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Competent, caring, knowledge-based registered nursing for the people of Saskatchewan

Volume 14, Number 3, Summer 2012

Leadership Rising to the Challenge Annual Meeting Resolutions • CCP Audit • Continuing Competence Spirit at Work • Nurse Practitioner Focus • Nurse to Know Leadership Conference • Health Quality Council • Annual Meeting & Conference Ethics Corner, SRNA Awards and More!

SaSk atch ewan R egi SteR ed n u R SeS’ aSSociation


Summer 2012 Vol.14 N0. 3

Contents President’s Message

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Executive Director’s Message

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SRNA Annual Meeting Resolutions

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ASK A PrACTICe ADVISor What Are My Responsibilities as a Supervising RN?

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The SRNA Newsbulletin is published four times a year by the SRNA. Its purpose is to inform RNs about the Association’s activities, provide a forum for discussion and information of topical interest. Inclusion of items in the SRNA Newsbulletin does not imply endorsement or approval by the SRNA. A subscription is $21.40 per year, outside Canada, $30.00 per year.

Connections

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National Nursing Week

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leTTer To THe eDITor Nursing Becoming More Influential

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ISSN 1494-76668

Continuing Competence

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Spirit at Work: How it Affects Me in My Nursing Workplace

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NurSe PrACTITIoNerS It’s About Time!

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NPOS/SANP Education Day

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Putting Patients First: LEAN, Releasing Time to Care and the LEADS Network

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HeAlTH QuAlITY CouNCIl Five Reasons Why You Should Take IHI Open School Online Courses

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SASKATCHeWAN SurGICAl INITIATIVe Release of Year Two Report

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eTHICS CorNer Cultural Diversity and Cultural Competence

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SRNA Annual Meeting and Conference

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SRNA 2012 Awards

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SRNA Public Survey Results

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SRNA Update

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The Saskatchewan Registered Nurses’ Association (SRNA) is a professional licensing body established in 1917 by the Registered Nurses Act of the provincial legislature. Its purpose is to set standards of education and practice for the nursing profession, and to license and support nurses as RNs to ensure the public receives quality nursing care.

Managing Editor: Shelley Svedahl E-mail: communications@srna.org The SRNA office is located at 2066 Retallack Street, Regina, SK S4T 7X5 Phone: 306-359-4200 FAX: 306-359-0257 Toll Free: 1-800-667-9945 E-mail: communications@srna.org Website: www.srna.org SRNA COUNCIL President: Kandice Hennenfent, RN 306-694-3949 President-Elect: Signy Klebeck, RN 306-659-4289 Members-at-Large Jeannie Coe, RN(NP) 306-425-2174 (Ext. 3) Sherry Culham, RN 306-766-8484 Robin Evans, RN 306-337-3354 Glen-mary Christopher, RN 306-786-0420 Pamela Komonoski, RN(NP) 306-966-2397 Janice Giroux, RN 306-842-8652 Noreen Reed, RN 306-883-4471 Public Representatives Karen Gibbons 306-729-4306 James Leach 306-244-4800 Heather McAvoy 306-652-5442 Executive Director Karen Eisler, RN 306-359-4200 Copy Deadlines: November 15 for Winter; February 10 for Spring; May 15 for Summer; and August 15 for Fall. The complete rate sheet is available online at: http://www.srna.org/ images/stories/srna_2012_nb_ad_rates.pdf To place advertising in the SRNA Newsbulletin please contact: SRNA at: communications@srna.org Toll Free: 1-800-667-9945

On the Cover: Left to Right: Kandy Hennenfent, RN; Kyla Avis, RN; Pam Molnar, RN and Dan Florizone, Deputy Minister of Health.

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President’s Message

2012 Annual Meeting and Conference

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hank you to everyone who attended the SRNA Annual Meeting and Conference in Regina. There were 177 attendees for the Annual Meeting; 158 for the Annual Awards Recognition Banquet; and 284 for the Annual Conference. A total of 365 individuals attended one or more activities. The SRNA held its second online voting for elections. Although voter turnout was considerably less than anticipated, we are hopeful that more members will participate in this new cost-saving format in future years. Congratulations and welcome to the new SRNA Council members, elected on May 2, 2012 in Regina (2012 – 2015): Glen-mary Christopher, RN Region IV and Pamela Komonoski, RN(NP) Region VI. Welcome to the new Nominations Committee member (2012 – 2014): Deanna Barlow, RN(NP) Thanks to all those who took the leadership challenge and had the courage to let their names stand for election. If you would like to know more about the 2013 nominations and elections please check out the information posted on the website under: About Us/Council or contact communications@srna.org. David Kline, RN is the Chair of the Nominations Committee. The SRNA would like to thank

Back Row left to right: Heather mcAvoy; Janice Giroux, rN; Signy Klebeck, rN; James leach; robin evans, rN; Karen Gibbons; Karen eisler, rN Front Row left to right: Noreen reed, rN; Pamela Komonoski, rN(NP); Jeanine Coe, rN(NP); Kandy Hennefent, rN; Sherry Culham, rN. missing: Glen-mary Christopher, rN

the following outgoing members of Council and the Nominations Committee for their leadership and service: Mark Tarry, RN(NP) Sandra Weseen, RN Patti Leblanc, RN, Member of the Nominations Committee 2012 SRNA

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Bylaw revisions were approved by the membership at the May 2, 2012 Annual Meeting. Bylaws will be reprinted in the fall, 2012. This information is posted on the SRNA website.

Kandy Hennenfent, RN SRNA President

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e x e c u t i v e d i r e c to r ’ s u P d at e

What Can You Do?

