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M AY - J U N E 2 0 1 4 no. XXXVII issue DESIGN & ART

A L E X TA R A G H I

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S A T E L L I T E 004 Masthead

006 Contributors 008 Forward

010 The Man Who Fell To Earth ~ F&G Photography 018 Genio X Leonardo Borra

019 Flat Life Clock X Finn Magee 020 Arcane Roots 021 Pool

022 Robert Montgomery 024 Fedrico Babina 026 André Saraiva

028 Bossy Sculpture

030 Kris Van Assche Dots 032 Ann Demeuleester 034 Peter Morino

036 The Nanny’s Secret 040 TEB

044 Alexandra Hart

048 Golden Years ~ Mike Ruiz

052 Modern Love ~ Sam Hofman 060 The Hunger ~ Kenny Koon 074 Earthling ~ Francis Gum

084 Rebel Rebel ~ Ivan Avila

092 Fashion. ~ Alena Krupetskova

102 The Young American ~ Alejandro Garcia 110 Books

photography F&G PHOTOGRAPHY FGPix.com styling FRANCIS OCON model ALEX TARAGHI

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076 EARTHLING Francis Gumayagay


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S A T E L L I T E Editor-In-Chief, Creative Director WILLIAM MONTALVO William@Satellite-Mag.com Managing Editor R. E. FISHER Richard@Satellite-Mag.com

Submissions We are always looking for new work. We accept submissions. If you would like to be considered as a contributor please send writing samples or images to Info@Satellite-Mag.com

Art Director BOX808 MEDIA Box808@Satellite-Mag.com Photography Consultant RACER MEDIA INC. RacerMediaInc.com Special Correspondent ADDISON DE WITT Addison@Satellite-Mag.com

Sponsorships & Advertising Please send your requests to Sponsorship@Satellite-Mag.com

Copy Editor ANNEMARIE MAES AnnemarieMaes@mac.com

Headquarters 600 S Curson Avenue Suite 423 Los Angeles California 90036 USA

Public Relations FRAME PR Frame-PR.net President R. E. FISHER Richard@Satellite-Mag.com Interns LONDON SILVER NAOMI WEST PARIS STUDIO Intern@Satellite-Mag.com

SatelliteŽ is a registered trademark of BOX808 Media, LLC and used in Partnership with BOX808 Media Companies. Copyright 2012 by Satellite Š. All rights reserved . No part of this publication my me reproduced or transmitted in any form without permission in writing from Satellite. Satellite makes every effort to ensure accuracy of the information it publishes, but is not responsible for unsolicited or contributed manuscripts, photographs, artwork or advertisements. Satellite is published bimonthly by BOX808 Media Los Angeles, CA.

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104 THE YOUNG AMERICAN Alejandro Garcia


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KENNETH KOON

AERYN PFAFF

IVAN AVILA

FGPix.com

KennethKoon.com

AerynPfaff@gmail.com

IvanAvilaPhotography.com

Beauty, Fashion, Commercial and Creative Photographers from Los Angeles, CA.

After more than 20 years of working in styling and creative direction for fashion and commercial clients, Toronto-based Kenneth Koon moved behind the camera in 2008. He has since established himself as an in-demand photographer with a distinctive vision—one that most often finds its expression through his ongoing exploration of the male body. Drawn from the communities of Canadian and American cities, the men that he shoots reflect a mixture of confidence and passion, strength and sensuality, captured in bold images whose technical assurance and dark beauty provide the foundation for their power.

Aeryn Pfaff is a Journalism major and DJ working and living in Toronto, Canada. He has far too many interests to pin himself down to just fashion, photography, politics or music, but he has a passion to write and he has found it to be the perfect way to mesh his interests. Aeryn is drawn to compelling work of all kinds, be it a smart politician, talented furniture designer or visionary visual artist. He loves that Journalism allows him to wear many hats and cover a variety of subjects.

Ivan Avila is a Las Vegas based life style and fashion photographer. He was born and raised in Zacatecas, Mexico and has been pursuing his career in the fashion industry for the last 4 years. He also works in visual merchandising and creative styling in major brands in Las Vegas. Ivan’s photography has been published in the US, England, Spain, Italy and Mexico. Ivan has a lot creative interests, especially in graphic and interior design. He finds his inspiration in music, art, film and architecture.

F is a fashion designer, doll collector, registered nurse and a food truck enthusiast. F loves the pageantry, I Love Lucy and The Walking Dead. G is a post production artist for David LaChapelle, a COBOL programmer and a class valedictorian. G has a netflix subscription (streaming only) and he loves asian food! Collectively they are known as F & G.

His work has been seen in solo exhibitions in Ottawa and Montreal and group shows in New York City and Toronto. He is currently working on a solo exhibit in Chicago. His work and creative process is the subject of Through the Lens of inkedkenny, a 2012 documentary short by German directors Denize Galiao and Marie Elisa Scheidt. Produced in partnership with the Hochschule für Fernsehen und Film München and Canada’s L’institut national de l’image et du son, the film has been widely showcased on the European festival circuit.


