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to library books and fuel for the bulldozers. In all, 37 parents and 42 companies raised $150,000. With the move to King’s Road, the school transformed from a schoolhouse into a full K-12 program, and within the next eight years the school’s population quadrupled to 1,200. At each phase of growth, the parent-school community led the school forward with vision, commitment and financial support to create an ever-improving center of educational excellence. 1970s & 80s: community spirit and action In the early 1970s, student enrollment at King’s Road was so great that a second campus, Ulu Pandan, was built for grades K-8. Fittingly, Ulu Pandan was dedicated on Thanksgiving Day 1973 and quickly became the venue for community and school activities such as 4th of July celebrations, football games and county fairs. At the campus dedication, U.S. Ambassador Edwin Cronk said, “Through community interest and action we can give our young people the opportunity to enjoy a full and interesting life in this wonderful country.” 1990s & 2000s: looking to the future The student population continued to grow, and in the early 1990s further expansion was again necessary. For several years a satellite school (BayTree) provided additional capacity while plans were made to lease a 37-acre property in Woodlands. Once again, parents, companies, the PTA, the Booster Club and even the bus operators contributed to the building fund. In 1994, elementary principal Pete Larson commented, “Everywhere you look, volunteer action and community initiative are in ready evidence, and as a result, the American community exudes an ambience kindred to our

Ulu Pandan campus, 1972–96

SEPTEMBER 2011

very best childhood memories.” The Woodlands campus officially opened in 1996. Designed for 2,800 students, the campus was expected to be sufficient for at least fifteen years, but dramatic growth soon persuaded the Board of Governors to expand, “very much in keeping with the tradition of the boards that had preceded it. Like each successive school board, the 2002 governors looked beyond the school’s present needs and challenges with an optimistic vision of the future.” The resulting three-year construction phase contributed an early childhood center and a new high school building, in addition to more classrooms, athletics facilities and an array of visual and performing arts venues. our most valuable asset SAS is what it is today because of a community that cares. With a population of more than 3,885 students, it is the largest single-campus international school with one of the finest reputations in the world. Minister Mentor Lee Kwan Yew, in his remarks at the school’s 50th anniversary commemoration in 2006, proclaimed the American “can-do” spirit as the school’s most valuable asset. At the same event, teacher and alumnus Jim Baker said, “The dreams of the SAS founders have been kept alive by succeeding generations of supportive Americans.” The vision, commitment and philanthropy of the school community—and the community members’ ability to act as visionaries and plan for the future— will ensure that Singapore American School continues to prepare students for generations to come. Text compiled from Singapore’s Eagles 1956-2006 and Singapore American Newspaper.

The current SAS campus at the Woodlands, 1996–present

SINGAPORE AMERICAN SCHOOL JOURNEYS

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Profile for Singapore American School

Singapore American School Journeys September 2011, Volume 10  

SAS Journeys is published twice a year by the advancement office of Singapore American School. It is distributed free of charge to alumni, p...

Singapore American School Journeys September 2011, Volume 10  

SAS Journeys is published twice a year by the advancement office of Singapore American School. It is distributed free of charge to alumni, p...

Profile for sasnf