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ohn F. Kennedy said “Do not ask what your country can do for you but rather what can you do for your country.” I believe this quote applies to transforming the Saskatchewan health system – ‘Do not ask what transforming the health system can do for you but what can you do to transform the health system in Saskatchewan.’ What if every health care provider and citizen asked themselves that question. Saskatchewan would be the leader in health care in the world and Saskatchewan people would be the beneficiaries. Greg Basky, Director of Communications, Health Quality Council wrote about “Balancing humility and impatience as we work on getting better at getting better” and below is an exerpt from his article. As we work to transform our health care system here in Saskatchewan, we must be both hard – and easy – on ourselves.

‘Do not ask what transforming the health system can do for you but what can you do to transform the health system in Saskatchewan.’ Easy, in that we need to be patient. Cut yourself some slack, I heard them say. You are going to stumble on this journey of learning how to improve. At the same time, we need to be continuously pushing ourselves to do more and do it faster – for the sake of the patients and families we serve. That good is never good enough. And that we must keep raising the bar.

Transforming health care requires us to be humble AND – at the same time – relentless in our pursuit of making care better and safer. We need to get comfortable with this constructive tension between accepting that we won’t get things right the first time and never being satisfied. These other systems we’re learning from have been on their transformation journeys for 10 years or more. And they’re still working on getting better at getting better. They’ve learned that there’s no end point on their journey. It’s about the process not the destination. (Basky, Quality Summit 2012) Greg’s insights help us understand how we can do things differently in Saskatchewan. We can achieve Better Health, Better Care, Better Value and Better Teams. Let’s work together to make it happen!

For the full article, visit: http://blog.hqc.sk.ca/2012/05/10/balancing-humility-andimpatience-as-we-work-on-getting-better-at-getting-better/

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Karen Eisler, RN SRNA Executive Director


s r na e l e c t i o n s

Annual Meeting Resolutions

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ine resolutions passed by the membership at the May 2, 2012 Annual Meeting in Regina will be taken to the June Council meeting. Options for Handling Resolutions: 1. Delegate to Executive Director for action as it is consistent with Ends and/or EL work with request for reporting to membership by February, 2013. 2. Action by Council as a committee of the whole, or by special committee. 3. Council decides not to pursue resolution at this time. 4. Other options as proposed by Council.

RESOLUTION #3

BE IT RESOLVED THAT SRNA work with all employers to support the use of technology by all health professionals and students in the clinical practice environment.

RESOLUTION #4

BE IT RESOLVED THAT a working group of RN(NP)’s and SRNA representation is formed to devise new RN(NP) license renewal requirements that continue to ensure public safety without unnecessarily restricting qualified practitioners.

RESOLUTION #5

BE IT RESOLVED THAT the SRNA RESOLUTION #1 BE IT work with the Saskatchewan Union RESOLVED THAT in the interest of of Nurses, Nursing Educational fostering accountability to the public, Institutions and other stakeholders the SRNA collaborate with other to optimize the roles of Registered professional regulatory bodies and Nurses(RNs) and Registered Nurse, Regional Health Authorities to have all Nurse Practitioners (RN NPs). health professionals communicate to Further be it resolved that the SRNA individuals and families their first and undertakes work that is both internal last name, designation and role on the and external and promotes the role of health care team. all RNs.

RESOLUTION #2

BE IT RESOLVED THAT to facilitate the transition and integration of nursing students into the nursing workforce, SRNA work with Nursing Educators and all employers to further develop education initiatives and resources to prepare RNs and RN(NP)s to be preceptors for nursing students.

RESOLUTION #6

BE IT RESOLVED THAT SRNA conduct a review of the practice of requiring hours worked as a method of measuring continued competency. And further that if hours of work is maintained as a requirement for maintaining licensure as a RN or a RN(NP), that hours worked as a graduate in either category be counted towards the required number of hours for maintenance of licensure.

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RESOLUTION #7

BE IT RESOLVED THAT the SRNA and SANP form a coalition with the intent of expanding the current scope of practice legislation to include: • Hospital admissions and discharge (Attending Health Professional Regulation) • Remove the ER bypass requirement when an NP is providing emergency room coverage (Ambulance Regulation) • Signage of Death Certificate (Vital Statistics Act) • Certify individuals under the Mental Health Act (Mental Health Act) • Pre-operative assessments (Hospitals Standards Act) • Allow NPs to sign all “sick slips” for all employers (multiple employers) • Thereby improving health care access for the people of Saskatchewan.

RESOLUTION #8

BE IT RESOLVED THAT the SRNA change bylaw VI, Section 3(3)(b)(vi) to “forms of contrast and non contrast radiographic energy” which would reflect the RN(NP) scope of education, thereby improving health care access to the population of Saskatchewan.

RESOLUTION #9

BE IT RESOLVED THAT the SRNA collaborate with SANP and SK Health to develop a measurement system that reflects the RN(NP) contribution to the health care system, thereby accurately reflecting the RN(NP) value added to the system.

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by Terri belcourt, rN, Nursing Advisor, Practice

ASK A PrACTICe ADVISor

What Are My Responsibilities as a Supervising RN? I am a RN Working with a Graduate Nurse (GN). What can the GN do? What are my responsibilities as the supervising RN? SRNA Council recently approved Guidelines for Graduate Nurse Practice, 2012. This document was created to provide direction to GNs, RNs and managers who work with GNs. This resource is available online; however a few key points are presented here.

