Issuu on Google+

Workplace health and safety:

a priority for all.

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011


Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health gratefully acknowledges Extendicare Sunset (Regina, Saskatchewan) employees for their participation in the photography for this year’s annual report.


Message from the Board Chairperson In 2010, the Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) was formed in an effort to make workplace health and safety a priority for all in the health care industry. During this time, the board of directors worked to establish the infrastructure and secure funding for the organization. In 2011, the Board of Directors provided clear strategic direction, opened office locations in Regina and Saskatoon and have now started building the team essential to operationalize our vision. SASWH has established a number of strategic partnerships and is also engaging with our members and stakeholders. Saskatchewan’s health workplace injury rate consistently ranks as one of the highest in Canada, exceeding that of construction, mining and manufacturing. Our industry has rationalized this with the mindset that it is unique from these others. Sadly, this has perpetuated a culture whereas it has become acceptable that our colleagues, our workers, our friends and our family members are being hurt.

The board of directors is proud that CEO, George Marshall and his team of employees are so passionate about ensuring the health and safety of our patients and our workers. This commitment and drive will be a major benefit to all SASWH members and stakeholders in 2012. I am proud to have been involved as the board Chair at such a pivotal time of growth and development for the association. Sincerely,

Cécile Hunt Board Chairperson

It is time for change. Eliminating injuries within the health care sector is a daunting task – but it will be achieved. This cultural change in Saskatchewan will start with our leadership, who are committed to coming together to make a difference.

Message from the Board Chairperson

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

1


Message from the CEO I would like to recognize the work that has been completed by the board of directors in the past two years establishing the infrastructure, mandate and strategic priorities for the Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH). The board has devoted a significant amount of unpaid time, effort and passion to grow this association and keep its vision alive. It was a very challenging time and earning the trust among members was integral to a new start. In the very beginning there were no employees, the board had to meet frequently under high-pressure circumstances and this required a major commitment from everyone involved. I am very fortunate to be working with such a high-functioning board of directors, who have the ability to bring the perspectives of labour and management together into a single voice. I feel a great deal of gratitude to have been entrusted with the responsibility of growing the association and I look forward to supporting employers in eliminating injuries in their workplace. The employees at SASWH experienced a number of challenges and changes as the organization was evolving and becoming fully functional. Words do not express how impressed I am with this team and their high-level of professionalism and commitment to the board’s vision. I am proud to be leading a team so passionate and with such a diverse set of skills. I have the utmost faith and confidence that they will prove to be an incredible resource for our members.

2

During the third quarter of 2011, SASWH started to focus its efforts on what we call the Priority 17 employers. Priority 17 employers account for 79% of all payroll in the health care industry and 85% of all time-loss claims. I am confident that if we can make a difference with this group in reducing injuries, it will lower premium rates regardless of facility size for all health care employers. I am committed to ensuring the association works in a proactive manner and that our efforts are focused on this group to ensure that our limited resources will have the greatest effect. In order to improve our safety culture within the health care sector, we need commitment from senior leaders to be accountable for workplace health and safety in their organizations. On June 14, 2012, I have committed to publicly signing the Saskatchewan Health & Safety Leadership Charter. I personally challenge all of our members to come and sign the charter with me; those already committed are listed on our website. Our success as an association will be measured by eliminating injuries among employees and reducing the suffering within their families. This effort will have a positive impact within their communities; as well as ensuring they are able to participate, able to work and support their colleagues in the workplace. Lastly, safe employees will ensure that they are able to continue providing the very best in patient care to our loved ones.

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

Together, let’s make workplace health and safety: a priority for all. Sincerely,

George Marshall Chief Executive Officer

Message from the CEO


Board of Directors & Operational Team SASWH is a non-profit association, established March 12, 2010, that is funded by all health care employers through a portion of their WCB premiums. SASWH is governed by a board of directors representing health services workers, employers and unions with a vision to make workplace health and safety: a priority for all. This unprecedented, co-operative level of labour and management participation is critical to SASWH’s success at eliminating injuries within the health care sector.

