot of people are arguing on the basis of passion, anecdote, emotion or financial gain -- but what's quite true is there are no good data saying whether it's better for you or worse for you," he said. Having said that, he has already voted with his feet. As has fellow biology professor Daniel Howell, who teaches human anatomy and physiology at Liberty University in the United States. Howell, dubbed the "Barefoot Professor" by his students after he began living his life 95 percent shoe-free, admits he's an extremist. He's spent almost all of the past six years in bare feet, he's run thousands of miles in all weathers and across many terrains without footwear, and he refers to shoes rather suspiciously as "devices". "Barefoot is the natural condition. It's the most natural way to be," he told the conference. "Walking and running are extremely complicated from a biomechanical perspective ... and if you add a device to your foot, it alters it." "When you put on a device, it changes the way you stand, the way you walk and the way you run. Those changes are unnatural, and generally negative." SHOES, OR DEVICES? While it's true that almost all modern athletes use running shoes in international sporting competitions, a few barefooters have been trailblazers for the cause. Back in 1960 Ethiopia's Abebe Bikila, one of the world's greatest Olympic marathon runners, won the first of his consecutive gold medals without shoes, covering the 26.2 miles in 2 hours, 15 minutes and 17 seconds. And in 1984, South African barefoot runner Zola Budd set a track world record when she ran 5,000 meters in 15 minutes and 1.83 seconds. Simon Bartold, a sports podiatrist and international research consultant for the sports brand Asics (7936.T), says most athletes, amateur or otherwise, should stick to wearing shoes. "I'd come down pretty heavily in favour of footwear," he said. "It does offer some real protection and some real performance advantages over barefoot."


Still, Asics and other big running shoe brands like Nike (NKE.N), New Balance and Saucony see no reason to be excluded from this new and potentially lucrative form of the sport just because it's about running in bare feet. A nifty rebranding of the trend to "natural" or "minimalist" running has opened up a potential new market in "barefoot running shoes" that promise to be the closest thing to wearing nothing at all. For Howell, even minimalist shoes are a step too far. "For most people, under most circumstances, most of the time, barefoot is the healthiest and most natural way to be," he said. Toombs, whose clients often come to her with injuries or illnesses that are restricting their movement, is concerned that scientific rows about the biomechanics of foot strikes, and efforts by sports brands to cash in, are robbing barefoot running of its best bits. Formerly an enthusiastic shod runner, she says training without shoes is partly about getting back to nature, but it's also about learning a better way to run, using the body's bounce and balance to improve form and reduce impact. "With barefoot running ... each time my foot strikes the ground, it lands slightly differently," she told Reuters. "In other words it's adjusting to what's underneath it." "I'm constantly scanning the terrain, dodging rougher areas and taking a much more meandering line, which works different sets of muscles. It's almost like dancing. But the moment I put shoes on, most of that sensitivity is gone."


Saucony Appoints New York Giants Linebacker As Ambassador SportsOneSource Media: Posted: 12/8/2011 Saucony, Inc. announced that New York Giants linebacker and recently signed Saucony athlete Mark Herzlich will act as a spokesperson for the brand. Herzlich, 24, will support the brand’s Find Your Strong marketing campaign, which inspires and engages consumers to find their personal "strong" through running. Herzlich survived Ewing’s sarcoma, a rare bone cancer, while attending Boston College and will share his story through multiple touch points, including the brand’s digital and social media platforms. A former Boston College star, All-American and ACC Defensive Player of the Year, Herzlich was signed by the brand to a multi-year endorsement contract prior to his joining the New York Giants as an undrafted free agent in September. Saucony is the 6-foot-4 inch, 245-pound linebacker’s official training footwear and apparel sponsor. "I was instantly drawn to the brand's Find Your Strong message," said Herzlich who recently earned a starting linebacker assignment for the Giants. "I thought ‘that’s me’. That's not only me, that's something I would love to be a part of and share with others. I felt a connection right away because I remember the process of being told that I had cancer, and finding strength inside me. That’s a process, finding the strength inside to say 'you know what, it doesn’t matter if I have cancer. I'm going to beat it and do what I love again,'" said Herzlich. To see Herzlich speak more about his story and his partnership with Saucony, please visit http://vimeo.com/33179269 Following his 2008 season at Boston College, Herzlich was forced to sit out the entire 2009 season after being diagnosed with cancer. Herzlich fought through treatment and was back on the field in 2010, starting in all 13 games that season. Despite a strong final season with Boston College, Herzlich went undrafted by all 32 teams in the 2011 NFL Draft due to concerns over his medical history. The New York Giants offered Herzlich a contract to join the team as a rookie free agent for the 2011 season. The Giants later announced Herzlich had made the September 3 opening day roster.


Herzlich has earned numerous honors for his courage and outreach, including the ESPY Award for “Best Comeback by an Athlete,” the Rudy Award, the Disney Spirit Award and the ACC's Brian Piccolo Award, among others. "Mark is inspired by the campaign and we are inspired by him," said Chris Lindner, Saucony’s chief marketing officer. "At the core, the Find Your Strong campaign is about realizing the amazing capacity of the human spirit to reach beyond what we sometimes think is impossible; it’s where and how we live and train and the people and moments that strengthen us. Mark’s personal journey perfectly represents this spirit. He greatly inspires others to fight their own battles and achieve their dreams in the face of harsh obstacles." The Saucony Find Your Strong campaign launched in Spring 2011 and will continue throughout 2012.