GN Defined GNs are members of the SRNA who have not yet met all of the registration requirements for registration as a RN (ie: passed the CRNE). The GN may: • have just graduated from an approved registered nursing education program in Saskatchewan or from another Canadian jurisdiction, or • have recently come to Canada (Internationally Educated Nurse [IEN]). These GNs may have a varying degree of RN experience in their home country and in other countries (SRNA, 2009).

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Background GNs are valuable members of the health care team who require support in consolidating their skills in our provincial health care system. GNs can work in various practice environments including acute care, community health, long term care and other areas where appropriate supervision by a RN in available (SRNA, 2011). Whether a GN has graduated from a Saskatchewan nursing education program, or has been educated internationally, they all have been educated or evaluated to meet the SRNA Standards and Foundation Competencies for Registered Nurses, 2007 (currently under review). This document provides the basis for curriculum development for Saskatchewan schools of nursing, as well as the basis for evaluation of IEN equivalency. Regardless of how the member has come to be registered as a GN, they are responsible for practicing in accordance with SRNA

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Standards and Competencies and the CNA Code of Ethics.

Supervision GNs must be supervised by a RN, or where appropriate by a RPN (SRNA, 2011). This requirement applies from the first day the GN begins practicing right through to their last day as a GN. There are different levels of supervision, and it is the responsibility


of the RN working with the GN to evaluate the level of supervision required to ensure safe care for the clients. The supervising RN must be knowledgeable about the nursing care required for the GN’s client assignment and must determine the level of supervision based on the GN’s knowledge, skill and ability related to that particular client assignment. Supervision should begin as direct, or side-by-side supervision until the RN has had time to evaluate the GN’s level of competence and can determine if the supervision can be less direct (SRNA, 2012). The level of supervision the GN requires is dynamic and depending on client acuity could change from day to day

GNs are valuable members of the health care team who require support in consolidating their skills...

or even hour to hour if the client’s condition changes. It is important to remember that the supervising RN has overall responsibility for the coordination of care and for the assignment given to the GN. The GN is responsible for the care he/she provides and must ask for direction if/ when needed.

as transfer of medical function. GNs cannot perform transfer of medical function skills. It is not possible to provide a list of skills GNs can or cannot perform. The RN and GN should refer to organizational policies and procedures to determine the appropriateness for the GN to perform the skill.

What can a GN do?

Providing a quality practice environment for GNs

GNs can do most activities that a RN can but there are a few limitations. GNs learn many skills in nursing education programs, however they may not have the opportunity to perform these skills in a real life practice setting. The GN must communicate with the RN their level of comfort and competence with performing skills. Skills that are considered to be special nursing procedures may be performed by the GN provided the GN has received the additional theory required by the agency/facility for these skills. The RN must always supervise the GN when the GN is performing a special nursing procedure. There are additional skills that are categorized

GNs require time and support to transition from a student to a well adjusted and confident RN. GNs benefit greatly from an environment that provides them with stable client assignments, co-workers who embrace new members of the team and an atmosphere of inquiry where GNs are encouraged to ask many questions. More information on the transition of GNs to RNs can be obtained through Nursing the Future - http://www. nursingthefuture.ca. To view the complete document: Guidelines for Graduate Nurse Practice, 2012: http://www.srna.org/ images/stories/pdfs/nurse_resources/ guidlines_for_graduate_nurse_ practice_2012_05_08.pdf

References Saskatchewan Registered nurses’ association. (2009). Bylaws. Regina, Sk: author. Saskatchewan Registered nurses’ association. (2011). interpretation of the Registered nurses act, 1988. council Policy, 3.18. Saskatchewan Registered nurses’ association. (2012). guidelines for graduate nurse Practice. Regina, Sk: author.

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connections by barb Fitz-Gerald, rN Nursing Advisor, Practice

Workplace Representatives Mark National Nursing Week

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nnually the SRNA Workplace Representatives (WPR) can apply for a kit that contains posters, activity lists and promotional items to use for celebrating National Nursing Week (NNW). This year over 120 WPRs received kits and organized festivities in their workplaces from May 7th13th. It is amazing what time and energy the SRNA WPRs put into not only celebrating their co-workers and the nursing profession, but also showcasing and educating the public on the role of the RN. WPRs Deb Grychewski RN, Joanne Petersen RN, and Donna Milbrandt, RN all brought the profession to life during NNW in a unique way. In Norquay, Deb Grychewski RN, along with current and retired nurses held their annual NNW banquet. Deb also organized local school children in physical fitness by participating in a community walk, and learning the roles RNs take in health prevention, community engagement and personal wellness. Donna Milbrant RN, from Yorkton wrote an informative, passionate letter to her local paper highlighting the changes to the RN role and why additional education was needed to meet the evolving health care needs of the public. She also explained that nursing is a knowledge profession based on critical thinking gained from evidence-based research.

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Closing the gap: from evidence to action

It is amazing what time and energy the SRNA WPRs put into … educating the public on the role of the RN. Joanne Petersen, RN who works at the Moose Jaw Union Hospital Emergency Room (ER) created storyboards using pictures and anecdotes to underscore the good nursing provided by the nurses she works with. The collage of the RNs’ personal and professional lives shows the richness, diversity and experience these RNs bring to their practice. Kudos to these nurse leaders for highlighting the varied and vibrant role that RNs have in Saskatchewan.