Board of Directors

Corinne Pauliuk , Regina and District Personal Care Home

Kim Nordmarken, Health Sector Chair/Health Providers

Association, Employer Director

Negotiating Committee, Saskatchewan Government and General Employee’s Union, Worker Director

Garnet Dishaw, Labour Relations, Health Sciences Association

of Saskatchewan, Worker Director

Pearl Blommaert, Canadian Union of Public Employees,

Lori Johb, Service Employees International Union West,

Worker Director

Worker Director

SASWH Operational Team

Chairperson – Cécile Hunt, Chief Executive Officer, Prince

Albert Parkland Regional Health Authority, Employer Director Vice-Chairperson – Norma Wallace, Occupational Health and

Safety Officer, Saskatchewan Union of Nurses, Worker Director Treasurer – Jacquie Griffiths, National Servicing Representative,

Canadian Union of Public Employees, Worker Director Gregory Cummings, Chief Executive Officer, Heartland

Regional Health Authority, Employer Director Michael Higgins, Vice-President Human Resources, Regina

Qu’Appelle Regional Health Authority, Employer Director Shelly McFadden, Director Worksafe & Employee Wellness,

Saskatoon Regional Health Authority, Employer Director Vivienne Hauck, Chief Executive Officer, Luther Care

Communities, Provincial Affiliates Group, Employer Director

Board of Directors & Operational Team

SASWH Team, L to R: Deb Taylor (Safety Advisor), Candice Jordan (Coordinator), Bay Vayachack (Executive Assistant to the CEO), Sindi Duncan (Director of Operations), Tanya Murray (Office Manager), Stephanie Rogal (Educator), Shelly-Anne Mckay (Communications Consultant)

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

3


SASWH plans to attain a minimum

10

%

reduction in injury rates in 2012.


Vision and Mission Statement The vision and mission were developed in part based on the WCB funding agreement and bylaws of the organization. Our Vision: Workplace health and safety: a priority for all.

Our Mission: To increase awareness and proactively support, through education, training and services, health related industry workers and employers in their efforts to prevent workplace injury and illness.

6

Core Values of SASWH:

Health and Safety

Stewardship

Trust

Collaboration

Innovation

Respect

Transparency

Commitment

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

The six strategic priorities for SASWH: 

1

P romote the establishment of strong accountability frameworks for Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) within health sector workplaces.

 Promote the recognition of the value that injury and illness prevention brings to the workplace.  Establish the Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health as a credible source of OHS information and services for members.

2 3 4

Promote the adoption of evidenced-based leading practices and provincial OHS standards within health sector workplaces.

5

P rovide training and education that supports injury and illness prevention.

6

T o demonstrate transparency and accountability in the association’s resource allocation. Vision and Mission Statement


A New Beginning There is an epidemic of injuries occurring within the health care sector across Saskatchewan. In 2010, there were 5,034 employees injured on the job resulting in 84,638 days of missed work. This is equivalent to 423 full-time employees unable to work for an entire year. Consider the impact this has on the individual, their family, community, and their workplace when they are suffering both mentally and physically from the trauma of a preventable injury. We must carefully evaluate the direct impact this has when 5,034 new patients need to be treated in health care facilities

that are now missing these 423 full-time employees—who are essential to providing quality patient care. In an effort to help stop this growing epidemic, the Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) was created. It has required substantial time and dedication to build the infrastructure of what is now known as the Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH).

February 12, 2010

March 12, 2010

January 1, 2011

February 1, 2011

March 03, 2011

March 21, 2011

July 27, 2011

August 8, 2011

January 9, 2012

Association Founded

Board of Directors Established

Regina Office Officially Opened

First Staff Member

Launch of Website

First AGM

First Newsletter

First CEO

Saskatoon Office Officially Opened

(originally G22 industry association)

A New Beginning

(Tanya Murray)

www.saswh.ca

(George Marshall)

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

7


Messages of Support for SASWH:

As Deputy Minister of Health, I am pleased to support the work of the newly formed Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH). Our government is committed to improving the safety of Saskatchewan’s health workers and will work closely with SASWH to reduce injuries in the workplace. Part of the solution involves all employees coming together to develop, promote and improve health and safety at work—recognizing that safety is everyone’s responsibility. We look forward to strengthening our partnership with SASWH as we work in collaboration to improve workplace health and safety. Dan Florizone Deputy Minister of Health Government of Saskatchewan

8

Saskatchewan has one of the highest injury rates in Canada. This epidemic of preventable injuries is responsible for one death every day in our province. The pain and suffering experienced by individuals, families and communities throughout Saskatchewan is immeasurable and places unnecessary stress on the health care system, which is well understood by its providers. With Mission: Zero as our common goal and through the principles of the Saskatchewan Health & Safety Leadership Charter, I look forward to a continued partnership with SASWH in support of its vision and mission. Together, we will work towards an injury-free Saskatchewan. Gord Moker Chief Executive Officer Safe Saskatchewan Inc.

