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“ Yes: I a m a drea me r. For a dreame r is on e wh o can o nly his wa y bynon moon lighce t , an h isispu n isolu h me n t is "Tof ind a chiev e the ch alan whdich abs t e ly that he sees the da w n be fore t h e re s t of t h e world.” n ecessa r y f o r a ma n, o n e art icle at leas t mu s t n ot mat ch ." - Os car A Wilde —Hardy mie s

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Masthead 004 Contributors 006 Forward 008 010 Marshall ~ Wander Aguiar (fer) Studio PRIMVS Three Autumn Cocktails Callen Parfums The 2 Bears Philippe Malouin Ryan Gander Andrew Williams Holybelly Skingraft Eric Lanuit Acne Studios

020 022 024 026 028 030 032 036 040 044 050 058 066 Brad ~ Frank Louis 076 Steven ~ Michael Piombo 086 Matthew ~ Carlo William Rossi & Eugenio D'orio

Books 096 098 Vincent ~ Geoffrey Guillin

photography WANDER AGUIAR model MARSHALL PERRIN

photography FRANK LOUIS model BRAD WELLING

photography MICHAEL PIOMBO model STEVEN EDWARD DEHLER

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photography CARLO WILLIAM ROSSI & EUGENIO D'ORIO model MATTHEW LISTER


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Editor-In-Chief/Creative Director WILLIAM MONTALVO William@Satellite-Mag.com Managing Editor R.E. FISHER Richard@Satellite-Mag.com Art Director BOX808 MEDIA Info@Box808Media.com Photogaphy Consultant RACER MEDIA INC. RacerMedia.com Special Correspondent ADDISON DE WITT Addison@Satellite-Mag.com Copy Editor ANNEMARIE MAES AmmemarieMaes@mac.com President R.E. FISHER Richard@Satellite-Mag.com Interns LONDON SILVER PARIS STUDIO CABO SHERMAN intern@Satellite-Mag.com

SUBMISSIONS We are always looking for new work. We accept submissions. If you would like to be considered as a contributor please send writing samples or images to Info@Satellite-Mag.com SPONSORSHIPS & SPECIAL PROJECTS Please send your requests to Sponsorship@Satellite-Mag.com HEADQUARTERS 6731 3rd Avenue Los Angeles CA 90036 USA Satellite-Mag.com FOLLOW facebook.com/satellite.mag instagram.com/satellie_mag twitter.com/SATELLITEonline satellite-Mag.tumblr.com

Satellite® is a registered trademark of BOX808 Media, LLC and used in Partnership with BOX808 Media Companies. Copyright 2012 by Satellite ©. All rights reserved . No part of this publication my me reproduced or transmitted in any form without permission in writing from Satellite. Satellite makes every effort to ensure accuracy of the information it publishes, but is not responsible for unsolicited or contributed manuscripts, photographs, artwork or advertisements. Satellite is published bimonthly by BOX808 Media Los Angeles, CA.

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MICHAEL PIOMBO

FABIO MERCURIO

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Brazilian-born WANDER AGUIAR has always been fascinated with people and the art of photography; he got his first camera on age 12 and started shooting his family members on vacations trips.

Frank Louis quit his high paying and successful corporate job to pursue his life long passion for photography. “At some point you realize enough is enough; life is too short and you have to follow your dream”.

Northern California native, Michael Piombo, grew up always having an eye for the aesthetic and an artistic side he needed to explore. His love for film, fashion and photography lead him art school and in 1992, Michael graduated from the Academy of Art San Francisco. Upon graduation, Michael moved to Los Angeles to pursue a career in photography. On a temporary basis, he also started to work for Los Angeles designers Nolan Miller and Mark Zunino. This temporary position soon grew into a 21-year collaboration with them both. Michael currently balances his time as Creative Director for fashion designer Mark Zunino, while also still working on special photo projects.

Fabio Mercurio, born of Sicilian origins, but Bolognese for adoption, graduated of Class of ‘77 at the Academy of Fashion and Costume. From 2003 to 2005 he worked with several fashion showrooms.

Four years after that he was discovered as a model and since than has done many runways and appeared in many campaign. Graduated as a Civil Engineer with eight years of experience on that field he decided to quit and become a traveler. On visiting California in 1998 he immediately lost his heart; he now lives San Diego and dedicated his time on his old passion working on the another side of the camera a welcome change as you can see on his fine portfolio. Wander says: “ I try to use my experience as a former model to bring the best on each one I work with, be a model is beyond to have a beautiful face you have to perform and show a different personality/ attitude no matter what you have on.”

“Walking away from financial security into the abyss of freelance photography was very scary but the best thing I ever did.” He currently works for the top modeling agencies as well as the best hairstylists in NYC and his work has appeared in many magazines. His inspiration comes from fashion and music. He resides in the West Village of NYC with his husband of 24 years.

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2006 he was a designer for well known fashion houses as a handbag and accessories designer. Fabio was also responsible for a Marie Claire Magazine’s campaign. In 2008 he worked as a freelance fashion stylist for magazines editorials, photographers and T V commercial spots. He boasts prestigious collaborations in Spain, Italy and Denmark with leading photographers and fashion brands. He is mostly known for his styling, set design.


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This exciting and visually stunning edition of Satellite Magazine, Issue XLVII, is filled with men's style and design from around the world. We have four amazing photographers who photographed some stunning men that are gracing our covers of this issue who are Wander Aguiar, Frank Louis, Michael Piombo and Carlo William Rossi & Eugenio D'Orio. The handsome designer Philippe Malouin and some of his beautiful creations are featured. Skingraft celebrates their anniversary in Los Angeles with an amazing show and performance. With the emoji craze, Acne Studios did a capsule collection with some whimsical emoji's embroidered and screened on shirts and shoes. Our music feature is The 2 Bears. A couple of big guys who are making feel good dance music. This is just a little bit of what this packed issue that will delight the eye. We hope you enjoy the issue as much as we did putting it together.