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050 GOLDEN YEARS Mike Ruiz


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“A lot of people don’t get it, but I design from the inside out so that the finished product looks inevitable somehow. I think it’s important to create spaces that people like to be in, that are humanistic.” ~ FRANK GEHRY “Simplicity and repose are the qualities that measure the true value of any work of art.” ~ FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT “It is all very well to copy what one sees, but it is far better to draw what one now only sees in one’s memory. That is a transformation in which imagination collaborates with memory.” ~ EDGAR DEGAS “Drawing is like making an expressive gesture with the advantage of permanence.” ~ HENRI MATISSE

esign and art takes a critical view of social, political and cultural issues. It deconstructs the American dream, fairy tales, nursery rhymes, and lullabies that are part of our childhood and adult culture. Having engaged subjects as diverse as the overly manly sculptures by Jorge Lizandra to a French street artist, André Saraiva, gone big or the simple drinking glass designed by Leonardo Borra. Satellite reproduces familiar visual signs, arranging them into new conceptually layered pieces. While Satellite uses a variety of subjects and processes each subject so that our methodology is consistent to you the reader. We hope you enjoy this exciting issue.

William Montalvo

Editor-In-Chief


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062 THE HUNGER Kenneth Koon


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THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH photography F & G FGPix.xom styling FRANCIS OCON model ALEX TARAGHI


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shirt LEVIS 511 levi.com pants Zara zara.com

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shorts HUGO BOSS hugoboss.com underwear 2(X)IST 2xist.com

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GENIO X

LEONARDO BORRA Every distillate taster knows that the tasting glass plays a central role in the experience. In particular, the

physical and mechanical characteristics of the glass are fundamental to best appreciate all qualities of distillates. Bearing all of this in their mind, Blueside Emotional Design presented its Genio glass, an innovative tasting glass whose shape reminds of Aladdin’s lamp, of course. Leonardo Borra, who designed the glass, chose to provide the glass with two chambers, so as to allow the liquid to fully release its fragrances while slowly streaming from one chamber to the other one. The first chamber is used to pour the distillate, while the second

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one serves as a real tasting container. Genio (“genie”), which resembles the famous “Aladdin’s lamp,” is held intimately in the palm of the hand, transmitting the warmth of the hand to the spirit to bring out its aroma and flavor. Leonardo Borra was born in Perugia in 1976 and graduated in architecture. He mainly focus on the shape of objects that are intrinsically connected following the context, time and place they are in. He currently works in an architectural studio handling design object projects. Blueside-Design.com

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s image everything? With Finn Magee’s Flat Life series, the answer is yes! A two-dimensional image performs as if it were the three-dimensional object. Here, magic, humor and surprise combine into a fully functional clock. The Flat Time is the next step in the series (the first was a lamp... a must see). It uses a custom crystal oscillator circuit which works with US and European power supplies. (Most bedside clocks rely on the frequency of the mains power supply to keep time.) He programmed some greeting text into it too. The designer of this wall claock is Finn Magee, trained as a product designer at the Royal College of Art, London. He is interested in how we consume objects and ideas. He uses advertising techniques such as surprise, juxtaposition and humor to create and sell products. Some of these are fictional and some commercial but they all aim to prompt awareness about the actual needs of the customer and citizen. FinnMagee.com

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ARCANE ROOTS A

rcane Roots announce they will be releasing a brilliant, completely brand new single ‘Over & Over’, on June 9th through Play It Again Sam. As with debut album ‘Blood & Chemistry’, ‘Over & Over’ was recorded at Moles Studio in Bath and is produced by Dan Austin (Doves, Biffy Clyro, Pixies). The track will be available on digital formats only and will act as a stop-gap between album campaigns, very much pointing towards the musical direction for Arcane Roots in the future. After a year of touring and supporting the biggest and best rock bands on the planet, ‘Over & Over’ is the sound of a band finding their musical feet and preparing to take over the world with a new higher ambition. p.

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Andrew Groves from the band says: “Over & Over is, musically, our reaction to having had one of the most incredible years of our life, supporting some of our biggest inspirations and building a relationship with our fans world wide. Our music was oriented around our individual parts for so long, but now, our attention is more firmly focused on what effect our parts can create. Our favourite moments are when we are completely in sync with the audience and so we wanted to give you something to sing, dance & rock out to, whether you even know the song or not. Lyrically, this song is about making a commitment and seeing it out through the good and bad, and in a way, that is our commitment to our fans.”

studio in the summer of 2014 to record their brand new record.

The band will be heading back into the

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Arcane Roots are currently on a headline European tour, which ends with a week of UK headline shows. These dates will the bands largest headline dates in all these territories, with London show being at The Garage in Islington, and will be their first live tour dates of the year. Support on all UK shows come from Empress and Boy Jumps Ship. The band announce they will be playing Leopallooza festival in Cornwall with the likes of Dry The River, French Soler, Gnarwolves, Foxes and many more.