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

The Saskatchewan Union of Nurses (SUN) desires a safe and healthy workplace for our members and all workers. SUN supports the mission of SASWH and agrees that health and safety must be a priority for all. Nurses are at risk for many hazards such as job burnout, stress, violence, shift work, involuntary overtime, excessive workload, work-related illnesses and injuries, blood-borne pathogen exposure, infectious disease exposure and musculoskeletal disorders. Ensuring the health, safety and well-being of the current and future nursing workforce is vital for retention and recruitment. Achieving a safe work environment is necessary in order for patients and families to receive quality and safe patient care.

The Ministry of Labour Relations and Workplace Safety is committed to ensuring Saskatchewan workplaces are safe, healthy and productive. As partners in WorkSafe Saskatchewan, we believe that all workplace injuries are preventable and strive toward Mission: Zero. We applaud and support your mission to increase occupational health and safety awareness in the health sector and proactively support these workers and employers in their efforts to prevent workplace injury and illness. Michael J.R. Carr Deputy Minister Ministry of Labour Relations and Workplace Safety

Rosalee Longmoore President, Saskatchewan Union of Nurses

Messages of Support


$

10,000 The average time-loss claim costs the system approximately

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

9


Specific Initiatives 1. Priority 17 A select group of Saskatchewan employers have been classified as Priority 17 based on their time-loss frequency data through the Saskatchewan Workers’ Compensation Board (WCB) and the Ministry of Labour Relations and Workplace Safety (LRWS). Priority 17 employers account for 79% of all payroll in the health care industry and 85% of all time-loss claims. This group will serve as the primary focus for the association’s efforts and is part of a three-way strategy between SASWH, WCB and LRWS at reducing injuries among employees within the health care sector. Because this group has such a strong financial impact in relation to direct costs for the entire health care sector, SASWH has focused its efforts specifically on this group. Reducing time-loss injury claims among the Priority 17 will result in lowering premium rates for all health care employers in the province, regardless of their size. The average time-loss claim costs the system approximately $10,000. In 2011, the total time-loss claims were 2,329* and without intervention, it is projected to be slightly above 2,400 for 2012. The direct cost estimated for time-loss claims in 2012 is $24.2 million dollars. The indirect cost estimated is $121 million dollars. SASWH plans to facilitate a minimum 10% reduction in time-loss and total claims. Success such as this, would mean an approximate $2.4 million dollar reduction

10

in direct costs and $12 million dollars in indirect costs for 2012. The association’s efforts with this group would more than pay for the investment that was made into the association by affecting this group alone. The health care industry has been introduced to a great deal of risk-based training, but past efforts have not resulted in injury reduction. SASWH has determined that some employers are lacking a strong and consistent safety management system (SMS). A winning strategy begins with: • evaluation of Priority 17 employers existing SMS; • consultations with our safety advisors; • training Priority 17 employers to improve their SMS; and • building strong accountability frameworks to ensure risk-based training is effective. *Source for time-loss claims: Saskatchewan Workers’ Compensation Board 2011 quarterly claims report.

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

2. Leading Practice Groups (LPG) Leading practice groups will consist of employer members who share common operational characteristics. They will meet regularly with the intent to reduce workplace injuries. This group pairs members with outstanding safety accomplishments with those struggling, so successes can be shared and challenges can be overcome together. The goal of a LPG is to identify leading practice policies and procedures for the health care sector. The SASWH website will become the repository for this information so that it can be shared among the members. The association’s long-term vision is to build a continuously improving safety culture within the health care sector so that Saskatchewan employers rank as the safest in the country. As a result of employers’ varied needs, two distinct Leading Practice Groups (LPG) will be created: Regional Health Authorities (RHAs) Currently, all RHAs and several supporting organizations engage one another at a variety of different levels that include CEOs, vice-presidents and other safety professionals. SASWH will support this group and facilitate its evolution into becoming a recognized LPG. The goal for this group in 2012 will be to implement and improve safety systems. In 2013, the focus will be on reducing musculoskeletal injuries.