William Montalvo Editor-In-Chief

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MARSHALL photography:

WANDER AGUIAR wanderaguiar.com model

MARSHALL PERRIN

at RED MODELS NY & ZINK MODELS styling

MICHELLE LA RUE

photography assistant ANDREY BAHIA

sweater A.P.C. pants THEORY


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poncho MSGM shirt JACK SPADE pants: ANTONY MORATO glasses ALEXANDER MCQUEEN


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jacket Viktor & Rolf sweater & shoes TED BAKER pants DENHAM sunglasses YVES SAINT LAURENT


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jacket MICHAEL KORS sweater THEORY pants TOPMAn shoes MEZLAN


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sweate A.P.C. pants THEORY poncho LA RUE & LA BELLE


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jacket BOSS pants THEORY sweater BURBERRY glasses PRISM


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(fer) studio began as a one-person firm, headed by Christopher Mercier A.I.A. in 2002. Mercier had worked with renowned architect Frank Gehry at his Santa Monica studio before striking out to establish his own practice.

photo courtesy of (FER) STUDIO

(fer) stands for Form, Environment and Research, the principles that describe the firm’s design philosophy. Firmly rooted in contemporary modernism, (fer) studio is dedicated to the idea that Form helps to shape the world, and can have a profound ability to positively impact contemporary experience. Through intensive research and the study of the site and environmental conditions, along with extensive client input, each project emerges as appropriate and unique. (fer) studio’s projects have included “ground up” construction, as well as the rehabilitation and adaptive re-use of a wide range of building types: residential, commercial, hospitality and academic. (fer) studio is passionate about urban design and development and the development of sustainable, livable cities. In 2005, Douglas Pierson joined (fer) studio (another Gehry alumni). In May 2016, Pierson and Mercier amicably ended their partnership when Pierson moved his family to North Carolina for personal reasons. Based in Inglewood, California (fer) studio is poised at the tipping point of the latest wave of urban renewal in Southern California. For decades, Inglewood, like Silverlake, Culver City and downtown Los Angeles, had been an underpriced and under-developed urban desert of empty storefronts and a deserted main street. In recent years, Inglewood has been discovered by urban explorers (and intrepid investors): writers, artists and entrepreneurs have arrived in search of affordable live/work spaces and retail storefronts. Mercier and Pierson have participated in various local design projects, including the “Inglewood Living City,” an urban design project (fer) studio developed for the city, as well as a similar project proposal the firm has submitted to Solano Beach called “Cedros Market.” In 2005, (fer) studio submitted a letter to the City of Inglewood’s Planning Department suggesting the city develop a Live/Work Zoning Ordinance to assist the artists relocating to the area. In 2014 (fer) studio began consulting with the city on a regular basis to see the ordinance through City Council’s approval in 2015. One of (fer) studio’s local clients was the Three Weavers’ Brewing Company, an artisan brewery and tasting room that opened in 2013. “It was a small project for Doug (Pierson) and I,” Mercier says modestly. “We were basically paid in beer. Three Weavers is a great local hangout and a wonderful addition to the neighborhood. We want to be part of the redevelopment of Inglewood, and we want (fer) studio to be the ‘go-to’ firm for the community.”

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Today, (fer) studio is a 14 person firm, dividing its time between various residential, hospitality and commercial projects. Completed restaurant projects on Mercier and Pierson’s roster include the popular Father’s Office in Culver City, Connie & Ted’s in West Hollywood and the newly opened Officine Brera in downtown Los Angeles. All three projects took vital clues from the local urban environment, and intense owner involvement informed the design strategies that made each space unique. For Officine Brera, located in the downtown Los Angeles Arts District, (fer) studio reimagined the existing space--a 1920s industrial building and a masonry and steel warehouse that once housed the Los Angeles Gas Company as an elegant, Northern Italian restaurant while preserving the industrial character of the 8,000 square foot building using reclaimed wood, concrete and exposed steel. Other recent or currently developing projects include The Hayden, a 30,000 square foot creative office adaptive reuse project in Culver City in the Hayden Tract. Mercier and Pierson also designed a 5,000 square foot family home in Fullerton, California, a 4,500 square foot single-family residence in Santa Monica, California, and a renovated lobby/reception area for Hana Financial in a downtown Los Angeles high-rise. (fer) studio recently completed Phase I of the photo studio and office space for Smashbox Studios in Culver City, and a reuse project adapting an existing structure into the Hayden, a creative office complex in Culver City. (fer) studio’s project mix varies from year to year, but they always strive to achieve a balance of residential, commercial and hospitality projects. “This encourages fresh thinking and helps foster over-lapping ideas between building types that may not happen otherwise,” says Mercier. The architects feel this brings vibrancy to their work. Today (fer) studio is involved in a variety of projects on a wide variety of scales: from small, sustainable residential spaces to large-scale urban centers. The firm is committed to a contemporary vision of design that continues to expand and evolve with each new project. Mercier brings a unique sensibility and intuition along with years of experience to every commission. (fer) studio is comprised of a diverse collection of young architects, artists, and designers assembled around a design approach utilizing both computer-generated models and hand-built physical modeling to provide a more complex and complete understanding of each project. (fer) studio is a young, eager and contemporary design-focused firm. After fifteen years, it continues to grow, taking on more complex challenges. The firm continues to expand its abilities and create unique contemporary structures that will engage interesting dialogue within the larger architectural community. FERStudio.com XLVI I