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POOL P

ool consists of three boys that have been making music together since they were fourteen years of age. Daniel Husten, David Stoltzenberg and Nils Hansen have been constantly evolving musically since the early days. With their basic layout of guitar, bass and drums, they manage to find a musical path between house patterns, psychedelic riff clouds and straightforward pop music. Still a major part of their sound is the gettogether of the two vocalists David and Nils. Though their voices differ a lot, their

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coexistence creates a mellow and peerless temper accomplishing the sound of guitar, bass and drums. Pool did two releases on 2DIY4/Diynamic Music, including remixes by Solomun, Aeroplane and Stimming. Over the last year, Pool also released exclusives on Colette’s “Olympics” compilation and Diynamic Music’s charity compilation ”5 Years”. They have been on tour with Digitalism, Gold Panda, Wild Nothing, Jamaica, Django Django and many more. Last summer they played festivals, such as Melt! Festival, Fusion Festival, Dockville Festival, Reeperbahn Festival and also attended SXSW. issue

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The hotly tipped alt-indie trio have announced their new single ‘Harm’. ‘Harm’ was the official anthem of the Berlin Festival. David says,”We wrote this track in the summer of 2012 when we were in a huge disco state of mind. All we wanted to do was deliver the funk slow, sexy but still dancey. So one night Nils came up with this guitarlick and we started playing around with it. The lyrics and vocals came naturally. It’s about that situation when two boys are in love with the same girl and start messing with each other.” PoolOfficial.com p.

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ROBERT MONTGOMERY

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orn in 1972, Chapelhall Scotland, United Kingdom Lives and works in London, United Kingdom Robert Montgomery follows a tradition of conceptual art and stands out by drawing from examples of public interventionist strategies and brings a poetic voice to the discourse of text art. Montgomery creates billboards, light pieces, woodcuts and watercolors. He was the British artist selected for Kochi-Muziris Biennale 2012, the first biennale in India. Montgomery has had solo exhibitions at venues in Europe and in Asia, including recently mounted, major outdoor light installations on the site of the old US Air Force base at Tempelhof in Berlin with Neue Berliner R채ume, and at the 2012 Kochi-Muziris Biennale in India. His work has been included in numerous exhibitions at venues including KOP, Breda, NL; Athens Festival, GR; Palais de Tokyo, Paris, FR; 54th Venice Biennale, Venice, IT; The De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill, UK; The Grand Palais, Paris, FR; Guido Costa Projects, Turin, IT; The Embassy Gallery, Edinburgh Scotland; and The BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, Newcastle-Gateshead, UK. RobertMontgomery.org

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FEDERICO BABINA archist city

The collection of 27 images, entitled Archist, playfully interprets the styles and themes of some of the world’s greatest artists including Picasso, Salvador Dali and Joan Miro, and imagines them as architectural forms. Babina explores the symbiotic relationship between architecture and art, and how they would interact with each other. “Art and architecture are disciplines that speak and lightly touch each other,” explained Babina. “The definition and function of architecture is changing constantly with the development of contemporary art.” The artist tried to imagine what a house designed by Dali or a museum designed by Miro might look like. “A sculpture is like a microarchitecture, a facade can become like a painted p.

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canvas and a building can be shaped as in the hands of a skilled sculptor,” he said. Among some of the most recognisable works is Roy Lichtenstein’s comic-book style and block colour schemes laid over a Moderniststyle house on stilts. Sliced images of Warhol’s Marilyn Diptych are spread across rooms decorated in bright colours with two Campbell’s tomato soup cans placed atop the rectangular building. Damien Hirst’s 2005 piece Wrath of God featuring a shark set in formaldehyde and his colourful dot series Mickey are used to bring a modular building to life. An eclectic and almost random arrangement of shapes make up the Picasso building, echoing the artist’s dabblings with Cubism. Marcel Duchamp’s building, meanwhile, draws on the artist’s Roue de Bicyclette, reinterpreting it as a pulley system watched over by issue

the Dadaist’s Fountain urinal. Salvador Dali’s distorted and surrealist shapes are propped up by wooden stilts and feature windows resembling an eye and nostril in Babina’s interpretation. Joan Miro’s Dancer is used to liven

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up a square building with the addition of circular and square windows and a deep blue finish. “Painting, sculpture and architecture have always been complementary disciplines that influence each other and grow and develop among common paths,” Babina concluded. The artist is planning on turning this and some of his other work into a book. FedericoBabina.com no.

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treet artist André Saraiva recently sat down to talk about the man behind the sticklegged “Mr. A” character has drawn and painted all over the globe different works. It’s about his infatuation with the character and his attitude towards the night. Satellte: Andre, how many times have you drawn your famous graffiti tag the long-legged Mr. A? Andre: 100,000, maybe 200,000 times? I spent periods of my life where, if I didn’t do 10 Mr. A’s a day, because I had stayed home, I would have to do 20 the day after. Imagine! I have been doing that for 20, almost 30 years now. S: When was the last time you drew Mr. A? A: Today. Look at the color on my fingers. I don’t do it as much as I used to, but I still enjoy it so much. It’s the thing that gives me the most pleasure and what connects everything I do. S: How did you start doing graffiti? A: When I arrived in Paris I was ten years old and I couldn’t speak French. I had to find my way so I started to draw a lot, which I was always good at, and when I was thirteen, fourteen years old that resulted in me starting to do graffiti. S: Do you have any favorite spots that you’ve painted? A: Some of the billboards I painted were amazing. I painted the Gucci billboard you can see from the pool here at the Chateau Marmont in LA. Nobody had ever painted this one before. That was three years ago. I also loved to paint billboards and rooftops in Tokyo. That was very exciting. But sometimes a small graffiti would give me more joy than a huge piece. S: Has the attitude towards your graffiti in the public space changed now that people know who you are? A: No, I still get a lot of shit! Especially in America. I’m not worried about going to jail, I’ve been to jail. But they would kick me out of the country and you are never allowed to come back. It’s happened to friends of mine. MonsieurA.com no.