Specific Initiatives


Saskatoon Affiliates - LPG SASWH will work to create a LPG with Saskatoon affiliates. The Saskatoon group will also focus on the development and implementation of safety systems and will receive significant support from the association in the form of consultation and training services.

3. Small Employer Risk Strategy Typically, large employers introduce health and safety management systems that consist of numerous documents, policies, procedures, training and communications. Often, the sophisticated nature of this type of system does not make sense for a smaller employer. Smaller employers tend to identify specific risks in their workplace and then work to mitigate those risks. SASWH plans to carefully review WCB claims data and work collaboratively with small employers to determine the exact injuries and risks that affect this group the most. Then, a program will be developed to address their specific issues and risks to make an impact in injury reduction. This strategy is projected for completion by the end of 2012.

Specific Initiatives

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

11


4,097 Total number of claims in 2011:


Roadmap to a Safety Culture Now is the time for the industry to implement a solid, health care specific safety management system (SMS). SASWH has developed a step-by-step consultative process called the Roadmap to a Safety Culture to help employers improve safety culture in their workplace. The Roadmap to a Safety Culture will: • comply with Occupational Health & Safety (OH&S) Regulations; • meet the standards of a WCB audit; and • establish a desired safety culture within the workplace. SASWH will provide support, consultation and core training programs for its members, their employees and the associated unions when navigating the Roadmap to a Safety Culture. This will provide the foundation necessary for health care employers to eliminate injuries and make workplace health and safety a priority.

14

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

Roadmap to a Safety Culture


Programs Over the last ten years, industries across Saskatchewan have been looking to their safety management systems (SMS) as the key to reducing employee risks and eliminating injuries. A SMS is the collection of all documents, forms, policies, procedures, practices, training and communication required to effectively manage health and safety in a workplace. Most industries have experienced a reduction in injury rates of 40% or greater as a result of a strong SMS—the one exception is the health care industry. SASWH will provide core programs for the health care sector to create a world-class SMS for their facility that exceeds the 2007 Joint Industry Committee standard framework indicating all safety systems should contain: • Management and leadership commitment • Assessment and improvement • Training and communication • Employee involvement • Regulatory standards

Core Programs – Safety Management System (SMS) Roadmap to a Safety Culture: This session provides a high-level overview of the Roadmap to a Safety Culture framework and its elements. The Roadmap provides a manageable step-by-step process to help implement

Programs

safety initiatives. It is easily customized for complex and smaller employers alike. The Roadmap also supports the elements of the Occupational Health and Safety legislation and the Workers’ Compensation Board audit results.

Workplace Safety Evaluation (Train the Trainer): The first step in the Roadmap to a Safety Culture—completion of a workplace evaluation, is necessary to identify elements that are working well and where improvement is needed to achieve an injury free workplace. Participants will work through an evaluation template and complete a sample action plan that will assist with implementing a change in culture. The objective will be to increase the focus on safety and the value of risk-based training programs to ultimately reduce injuries.

Effective Identification & Control of Hazards/ Risks (Train the Trainer): This session will provide trainer candidates with the tools and resources necessary to teach others how to effectively complete inspections and job safety analysis. Participants will fact-find case scenarios focusing on identification of root cause.

Risk-Based Training Programs Transferring Lifting Repositioning (TLR): This program is designed to assist workers with identifying and managing/eliminating risks associated with client handling and moving general objects.

Professional Assault Response Training (PART):

Leadership & Safety: Today’s health care managers and supervisors are accountable for a variety of tasks including the safety of employees. This interactive session will provide information, tools and resources to assist leaders in understanding legislative requirements and to implement a constantly improving safety culture in their environment.