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All Primvs food products have been analysed and sampled by gourmet experts and we only offer the best products that have a certified designated area of production. From the very onset, the founder was focused on the quality of the products and decided that if they were unable to obtain the high quality of products that reflect the Primvs philosophy , then they would not supply food to our consumers and customers. So in keeping with the Primvs leif motif they only offer certified food products that are produced in limited quantity by vetted and trusted suppliers. They undertook a very diligent and pragmatic approach and many food products and suppliers were turned down as they did not fit the Primvs quality philosophy. We are aware that the food products we offer are available on the market, the one major difference is that we only offer our own exclusively sourced supreme quality IGP/DOP/BIO brand products in a very eyepleasing package that is ECO friendly with the added Primvs guarantee of quality. Primvs food has also encompassed a minimalist packaging – a first in the food industry. The packaging is quintessentially minimalist in form and function. Primvs desired to transmit a sense of serenity and a touch of bygone attention to the detail. Natural material was utilised where possible to provide an earthy look. The contours and lines lend to a form that, whilst dynamic, was conceived to satisfy the aesthetic demands of a discerning customer.

photo courtesy of PRIMVS

PrimvsFood.com

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thre e co cktail s to kno ck back this autumn text RICHARD GODWIN

We’re now entering a time of year when the crispness in the air and a certain back-to-school melancholy prompt a need for some of life’s richer things. Roast partridge and bacon. Miles Davis. Scarves. Bourbon. Autumn may not be everyone’s favourite season, but it always has the best threads, the best palette and and, crucially, the best drinking. Summer drinks are fine for flings, but the dark spirits are so much more companionable as the evenings begin to lengthen. I’m thinking wood, smoke, maple, orchards, spice, high proof. As you ease into the season, therefore, why not take the edge off with the kind of cocktail that you can truly savour? The three below should do the trick nicely.

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THE SYLVANIAN MARTINI The martini is an all-season staple, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t refresh its accessories as the leaves turn. My inspiration here is the woodland martini, a modern classic by Tony Conigliaro of 69 Colebrooke Row in north London. His version involves foraging your own botanicals from the forest floor. Mine just takes the general principle of combining gin with amontillado sherry – that’s the rich, nutty sort – and adds an extra bosky note by rinsing the glass with pine-scented liqueur. Zirbenz Stone Pine Liqueur from Austria is ideal, but I find yellow Chartreuse, Galliano or even the dreaded Jägermeister work just fine. Ingredients: A dash of Alpine-style liqueur 50ml gin 25ml amontillado sherry A dash of Angostura bitters Swirl a dash of the Alpine liqueur around a cocktail coupe so the surface is completely coated, then shake off (or sip) the excess and place the glass in the freezer. In a mixing jug, stir the gin, sherry and bitters (really just a shake) with copious amounts of ice until everything’s really cold. Garnish with an orange zest twist. THE JACK ROSE In the classic home-bartending menu The Fine Art Of Mixing Drinks, Mr David Embury lists the Jack Rose – applejack, lemon and grenadine – among his seven essential cocktails. It’s fair to say posterity has been kinder to the martini and manhattan, but come autumn, I’m always in the mood for a Jack Rose. A few minor alterations lift it to the heavens. The first is to make your own grenadine (combine one part fresh pomegranate juice with two parts golden caster sugar and warm/stir until completely dissolved). The second is to use English cider brandy instead of applejack. The Temperley family’s five-year-old Somerset is godly. The third is to use a teensy dash of a smoky Scotch – Laphroaig is perfect – to give it that bonfire note. You can keep it as a simple sour drink, but it also makes a fine long drink if you lengthen with ginger beer. Ingredients: A dash of Islay whisky (for example, Laphroaig) 50ml apple brandy 15ml lemon juice 10ml grenadine Rinse a coupe with the Scotch so the whole surface is coated and place in the freezer while you make the cocktail. In a shaker, combine the apple brandy, lemon juice and grenadine with ice, agitate hard and fine-strain into the glass. Garnish with a lemon zest twist. If making long, pour into a tall glass filled with ice cubes, top up with ginger beer and garnish with a lemon wedge. THE TREACLE The late Mr Dick Bradsell, who single-handedly revived the London drinking scene in the cocktailing dark ages before expiring earlier this year, had two main claims to fame, namely his invention of undisputable modern classics the espresso martini and the bramble. His third drink, the treacle, deserves to be as widely known. It’s basically an old fashioned, made with rum and topped up with an apple juice float. Which sounds a little basic, but somehow the apple juice is the ideal means of refreshing the old fashioned, turning it into something toothsome and endlessly sippable. Use a fresh one, such as Copella, and a rich, spicy Jamaican rum. Ingredients: 50ml dark rum 5ml golden sugar syrup (2:1 sugar:water) A dash of Angostura bitters 25ml apple juice Make a basic old fashioned by patiently stirring the rum, sugar syrup and plenty of bitters with large and rugged lumps of ice in a squat tumbler. Carefully float the apple juice on top by pressing a spoon to the side of the glass and trickling the liquid down. Garnish with an orange zest twist. S AT E L L I T E - MAG. COM

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CARLEN PARFUMS Carlen was founded in 2014 by Jeff Madalena and Jason Gnewikow. Instinct, intuition and a measure of naivetÊ combined with a passion for rare and high quality materials led to the birth of Carlen. A german woman’s name that translates to free-man, Carlen is the muse inspiring a cast of irreverent, unisex fragrances that seamlessly float between and above gender. Sometimes we feel butch and sometimes we feel femme. Each Carlen perfume is designed to be distinct, directional and unique, composed with the highest quality materials. CarlenParfums.com