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orge Lizandra was born and raised in Valencia, Spain and fell in love with Animation art and Sculpture at the age of 7. He began drawing and, later, modelling with plasticine. Soon after he discovered photography and fell in love with it too. He graduated in Graphic Design, and work in it for a few years. In the meantime he kept modelling his figures. His first collection was created back in 1997 and sold around Spain, England, USA and Germany. In 1998 he moved to London and inspired him for his second collection back in 2002. Since then he has been living between London and Valencia. In 2008 he began creating new models for his 3rd collection. Finally 2013 is the year for his 4th but not last collection as Jorge is an artist constantly evolving and He finds in this medium his way of vital expression. All these figures are created by Jorge. The originals are made out of clay or supersculpey. When they are finished a mold is made in silicone rubber. Then they are casted in hard resin. The number of castings is 50 for each design. They are all hand painted in acrylic paint and come with different finishings and a protective coating. Check out his site for more version from the one featered on the left. BossySculpture.wix.com/BossySculpture no.

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photography Alessio Bolzoni stylist Mauricio Nardi

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“There is always an element of contrast in what we do here,” explains Kris Van Assche of his latest collection. “And the idea of sport – an element I have had since my first collection, where all of the shoes were white Stan Smiths with a green logo – versus the grown-up, chic connotations of cognac as both a drink and a classic colour of men’s leather goods, was a combination I wanted to explore. The men who have grown up with sportswear, wearing it since they were boys, are often some of the most sophisticated fashion customers. Because they have always had an eye for detail – whether they are looking at a trainer or a handmade shoe. The collection is about that personal interpretation of the rules and the codes of menswear, not adhering to the prescribed, clichéd view of a choice of either ‘sport’ or ‘chic’ – it’s both. The attitude of the collection is anti-precious, avoiding ‘the dandy’, playful, yet still enjoying the refined.” Top ~ Polka dot dbl breasted jacket, Classic shirt with black wingtip print, Sweater with holes and black dots Middle ~ Transparent rubberised sunglasses, Polka dots pleated shorts, Sneakers with crocodile pattern Bottom ~ Polka dots short length pants, Hiking backpack, Scark with ehite polka dots no.

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ANN DEMEULEMEESTER

After graduating from the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in the late 80s, Ann Demeulemeester became known as part of the Antwerp Six, a group of radical new designers famous for their forward-thinking style. Demeulemeester released her eponymous label in 1996 with an avant-garde menswear collection, earning immediate recognition for her unconventional, deconstructivist designs. Her streamlined silhouettes and elongated cuts call to mind a sensual, emotive aesthetic that draws influence from Gothic, punk and Japanese culture. Her current collection is a pared-down palet of black and white. With silver jewlery is subtly amplified by brushed textures, tonal detail and antiqued finishes. Clockwise ~ Button chain in antiqued silver-tone metal. Curb chain length with toggle at one end. Detailed bird claw-shaped hinged clip at opposite end. Multi-chain bracelet in antiqued silver. Toggle closure. Loop and medallion details at closure. Belt-shaped ring in antiqued silver-tone metal. Pin-buckle closure-shaped feature at ring face. Carved bird claw-shaped open ring in blackened silver. AnnDemeulemeester.be special thank you Ssense.com

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Architectural Review Future Project Awards Commendation for a mixed use development in Beirut, Lebanon, and a Best of Year Award from Interior Design Magazine for Chanel Soho. In 2010 he received the American Institute of Architects (AIA) New York Chapter Interiors Honor Award for Chanel Robertson Boulevard, and has received AIA Awards for Chanel rue Cambon, Ermenegildo Zegna New York, Louis Vuitton Hong Kong, and a private residence in London. In 2007 he was honored with two MIPIM awards (“OverallWinner” and “Tall Buildings”) for a residential tower in New York. In 2006 he was elevated to a Fellow by the AIA and awarded an AIA Award of Merit for the Nassau County Museum of Art. In addition, he was awarded a Citation for Design for Fendi Beverly Hills and an AIA Excellence in Design Award for Chanel Osaka in 2001, Estée Lauder Plaza New York in 1999 and Emporio Armani New York in 1997.