Effective Incident Investigation – Finding the Facts (Train the Trainer): This session will provide trainer candidates with the tools and resources necessary to teach others how to effectively complete investigations. Through hands-on and role-play activities, participants will fact find case scenarios focusing on identification of root cause.

This program is designed to assist workers with a means of identification and appropriate response to potentially assaultive situations. PART principles support the emphasis of self-control, assessment skills and verbal crisis intervention.

Safe Moving and Repositioning Techniques (SMART): This program is designed to assist workers with identifying and managing/eliminating risks associated with manual handling of objects/materials.

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

15


Strategic Plan Strategic Priority

1

Promote the establishment of strong accountability frameworks for Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) within health sector workplaces: • Develop a provincial OHS Management System template for health sector firms including guidelines for effective accountability • Develop training programs to help firms implement the new OHS Management System standard • Investigate the possibility of obtaining a common web based OHS Management System e-tool for use by all members • Support health sector firms targeted under the WorkSafe Saskatchewan Priority Firms initiative

Ambition To reduce the G22 time-loss injury rate by 10% per year To reduce the G22 total injury rate by 10% per year To reduce the Priority 17 total injury rate by 10% per year To increase the number of firms with OHS Management Systems by 10% per year To help 90% of the Priority Firms

Actions A process/template for implementing safety management systems in large organizations has been developed. This process is consistent with a methodology developed by Workers’ Compensation Board and used in the manufacturing and public service industries in Saskatchewan. Currently this process is being implemented across all ministries. Our process includes:

16

1

Obtaining the member’s leadership commitment through public signing of a charter; the Safe Saskatchewan Health & Safety Leadership Charter Uniting external messaging/strategies—Labour Relations and Workplace Safety (LRWS), Occupational Health & Safety (OHS), Saskatchewan Workers’ Compensation Board (WCB) and the association—and looking for opportunities to partner with employers on safety communications

2 3

Obtain leadership endorsement of the association’s role in providing consultation and training in the improvement of safety management systems On November 16, SASWH presented to the Leadership Council with the goal of obtaining commitment from all Regional Health Authorities (RHAs) to the above process/template. The meeting was well attended and largely successful. Plan is in place to complete the development of core safety system training programs by June 30, 2012.

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

A preliminary investigation of e-tools has been made. A partnership is in development with the Nova Scotia Health and Community Safety Association (AWARE-NS) to share e-campus resources thus lowering operational costs and expanding services and programs.

Progress in 2011 Figures below as of December 31, 2011: G22 time-loss injury rate decreased by 8% in 2011 G22 total injury rate decreased by 6% in 2011 Priority 17 time-loss injury rate decreased by 8.6% in 2011 Priority 17 total injury rate decreased by 6.6% in 2011 0% increase in firms with OHS Management Systems for 2011 At the end of 2011, 76% of Priority 17 firms have been contacted and an engagement strategy is in place to help them.

Strategic Plan


Strategic Priority

2

Promote the value that injury and illness prevention brings to the workplace: • Develop and implement a participative consultation process for association members that supports their ownership for OHS within their workplaces • Develop and implement a communications strategy that promotes health and safety in the workplace and the availability of services and resources from the association • Facilitate effective relationships and provide access between the association and workers, employers and occupational health committees • E xplore relationships with external key players who support the association’s vision

Ambition

Progress in 2011

To increase the number of health sector workers who believe OHS is a priority by 5% per year

71% of Priority 17 firms have signed or are committed to signing the Saskatchewan Health & Safety Leadership Charter.

Actions

Overall, 22 members or health care related organizations have signed or committed to signing the Saskatchewan Health & Safety Leadership Charter representing an increase of 144% from 2010.

The consultation process has been developed. Elements include: • Ensuring CEO/Leadership commitment • Individual assessment of current OHS Management System • Development of action plans specific to that organization with an end date specified • Delivery of train the trainer type programs and proactive consultation related to those programs • Follow-up assessment • Perception surveys Building and maintaining relationships continue to be a priority.