Saucony Guide 5 General Info The Guide 5 is Saucony’s most popular shoe, and for good reason: the model provides a great fit and a comfortable ride at a good price. In its latest iteration, the Guide 5 has shed weight, increased cushioning, and most importantly, shed the heel drop to a slender 8mm. The end result is a shoe which provides balanced and subtle guidance without hampering a runner’s stride. The shoes stay light and comfortable on long runs, creating a great experience in which the wearer can feel supported while still able to move naturally. By reducing heel drop, Saucony made their most popular shoe even more fun to run in — adopting a more neutral platform while still supporting the foot. Their efforts created a lighter, more responsive stability shoe. Saucony Guide 5 Impressions


At the risk sounding hyperbolic, I found the Guide 5 to be a truly fantastic shoe. As many shoe manufacturers are moving to revamp models based solely on trends, Saucony sought subtle improvements to the Guide series in its latest incarnation. By making the newly-introduced eight-millimeter heel drop the focal point of the redesign, Saucony makes genuine improvements to the Guide that can also bolster better running form for its wearers. By shedding weight, lowering the heel drop, and improving the model’s flexibility, Saucony included major advancements that may not be flashy but make a difference where it counts. These subtle improvements create an experience which is greater than the sum of their parts—providing a fit and feel of a light trainer without losing the guidance and support of a stability shoe. Overall, the Guide 5 provided excellent support for my long and short runs post-marathon. While it was initially difficult to get back into the running mindset, having the physical support provided by the shoes helped fatigued and sore muscles get limber and active once again. The supportive ProGrid LITE midsole cushioning and impact zones provided welcome comfort without becoming obtrusive, allowing me to move and adjust my stride without hampering my style or overcorrecting my foot placement. Much of the shoe’s unobtrusive feel could be chalked up to the balanced ride from the reduced heel drop—having a more even surface made my feet feel free to land naturally without any overcorrecting from the shoe. Another boon to the Guide 5 is the comfortable material found in the sockliner and upper — these elements felt smooth on the skin on top of both cotton and technical socks, and the upper never felt heavy despite being thick enough to stand up against rain debris. As a small yet telling detail of Saucony’s attention to detail, the Guide 5 features flat shoelaces which I never saw previously, but began to love due to their easiness of use and lack of slippage. From top to bottom, the Guide 5 is a solid shoe that has only improved in its latest incarnation. Saucony Guide 5 Sole Unit In keeping with the general aesthetic of the shoe, the Guide 5 has an outsole that provides an excellent, no-frills experience which focuses on providing an excellent grip on the road, track, treadmill, or trail. The outsole rubber is fairly flat, making it well-suited for multiple surfaces. Don’t be fooled by the flatness of this feature, however, as it provides excellent traction under wet or slippery surfaces. By not overloading the outsole with extra rubbers in unnecessarily-deep grooves, Saucony kept the Guide 5 light, practical, and performance-oriented. From a cushioning and guidance standpoint, Saucony’s ProGrid LITE foam provides a reliable and familiar ride for Saucony wearers, and a pleasantly unobtrusive experience for newcomers. The dual-density SSL EVA foam provides a comfortable level of cushioning and rebound after impact—helping the shoe feel springy without providing too much bounce. Of particular interest is the shoe’s impact zones, which provide extra support for the most common landing and push-


off areas of the foot. The impact zones, like the rest of the midsole, seek to improve foot comfort and rebound without forcing movement. As the name implies, these elements seek to guide the foot, but do not force the runner to alter his or her stride greatly. These efforts are supported by the shoes’ new heel drop: though the lower drop may startle some, the end result is a pleasant ride that helps the foot move more naturally without a drastic change. Saucony’s story of the summer was the introduction of their new, lower heel drop. Slimming down from twelve to eight millimeters created a shift which takes the physiological elements of minimal running and applies them to runners who prefer a guidance shoe. In doing so, the company helped ensure that runners of all strides are able to take advantage of advancements in shoe design. Having a balanced platform makes a difference in a guidance shoe — the Guide 5 allows runners to feel secure and supported within the shoe without being forced to move the foot in any specific direction. This is a tremendous step forward, and though it may take some getting used to for guidance-shoe purists, the experience should be generally positive. Saucony Guide 5 Upper Unit As far as the upper is concerned, the Guide 5 features a comfortable ankle collar, which is not only soft but also of an unobtrusive height. As a frequent sufferer of Achilles blisters from toohigh collars, the Guide 5 provides a welcome respite from this problem. Even if a runner finds the collar to be higher on this shoe than other pairs, the HydraMAX collar lining would provide a tremendously soft experience which would help prevent blistering. Throughout the entirety of the midsole is Saucony’s Comfortride sockliner. This was among the greatest features of the shoe, as it provides a truly comfortable experience during runs of varying length and intensity. Although my feet were sore post-marathon, I never felt uncomfortable or suffered blisters on my feet. Considering I was breaking in new shoes so soon after a long race, I was very impressed by how comfortable the experience was; even my go-to shoes (Kinvara 2) take more time to break in than the Guide 5. As a final, yet appreciated detail, the flat shoelace design helped keep knots in place without loosening, becoming untied, or slipping while running. Previously to the Guide 5, I had not come across this design on a stability shoe; its inclusion was certainly appreciated. Saucony Guide 5 Opinion The Guide 5 provides an overall experience that I not only appreciated, but truly loved. In an industry where hype and gimmickry can overshadow true craftsmanship and attention to detail, the Guide 5 bucks the trend. The shoe is devoid of gimmicky materials, overhyped promises, or overpriced materials. As a result of this, the wearer is left with a shoe that does its job incredibly well—all of the focus is on the run, and not the technology.


Saucony walked a fine line while updating the Guide model, shed weight, reducing heel drop, and improving on a fan favorite without changing things too drastically. While the shoe’s lower heel may come as a surprise to some, it did not provide for a radically different experience. The Guide 5 provides a dependable, comfortable experience for runners who seek stability as well as responsiveness. Dropping the shoe’s weight and heel-to-toe drop facilitated this aim, and in turn, created a new incarnation of a shoe that provides a great running experience under any set of conditions.