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Every year on May 12th nurses around the globe celebrate International Nurses Day (IND). To commemorate IND, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) publishes education kits for nurses. This year the kit contained the document, Closing the gap: from evidence to action. It highlighted the need for nurses to use evidencebased research and defined what evidenced-based research is. It directed nurses how to find good sources of information, and then implement and evaluate the outcomes. It also emphasized that partnerships between employers, health care professionals, policy makers, patients, families, communities and others are vital to linking research to healthy outcomes. To further develop your knowledge on evidence-based practice, take time to read ICN’s new document, Closing the gap: from evidence to action. It is available at www.icn.ch/ publications/2012-closing-the-gapfrom-evidence-to-action/


An Innovative Idea for National Nursing Week by Joanne Peterson, rN, Workplace representative

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thought it would be a great idea to get all the staff to bring their grad pictures in an effort to get acquainted. National Nursing Week telehealth I snapped some current photos, and ver 22 telehealth sites across Saskatchewan joined Karen Eisler, RN, SRNA conducted informal interviews and Executive Director and Professional Practice Group (PPG) representatives summarized the conversation in a Delores Ast, RN with the Retired Nurses PPG; Susanne Nasewich RN with the short story format. The end result was Saskatchewan HIV\AIDS\HCV Nursing Education Organization; and Heather a poster with a past and present photo Keith RN(NP) with the Nurse Practitioners of Saskatchewan to talk about and a short write-up about the team “Nursing, The Health of Our Nation” theme on May 9, 2012. member. It was a great way to showcase who we are and build team spirit. The entire project cost UNDER $20 and I Celebrating National Nurses Week in my home town! am proud of that. by Deb Grychewski, rN, Workplace representative Delores Ast, rN; Susanne Nasewich, rN; Heather Keith, rN(NP); Karen eisler, rN

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orquay area nurses, retired nurses, students and guests met during National Nursing Week from May 7- 13th to celebrate. The theme: “Nursing, The Health of Our Nation” reflects the positive impact nurses make on the lives and wellbeing of our community. In keeping with this theme the nurses organized a Community Health Hike, including nurses, other health care workers, students and families from Norquay School to promote physical activity and awareness of Nurses week. Retired and practicing nurses and several guests enjoyed supper together, visiting and viewing the various nursing memorabilia brought by members. The guest speaker was Yvonne Hotzak RN, from the area who shared her experiences working as an operating room nurse in Saudi Arabia.

moose Jaw union Hospital celebrates National Nursing Week

Back row- Deb Grywacheski rN, Joy Hubic, Yvonne Hotzak rN, Pat Kauchman, Patrick livingstone rN, oriole livingstone, Frankie Sedilmeir, Heather ostapak, Joanne Jenner rN, Gwen Westerlund Front row- Dawna Abrahamson rN(NP); Dan larson, Joyce Johnson, Joy Fiala, Pauline Johnson, mary Knutson, Doris Johnston Left to Right: Diane Ireland, rN; barb Fitz-Gerald, rN; brandy mcFadden, rN

I also sent invitations encouraging other departments to come meet our team in Emergency. There was lots of interest from other departments and many people came down to see our posters on the walls of our unit. The response was really positive! You just never know how things will be received.

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by Jone barry, rN (NP) CDe

leTTer To THe eDITor The following letter to the editor appeared in the YORKTON THIS WEEK paper on Wednesday, May 9, 2012. Dear Editor: The nursing profession is celebrating National Nursing working alongside other inter-disciplinary team members such as physicians, dieticians, physio and respiratory Week May 7 to 13, 2012. This year’s theme is Nursing, therapists, and social workers. The need for an increasing the Health of our Nation. This will mean different things and varied knowledge base for educational, clinical and to different people depending on one’s personal or leadership roles now demand a Masters or PhD education professional experience within the health care system. and has provided the necessary leverage for executing Traditionally, RNs were viewed by the general public change in healthcare. as the 24/7 direct caregivers for ill patients in an Acute I applaud those who are moving forward with these Care hospital with little direct influence over the general commitments to lead our profession into becoming a prohealth of our communities. A small contingency of active influence of healthcare in our province. RNs really Public health nurses performed basic health promotion do care about their clients and want to deliver patient and and prevention particularly for school-age children. Due family focused care that result in the best to the “fatal availability” of 24/7 nursing Advances in health outcome for clients whether in hospital, model in hospitals, RNs were often called upon to provide after hours services for care and the need to community or participating in a cardiac rehabilitation program. Nursing plays other professions and support services who provide care along the a role in the many aspects of health in generally worked daytime hours. Depending areas such as diabetes education, lactation on the location, this could mean performing continuum required consultant, HIV and clinical education, physiotherapy treatment, starting the porridge at 6 am or checking gauges in the a dramatic shift in pulmonary and cardiac rehab, teambased nurse practitioner, travel nursing, boiler room while the rest of the world slept focus. occupational health, palliative, home or enjoyed weekends off. This led to feelings of increasing frustration as the scope of practice, research- care, mental health, infection control, chemotherapy, air based best practices and technological advances propelled ambulance, management and CEO of health regions. While I am in the twilight of my nursing career nursing into a scientific-based approach to patient/client and must soon turn the page into my next life of care. In order to better care for our clients, we needed to critically think through the process of assessment, nursing opportunities, I am thankful I am a member of a profession who in increasingly influencing the health of diagnosis, make a plan and evaluate the results of our the citizens of our communities. Happy Nurses Week to intervention. Advances in health care and the need to my many colleagues in Sunrise! provide care along the continuum required a dramatic shift in focus. Donna Milbrandt, RN New educational standards encouraged those of us Workplace Representative with diplomas into under-graduate degree programs that fortunately is now readily available by long distance. Saskatchewan Registered Nurses’ Association Registered Nurses can now claim some credit hours for the many hours of rich experience obtained at the bedside

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DISCIPlINe DeCISIoN

Nursing Education Program of Saskatchewan (NEPS) Graduate Survey Report

Laura A. Watson RN#33981, Prince Albert, Saskatchewan

A two-year follow-up survey of the 2007-08 Graduates of the NePS Program showed that: a) 87.2% of respondents are employed as a nurse; b) 92.5% of respondents are currently employed in Saskatchewan. A five-year follow-up survey of the 2005 Graduates of the NePS Program showed that: a) 94.6% of respondents are currently working as a nurse or are currently on paid leave from their nursing position; b) 87.6% of respondents who are employed in nursing are employed in Saskatchewan; and c) of those graduates that are employed within Saskatchewan, 79.5% are not planning to leave to work outside the province.