Strategic Plan

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

17


Strategic Priority

3

Establish the Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health as a credible source of OHS information and services for members: • Develop the association’s website to include a comprehensive set of OHS information products, e-tools, links and e-learning options that can be accessed by all members • Provide employers and workers with better access to OHS information and services • Improve the design of existing or new programs and services to enable access to all members

Ambition

Actions

Progress in 2011

Increase the number of web hits by 10% per year

The OHS Resources area on the website has now been completely set-up. The current structure will provide easier navigation and access to the OHS Management System and other learning resources. Links to some online podcasts, webinars and free courses have been added.

Tracking for the website was launched in May 2011. Performance measure not yet available.

Provide train the trainer to 100% of those workers who require it Increase the number of workers that access online training by 10% per year See 90% of clients rate the quality of service as high

Currently no training is available online, but a partnership is under development with the Nova Scotia Health and Community Services Safety association (AWARE-NS) to work on an e-campus solution. Internal training resumed in September with a new educator.

18

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

Strategic Plan


Strategic Priority

4

Promote the adoption of evidence-based leading practices and provincial OHS standards within the health sector workplaces: • Provide links to quality OHS best practice documents of interest to health sector employers on the association’s website • Engage stakeholders to identify evidence-based leading practices to address specific priorities identified by members • Support the members in achieving provincial standards and legislation for health sector employers

Ambition

Progress in 2011

Develop three standards or leading practices

No standards/leading practices developed

See a 10% increase in the number of web hits to access standards or leading practices

Increase in hits is N/A at this time

Actions Links to best practice websites are now live on the SASWH website. Links have been added to the WCB Act, legislation requirements, handbooks, safety information and more. As an association, we are trying to shift from being “reactive” to our members needs to being “proactive” with guidance and expertise. Once OHS Management Systems have been effectively implemented, they will lead to a significant reduction in injuries. Further, they will enable TLR, PART and SMART to be as successful as possible. That is the time to look at the injuries remaining and build specific risk based standards, practices and training to deal with them. This will coincide with the implementation of two leading practice groups which will focus on specific standards.

Strategic Plan

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

19


Strategic Priority

5

Provide training and education that supports injury and illness prevention: • Assess the programs and delivery mechanisms for TLR, PART and SMART • Engage stakeholders to identify training/education programs and processes to be delivered by the association • Expand, where practical, the use of web based training and education programs • Maximize internal OHS capacity through train the trainer courses, providing training and support internal employer safety champions • Advocate for better and more comprehensive OHS education at post-secondary institutions and regulatory/professional bodies

Ambition

Progress in 2011

Provide Train the Trainer to 100% of those workers who require it

TLR Train the Trainer: two sessions/11 participants

Increase the number of workers that access online training by 10% per year

TLR Trainer Re-certification: two sessions/19 participants

Actions

PART Train the Trainer: five sessions/36 participants

A project plan is being developed to implement a comprehensive internal review of TLR, PART and SMART during the first half of 2012. Instructor groups for TLR and PART met in mid-September and will play a part in the review.

TLR Client Moving-Front line Worker: one session/9 participants PART Trainer Re-certification: two sessions/15 participants SMART Instructor Qualification: one instructor qualification SMART – Assisted regional instructor with Train the Trainer sessions: two sessions/14 participants

Train the Trainer programs for OHS Management System courses to be developed from January to June, 2012.

20

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

Strategic Plan


Strategic Priority

6

To demonstrate transparency and accountability in the association’s resource allocation: • Finalize and regularly report progress on the association’s strategic plan to members • Establish infrastructure, staff and governance structure to enable accomplishment of the association’s strategic plan • Use resources efficiently and effectively to improve OHS for all workers in the province

Ambition

Progress in 2011

100% compliance with accounting and reporting rules in the independent financial audit

SASWH achieved 100% compliance with accounting and reporting rules in the 2010 independent financial audit

Publish annually the balanced budget

2010 annual audited financial report was published

Publish annually the audited financial report

Actions Held the 2011 annual general meeting; the association fulfilled all legal business requirements. SASWH acquired office space, furniture and filled nine staffing positions including the CEO. An HR manual has been created and implemented. We are in negotiations to expand our facility in Regina. We may look to rent out vacant offices in Regina (once expansion is complete) and to rent offices in Saskatoon from another safety association.

Strategic Plan

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

21


410

The number of people we’ll keep injury-free when we reach our 2012 goal.