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the 2 bears

The 2 Bears are a British musical duo formed in 2009 composed of Joe Goddard (of electronic band Hot Chip) and Raf Rundell (previously of 1965 Records). The duo produces original material amalgamating various styles including 2-step, house, hip-hop and soul and also host a radio show on Ministry of Sound Radio entitled "Follow the Bears". Critics offer various descriptions of The 2 Bears' sound including "pop-hip-house" "liquid-bmore-housestep" and "rave-garage".The 2 Bears have received UK national radio support from DJs including Fearne Cotton, Scott Mills, Nick Grimshaw, Greg James, Annie Mac, Huw Stephens, Kissy Sell Out, Dev, Rob Da Bank and John Kennedy. The duo have produced remixes for several established artists including Santigold, Metronomy, Toddla T and The View.

Raf Rundell, a former press officer, and Joe Goddard, one fifth of electronic music band Hot Chip, met while working together at the Greco-Roman soundsystem parties. Joe has told how the band originated from the suggestion of a friend who proposed that he, Raf and Joe Mount (from the band Metronomy) form a band called 'The 3 Bears'. The band ultimately formed as a two piece without Joe Mount. During their formative studio sessions Raf & Joe created the tracks 'Mercy Time' and 'Be Strong', which went on to appear on their first EP 'Follow The Bears', released by Southern Fried Records in early 2010. 'Follow The Bears' was supported by a subsequent remix EP featuring contributions from Derrick Carter & Supabeatz. The Bears went on to release a further two EPs on Southern Fried Records, 'Curious Nature EP' in the latter part of 2010 and 'Bearhug EP' in early 2011. Both were accompanied by further remix EPs with contributors including Maxxi Soundsystem and Midland. The 2 Bears first complete album Be Strong was released on 29 January 2012 and was preceded by the single 'Work' on 2 January. The single was included on the XFM playlist. They also made a mix album, 2 Bears 1 Love which featured Wiley, Toddla T, and remixes p .

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from the 2 Bears. They also announced a second LP titled 'The Night is Young' was to be released in October 2014 on Southern Fried Records. The 2 Bears' Raf Rundell and Joe Goddard continue the empowering feel of their debut album Be Strong on The Night Is Young, a set of songs that ponder aging and life's fleeting pleasures — not the least of which are moments spent on the dancefloor. As the duo deals with uncertainty and finds comfort in steady beats, the '90s influences they introduced in their earlier work sound fresher and more relevant than ever. The Night Is Young opens with the inspired one-two punch of "Get Out," which shifts from moody breakbeat to confident house rhythms and back again, and "Angel (Touch Me)," which manages to be equally comforting and kinetic with another solid fouron-the-floor beat and soaring pianos and vocals. Many of the album's other highlights follow suit: the tender, thoughtful "Modern Family," the inspiring "Unbuild It," and the stylish "Not This Time" are as reflective as they are danceable, recalling Goddard's work with Hot Chip on albums like One Life Stand and In Our Heads. While The Night Is Young is rooted in the same spirit that made Be Strong so engaging, Goddard and Rundell go farther afield musically and geographically. The 2 Bears join a crew of artists including Damon Albarn, Populous, and DÊbruit who mine Africa's rich musical traditions for inspiration, and the duo recorded parts of the album in South Africa with local musicians. The hypnotic "Son of the Sun" bears these influences most clearly with vocals by Senyaka and Sbusiso, but this expansive feel extends to much of the album's latter half. Rundell and Goddard sound especially liberated on "Mary Mary," an elongated journey through acoustic guitar loops and spoken word samples recalling early-'90s Orb; the harder-edged "Run Run Run"; and the transcendent title track. The2Bears.co.uk

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PH I LI P P E M A L O U I N Canadian Philippe Malouin holds a bachelor’s degree in Design from the Design Academy Eindhoven. He has also studied at the École Nationale Supérieure de Création Industrielle in Paris and University of Montreal. He lives and works in London. He set up his studio in 2009 after working for English designer Tom Dixon. He is also the director of POST-OFFICE, the architectural and interiors design practice.

His diverse portfolio includes tables, rugs, chairs, lights, art objects and installations. Philippe’s client list includes: Roll & Hill, 1882 ltd., Kvadrat, Established & Sons, Umbra Shift,

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Caesarstone, NextLevel galerie Paris, Gallery Fumi London, ProjectB Gallery Milan, Swarovski, Bloomberg, Aesop, Touch Digital. Philippe has won the W Hotels ‘Designer of the Future’ Award and the Wallpaper ‘Best Use of Material’ Award. From 2012-2015 he taught platform 18 alongside Sarah van Gameren at the Royal College of Arts. Philippe lives and works in London, where he operates his design studios. PhilippeMalouin.com

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ryan gander text RACHEL BUCHHOLTZER

Ryan Gander is an artist for right now. The poster child of his recent exhibition, “Make Every Show Like It’s Your Last,” is Magnus Opus, a pair of giant roving animatronic eyes set in the gallery wall. It is a cartoon-cliché of the haunted portrait with the wandering eyes. The work is linked to the rest of the exhibition in Gander’s quintessential mode: loosely. His overall body of work, a freely associative mix of multimedia pieces, ranges from idiosyncratic sculptures made of household goods, to sartorial collaborations with adidas and 84-Lab.