eter Marino, FAIA, is the principal of Peter Marino Architect PLLC, an internationally acclaimed architecture, planning and design firm founded in 1978 and based in New York City. Six associates and one hundred sixty employees and offices in Philadelphia, PA and Southampton, NY assist him. Mr. Marino’s design contributions in the areas of commercial, cultural, residential and retail architecture have helped redefine modern luxury worldwide, emphasizing materiality, texture, scale, light and the constant dialogue between interior and exterior. He is widely known for his residential and retail designs for the most iconic names in the fashion and art worlds. Notable and recently completed retail projects include Ermenegildo Zegna flagships in Paris, Milan, New York, Tokyo and Shanghai; Chanel boutiques in Paris, New York, Singapore, Osaka and Hong Kong; Louis Vuitton in Shanghai, Singapore, Paris and Hong Kong; Christian Dior in Los Angeles, New York, Paris and Shanghai; a boutique for Céline in New York; and for one of his newest brands, Lancôme, a flagship in Hong Kong. Commercial projects include 170 East End Avenue, a luxury, high-rise condominium on New York’s Upper East Side, and the Coral Casino Beach and Cabana Club in Santa Barbara, CA. Notable hospitality projects include the Yacht Club Costa Smeralda in Sardinia, the Penthouse and Presidential Suites at Four Seasons Hotel New York, and the Spa at Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore Santa Barbara. Currently, Mr. Marino is designing numerous private residences around the world, including Aspen, London, Paris, Milan, New York, Santa Barbara, Palm Beach, Beirut and Gstaad. His cultural design projects include the Zwinger Porcelain Collection and Meissen Animal Gallery at the Dresden Museum in Germany and a 2010 retrospective of the work of Claude and François-Xavier Lalanne at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris, France. In 2011 Mr. Marino received a MIPIM p.

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In 2011 and 2010 Mr. Marino was among Architectural Digest’s AD 100, and in 2010 was named among the World’s Top 30 Architects by Robb Report. Each year, Interior Design magazine continues to recognize him as a Design Giant, and in 2006 he was named Most Influential by New York Magazine for his contributions in the Fashion industry. Mr. Marino sits on the boards of the New York Foundation for Architecture, the Venetian Heritage Foundation and the International Committee of the L’Union Centrale des Arts Décoratifs, and was recently appointed to the U.S. General Services Administration’s National Register of Peer Professionals as part of its Design Excellence Program.

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In 2012, he was named a Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Ministry of Culture in recognition of his significant contributions to furthering art and culture. Mr. Marino holds an architecture degree from Cornell University and began his career at Skidmore Owings & Merrill, George Nelson and I.M. Pei/Cossutta & Ponte. PeterMarinoArchitect.com no.

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ccentric, compulsive, private, pack-rat, secretive, voyeur — just a few words that describe the personality behind the amazing, recently discovered street photographer Vivian Maier. When John Maloof purchased a box of negatives for $380.00 at an auction he had no idea what he was in for. Initially, the purchase was made for research on a book about his Chicago neighborhood, Portage Park. He rummaged through the box of negatives and saw some interesting compositions, but unfortunately not what he was looking for. He found the name Vivian Maier on one of the envelopes, and like any curious individual he took “ Vivian Maier” straight to Google, nothing came up. There were no references to any photographers with that name, so he let the box sit for a while.

The spirit of Vivian must have compelled John Maloof back to that box, because when he took a second look he was still impressed and decided to scan a few images and put them up on Flicker. It started to gain a lot of attention, so he continued his research finding an obituary for Vivian and an address that lead him to a man that said Vivian had been his nanny. A nanny? Why would a nanny have these beautiful street images akin to the work of Diane Arbus, Henri Cartier Bresson, and even Alfred Steiglitz? His investigation was underway and he found over 100 people that knew Vivian. As time would tell, this mysterious 6 ft. shutterbug/nanny was emerging into a talent time would not soon forget. John got into Vivian’s storage locker just before it was going to be dumped and what he discovered was incredible.

The work of a pack-rat, collector of things, a time capsule of a woman’s life, boxes of undeveloped film and thousands of negatives. The film “Finding Vivian Maier” by John Maloof and Charlie Siskel takes you on the journey of discovering who this woman was. Often intimate and private, sometimes slightly disturbing and other times enchanting, there is no doubt Vivian Maier was a woman who enjoyed the journey of photography. The freedom that came with taking pictures is evident, sometimes a voyeur and other times a social tool that let her engage with the rest of the world. This documentary engages, surprises and enlightens. I know I won’t be the only photographer scouring eBay looking for a Rolleiflex of my own. VivianMaier.com


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text is by AERYN PFAFF AerynPfaff@gmail.com photography KENNETH KOON KennethKoon.com props TERRY EDWARD BRICELAND TEBInteriors.com props assistant JESSICA FRYER location THE BURROUGHES BUILDING TheBurroughes.com

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erry Edward Briceland and Matthew Adams make up teb Interiors: a Toronto based Custom Home Furnishings and Design Firm. They work out of Design Republic, a popular furniture store in the hip Queen West area, which is where we met to talk some teb. Aeryn: Can you recall why you became designers? Matthew: I’ve always liked unique stuff, and I love the reaction of someone saying, “Where did you get that?” and being able to say “I made it”. We’re both self taught. Terry: It’s nice to make something new. If we want or need something, we figure out how to make it ourselves. I want to be able to create things that are different, edgy and cool. I want people to know distinctively that it’s by us. There are tattoo artists, strippers, drag queens and cool people out there who like nice things as well; and I am just the guy to design all those things for them. What happened was, we were working separately by ourselves at home and often we would pass this store called Design Republic with all these cool things in the window. So one day I got the balls and just went in and said “Hey we make cool pillows do you wanna sell them in your store?”, and next thing you know they were saying “Well why don’t you just move in?” So we did. A: What would you say are your main influences when conceiving a piece of work? M: The fabric would be the seed. We would say “That would be really cool as an ottoman in this shape, or in that shape, with nail heads or tufting”. The world around me is inspirational as well. I think no.