LEXINGTON, MA (December 6, 2011) – Boston-based Saucony, Inc., a leading global supplier of performance athletic footwear and apparel, has announced that New York Giants linebacker and recently signed Saucony athlete Mark Herzlich will act as a spokesperson for the brand. Herzlich, 24, will support the brand’s Find Your Strong marketing campaign, which inspires and engages consumers to find their personal “strong” through running. Herzlich survived Ewing’s sarcoma, a rare bone cancer, while attending Boston College and will share his story through multiple touch points, including the brand’s digital and social media platforms. A former Boston College star, All-American and ACC Defensive Player of the Year, Herzlich was signed by the brand to a multi-year endorsement contract prior to his joining the New York Giants as an undrafted free agent in September. Saucony is the 6-foot-4 inch, 245-pound linebacker’s official training footwear and apparel sponsor. “I was instantly drawn to the brand’s Find Your Strong message,” said Herzlich who recently earned a starting linebacker assignment for the Giants. “I thought ‘that’s me’. That’s not only me, that’s something I would love to be a part of and share with others. I felt a connection right away because I remember the process of being told that I had cancer, and finding strength inside me. That’s a process, finding the strength inside to say ‘you know what, it doesn’t matter if I have cancer. I’m going to beat it and do what I love again,’” said Herzlich. To see Herzlich speak more about his story and his partnership with Saucony, please visit http://vimeo.com/33179269 Following his 2008 season at Boston College, Herzlich was forced to sit out the entire 2009 season after being diagnosed with cancer. Herzlich fought through treatment and was back on the field in 2010, starting in all 13 games that season. Despite a strong final season with Boston College, Herzlich went undrafted by all 32 teams in the 2011 NFL Draft due to concerns over his medical history. The New York Giants offered Herzlich a contract to join the team as a rookie free agent for the 2011 season. The Giants later announced Herzlich had made the September 3 opening day roster. Herzlich has earned numerous honors for his courage and outreach, including the ESPY Award


for “Best Comeback by an Athlete,” the Rudy Award, the Disney Spirit Award and the ACC's Brian Piccolo Award, among others. “Mark is inspired by the campaign and we are inspired by him,” said Chris Lindner, Saucony’s chief marketing officer. “At the core, the Find Your Strong campaign is about realizing the amazing capacity of the human spirit to reach beyond what we sometimes think is impossible; it’s where and how we live and train and the people and moments that strengthen us. Mark’s personal journey perfectly represents this spirit. He greatly inspires others to fight their own battles and achieve their dreams in the face of harsh obstacles.” The Saucony Find Your Strong campaign launched in Spring 2011 and will continue throughout 2012. For interviews, please contact Sharon Barbano at Saucony (617-824-6126), sharon.barbano@saucony.com or Jeff Lawrence at Mullen (617-226-9945), jeff.lawrence@mullen.com. About Saucony, Inc.: Saucony, Inc., a subsidiary of Collective Brands, Inc., is a leading global running lifestyle brand that fuses performance, innovation and style to create compelling footwear and apparel with its widely recognized brands Saucony and Saucony Originals. Founded in 1898, Saucony continues to inspire runners everywhere with its award winning innovations, including ProGrid™, PowerGrid™ and ViZiPRO™ apparel. For more information, go to www.saucony.com. Collective Brands, Inc. (NYSE: PSS) is a leader in bringing compelling lifestyle, fashion and performance brands for footwear and related accessories to consumers worldwide. The company operates three strategic units covering a powerful brand portfolio, as well as multiple price points and selling channels including retail, wholesale, ecommerce and licensing. Collective Brands, Inc. includes Payless ShoeSource, focused on democratizing fashion and design in footwear and accessories through its nearly 4,500-store retail chain, with its brands Airwalk®, Dexter® and Champion® and designer collections by fashion designers Christian Siriano, Lela Rose, Isabel Toledo and Silvia Tcherassi; Collective Brands Performance + Lifestyle Group, focused on lifestyle and performance branded footwear and high-quality children's footwear sold primarily through wholesaling, with its brands including Stride Rite®, Keds®, Sperry Top-Sider® Robeez®, and Saucony®, among others; and Collective Licensing International, the brand development, management and global licensing unit, with such youth lifestyle brands as Airwalk®, Above The Rim®, Vision Street Wear®, STRIKEFORCE™, Clinch Gear™, Sims®, Lamar® and LTD®, World Snowboarding Championships™ and Hind®. Information about, and links for shopping on, each of the Collective Brand's units can be found at www.collectivebrands.com.


New rule may see more athletics sponsorships By Sara Germano Dec. 5, 2011, 12:01 a.m. EST

Reuters Usain Bolt (center) competes during the men's 200-meter final at the IAAF World Athletics Championships in Daegu, South Korea. NEW YORK (MarketWatch) — Track and field athletes may have more opportunities to attract sponsors in future after the sport’s international governing body on Friday opened the door to more corporate logos on uniforms. A new rule will allow two logos on an athlete’s uniform, that of the manufacturer and another sponsor, the latter a new feature that is planned to come into effect on Jan. 1, 2012. The decision could be a huge boost in financial security for athletes.


“Who knows, you could be seeing Nick McDonald’s running in the Olympics next year.” Nick Symmonds, Olympic 800-meter runner Lauren Fleshman, a professional runner for Nike Inc. /quotes/zigman/235840/quotes/nls/nke NKE +0.08% , said having only one sponsor puts a lot of pressure on athletes. The faltering economy, she said, means “the world’s best athletes can be one bad race or one bad season away from having half their income taken away.” An additional sponsor “could make it easier [for us athletes] to make a life,” she added. The rule was put forward by a representative of the IAAF at the USA Track and Field Annual Meeting in St. Louis, during discussions that included prominent track and field sponsors Nike, Saucony, Reebok, and Adidas AG /quotes/zigman/364540 ADDYY -1.02% . It remained to be seen how USATF, as the national governing body of the sport, plans to enforce the rule. The issue would continue to be discussed among the organization’s board of directors and Athletes Advisory Committee, though there was no timetable for the resolution. The new ruling affects only international IAAF-sanctioned track and field meets “in the event that such meeting[s are] sanctioned by organizations that do not have their own advertising regulations,” according to an official memo. The first fruits of the new rule may be seen at the inaugural U.S. Open meet at New York City’s Madison Square Garden on Jan. 28, as well as next summer’s USA Outdoor Track & Field Championships. This year’s Championships, broadcast by NBC /quotes/zigman/89307/quotes/nls/cmcsa CMCSA -0.04% , drew 3.2 million viewers. But even if implemented, the new rule may not mean potentially more sponsors for all athletes — some have manufacturer contracts with an exclusivity clause to ensure the maker’s logo is the only one on an athlete’s uniform. It was also unclear exactly how much more money athletes stand to make, since most contracts are signed with strict confidentiality rules. Sources familiar with the matter said compensation can range from provisions for housing and equipment to salaries in the six figures, though those contracts are few and far between. Most professional runners are independent contractors for their sponsors, without benefits packages. Sam Grotewold, manager of professional athletes for the New York Road Runners, which stages the ING New York City Marathon, said the inclusion of more sponsors will benefit everyone in the sport, adding that corporate diversity is a consideration for meet directors, who “don’t want a photo at the starting line with all the same sponsor.” Grotewold said even with the new rule, athletes should be thinking of ways to advance their public profile beyond just logo displays.