In an Agreed Statement of Facts, Laura A. Watson entered a guilty plea to two charges of professional misconduct pursuant to subsections 26(1) and 26(2) (q) of The Registered Nurses Act, 1988. Pursuant to section 31(1) (c) of The Registered Nurses Act, 1988, Ms. Watson may continue to practice Registered Nursing with conditions imposed upon her licence as outlined in the penalty order. For a full copy of the Decision, please refer to the SRNA website www.srna.org.

Visit npnow.ca cna and SRna are collaborating in the canadian nurses association (cna) national nurse Practitioner campaign to raise public awareness about how nPs can improve access to quality health care and reduce wait times. Launch date in Saskatchewan was Monday, May 14, 2012. Please follow the campaign on our websites. www.npnow.ca www.srna.org

Share your story. as a Registered nurse how are you Making the difference? each and every day Rns and Rn(nP)s make a difference in the lives of their patients and their families.

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continuing coMPetence

2011 Continuing Competence Audit

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he RN and the RN(NP) Continuing Competence Program (CCP) audits ran concurrently in May 2012. Both audits encompassed the 2011 registration year. In the middle of March, 52 RNs and 14 RN(NP)s were randomly selected to participate in the CCP audit. Letters were sent out requesting half of those selected to submit an audit survey for the 2011 registration year; the other half were requested to submit both the audit survey and their continuing competence documents (personal assessment, peer feedback, learning plan, and evaluation) for 2011. A call for auditors went out to all RNs and RN(NP)s. Those interested were requested to send in a resume as well as a brief explanation as to why they were interested in being an auditor. The Registration and Membership Committee considered all those who expressed an interest and selected two RNs and two RN(NP)s as peer auditors.

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The Registration and Membership Committee considered all those who expressed an interest and selected two RNs and two RN(NP)s as peer auditors. As the surveys and continuing competence documents came into the SRNA office, they were blinded (all identifying information was removed), to maintain confidentiality of the RN or RN(NP) member. Each submission was assigned a number which was used as a reference by the auditors. The audit occurred on May 10th and 11th, 2011. RN submissions were reviewed by RN auditors and RN(NP) submissions were reviewed by RN(NP) auditors. Each RN and RN(NP) received written feedback from the auditors. Recommendations and feedback given

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by the auditors will also be forwarded to the Registration and Membership Committee. In addition, the Registrar received a confidential report of the audit results. The auditors noted that one common theme emerged. Several members did not obtain their feedback in the appropriate licensure year (2012 versus 2011). Members who failed to meet the CCP requirements—one or more of the four required components (selfassessment, peer feedback, learning plan, evaluation) were completed in the 2012 licensure year and not 2011—have had conditions placed on their licence. Failure to comply with the conditions imposed will result in the member being ineligible for licensure in 2013. The audit of 2012 CCP documents will occur in Spring 2013. If you are interested in becoming an auditor for either the RN or RN(NP) audit, please contact the SRNA at info@srna. org or at 359-4200 (toll free 1-800667-9945).


Assessing your learning needs and getting peer feedback Here it is spring already and you are keeping up with all your New Year’s resolutions. Okay… so maybe some have fallen by the wayside…but don’t let your Continuing Competence Program resolutions be the lost ones. As you know, the Continuing Competence Program requires the RN or RN(NP) to yearly selfreflect on his/her practice and make improvements. The components of the continuing competence program include: • optional professional profile, • personal assessment, • feedback, • development and implementation of a learning plan, and • evaluation of the impact that the learning plan has had on your practice. By now you should have completed a personal assessment of your practice using the current Standards and Foundation Competencies ForThe Practice of Registered Nurses, and the Code

of Ethics for Registered Nurses. RN(NP)s also utilize the Registered Nurse (Nurse Practitioner) RN(NP) Standards and Core Competencies, 2003. The assessment also includes asking a peer, another health care professional, a client, or sometimes a supervisor to give you feedback on your practice. Remember it is important to start early in the year in order to achieve your learning goals. For assistance with this process and access to the forms please go to: http://www.srna. org/rn-competence/continuingcompetence

Review Committee by Shirley mcNeil, rN Chair, SrNA Continuing Competence review Committee

The SRNA Continuing Competence Review Committee met on April 18, 2012, at the SRNA office in Regina. At the meeting the committee reviewed a consultant’s report that focused on continuing competence programs from select Canadian and American nursing jurisdictions, and

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professional regulatory bodies, both within and outside of healthcare. The strengths and weaknesses for each program were discussed. The committee also reviewed results of the January SRNA on-line survey. Due to the low on-line survey response, the Committee recommended further feedback be solicited by holding several focus groups around the province. As a result, focus groups were held from May 23 to June 6, 2012. It is hoped that this information will provide additional member feedback on the program. At the next meeting on Sept 26, the committee will focus on reviewing the focus group feedback and will then consider if revisions to the existing bylaws are required. Should any bylaw changes be required they will require approval by SRNA Council, followed by members at the annual meeting in May 2013, with final approval by the Ministry of Health. Regular updates on the review will be provided in the SRNA Newsbulletin.