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a lot of industrial stuff is very inspirational for us. Trying to combine elements of refinement with elements of unfinished, or old and rotting. T: If I’m just coming in to the shop on the streetcar and I see someone’s bag for instance and I like those colors and the way somebody’s put something together, I re-imagine that and take the feeling that I got and turn it into a bed. Or an ottoman. Or a pillow. Things I see on a TV, I’ll like the color combinations or the textures and turn that inspiration into something. A: How did you get to be known for your teb pillows? T: Pillows are so much easier to be really creative with, because they’re like a blank canvas. I have a note app in my phone and it’s stacked with lists of hundreds and hundreds of ideas and inspirations that will all of a sudden pop into my head. Color combinations. The Tin man from the wizard of Oz. Anything I can think of. And one day I’ll try to remember to turn that into a pillow somehow. A lot of times we’ll even think of somebody we like and try to make a pillow, not that looks like them, but that feels like them. That started because Matt taught himself how to silk screen. And we thought, “Let’s try silk screening on pillows”. The first one we tried was the Union Jack. M: I had made a Union Jack pillow. My wife’s a teacher and her school does an auction where people donate things to be auctioned and so we put together some pillows and one of them happened to be a Union Jack pillow. It was a combination of a few images I put together, like a stamp and skulls and a crown; kind of edgy. It wasn’t just a piece of fabric we have, we cut the pieces and sewed them all together. The blue is a separate piece and the reds’ a separate issue

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piece. T: They’re all lined with a purple fabric. Purple is kind of our trademark color; like Christian Louboutin’s red soles on the shoes, we’re purple. We have purple zippers, purple lining, every pillow has a little purple loop in the corner and on the inside it’s lined with purple fabric. With that purple loop sometimes we’ll hang things on it. We have this pillow called Naughty Girl. It’s a pillow of a girl grabbing her ass in fishnets and she’s got handcuffs on, so before this one is done we’ll attach little handcuff keys to the loop so you can “unlock her handcuffs”. A: What comes first - the materials or the design idea? M: It changes. Sometimes if Terry sees something on his way into work then you have to source all the other stuff out, but there’s no one formula for us. It’s very organic. An idea is gonna hit you anytime, anywhere and you just have to be open to it. Terry motions to his phone. T: These are my notes. All these are inspirational ideas that I, one day need to get on and make pillows or something out of and check them off the list. Like here, “Mindy’s hound’s-tooth dress”. I was watching that show The Mindy Project. She had a dress on with big hound’stooth checks on it and it was sequined, and I thought , hey, that could make an awesome pillow or a bed or ………. something. A: How do you choose your materials? T: When it comes to our own stuff we’re a bit more picky. But a lot of customers worry too much about “what type of fabric should I use for my curtains?”. We try as much as we can to just use anything we want. If you want a chair upholstered p.

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pillows, furniture, mirrors and accessories TEB INTERIORS / DESIGN REPUBLIC tebinteriors.com mydesignrepublic.com glassware and accessories CB2 cb2.com artwork DANIEL BOMBARDIER / DENIAL ART denialart.com photography artwork JEFF TURNER PHOTO jeffturnerphoto.com bikini LUMIERES DE BAIA lumieresdebaia.com models MICHAEL, MATT, SIMON, JEFF, CRAIG, LERON


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in silk, just do it! It looks amazing! We try not to limit ourselves. M: Or limit our customers. We try to educate them. You can use anything. There’s no rule except for actual physical limitations. If you like it, then it’s right. A: What part of the creative process excites you the most? T: The beginning and the end. The middle blows. M: There’s two parts. The beginning when you’re super excited, the idea pops in your head and you start to form it and you start to visualize what you want it to turn into. It’s really exciting to put that image together. And then you have to start to figure it all out. Then when you’re done, and you step back and it’s madeT: And it works. M: That’s really exciting. T: And other people love it and it sells. Dude, that feels fucking awesome. M: For me figuring out some of the technical aspects to building something, in a nerdy kind of way is cool, but as soon as you’re done it, you’ve spent so much time with it, then you’re done it and you want to move onto the next thing. A: What do you regard as the greatest success of your career to date? T: We’ve made some stuff for celebrities. We’ve made pillows for Khloe Kardashian, Elton John, Laurence Fishburne came in and bought some of our pillows. Guillermo Del Torro bought some pillows from here. I also made Kat Von D a pillow. She’s a big Beethoven fan, so we copied the star tattoos on her eyes and put them on Beethoven’s face on the pillow and there was a raccoon tail hanging from the purple loop and it was all ripped with leopard skin and spikes on it. It was awesome. A: What’s next for teb interiors? M: We’re always expanding. We want to expand our audience. We have lots of customers now so we know people with our tastes are out there. We just want more of them to find us. T: And Lighting. We are developing a new line of Marquee signs and lights for the home. Just like our teb sign as well as quite a few other styles and designs. TebInteriors.com