Nick Symmonds, an Olympic 800-meter runner for Nike, is one athlete taking Grotewold’s advice to heart, and is pursuing other methods of attracting sponsorship revenue. Symmonds became an inadvertent poster boy for athletes’ sponsorship issues after creating a Facebook group in October to vent his frustration regarding rule enforcement that grew to more than a 1,000 members within 48 hours. Membership of the group, “I’m tired of USATF and IAAF crippling our sport,” now stands at nearly 6,500. While he hasn’t confirmed any new endorsements, Symmonds said he’s even willing to legally change his last name to satisfy potential sponsors, which is prominently displayed on bibs worn in competition. “Who knows, you could be seeing Nick McDonald’s running in the Olympics next year,” said Symmonds, referring to the fast-food retailer /quotes/zigman/233369/quotes/nls/mcd MCD 0.04% .


NOVEMBER 14, 2011

NEWS & INFORMATION FOR THE RUNNING & TRIATHLON MARKET

PSST! PSR IS NOW SGB PERFORMANCE


ISSUE 1146 NOVEMBER 14, 2011

Group Publisher Bill Garrels bgarrels@sportsonesource.com 303.997.7302

NEWS & INFORMATION FOR THE RUNNING & TRIATHLON MARKET

Page12

Editor In Chief James Hartford (704.987.3450 x104) james@sportsonesource.com Senior Business Editor Thomas J. Ryan (917.375.4699) tryan@sportsonesource.com Creative Director Teresa Hartford

Photo courtesy of Saucony

Graphic Designer Camila Amortegui Advertising Sales Account Manager Katie O’Donohue (704.987.3450 x110) katieo@sportsonesource.com Circulation & Subscriptions subs@sportsonesource.com Technology Chief Information Officer, Mark Fine VP Research & Development, Gerry Axelrod Manager Database Operations, Cathy Badalamenti

SportsOneSource Publications SGB TEAM Business Sportsman’s Business The B.O.S.S. Report Sports Executive Weekly SGB Update Footwear Business Update Outdoor Business Update Sportsman’s Business Update Team Business Update

NEWS 4 5 6 8 9

CITY SPORTS Builds Female-Friendly In-Store Shop BROOKS SPORTS to Relocate Global Headquarters to Seattle FINANCIALS - Easton Bell, Heelys, Mizuno and Nautilus ECCO Opens 1,000th Store Worldwide NYC MARATHON The ING New York City Marathon, sponsored by Asics, rolled into town on November 5. PARAGON SPORTS Largest retailer presence in the ING New York City Marathon

GIVING BACK 10 TIMBERLAND Partners With Ringo Starr on Charity Effort

SGB Weekly

FEATURES

SportsOneSource Research SportScanInfo OIA VantagePoint SOS Research

14 WHAT IF EINSTEIN RAN? Mizuno’s new marketing campaign turns to Albert Einstein to help explain its running footwear design philosophy 18 SAUCONY Launches Geometry of Strong

I AM...SGB PERFORMANCE 22 JIM HOFF, VP Sales, Brown Athletic

Cover photo:Mizuno Wave Rider 15 SportsOneSource, LLC (AWKINS3TREETs3UITEs#HARLOTTEs.#s T  sF   www.SportsOneSource.com

Copyright 2011 SportsOneSource, LLC. All rights reserved. The opinions expressed by writers & contributors to SGB WEEKLY are not necessarily those of the editors or publishers. SGB WEEKLY is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or artwork. Articles appearing in SGB WEEKLY may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the express permission of the publisher. SGB WEEKLY is published weekly by SportsOneSource, LLC, 2151 Hawkins Street, Suite 200, Charlotte, NC 28203; 704.987.3450. Send address changes to SGB WEEKLY, 2151 Hawkins Street, Suite 200, Charlotte, NC 28203; 704.987.3450.

WEEK 1146 | SGBweekly.com

3


SAUCONY LAUNCHES GEOMETRY OF STRONG The running brand is changing the heel-to-toe height of its iconic models - Guide, Triumph and Hurricane - from 12mm to 8mm to bring some of the benefits of minimalist construction to the average runner. By Thomas J. Ryan


Describing the change as the brand’s biggest product initiative ever, Saucony rolled out its Geometry of Strong platform that introduces a completely redesigned heel-to-toe offset on three of the brand’s traditionally best-selling models. Reflecting its own learnings from its minimalist push since first launching the Kinvara 4mm-drop shoe in 2010, Saucony is moving three of its flagship shoes - the Guide 5, Triumph 9 and Hurricane 14 – from a 12mm heel-to-forefoot drop to an 8mm heel-to-forefoot drop. The new Triumph 9, its premier neutral cushioned training shoe, and Guide 5, a stability model that is now also 1.5 oz. lighter, were unveiled at the New York City Marathon Expo while the Hurricane 14, its other stability model, is slated to launch in February. In an interview with SGB Weekly, Richie Woodworth, president of Saucony, said several events – citing the fascination over Christopher McDougal's Born to Run book, new scientific findings supporting the benefits of a forefoot or midfoot strike, as well as feedback from its team of elite running athletes – "inspired us to look at how various geometries could enhance the runner’s experience." That was galvanized over the last year by the strong response the brand was seeing to its growing number of minimal models, which also include the Mirage 4mm-drop road shoe, the Peregrine 4mm-drop