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by Joan Wagner, rN Assistant Professor, Faculty of Nursing, university of regina; research Associate, regina Qu’Appelle Health region

Spirit at Work: How It Affects Me in My Nursing Workplace

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pirit at Work (SAW), comes from the study of team dynamics within management and organizational theory. SAW is perceived as experiencing the cognitive, spiritual, interpersonal and mystical dimensions of meaningful work. It is characterized by deep and intense feelings of wellbeing, recognition of alignment between one’s values, beliefs and work, and a perception of authenticity (Kinjerski & Skrypnek, 2004). When there is consistency between the individual and workplace values, workers perceive a high sense of SAW. When there is an inconsistency, SAW fades, and employees begin to experience moral distress. Moral distress is experienced when one is constrained from moving from moral choice to moral action (Ganske, 2010; Jameton, 1984). Moral distress tends to be linked to feelings of frustration, powerlessness, guilt and anger and impels employees to begin to withdraw. They do this in many ways, including work termination, absenteeism, withdrawal of services, reduced commitment and reduced involvement. As SAW declines so do joy and sociability, sense of community, and job satisfaction (Kinjersky & Skrypnek, 2004; Wagner, 2010). Research indicates that reduced nurse job satisfaction leads to increased patient morbidity

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Incorporating spirituality into the workplace leads to increased employee wellness and improved organizational performance... and mortality (Aiken, Clarke & Sloane, 2008; Wagner, 2010). Incorporating spirituality into the workplace leads to increased employee wellness and improved organizational performance (Mitroff & Denton, 1999). The connection between spirituality and creativity and between

creative individuals and successful organizations has been documented in literature (Drucker, 1996; Peters and Waterman, 1982). Management experts state that excellent organizations engender employees who ask for what they need and find creative solutions to meet their needs. Providing employees with a voice in how their work is performed and how their jobs are designed, leads to high quality output, or improved patient care. Encouraging nurses to find creative solutions to the problems that affect them promotes SAW and at the end of the day contributes, not only to the growth of a thriving organization, but to improved health care.

References Aiken, l. H., Clarke, S. P. & Sloane, D. m. (2008). effects of hospital care environment on patient mortality and nurse outcomes. The Journal of Nursing Administration, 38(5), 223-229. Drucker, P. (1996). landmarks of tomorrow. edison, NJ: Transaction Publishers. Ganske, K. (2010). moral distress in Academia. online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 15(3). retrieved from http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?vid=3&hid=12&sid=1588149c-1eac401b-b678-b5afd2c698a8%40sessionmgr11&bdata=JnNpdGu9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d #db=a9h&AN=56594947 Jameton, A. (1984). Nursing practice: The ethical issues. englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. Kinjerski, V., & Skrypnek, b. (2004). Defining spirit at work: finding common ground. Journal of organizational Change management, 17, 26-42. mitroff, I., & Denton, e. (1999). A study of spirituality in the workplace. Sloan management review, 40(4), 83-92 Peters, T. J. & Waterman, r. H. (1982). In search of excellence: lessons from America’s best run companies (1st ed.). New York, NY: Warner books. Wagner, J. I. J., (2010), exploring the relationships Among Spirit at Work, Structural and Psychological empowerment, resonant leadership, Job Satisfaction, and organizational Commitment in the Health Care Workplace, unpublished doctoral dissertation, university of Alberta, edmonton, Ab.

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Update on the Optimizing the Role of the Registered Nurse Project (Registered Nurse Certified Practice [RN(C)] project) by Suzanne Downie, rN, Director, Nursing Practice

Thank you all very much for your patience, feedback and enthusiasm as the SRNA works on the RN(C) project with key stakeholders. As you may know, the target date for bringing the RN(C) project Bylaws and Standards to be voted on at the SRNA Annual Meeting has been reset to 2013. During the remaining time in 2012 and 2013, the SRNA will be completing specific tasks to clarify the framework of the project. The focus of the next phase of work is: • a more detailed understanding of the Transfer of Medical Function that is currently in place; • continuing comparison with other provinces related to specific issues and ideas raised by our members and stakeholders; • research on the education program for the RN certified practice;

NurSe To KNoW

• a refined definition of the RN certified practice role within Primary Health Care in Saskatchewan; • exploration of how the RN certified practice integrates with other health care team members; and • examination of how RN certified practice harmonizes with changes to other regulations and legislation. Since February the team has met with RNs, RN(NP)s, physicians, nursing educators, government and legal counsel. We are pleased to report that the work and communication is resulting in better understanding of the project and the project goals. There is more work to be done; and the team has immediate plans to meet with First Nations groups, northern physicians, northern registered nurse practitioners and representatives of other provinces. We look forward to meeting with stakeholders who wish to participate in this exciting project. Please contact the SRNA at info@srna.org or by telephone at 306-359-4200 (Regina) or Toll Free: (800)667-9945 if you would like to be involved.