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ALEXANDRA HART images created ANDREW & MANSFIELD AndrewAndMansfield.com corset ALEXANDRA HART AlexandraHart.com dress ELINA SHERAPOVA makeup CRISTIAM ALFONSO hair MELINA AGUIRRE model CANDICE EDWIN

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lexandra Hart is known for her sophisticated and artful couture jewelry and metal sculpture. With both Bachelors and Masters degrees in art and metalsmithing, with fashion experience designing for Lagerfeld and Givenchy jewelry, and with fine jewelry design and manufacturing with Barbara Heinrich Studio, she has achieved the synergy among artistic inspiration, high design and skillful craftsmanship that many artists spend their entire careers chasing. Satellite wanted to get to know the designer behind these beautiful sulped body pieces. Satellite: Can you recall how or why you became a jewelry designer? Alexandra: I was always creative and details oriented growing up, and discovering jewelry and metal working in high school was like “eating the icing off the cake-“ seemed too good to be true. It just fit! S: What would you say are your main influences when conceiving a piece of work? A: The theme of ocean creatures consistently appear to emerge in my work: some aspect or gesture or shape of animals, from arthropods to cephalopods. My interest in the biology and the science of nature is expressionistic in my work. S: What is sustainable jewelry and being part of Ethical Metalsmiths? A: What better way to communicate the importance sustainability than to design natural forms? Sustainable jewelry is that which is made from

natural resources yet does not leave the environment worse off than before. While there are some responsible mining practices, I prefer to work with reclaimed precious metals. A nice thing about high value natural materials, they are always recycled! My work on the board of Ethical Metalsmiths is to help educate, network and promote these kinds of responsible practices to the jewelry industry.

Design, I celebrate the beauty in the unexpected- the sensual curves of a sea slug, or the radiant spines of a sea urchin- and still relate the pieces to the human body as “jewelry.”

S: What comes first - the materials or the design idea? A: Definitely the design! In fact, the materials and techniques are decided by the design- for example the best way to create a particular shape may be in a certain metal, color, and with a certain technique.

S: What do you regard as your greatest success in your career to date? A: Being invited to exhibit my “jewelry” in museums, such as Mingei, Oceanside Museum of Art, the Athenaeum, and CCAE, is one of the highest compliments to an artist.

S: How do you choose your materials? A: Mostly by their particular properties and workability- some materials lend themselves better to the shapes or functions of a particular design project. For example copper is very malleable and can be formed readily when annealed, it also can be patina to a range of beautiful colors, thus was the choice for this Arthropod Series.

S: What do you enjoy doing apart from designing your beautiful pieces? A: I enjoy running my fabulous dog, gardening, hiking, riding (motorcycle and horses), mentoring teens and doing “good” around the world by working with non-profit organizations.

S: What part of the creative process excites you the most? A: I think the part when the design in my head, even worked out on paper, starts to develop, evolve, and look even better as its being made in metal….! S: What makes you different/unique from other designers? A: I am not only willing to ignore boundaries and categories of Art and

S: What’s next for Alexandra Hart? A: I am developing a new series of bracelets which will be either “symbiotic” or “parasitic” in nature… alongside expanding my production line of sterling and diamond jewelry, all sustainably sourced of course. (AlexandraHart.com/collections/ pure-flight/pure-flight-necklace) Also on the radar, a possible trip to Zimbabwe this summer: Hoping to merge my work with Compassion for African Villages with my career and Ethical Metalsmiths work, such that I can help improve lives in Zimbabwe where so many natural resources are being exploited for the jewelry industry. (compassionforafricanvillages.org) AlexandraHart.com


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makeup KURTIS DAM-MIKKELSEN KurtisInBeauty.com hair ZULEIKA ACOSTA ZuleikaAcosta.com model SAMANTHA SUSSON

photography MIKE RUIZ MikeRuiz.com

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photography SAM HOFMAN SamHofman.co.uk set design ANDREW STELLITANO AStarism.co.uk post production STILLETTO special thank you to OKI-NI Oki-Ni.com p.

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MICHAEL jacket J. LINDENBERG jlindeberg.com, t-shirt DIESEL diesel.com, jeans & boots TIGER OF SWEDEN tigerofsweden.com, skull ring & bracelet ZANE visitzane.com, bracelets VITALY tigerofsweden.com, sunglasses LOU REED FOR ILLESTEVA illesteva.com at visitzane.com MATT jacket RALPH LAUREN ralphlauren.com, sweater & boots TIGER OF SWEDEN tigerofsweden. com, pants J.BRAND jbrandjeans.com, bracelet G & B gilesandbrother.com at visitzane.com, bracelet DIESEL DIESEL.COM, bracelet CHAN LUU chanluu.com at visitzane.com CRAIG hat CABARET VINTAGE cabaretvintage.com, coat, pants & boots TIGER OF SWEDEN tigerofsweden.com, vest & tank SAINT LAURENT ysl.com, bracelets & necklace VITALY vitalydesign.com at visitzane.com, rings ZANE visitzane.com