trail shoe, and the Hattori zero-drop shoe. The creation early last year of the Saucony Human Performance and Innovation Lab at its Boston-based headquarters served as a base for experimentation. "We learned that striking with your foot closer under your hip makes it easier to land on your midfoot, lowering the impact rate while allowing for a more powerful running stride," said Woodworth. "A 4mm shoe or even an 8mm shoe doesn't force you or necessarily make you change your gait cycle. But if you’re interested in becoming a midfoot striker, a lower offset will make it much easier to do. We also learned that elite runners and runners in general want to get the most out of their bodies. The idea of lowering the geometry from 12mm to 8mm and 8mm to 4mm puts the foot in the position to allow the muscles in the lower part of the leg - the GastrocnemiusSoleus-Achilles tendon system – to achieve a greater range of motion, making you a stronger runner.” Believing Saucony gained a "little bit of a head start" over competitors with its release last year of the Kinvara, Woodworth said its product team, led by Patrick O’Malley and Spencer White, found the 8mm offset for its iconic models and would lead to greater control, alignment and suspension. "We believe we're thought leaders in this area. We believe we're taking some bolder steps in going to 8mm

WEEK 1146 | SGBweekly.com

19


from 12mm and we're processing what we've learned across our the whole line," he said. While bold, Woodworth said Saucony was "certainly not reckless" in both how it decided to make the lower-drop shift as well as how it was introducing the radical change to the marketplace. Along with recognizing in lab tests that shifting its top-selling styles from the average 12mm to 8mm allowed for a lower impact strike and more powerful running stride, Saucony also conducted blind tests with scores of Saucony loyalists as part of its wear–test program. Runners tested both 12mm and 8mm versions of the same shoe and "overwhelmingly" supported the 8mm-offset. On the education front, Saucony, well-before the shoes launched, talked to influential bloggers in the marketplace to "give a voice to this whole idea of Geometry and our brand" to build support and buzz around the change, according to Woodworth. Editors from the running world and retailers in the U.S. and the U.K. were invited to Saucony's headquarters to discuss the 8mm Geometry story and launch as well as to debate running biomechanics. Over 200 Geometry clinics were held in run specialty stores across the country with more planned to promote and reinforce the Geometry positioning. Woodworth also noted that the shift came amid evidence that "more of the classic and traditional models have slowed down at retail" while Saucony is witnessing "fantastic growth" with its newer lightweight/minimalism styles, represented by its 4mm-drop models and zero-drop Hattori. Coming soon will be the third-iteration of the Kinvara with a new material called FlexFilm™ allowing the upper to "have a little bit of form and substance to it" while not impeding flexibility in the foot, said Woodworth. The upgrade also features a more strategically placed rubber on the outsole for enhanced durability and a beveled heel to achieve an even smoother transition. A Kinvara trail version will also be introduced. POS materials in stores include QR-codes that link to a video explaining the Geometry of Strong technology. Messaging will also be incorporated into its successfully-received "Find Your Strong" marketing campaign. Regarding marketing, Woodworth described the brand's launch into national TV advertising in May this year as "pretty fantastic." He elaborated, "It's hard for us to metrically quantify it but certainly it elevated our brand and our message." Woodworth said an integral reason for Saucony's recent growth has been how its "Find Your Strong" campaign has resonated with consumers and increased brand awareness. "One of the great things that's a big part of the Saucony story today is the way that we're going to market," he said. “We've got a great new chief marketing officer, Chris Lindner, who's been here a year now. Under his leadership, the idea of story-telling and bringing a message and a voice to our brand is being elevated in a particularly emphatic way with the 'Find Your Strong' campaign. TV was certainly a seminal moment for us. But we're going to up the ante on the 'Find 203'"0%2&/2-!.#%L./6%-"%2 

Richie Woodworth, president of Saucony

Your Strong' marketing message next year as it plays both in product and on the relevance that this message has for our consumer." In response to the campaign, runners have written their personal stories on overcoming challenges and what the idea of "Find Your Strong" means to them. He said the campaign has "lit a little spark" in many people’s lives. Added Woodworth, "We've had tons of emails and posts on our site about how this idea of finding your strong 'is inspirational and personal to me.' We think we're completely right on with the messaging and we're going to platform it to more directly reach consumers on an even deeper emotional level as we head into 2012." Saucony will also continue its commitment to cross country sponsorships to further reach the younger runner that has provided the brand with the leading position in the cross country footwear segment. Among its sponsorships are the Saucony XC Spike Nights, a nationwide grassroots program now in its fifth year, and the 2011 Foot Locker Cross Country Championships. "That's the competitive heartbeat of our sport," said Woodworth. "That 16 year old kid running and buying their cross country spikes. Our ability to be number one and invest in the market is important not just for the trade but for the growth of the sport as well.” The London Olympics are also expected to shine a spotlight on many of Saucony's star endorsers, including likely participants such


Triumph 9

Guide 5

Hurricane 14

as Wallace Spearmon, Jr. in the 200 meters, Magda Lewy-Boulet in the marathon, and Molly Huddle in the 5000 meters. Said Woodworth, "Those are people who are at the tip of the spear in American running and are proudly wearing Saucony. They also inspire us to look at and change our thinking around what we're doing in shoe design and engineering; they're actively engaged here in our Innovation Lab helping us figure out how to do things better." With the 8mm-drop, Saucony extends the range of shoes by offering runners a choice between 0mm, 4mm, 8mm and 12mm offset. Woodworth said runners are increasingly recognizing the benefits of different heel-to-toe drops and rethinking their shoe needs based on a better understanding of their gait cycles. "While I might use an 8mm shoe on a long slow distance run, tomorrow I might pull out my Kinvara's and do an up-tempo,

more active training run," said Woodworth. "This conversation is happening now, and we love the fact that we're changing the language around running." But Woodworth said the biggest factor giving Saucony confidence in its move to reduce the offset on its traditional models – as well as its commitment to the minimal/lightweight trend – is that both are not being driven by the industry like past trends, but by consumers. "The best part about it is that this is a trend that is really coming from the consumer. I dislike that word because trends turn into fads, but the consumer is driving this and that makes it far less likely to be a faddish concept. This is authentic and true to our sport and it’s a way for us to evolve, change and be dynamic in how we look at the sport of running and what role shoes play. It’s all about enhancing the runner's experience. That's what we do." Q WEEK 1146 | SGBweekly.com

21


Do you see what I see? It’s no shock to any of us that more of our running occurs in the dark during the winter months; it’s dark when we wake up and often dark by the time we get home. Yet, knowing that very few of us dress in a way that ensures drivers can see us.