If art today is often prized for its imageability—its Instagram likeability— then Gander’s work operates by using expectations to catapult abnormality. As the show’s curator, Mark Lanctôt, observed, the shifting eyes of Magnus Opus consistently provoked muted exclamations of surprise from museum-goers. Gander’s work challenges the way we engage with physical and institutional space. How do you act in a gallery? Gander pushes the viewer to ask this question of themselves, cutting through a lot of the pretension that often surrounds the art milieu. He is unapologetically vocal about this, calling out everyone from trust-funded artists to lazy viewership. On the occasion of his exhibition in Montreal, he spoke with Rachel Buchholtzer. It seems like your audience has to do a lot of work at your exhibitions. Ryan Gander: I think good art isn’t really complete without the spectator. It’s funny how developed the human race is, but 95% of art is still hung on the wall—you just look at it, and then you walk onto the next piece of work. It’s kind of spectacularly ridiculous. You’ve talked about there being “infinite stuff” around us that has the potential to inspire a work. How do you know when an idea is worth pursuing? That’s difficult. I guess when you’re given something on a silver plate, it doesn’t mean as much to you as if you discover something. When you discover something on your own grounds, it’s almost like it belongs to you. In that sense, I think it’s always good to make spectators work a little bit, to get the idea, or to get a sense of ownership. For the show in Montreal, there are three works that are crumpled pieces of paper on the floor and they look like litter. There’s a piece of letter paper with a drawing of a fictional dinner seating plan on it, and there’s one that’s

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a fortune cookie message. They’re presented as detritus, of little consequence and little meaning, as if they should be picked up and thrown in the bin. It’s only really the keen eye and the keen mind that notices that this fragment maybe belongs in the realm of art. And when you speculate, and discover this idea, then you can take ownership. You have an exhibition in Montreal and you are a “Nomadic Resident” at the Ontario College of Art and Design for 2016. I’m speaking to you from Vancouver, where “Make Every Show Like It’s Your Last” was also shown at the Contemporary Art Gallery in 2015. How did you come to be working in multiple cities in Canada? Art is really weird because it functions in waves. Like next year is a big China and Korea year for me: I have three shows in each, respectively. Last year was just a Canadian year. Then you’re big in France. It has to be this way, otherwise you exhaust everybody, and they get very bored of you. I mean, that’s just the way the whole art tour mechanism works. You’re traveling constantly. How does this influence your work? It’s funny, because when you do an artist residency, the institutions always expect you to make work about the place you are in. But that’s ridiculous really, you need digestion time—it usually takes a year to infiltrate into the whole idea system. So next year I’ll be making works about Canadian culture, or a phenomenon that I remember, or photographs. And because the goal of my work is universality—that it follows this crazy path of diversity and jumps from one thing to another— I travel out of necessity. Otherwise I’d have a very singular perspective on the world. Did you always want to be an artist? I didn’t really decide to be an artist, I just sort of became an artist. It’s the best job anyone could have, but I really don’t know how it happened. So it was just kind of a natural progression? Yeah. I had a show, and then someone asked me if I wanted to do another one, then someone else suggested we make a book. I mean, it sounds kind of blasé, but it was actually a lot of work and turmoil and stress and questioning of selfworth. And a lot of doubt. It’s hard to make the decision that you’re going to make art professionally, cause effectively 0.01% of the people who choose to make art actually make a living at it. But once you get recognition it must start to seem more possible. Exactly. But you have to keep the momentum up. I didn’t really realize that aspect. You can’t do a load of shows and have some recognition, and then not do anything for six months after. So you just end up working six days a week really hard. But doesn’t everybody? At least I get the occasional first class flight. You collaborated with adidas in 2014 on the ZX 750 S AT E L L I T E - MAG. COM

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sneakers. Could you talk about how this collaboration came about? It was a collaboration with adidas Originals in Tokyo. Kazuki Kuraishi is the guy who decides what gets made and is very involved with knowing what’s cool. He asked if I’d be interested in doing some trainers, and when I asked him what he wanted. He just said, “Anything.” That sounded like it could be dangerous. I didn’t think they’d be actually able to mass-produce what I was asking them to do. But they did, and the shoe sold out pretty quick. And there was a lot of controversy around them too. Was there? I didn’t know that. Yeah, people seemed to either love them or ask, “Why would anyone pay money for these?” But those are philistines and charlatans, you get them with everything. They’re the kind of people who just want people to listen to them, which is sad. What do you think about artist-fashion collaborations in general? Would you do one again? Absolutely. It was one of the best things I’ve ever done. I mean obviously making museum shows, and biennials, and the art thing is great. It’s my main job in a way. But there are parts of making clothes that I enjoy way more. I went out one night in London, and there was a guy wearing one of the black Gore-Tex coats that I’d designed. I asked him where he got it from, but he didn’t know that I’d made it. Interactions like that are so rewarding. Usually with art, art people go and see your shows—you know how many people attended, you have visitor figures, and you read the reviews. But with stuff that people wear, it’s totally different, because you experience it in the street. It’s nice that people want to associate themselves with your work. It’s a different kind of value system. It must be kind of surreal in a way, seeing people wearing things you created, but in such unpredictable contexts. I’d love to do more of it. I could do it as a job. You work in such vastly different mediums. What makes a work a Ryan Gander piece? There’s two ways of identifying works. One is by visual characteristics, but I’m not very fond of art that has any sort of stylistic signature or artist’s identity attached to it. I think it’s self-obsessive to have style. But the other way of identifying work is by its conceptual underpinnings. All my work looks like different people could have made it. It’s diverse and there’s no stylistic signature, but you can see all of it is to do, somehow, with absence, or loss, or invisibility, or latency, or showing the framing system but not having any content. Someone told me once that they saw a work of mine at an art fair, and they were playing a game of "guess the artist." One girl immediately said “It’s a Ryan Gander,” and when someone asked how she knew, she said “Because I don’t know who else it could be by.” So maybe I do have a style, and that style is everything else. XLVI I

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From high school street artist, to musician, to talented 3D creator, Andrew Williams—“Gohmn” to his online community – has dabbled in a lot of creative outlets. His current passion is creating surreal and detailed 3D worlds which are the result of a daily practice.