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Congratulations to Leslie-Ann Smith, RN leslie-Ann received Health Canada’s First Nations and Inuit Health branch Award of excellence in Nursing Leslie-Ann is a RN currently employed by Health Canada’s First Nations and Inuit Health Branch as Nurse-in-Charge at the Spiritwood Health Centre. She has worked with First Nations communities for the majority of her nursing career. Since graduating in 1991 from the Saskatchewan Indian Institute of Technologies’ Indian Diploma Nursing Program, she has continued to pursue educational opportunities, completing a Bachelor of Nursing Science from the University of Saskatchewan in 2007. This desire for lifelong learning has effectively increased her ability to provide compassionate, client-centered care in a variety of settings. Leslie-Ann is recognized by her peers as being passionate about her career, never satisfied with the status quo and always looking for opportunities for improvement.

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Visit npnow.ca

In Saskatchewan only 33% of the population has access to a primary health care provider, and those who do often have difficulty accessing timely care. Although we’ve seen progress in recent years on wait times for certain diagnostic tests and procedures, what we need now more than ever is to focus on preventing chronic disease and promoting health and wellness to help Saskatchewan people get healthier. One of the ways to do this is through better integration of and investment in nurse practitioners (NPs) throughout our province. Currently, there are 140 NPs practising in Saskatchewan. Making NPs a more integral part of our strategies to prevent chronic disease and reduce wait times will go a long way toward improving the health of our population. This would result in a health system that is more responsive to people’s needs. This would facilitate: • early screening, diagnosis and treatment • better management of chronic diseases to reduce hospital admissions • timely access to care by using all available entry points to care, and • health education, counseling and monitoring at the community level. The Saskatchewan Ministry has recently announced a significant investment for eight new primary care sites as the beginning of a process to strengthen primary health care teams in Saskatchewan. Continued commitment by the provincial government

is needed to ensure additional investment in provincial NP education programs. It’s about time to collaborate? The onset of many chronic diseases could be prevented or delayed through earlier intervention, health promotion (e.g., initiatives to encourage physical activity and smoking cessation), or efforts to modify other risk factors by involvement of NPs. Education, recruitment and retention of NPs as essential elements of interprofessional collaborative teams would allow NPs to be integrated into more of our communities. The benefits of fully integrating the role of NPs are well documented but have not yet been fully realized in Saskatchewan. There is a shortage of qualified NPs in Saskatchewan. There are currently over 25 vacancies in NP positions across the province. There is strong evidence linking care provided by NPs with better health outcomes at lower costs in hospitals, longterm care facilities and the community at large. The Saskatchewan government has demonstrated a collaborative effort to improve health-care outcomes and lower costs by integrating NPs into new primary health care strategies and investing in additional NP education seats. We look forward to having more NPs in Saskatchewan.

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by mary ellen Andrews, rN(NP), Co-Chair, NPoS/SANP education Day Committee

NPOS/SANP Education Day April 20th and 21st, 2012 On April 20th and 21st, 2012, the Saskatchewan Nurse Practitioners (NPs) had their 8th Annual Education Conference in Saskatoon.

The conference is hosted each year through collaboration between the Nurse Practitioners of Saskatchewan (NPOS - a Professional Practice Group of the SRNA) and the Saskatchewan Association of Nurse Practitioners (SANP- an advocacy group promoting the role of nurse practitioners). The aim of this event is to bring together the nurse practitioners who work in Saskatchewan to be updated about

medical conditions and to network with colleagues about new directions, innovations and legislation pertinent to NP profession practice. The members of the conference organizing committee were: Co-chairs Bev Houk, RN(NP)/Mary Ellen Andrews, RN(NP), and Jone Barry, RN(NP), Barb Beaurivage, RN(NP) and Linda Smallwood, RN(NP). Each year at the conference, SANP hosts a wine and cheese evening. This event celebrates the contribution of NPs to the health of Saskatchewan residents and acknowledges the dedication of NPs through peer nominations for the Annual Heather Keith Award. The 2012 winner of the award was Lynn Digney Davis,

RN(NP). Wendy Quinn, RN(NP) and Shelly Cal, RN(NP) were also honored nominees. The presentations describing each nominee highlighted the commitment of these NPs to the health of Saskatchewan residents. It was truly inspiring! The conference attracted over 90 delegates this year, most of which were NPs, Administrators with Primary Health Care Agencies/Portfolios and students from both of the Primary Health Care NP Programs in the province. NP students are encouraged to attend the conference and learn with their future colleagues!

Shelly Cal, rN(NP), Heather Keith Award nominee

RN(NP)s on NPOS Executive Back left to right: Karen loveridge, rN(NP); lisa Plank, rN(NP); Heather Keith, rN(NP); Debbie macdonald, rN(NP) Front left to right: Jone barry, rN(NP); Kari Greenwood, rN(NP); mary ellen Andrews, rN(NP) 18

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Wendy Quinn, rN(NP), Heather Keith Award nominee


The conference includes the Annual General Meetings of the two hosting organizations. These successful meetings are a way to plan and further the work of supporting NPs within the province. The meetings each year include the election of new members to the executive boards. Executive members are congratulated for the work they perform and the time and commitment given to promoting NP professional practice. A big Thank You to our conference presenters this year: Donna Flahr, RN(NP) Dr. Betsy Brydon, Dr. Alana Cribb, Donna Magnusson, Dr. Bernard Lawlor, Leann Nixon, Dr. Garth Bruce, along with Donna Cooke, RN, and Suzanne Downie, RN, of the SRNA.

lynn Digney Davis, rN(NP); Heather Keith Award winner left to right: lynn Digney Davis, mary ellen Andrews, rN(NP); barbara Warkentin, rN(NP).

RN(NP)s on SANP Executive Back left to right: barb beaurivage; Shelly Cal; Joyce bruce; Ivy Poulin; beverly Houk. Front left to right: maureen Klenk; barbara Warkentin; lia boxall.