Seriously even for Ragnar and Wild West in remote places, I was barely visible with just a chest strap and the rest of my black clothes! Be honest…you wear black pants! I know every female I saw last weekend was certainly wearing, black or dark blue pants which leaves only your upper half has a visible surface. Most of us are not wearing colors that truly reach the drivers eye.

During my KC trip, a Saucony rep at the running group talked about their ViziPro line in more detail. I finally understood that these aren’t just amazingly bright colors, but actual material that has been tested with the same standards


as highway workers safety gear. Drivers will see you. You will be safer. You will come home to your family. It is worth it. I now have a pair of snazzy ViziPro Protection gloves for all my traveling winter runs and I plan to go pick up the Ethereal jacket because it too is more to make me visible and happens to be wind resistant and waterproof! DUDE people would be able to pick me out on race day too!!

The USB LED light can be removed and recharged which is something that older versions did not have. The light will hold up to a two hour charge which should get you through any early morning run. I like the way the cuff of these gloves fit as well…it is a little bit longer than other gloves so it doesn’t leave an opening for cool air, but loose enough to go over the bulky Garmin.

Add it to the Christmas list folks and then you can sign “Do You See What I See” during many morning runs…seriously I have been…goofy maybe, but it makes me laugh. Now with these two purchases ratcheting up my safety the next item on my list (are you there Santa) will be the new Triumph 9!! If you have been reading very long, you have seen my love affair with the Kinvara’s growing, but sometimes I do want a shoe with just a tad more cushion. Hence the Triumph. At an 8mm drop it is still lower than most shoes which are around 15mm, but slightly higher than the Kinvara 4mm. The Saucony rep also talked about this shoe and this guy must have been good because it made me want them. I have had far fewer injuries since switching to lower profile shoes, so I’m excited to track down a boat size pair 11’s and see what I think. Gloves were provided free for review.


Flashy With shorter days arriving all runners need to take a minute to consider their gear before heading out the door. As shown in my post about the danger distracted drivers pose to runners, we have to be in charge of our own safety. On that note I have seen some things that I wanted to share!! Sauncony recently released a line of ViziPro gear which I think is both snazzy and ensures that I will be seen!

Additionally, have you seen their current giveaway?? Click on the image to enter, but don’t win because I want to!


I have to admit my recent perception of Saucony has changed dramatically. In my mind they were not a serious running company probably because I used to buy their shoes for cross training needs… but it turns out I just didn’t know everything they bring to the table. I am in love with my new Saucony Kinvara’s as many of you know from Meet Team Brooks This shoe is really allowing me to transition from a standard running shoe down to a more barefoot feel and I have found that my ITB actually feels better in these shoes. I did not get that same feeling from the Nike Free’s and that is probably just something to do with my stride and how they fit me personally.


Also, I noticed I’m A Fitness Junky has a giveaway for reflective Brooks Arm Bands and I Tri To Be has a giveaway that includes some reflective Yankz, so head on over there to win some safety gear. Do you use Saucony? Do you wear reflective gear or carry a light with the darker days? Nothing was received for this post, I just wanted to share this great gear.


I


GearGuide | Saucony ProGrid Hurricane 13 Review | Outdoor Gear Reviews About

Contact Us

Cool Deals and Info

Surveys

Enter search keyword

Apparel

Footwear

Camping

Hiking

Fly Fishing

Running

Skiing

Travel

Tech

Destinations

News

Saucony ProGrid Hurricane 13 Review 2 days ago

Footwear, Running Submit

Like

First Impressions At the top of Saucony’s stability shoe line stands the ProGrid Hurricane 13. We’re big fans of Saucony at GearGuide after having been turned onto the brand last year. Since then, we put more than a few miles on their more minimal stability shoe, the Mirage, and trail runner, the ProGrid Guide. When the chance came to try a

Where to Buy Saucony Hurricane Shoes

more traditional stability shoe from the company, we jumped at it.

Saucony ProGrid Hurricane 13 Running Shoe Men's - 2E Width

Out of the box, the Hurricane does not disappoint. It’s good looking, uses the same high-quality materials as other Saucony shoes and is built to handle plenty of road miles.

Features Saucony designed the Hurricane to handle just about anything – from speed work to high mileage

TriVillage.com

marathon training. It’s light weight at 25 ounces for a pair of Men’s size 11 shoes. Not the lightest in

$119.95 Buy Now

the test, but pretty darn close. Underfoot, you’ll find approximately 27mm of cushion dropping to around 17mm at the forefoot. Part of this includes the company’s ProGrid midsole that runs the full

Saucony ProGrid Hurricane 13 Running Shoe Men's - D Width

length of the shoe and is designed to aid in transition from heel to toe. Specs Upper: Synthetic mesh and leather Sole: Proprietary XT-900 rubber Weight: 25 oz per pair

TriVillage.com

The Hurricane provides a very comfortable ride. The roughly 10mm of drop from heel to toe almost

$119.95 Buy Now

feels like a more minimal shoe. The combination of ProGrid and other midsole materials provides just about the right amount of cushion for a shoe in this category. And outer sole grip is quite good on dry and wet surfaces, on moderate uneven terrain and trails and on the road. powered by

Like

Socialbar

Saucony ProGrid Hurricane 13 Running Shoe Men's - D Width

TriVillage.com $119.95 Buy Now Hurricane 13 Left Side

Hurricane 13 Tread

Hurricane 13 Right Side

http://www.gearguide.info/2011/10/16/saucony-progrid-hurricane-13-review/[10/18/2011 2:42:37 PM]

< prev next >


GearGuide | Saucony ProGrid Hurricane 13 Review | Outdoor Gear Reviews

Fit One of the most innovative features on the Hurricane is the Arch-Lock. Located on the instep, this

Latest Deals and News

soft, flexible ladder of plastic and mesh climbs from the midsole to the lacing eyelets. Snug it up and your foot is locked into place. When you combine this feature with the nicely designed heel cup, you get an easily customizable fit with no sloppiness or sliding. Overall, the Saucony fit perfectly out of the box. No need to size up or down.