His inspiration for his work ranges from music, to Arizona sunsets, to artists who share their work online. He’s also one of those rare folks who shares little more than his art on social media, which makes those fantastical worlds that much more intriguing. Where does the name “Gohmn” come from? Gohmn (rhymes with “home”) reaches back to when I was making silly street art characters in high school. Back then I adopted the name Gohma, which is the name of a Zelda boss. Gohma is the first boss in Ocarina of Time, which is a game I’ve started playing—and never beat—at least 20 separate times in my life. I guess I just latched onto this character that I’ve had to kill over and over. I switched to Gohmn when I started producing music and wanted something more google-able. Eventually time spent making music slowly transitioned into time spent making visual art and I just stuck with Gohmn. Your 3D work is incredibly detailed. What tools or programs do you use to create your art? The main programs I use are Cinema4D, Octane Render, and Photoshop. Then there are a bunch of other plugins and one-off programs that get used in conjunction with those depending on what I’m trying to make. Lately I’ve been having a lot of fun with World Machine. You “post a new image on the daily.” What made you decide to create a piece of art every single day? The original daily-art-maker that I fell in love with was Ljudbilden. He heavily influenced my character illustration phase. Then I discovered Beeple and was blown away at the difference between his first day making 3D art versus his more recent stuff. He got so good just by sitting down and making something every day. It was inspiring and still is. Dude’s been at it for like 10 years. I wanted to focus on having a marketable skill so I didn’t have to work shitty jobs anymore, so a few years ago I decided to follow his lead. p .

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And for the record, I don’t actually post every single day anymore. Nowadays I focus on achieving a healthy balance between doing client work, making dailies, and spending time with my girlfriend. The worlds you create are beautiful and surreal. Where do you go for inspiration, either online or in the physical world? Online, mostly Instagram, Tumblr, Ello. I follow a lot of my fellow daily art makers who inspire me to no end. There’s a huge amount of amazing shit being pushed by them legitimately every single day. It’s nuts. There’s also some good art and photography curation accounts on those sites that I enjoy as well. In real life, if I’m honest, I wish I got out of the house more. When I do, I love discovering what the southwestern US has to offer. There are some beautiful landscapes and formations out here. Nothing beats an Arizonan sunset. Along with making 3D digital art, you also produce music and DJ. Does music influence your graphic art, or viceversa? Music has a huge influence on what I do. My main gig nowadays is lead designer at Heroic Recordings. Listening to a song and trying to capture those emotions in a square image is a daily occurrence for me. Are there any new mediums or creative techniques you’d like to try out in the future? I would love to dive more into 3D sculpting. It’s something I’ve dabbled in but have yet to focus on. Also, 3D scanning and photogrammetry have heavily piqued my interest lately. What do you want people to see, or get out of your art? I mainly just want people to look at the things I make and say, “Damn. That’s pretty dope.” What’s your favorite thing to do that doesn’t involve sitting in front of a computer? I just bought a pretty cool mountain bike! So I’ve been getting into that lately. Gohmn.com

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Nico Alary owns Holybelly with his partner Ms Sarah Mouchot. The pair lived in Melbourne before setting up shop in Paris three years ago. He worked as a photographer, and a series he shot for Kinfolk magazine about coffee professionals in Melbourne became pivotal for him. Upon returning to his native France, he noted: “There was really nowhere you could eat good food and have good coffee at the same time, whereas you can do that pretty much anywhere in Melbourne. We were missing it so much, we thought: ‘That’s what we should do.’ I’m a social creature, so I like the fact that when you’re a barista, you’re also interacting with a lot of people.” The duo didn’t actively set their sights on the 10th. “When you go to a real-estate agent, you tell them what you need and how much money you’ve got, then they tell you where you can settle down. Three years ago, [the area] wasn’t what it is today; it was still emerging.” The venue they bought was a worn-out Lebanese restaurant with low ceilings, but it had an extractor for the kitchen and room for a skylight; nine months later, they opened. After the attacks, Alary’s business picked up relatively quickly. “I’m glad that, instead of just staying home and being scared, [customers] decided to go out and come here,” he says. “It’s a very self-sufficient arrondissement. You get this village vibe going on. Sometimes I don’t even feel like I’m in Paris – more en province.” “French people are not really into breakfast,” he admits. “We get tourists for breakfast. Over time, I learnt that tourist doesn’t have to be a bad word. Even if people are speaking Spanish or Japanese next to you, it's still a neighbourly French café.” Who owns Holybelly? Sarah Mouchot and Nico Alary. 50/50. There’s no outside investors.

photo courtesy of NICO ALARY/HOLYBELLY

When did it open? October 14th 2013. Is it an American diner? Definitely not. We love diners but we have no pretensions to be one. If anything Holybelly is really close to a Melbourne style Café in the sense that we specialise in delicious food served from 9am, good coffee and friendly service. What kind of food is it? Australian? American? French? It’s hard to define our menu as originating from a specific