Independent Auditors Report KPMG LLP Chartered Accountants

Auditors’ Responsibility

Opinion

McCallum Hill Centre, Tower II 1881 Scarth Street, 20th Floor Regina, SK S4P 4K9 Canada

Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with Canadian generally accepted auditing standards. Those standards require that we comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement.

In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Saskatchewan Association of Safe Workplaces in Health as at December 31, 2011, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles.

Telephone (306) 791-1200 Fax (306) 757-4703 www.kpmg.ca

To the Directors We have audited the accompanying financial statements of Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (formerly G22 Safety Association - note 1), which comprise the balance sheet as at December 31, 2011, the statements of operations and net assets and cash flows for the year then ended, and notes, comprising a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information.

Management’s Responsibility for the Financial Statements Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in accordance with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles, and for such internal control as management determines is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

24

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on our judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, we consider internal control relevant to the entity’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements.

Chartered Accountants

Regina, Canada February 21, 2012

We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained in our audits is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion.

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

Financials


Balance Sheet Year ended December 31, 2011, with comparative information for 2010 2010

2011 Assets Current assets:

Cash

Accounts receivable

$

Prepaid expenses

14,928

Investment (note 3)

401,754

400,986

590,151

550,606

Property, plant and equipment (note 4)

$

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

$

Deferred revenue

$

136,984

29,583

-

143,886

12,636

2,000

75,500 665,651

$

552,606

37,065

$

1,403

Liabilities and Net Assets Current liabilities: -

10,496

47,561

1,403

Net assets

618,090

551,203

Commitments (note 5)

$

665,651

$

552,606

See accompanying notes to financial statements.

Financials

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

25


Statement of Operations and Net Assets Year ended December 31, 2011, with comparative information for 2010 2010

2011 Revenue: Funding from Saskatchewan Workers’ Compensation Board $ 882,250 Training and development revenue 116,194 Interest 33 998,477 Expenses: Salaries and benefits 448,007 Contracting fees 207,001 Meetings and travel 54,999 Rent 45,040 Training and development 44,120 Office and administration 30,305 Advertising and promotion 27,239 Communications 21,839 Amortization 13,642 Consulting 10,214 Repairs and maintenance 9,582 Professional fees 7,160 Utilities 4,683 Insurance 4,489 Miscellaneous 3,270 Executive search - Facilitation - 931,590 Excess of revenue over expenses 66,887 Net assets, beginning of year Net assets, end of year $

551,203 618,090

$

697,000 1,088 698,088 6,736 11,863 487 1,000 85,309 2,867 802 400 35,271 2,150 146,885 551,203

$

551,203

See accompanying notes to financial statements.

26

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

Financials


Statement of Cash Flows Year ended December 31, 2011, with comparative information for 2010 2010

2011 Cash provided by (used in):

Operations:

Excess of revenues over expenses

Item not involving cash:

Amortization of property, plant and equipment

$

66,887

$

551,203

13,642

-

(29,583)

-

Change in non-cash operating items:

Increase in accounts receivable

Increase in investment

(768)

(400,986)

Increase in prepaid expenses

(2,292)

(12,636)

Increase in accounts payable and accrued liabilities

35,662

1,403

Increase in deferred revenue

10,496

-

94,044

138,984

Investments:

Addition to property, plant and equipment

(87,142)

(2,000)

Increase in cash

6,902

136,984

Cash, beginning of year

136,984

Cash, end of year

143,886

$

$

136,984

See accompanying notes to financial statements.

Financials

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

27


Notes to the Financial Statements 1. N  ature of operations: The Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (the “Corporation”) was incorporated as G22 Safety Association Inc. under The Non-Profit Corporations Act of Saskatchewan on February 12, 2010 and commenced active operations on that date. On February 22, 2011, the Corporation amended their name to Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health. The primary purpose of the Corporation is to develop and co-ordinate safety training programs for safety and injury prevention for workers in the province of Saskatchewan. Pursuant to a funding agreement, the Corporation receives significant funding revenue from the Saskatchewan Workers’ Compensation Board (the “WCB”) to finance the development and coordination of the safety training programs referred to above. As a result, the Corporation is dependent upon the continuance of this funding to maintain operations at their current level. The agreement provides further that all property, plant and equipment or assets acquired for safety program development and training are deemed to be supplied by the WCB and shall remain the property of the WCB. Additionally, the agreement provides that on dissolution of the Corporation, assets will be transferred to the WCB.