Final Verdict As promised, the ProGrid Hurricane 13 delivers all around performance. It’s light weight enough for

Get the Latest: Top Stability Road Shoes http://t.co/GyzBHvg7 #footwear #running #adidas #asics #saucony 1 day ago Get the Latest: #Adidas AdiStar Salvation 3 Review http://t.co/geflpEWp #footwear #running 1 day ago Get the Latest: #Saucony ProGride Hurricane 13 Review http://t.co/SDPthVKW #footwear #running 1 day ago

speed work, and provides plenty of cushion for longer training runs. Thanks to the Arch-Lock, the shoe’s fit can be easily customized. If you’re looking for a good stability road shoe that’ll get you through your next training season – including the wet Fall/Winter months – definitely give these a try.

Get the Latest: #ASICS GEL-Kayano 17 Review http://t.co/1B164uZJ #footwear #news #running 1 day ago Get the Latest: #Cushe Boutique Sneak Review http://t.co/9adEc6NJ #footwear #travel #minimalist #womens 5 days ago

First Impressions:

Features:

Fit:

Final Verdict:

Thanks for reading another outdoor gear review from GearGuide. And thanks to Saucony and Mullen for providing product for this review. Written by Matt K.

Related Posts: Top Stability Road Shoes Top Minimal Road Shoes Saucony Mirage Review Saucony ProGrid Guide Trail Running Shoe Review Adidas AdiStar Salvation 3 Review Running, Saucony

Saucony Running Shoes

Huge Selection, Custom Sizes Or Models Can Be Ordered. Contact Us!

Leave a Reply

www.RunnersHabitat.com Name (required)

Mail (will not be published) (required)

20% Off Select Asolo

20% Off Select Men's Asolo Boots At EMS Today! Free Shipping* www.EMS.com

Website

New Balance Shoes

$20 Off Reg. Price Orders of $90+! Huge Selection. Free Shipping. www.OnlineShoes.com/NewBalance

http://www.gearguide.info/2011/10/16/saucony-progrid-hurricane-13-review/[10/18/2011 2:42:37 PM]


GearGuide | Saucony ProGrid Hurricane 13 Review | Outdoor Gear Reviews

Submit Comment

« Previous Entries

Next Entries »

© 2011 GearGuide.

http://www.gearguide.info/2011/10/16/saucony-progrid-hurricane-13-review/[10/18/2011 2:42:37 PM]

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy


Saucony Running Shoes Reviews | Running Shoes Guru

Helps you choose the right running shoes.

Home Reviews Buying Guide Links About Write For Us! Search the archive...

Home » Archive

Articles in the Saucony Running Shoes Reviews Category Lightweight Running Shoes Reviews, Minimalist Running Shoes Reviews, Reviews, Saucony Running Shoes Reviews » Saucony Hattori Running Shoes Review [23 Sep 2011 | No Comment | ]

Saucony released the Hattori, their first true barefoot running shoe back in May of 2011 to a great deal of hoopla from the barefoot running market. Billed as a zero drop barefoot shoe with enough protection to handle daily running on roads while still giving the runner a true barefoot experience.

Cushioning Running Shoes Reviews, Reviews, Saucony Running Shoes Reviews » Saucony Powergrid Cortana Running Shoes Review [9 Sep 2011 | One Comment | ]

http://www.runningshoesguru.com/category/reviews/saucony-running-shoes-reviews/[10/18/2011 2:46:31 PM]


Saucony Running Shoes Reviews | Running Shoes Guru

Saucony continues its Powergrid line of impressive and minimalist shoes based on the very popular Kinvara model. The hallmark of this series is a minimalist heel-toe drop of 4mm, Powergrid and Powerfoam in the midsole for cushioning, and lightweight breathable uppers that hug the foot. The Powergrid Cortana is no exception to these rules and Saucony continues to hit the mark with an innovative design that combines plush cushioning and a modicum of support with lightweight, low profile minimalism. So, what does this all mean? It means that Saucony has introduced a shoe with incredible cushioning with the feel of the Kinvara model; low to the ground and fast.

Barefoot Running Shoes Reviews, Cushioning Running Shoes Reviews, Featured, Lightweight Running Shoes Reviews, Reviews, Saucony Running Shoes Reviews » Saucony ProGrid Kinvara 2 Running Shoes Review [4 Sep 2011 | No Comment | ]

there are noticeable differences between the Kinvara 1 and 2, the overall positives of the shoe remain intact. At a glance, there’s very little difference between them–and paradoxically, this similarity is what makes all the difference.

Cushioning Running Shoes Reviews, Reviews, Saucony Running Shoes Reviews » Saucony ProGrid Ride 4 Running Shoes Review [25 Aug 2011 | One Comment | ]

The Saucony Progrid Ride 4 is the newest incarnation of this fan-favorite model, combining durability, moderate cushioning, and comfort in a well-constructed and flexible all-purpose running shoe.

http://www.runningshoesguru.com/category/reviews/saucony-running-shoes-reviews/[10/18/2011 2:46:31 PM]


Saucony Running Shoes Reviews | Running Shoes Guru

Lightweight Running Shoes Reviews, Reviews, Saucony Running Shoes Reviews, Stability Running Shoes Reviews » Saucony Progrid Guide 3 [24 Jun 2011 | One Comment | ]

As an avid wearer of the Progrid Guide 2 I was not expecting Saucony to change much in their flagship lightweight stability shoe.