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country. Every month Sarah and Martin get together and establish the menu for the following four weeks depending on what is locally available and in season at the time. One month we can have a very classic French dish on the menu like “Aligot et saucisse de Morteau” and the next a southern Comfort Food classic like “Corn bread and beans”. Why do you communicate in English when your shop is based in Paris? English is universal. Everyone speaks it and the ones who don’t can only blame themselves for it. It’s 2016, we travel, we interact and limiting Holybelly’s voice to the border of our tiny country would be a shame. It’s like in “Games of Throne” they’ve got Winterfell, they’ve got South Landing, the Dothraki, the Wildlings and they all have their own wacky language and slang only spoken in specific regions but they also all master the “common tongue” meaning that wherever they happen to get lost, whosever’s throat they end up cutting, they can at least communicate with each other. That is what English is in our day and age, the common tongue. Plus it is incredibly fun to write and speak, get onboard. Why is your coffee better and more expensive than anywhere else? There are a few reasons why the coffee tastes good. First we look after the main component of your cup of joe, the water. Ours goes through a reverse-osmosis system calibrated to give us precisely the water we need to make the best coffee possible. Second, we buy the best beans in town from la Brulerie de Belleville. They source in season, high grade beans and then roast them just right. Finally we set the ego aside and use the amazing tools at our disposal to not only be good sometimes but be good all the time. We don’t pull shots manually, only relying on our eyes to decide when a shot is fully extracted, we let the volumetric paddle measure the right amount of water going through the bed of coffee so that your espresso tastes invariably delicious, whether I’m watching it pour or not. It’s called consistency and it matters to us. As far as the price goes, Belleville buys great beans from farmers who work hard to deliver that level of quality so it only make sense they pay the big bucks for it and, as a result so do we, and, as a result, so do you. That being said a double espresso in a no name Brasserie serving filthy Café Richard from a dirty machine on rue Rivoli goes for 6 euros so… Holybel.ly


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SKINGRAFT CELEBRATES THEIR 10 YEAR ANNIVERSARY WITH A RETURN TO THE L.A. RUNWAY To mark the brand’s 10th anniversary, SKINGRAFT announce a return to Los Angeles to showcase their latest collection, PRIMAL, at the DTLA's private membership club RVCC..This hallmark runway event marks the first-ever showing of the brand’s current collection, marking SKINGRAFT’s fashion calendar-busting move to a new, direct to consumer model. SKINGRAFT was founded in Los Angeles, California in 2006 by brothers Jonny and Christopher Cota. Credited as a pioneer of the new American avant-garde, SKINGRAFT's roots in performance art-inspired fashion influence its seasonal collections, where music and its lifestyle-driven subcultures strongly inspire the cuts, colorways and fabrication of the brand’s signature dark, body-conscious designs. Even as SKINGRAFT continues to push boundaries and redefine itself season after season, it is always identifiable by its unique layered aesthetic, intricate detailing and standout silhouettes. "The PRIMAL collection conjures up ideas of primitive core living and animalistic human behavior. The clean, modern collection takes root in the inspiration of 'animal magic' and evolves into something both fierce and vibrant, and also refreshingly youthful and sophisticated." Says creative director Jonny Cota of the new collection, “At the very core of PRIMAL, and of SKINGRAFT itself, there is a consistent pulse of something that I call 'animal magic' or 'future primitive.' This is a fusion of very ancient ideas of nature and animal imagery, combined with hyper contemporary and futuristic concepts of aesthetic. It is sometimes beautiful and ethereal, and sometimes brutal and masculine. It's taking something grounded in sacred practices and beliefs and reimagining it for our world today.” In lieu of a traditional runway, the show featured an unforgettable performance by top dancers wearing looks from the PRIMAL collection, choreographed by Danny Dolan. Following the riveting performance, Austin Westbay performed an hour long Butoh number entwined in an art installation featuring archival pieces from the past 10 years of SKINGRAFT collections. His performance represented the physical weaving of the brand’s 10 year history into the current tapestry of the brand. Legendary Los Angeles monster-drag performer Squeaky Blonde closed out the night with a haunting rendition of Nina Simone's "Wild Is The Wind" within an altar of candles and burning sage. SkingraftDesigns.com


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Just imagine Scandinavian minimalism, Japanese precision, French elegance and Italian leather coming together in one collection of beautiful accessories. To achieve such a productive merger, it might be necessary to have an outside view, just like Budapest-based designer Agneskovacs has. The LIÉ collection is a handcrafted, multicultural journey from Europe to Asia, where the Scandinavian minimalism, the French elegance, the Italian premium leather and the Japanese precision meet in harmonious unity. LIÉ was created based on a design idea of the unification of opposing forces. Like clasped hands the bags are constructed by the unseparated parts of only one leather sheet which are accurately joined together to form the body. The inspiration came from a unique Japanese wood joinery technique where the perfectly fitting wood elements are fixed together without nails. The stability and the harmony emerged from the unity of opposing forces is just as important regarding the shape as regarding the content for the LIÉ collection which was inspired by aiming the creation of this ideal state. LIÉ bags combine the contemporary elegance with fine details, exciting geometric lines and functional twists. Agneskovacs.hu Photographer György Károlyi_Flashback Hair Márk Károlyi Make up Tímea Vozák Styling Dóra Bellák

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Born in Paris in 1965, Eric Lanuit has always been interested in image, fashion and photography. His bedroom was full of vintage Vogue and Harper's Bazaar magazines and his first photo shoot was at age 13.