2. S ignificant accounting policies: The financial statements are prepared in accordance with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles. The following policies are considered significant:

28

(a) R  evenue recognition: Contributions are recognized as revenue when received or receivable if the amount to be received can be reasonably estimated and collection is reasonably assured.

(b) F  inancial assets and liabilities: The CICA Handbook, Section 3855 establishes standards for recognizing and measuring financial assets and financial liabilities. The measurement basis depends on whether the financial assets or liabilities has been classified as held for trading, available for sale, held to maturity, loans and receivables, or other financial liabilities. Financial assets classified as held for trading are measured at fair value and changes in fair value are recognized in increase in operations for the year. Financial assets or liabilities classified as available for sale are measured at fair value with changes in fair value recorded in

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

Financials


other comprehensive income, however, unrealized losses considered other than temporary continue to be recognized as a decrease in operations for the year. Financial assets or liabilities designated as held to maturity, loans and receivables, or other financial liabilities are measured at amortized cost using the effective interest method. The Corporation has no financial instruments designated as available for sale. Cash and investments are designated as held for trading. Accounts receivable have been designated as loans and receivables. Accounts payable and accrued liabilities are designated as other financial liabilities. The Corporation has elected to apply the disclosure requirements of the CICA Handbook, Section 3861 in place of Handbook Sections 3862 and 3863, which results in more limited disclosure of the nature and extent of risks arising from financial instruments.

(c) Property, plant and equipment: Property, plant and equipment is recorded at cost. Amortization is calculated using the straight-line method over their estimated useful lives as follows: Asset

Financials

Rate

Office furniture and equipment

5 years

Leasehold improvements

5 years

Computer hardware

5 years

Computer software

5 years

(d) Income taxes: The Corporation is incorporated under the Non-Profit Corporations Act of Saskatchewan. Under present legislation, no income taxes are payable on reported income of such corporations. (e) Use of estimates: The preparation of financial statements in conformity with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amount of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from these estimates.

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

29


3. Investment: The investment is comprised of a term deposit that has an effective interest rate of 1.25% (2010 - 0.90%) and maturity date of January 11, 2012 (2010 - September 22, 2011).

4. Property, plant and equipment:

Office furniture and equipment

29,685 $

$

Leasehold improvements Computer hardware

Computer software

$

2,917

2010 Net book value

2011 Net book value

Accumulated Cost amortization $

26,768

$

2,000

3,663

485

3,178

-

43,005

7,824

35,181

-

12,789 89,142 $

2,416 13,642

-

10,373 $

75,500

$

2,000

5. C  ommitments: The Corporation is committed under leases for office space, office equipment and vehicles over the next four years as follows: 2012

$

2013 2014

7,038

2015

6,451

30

53,757 12,960

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

$

80,206

Financials


6. F air value of financial assets and financial liabilities: The fair value of the Corporation’s cash, investment, accounts receivable and accounts payable and accrued liabilities approximate their carrying amounts due to their short-term nature.

7. C  apital management: The Corporation’s primary objective when managing capital is to preserve capital to develop and co-ordinate safety training programs for safety and injury prevention related training, programs and services for workers in Saskatchewan.

8. R  isk management: The Corporation, through its financial assets and liabilities, has exposures to credit risk and interest rate risk. Credit risk The Corporation’s principal financial assets are cash, investment and accounts receivable, which are subject to credit risk. The carrying amounts of financial assets on the balance sheet represent the Corporation’s maximum credit exposure at the balance sheet date. Interest rate risk The Corporation has limited exposure to interest rate risk on its investment due to its short-term maturity.

9. C  omparative figures: Certain 2010 comparative figures have been reclassified to conform with the financial statement presentation adopted in the current year.

Financials

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011

31


Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) 1816 - 9th Avenue North Regina, Saskatchewan S4R 7T4

P. 306.545.5595 F. 306.545.6574

info@saswh.ca www.saswh.ca

Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health (SASWH) Annual Report 2011


SASWH Annual Report - 2011