Lightweight Running Shoes Reviews, Reviews, Saucony Running Shoes Reviews, Stability Running Shoes Reviews » Saucony Progrid Mirage Running Shoes Review [12 Apr 2011 | 3 Comments | ]

The Mirage represents where the running shoe industry is going and will eventually look like in five years time. The Saucony Mirage represents a performance oriented shoe that will work well for the “every man” as well as the elite runner.

Lightweight Running Shoes Reviews, Reviews, Running Shoes Buying Guide, Saucony Running Shoes Reviews, Trail Running Shoes Reviews » Saucony Peregrine Running Shoes Review [23 Mar 2011 | 3 Comments | ]

I was very impressed with this shoe right out of box and my satisfaction with this shoe only grew the more I ran in it. The Peregrine feels minimal, light, and flexible, yet it is also protective and supportive enough to wear on gnarly trails for long trail runs http://www.runningshoesguru.com/category/reviews/saucony-running-shoes-reviews/[10/18/2011 2:46:31 PM]


Saucony Running Shoes Reviews | Running Shoes Guru

General Info, News, Previews, Saucony Running Shoes Reviews » Saucony Spring 2011 Running Shoes Collection Preview! [9 Nov 2010 | One Comment | ]

A preview of Saucony running shoes update for Spring 2011.

General Info, News, Running Shoes Buying Guide, Saucony Running Shoes Reviews » Saucony ProGrid Kinvara named “Gear of the Year” by Outdoor Magazine [12 Oct 2010 | No Comment | ]

Brand’s relentless pursuit of innovation once again results in coveted award for the company; big win for runners everywhere.

Cushioning Running Shoes Reviews, Reviews, Saucony Running Shoes Reviews » Saucony Progrid Kinvara Running Shoes Review [16 Aug 2010 | 7 Comments | ]

Saucony Progrid Kinvara Running Shoes Review. New introduction for 2010, the Kinvara is undoubtly the most talked about running shoe at the moment. With “less is more” in mind, Saucony launched this extremely lightweight trainer as a lean, clean and essential everyday trainer for the neutral running crowd. Winning Runner’s World Best Debut 2010 surely contributed to Kinvara’s hype, but the shoe truly is a game-changer, especially at this price.

http://www.runningshoesguru.com/category/reviews/saucony-running-shoes-reviews/[10/18/2011 2:46:31 PM]


Saucony Running Shoes Reviews | Running Shoes Guru

Page 1 of 212»

Asics Gel Running Shoes

Great Selection of Asics GEL Shoes! Free Shipping & Exchanges Always. www.OnlineShoes.com/Asics

Saucony Running Shoes

Huge Selection, Custom Sizes Or Models Can Be Ordered. Contact Us! www.RunnersHabitat.com

SKECHERS Shoes

Shop over 5000 Styles And Colors. Order On SKECHERS Official Site Now www.skechers.com

Adidas® - Official Store

Shop New Summer Arrivals & Receive Free Shipping with any $49 Order! ShopAdidas.com/running

Reviews by Brand

Help Me Choose The Right Running Shoes! 1) What is Pronation and why should I care? 2) A simple test to determine your pronation 3) What kind of shoes for my pronation

Buying Guides The best running shoes for flat feet The best running shoes for women Running shoes that promise to improve your running style The best running shoes for heavy runners Nike LunarGlide vs LunarSwift vs LunarRacer vs LunarElite Minimalist running shoes for 2011

Like us on Facebook! Find us on Facebook

Running Shoes Guru Like 657 people like Running Shoes Guru.

http://www.runningshoesguru.com/category/reviews/saucony-running-shoes-reviews/[10/18/2011 2:46:31 PM]


Saucony Running Shoes Reviews | Running Shoes Guru

Rick

Doug

Chico

ho

Benoit

Rob

Nick

Frank

Facebook social plugin

Popular Posts The Best Running Shoes for Flat Feet 83 comment(s) Asics Gel Nimbus 12 Running Shoes Review 74 comment(s) Asics Gel Nimbus 11 Running Shoes Review 58 comment(s) Choose The Best Women's Running Shoes 58 comment(s) Running Shoes That Promise to Improve Your Running Style 39 comment(s) Nike Zoom Vomero + 4 Running Shoes Review 31 comment(s) Asics GT 2150 Running Shoes Review 27 comment(s) Nike Zoom Vomero+ 5 Running Shoes Review 26 comment(s)

Garmin GPS Watches

Garmin Forerunner 405 Water Resistan... Garmin Best Price $195.52 or Buy New $198.88

Privacy Information

Recent Posts Energy Drinks: The Good and the Bad “On” – The New Running Shoes from Switzerland http://www.runningshoesguru.com/category/reviews/saucony-running-shoes-reviews/[10/18/2011 2:46:31 PM]


Saucony Running Shoes Reviews | Running Shoes Guru

Saucony Reduces the Drop of 3 Shoes to 8mm Brooks Running is Looking for Wear Testers Asics Gel Nimbus 13 Running Shoes Review

Most Commented The Best Running Shoes for Flat Feet Asics Gel Nimbus 12 Running Shoes Review Asics Gel Nimbus 11 Running Shoes Review Choose The Best Women's Running Shoes Running Shoes That Promise to Improve Your Running Style

Blogroll Believe in the Run Colin Allin Diet Minded Endurance and Sustainability Fit Bottomed Girls Football Soccer Boots Personal Logs sound mind, sound body TriHarder Performance Optimization WordPress Plugins by W3 EDGE Powered by WordPress | Log in | Entries (RSS) | Comments (RSS) | Arthemia theme by Michael Hutagalung | Privacy Policy

http://www.runningshoesguru.com/category/reviews/saucony-running-shoes-reviews/[10/18/2011 2:46:31 PM]



Saucony Q4 2011 Clipbook