In 1987 he graduated from Ipag, where he spcialized in marketing and later from the Institut Francais De La Mode, where he chose to work in communications, public relations and fashionimages. Aafter 15 years as the head of communications and press relations for various hautr courture houses, including Givenchy with John Galliano and Alexander McQueen, he decided to change his direction and in 2003 he began working with the famous Parisian Cabaret THe Lido. At The Lido the spectacle of what happens onstage and backstage revived his original interest in photography. In July 2011, need both an outlet for his own photography and a showcase for the art and images from others he admired, he created the digital magazine Character. Then he created in 2013 Men Addicted, the first stylish gay fetish and homo-erotic art magazine entirely forcused on black and white photography and art. In 2015 Ayor Magazine which features gay aerworks exclusively created for the magazine by international artists. The same year he creates Art+Gay Publications for the three magazines. Eric in now based in Lyon - France and focuses on his own photography artwork as well as on his magazine in which he promotes gay artists and art. What is the show about? Uniforms have always been the subject of fantasies

for him. If the clothes do not make the man, it helps in the perception of what emanates from the wearer. What is the story behind Uniforms? "Authority, power, heroism, strength, or simply the aesthetics of clothing and accessories, the enhancement of the male body, all these mixed feelings at the sight of a man in uniform awake our imagination and strata of our homoerotic cultural unconscious. Just a detail can arouse our excitement and desire. The uniform but also the work clothes, the regulation outfits, the sport gears, the fetishist outfits, the clothes and accessories excite libido and imagination though the promise of masculine sex overflowing of testosterone, hot games of domination and submission, exhibitionism and worship." Why work uniforms? All these portraits are looking to the horizon of their goal, proud of their outfit that enables them to do their job, their duty, their performance, proud of their body that endorses the outfit or accessories of what they represent, proud of the look they cause on the attributes of their virility. From athlete to soldier, from worker to businessman, from master to slave, from cowboy to sailor, all proudly display the artifices of their conviction, their profession, their passion, or their sexual practice, arousing the desire of the unattainable beauty of the idealized male. EricLanuit.fr


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Acne Studios revealed a new capsule collection with unique prints inspired by emojis. The range plays with everyday objects that have taken on new life as emojis, representing them as isolated symbols on wardrobe staples such as sweatshirts, T-shirts, knitwear, caps and sneakers. The collection is avalable now in Acne Studios stores and online. Classic sweatshirt styles are given a new twist with highly detailed compact embroideries of oversized microphones, bananas and doughnuts. As an alternative, the pig’s nose and a brown swirl of mousse become small chest embroideries. Banannas, microphones, donuts and hot dogs appear as a knitted pattern in a jacquard sweater, as well as printed on a heavy jersey T-shirt, while patches of square faces show what they’re thinking about on sweatshirts. There are also patches on a cap, and white sneakers with the graphics boldly printed down the side and toe. AcneStudios.com

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FrankLouis.com

instagram franklouisphoto twitter franklouisphoto model

BRAD WELLING

instagram _bradw_official stylist

ANTHONY PEDRAZA AnthonyPedraza.com

Instagram fashion_stylist_ap

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CARLO WILLIAM ROSSI and EUGENIO D'ORIO

www.credo.photography stylist

FABIO MERCURIO

FabioMercurio.com

@HMBattaglia / @Things By People grooming

KRISS BARONE

@KrissBaroneMakeup model

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at Established Models London stylist assistant

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BOOKS S A T E L L I T E

In 1998, TASCHEN introduced the world to the masterful art of Touko Laaksonen with The Art of Pleasure. Prior to that, Laaksonen, better known as Tom of Finland, enjoyed an intense cult following in the international gay community but was largely unknown to a broader audience. In 2009, TASCHEN followed up with the ultimate Tom overview: Tom of Finland XXL, a beautiful big collector’s edition with over 1,000 images, covering six decades of the artist’s career. The work was gathered from collections across the United States and Europe with the help of the Tom of Finland Foundation, featuring many drawings, paintings, and sketches never previously reproduced. Other images had only been seen out of context and were finally presented in the sequential order Tom intended for full artistic appreciation and erotic impact. The elegant oversized volume showed the full range of Tom’s talent, from sensitive portraits to frank sexual pleasure to tender expressions of love and haunting tributes to young men struck down by AIDS, and was completed by eight commissioned essays on Tom’s social and personal impact by Camille Paglia, John Waters, Armistead Maupin, Todd Oldham, and others, plus a scholarly analysis of individual drawings by art historian Edward Lucie-Smith. The only thing missing from Tom of Finland XXL was a widely affordable price tag—until now. The new Tom of Finland XXL is still big enough to work your biceps, and includes all of the original content. Taschen.com p .

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“Les diners de Gala is uniquely devoted to the pleasures of taste … If you are a disciple of one of those calorie-counters who turn the joys of eating into a form of punishment, close this book at once; it is too lively, too aggressive, and far too impertinent for you.”—Salvador Dalí Food and surrealism make perfect bedfellows: sex and lobsters, collage and cannibalism, the meeting of a swan and a toothbrush on a pastry case. The opulent dinner parties thrown by Salvador Dalí (1904–1989) and his wife and muse, Gala (1894–1982) were the stuff of legend. Luckily for us, Dalí published a cookbook in 1973, Les diners de Gala, which reveals some of the sensual, imaginative, and exotic elements that made up their notorious gatherings. This reprint features all 136 recipes over 12 chapters, specially illustrated by Dalí, and organized by meal courses, including aphrodisiacs. The illustrations and recipes are accompanied by Dalí’s extravagant musings on subjects such as dinner conversation: “The jaw is our best tool to grasp philosophical knowledge.” All these rich recipes can be cooked at home, although some will require practiced skill and a wellstocked pantry. This is cuisine of the old school, with meals by leading French chefs from such stellar Paris restaurants as Lasserre, La Tour d’Argent, Maxim’s, and Le Train Bleu. Good taste, however voluptuous, never goes out of fashion. In making this exceptionally rare book available to a wide audience. Taschen.com S AT E L L I T E - MAG. COM

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No XLVII Marshall Perrin by Wander Aguiar  

Transmitting distinctive culture

No XLVII Marshall Perrin by Wander Aguiar  

Transmitting distinctive culture

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