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THE HUNGER photography KENNETH KOON KennethKoon.com

styling RANDY SMITH JudyInc.com stylist assistant JO LEVITAN hair & makeup ASHLEY GESNER for Tresemme Hair Care JudyInc.com 1st photo assistant TONY FONG 2nd photo assistant KENNY WALSH models MICHAEL, MATT, CRAIG, JEFF, SIMON & LERON location DESIGN REPUBLIC mydesignrepublic.com

JEFF jeans J.BRAND jbrandjeans.com, coat, sweater & boots TIGER OF SWEDEN tigerofsweden.com, ring VITALY visitzane .com at visitzane.com SIMON jacket, sweater, jeans & boots TIGER OF SWEDEN tigerofsweden.com LERON jacket, t-shirt, pants & boots TIGER OF SWEDEN tigerofsweden.com, blazer SAND sand.dk, scarf J. LINDENBERG jlindeberg.com, necklace & ring VITALY visitzane .com at visitzane.com


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Fade/Beard cut & groomed DAVE MARTINEZ SINA atBARBERSHOP VISION LOS ANGELES atmodel OLD GLORY & TATTOO makeup SIFA SITANI modelmayhem.com/sifa OldGloryBarberShop.com hair NINA J wardrobe MALCOLM BACANI photographer assistant DARWIN ABAD showroom FOR THE STARS necklace BIJOUX bijouxusa.com


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photography IVAN AVILA IvanAvilaPhotography.com model Justin Tatum stylist Iliki Price IlikiPrice.com grooming Ivan Avila Location LAS VEGAS UNDERGROUND

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his 25 Edition rounds up some of today’s most exceptional and inspiring interiors on six continents. Making stops in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia, the painstakingly chosen and sumptuously photographed selection of 100 interiors represents a global spectrum of contemporary styles, from rustic minimalism to urbane eclecticism. What unites these dwellings is authenticity, a love of detail, and a zest for individual expression that will never go out of fashion.

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oised at the start of the 21st century, we can see clearly that the previous century was marked by momentous changes in the field of design. Aesthetics entered into everyday life with often staggering results. Our homes and workplaces turned into veritable galleries of style and innovation.

Taschen.com

From furniture to graphics, it`s all here - the work of artists who have shaped and recreated the modern world with a dizzying variety of materials. From the organic to the geometric, from Art Deco, through to Pop and High-Tech, this book contains all the great names - Harry Bertoia, De Stijl, Dieter Rams, Philippe Starck, Charles and Ray Eames, to name only a very few. This essential book is a comprehensive journey through the shapes and colors, forms and functions of design history in the 20th century. An A-Z of designers and design schools, which builds into a complete picture of contemporary living. Lavishly illustrated, this is design in the fullest sense. Taschen.com

DESIGN p.

110

O

ver the years, talented architects have occasionally indulged themselves with the challenge of designing small but perfectly formed buildings. Today, with reduced budgets, many architects have turned in a more focused way to creating works that may be diminutive in their dimensions, but are definitely big when it comes to trendsetting ideas. Whether in Japanese cities, where large sites are hard to come by, or at the frontier between art and architecture, small buildings present many advantages, and push their designers to do more with less. Taschen.com

issue

M AY - J U N E

no.

XXXVII


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T

he Chinese Art Book presents a definitive selection of 300 works, from the earliest dynasties to the new generation of contemporary artists enlivening the global art world today. From painting, calligraphy, ceramics and bronzes, to contemporary installations, photography and performance art; outstanding examples from all periods are showcased side by side, to create fascinating combinations linked with detailed cross-references.

S

panning 125 years, Art and Queer Culture is the first major historical survey to consider the ways in which the codes and cultures of homosexuality have provided a creative resource for visual artists. Attempts to trouble the conventions of gender and sexuality, to highlight the performative aspects of identity and to oppose the tyranny of the normal are all woven into the historical fabric of homosexuality and its representation. From Oscar Wilde to Ryan Trecartin, from the molly houses of eighteenth-century London to the Harlem drag balls of the 1920s, the flamboyant refusal of social and sexual norms has fuelled the creation of queer art and life throughout the modern period.

Also includes an informative introductory essay, comprehensive glossary and an illustrated time line placing the works in their political and cultural contexts. Phaidon.com

Phaidon.com

A

clear and engaging account of art where the idea behind the work is as important as, if not more than, its physical existence. The first truly international account of Conceptual art, considering works from as far afield as Japan and Argentina, as well as the more well-known locations of Europe and America. Covers the many forms of Conceptual art: photographs, videos, posters, billboards, charts, plans and even language itself.

no.

ART XXXVII

Traces its origins to the anti-art gestures of Dada, as well as considering how artists have continued to adapt Conceptual strategies up to the present day Phaidon.com

issue

M AY - J U N E

p.

111


S A T E L L I T E

S AT E L L I T E - M A G . C O M A L E X TA R A G H I

photographed by

F&G PHOTOGRAPHY

May-Jun 2014 Design/Art Issue No XXXVII  

Transmitting distinctive culture.

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