RN(NP) Students and Instructors Who Attended Education Day Back row left to right: Joyce bruce, mary ellen Andrews, becky lockhart, Trina mucha, Chet mcCuaig, Troy moore, maggie Phelan, esther Sunchild, Tammy matiasz, maureen Klenk. Front row left to right: Sabrina Kyryluk, myra opekokew, Shelley Anderson, Claire Chao, rhonda Nickel.

About NPOS and SANP NPoS is a Professional Practice Group (PPG) of the Saskatchewan registered Nurses Association (SrNA). PPGs are bound by the mandate, mission, vision and ends of the SrNA and work closely with the SrNA on practice and regulatory issues affecting rN(NP)s. The mandate of NPoS is to be the voice of rN(NP)s speaking in the public interest. www.npos.ca SANP strives to be the cohesive voice for all nurse practitioners in Saskatchewan that promote and advance nurse practitioner roles to improve the health of the province’s residents. In partnership with key stakeholders, SANP increase awareness of the nurse practitioner role, and influences legislation, regulation and policy. SANP is a non-profit, volunteer-run, professional organization. www.sasknursepractitioner.org

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by Shelley Svedahl, manager, Communications, SrNA

Putting Patients First: LEAN, Releasing Time to Care© and the LEADS Framework

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uring the March 29 & 30, 2012 Ministry of Health ‘Courage to Lead’ Conference in Saskatoon I had an opportunity to facilitate a dialogue with: Kyla Avis, RN, Program Director, Releasing Time to Care, Health Quality Council; Dan Florizone, Deputy Minister, Department of Health; Pam Molnar, RN, Manager, 5th Medicine, Saskatoon Health Region; and Kandy Hennenfent, RN, President, SRNA. It’s been four years since the Releasing Time to Care© (RTC) program was introduced in Saskatchewan. The program continues to grow and there are many success stories. Four of Saskatchewan’s leaders discuss the project and respond to the questions on everyone’s mind: What’s next? Is there a next phase? And what is the link to LEAN and LEADS?

Kyla Avis, rN “Four years ago we started a program in Saskatchewan - our first step into looking at the way we design and deliver care - how we care for patients and understanding our health care world as a system. Four years later we’re moving away from a project with a certain group of health care providers to an entire system. The entire health care system will be involved in that journey; we’re not just asking frontline care nurses and their managers to look at redesign

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…what it really comes down to is the real transformation in Saskatchewan is built on the principles of patient first, patient and family centred care, … but everyone throughout the whole organization doing continuous improvement work. What I’m excited to see is the nurses who’ve been doing ward-review meetings for the last four years, measuring, 5Sing.* Now that will not just be on their shoulders to do - it will be taken up by everyone from the CEO to VPs to the qualityimprovement-support people. So quality is becoming everybody’s job now, not just certain people, which is exciting.” *[1] Sort, Set in order, Shine, Standardize, Sustain- Elements of LEAN concept.**

Read the entire dialogue online at www.srna.org

Dan Florizone “There���ve been signals and kind of a misinterpretation that RTC is somehow the old thing and now we’ve got this new thing going on. You can call it LEAN or call it LEADS or call it Continuous Improvement,

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but the fact is that RTC is here to stay. It is a foundational element and we’ve had very strong success in its deployment. The whole strategy from the beginning - what we really did well – was to prototype then spread. The beauty of it isn’t in its rigidity; it’s that ability to really start to inspire the need for those at the front line, not only to be engaged, but to come up with creative ideas for improvement. What we’re doing now, is building on that solid foundation. It’s not a project with a beginning and an end; it’s actually become the definition of a culture, ‘the way we do things around here.’ We’re fundamentally changing the way we do things around here- that’s transformation. Some people think transformation is a re-organization, or transformation is some big, visible change that’s led by some single, all-knowing leader. And

I think we’re going to get that culture change by planting, nurturing and developing little seeds of leadership... what it really comes down to is the real transformation in Saskatchewan is built on the principles of patient first, patient and family centred care, and the engagement of point of care staff in coming up with creative ideas.


Pam Molnar, rN “Have the courage to take the risks to think out of the box of how we do things. And that’s where I was thinking, we just need to open our eyes a little bigger - jump out of the fishbowl if we can, and see it through another lens. See what the opportunities are - to not be stuck within the constraints of this is how we’ve always done things, but to see the opportunities. Involve the patients and families. There are some keys things that will happen when we have the courage to take the risk to do something different. It’s amazing the outcome you can see.”

Left to Right: Pam molnar, rN; Dan Florizone, Deputy minister of Health; Kyla Avis, rN and Kandy Hennenfent, rN.

Kandy Hennenfent, rN “When I reflect on Releasing Time to Care I see it as a systems change. It’s not just a project that we’re working on - it’s the entire system, and I certainly instill in the nursing students that once they graduate, this will be how things are done. Right now students are seeing posters and all of these things that they are not directly involved in, but this is the way that things will be when they graduate. It’s going to be part of providing care every day. Releasing Time to Care is about quality becoming everybody’s job, that’s certainly the intent, but I see it as systems change. It’s not about just focusing on RTC as a project, that we will complete and move on to the next project. It’s going to be part of our day-to-day job in order to sustain the releasing time to care.”

Pam Molnar, rN “I think we’re going to get that culture change by planting, nurturing and developing little seeds of leadership. Individual leadership spreads and I think that synergy will be the eventual

Kandy Hennenfent, rN

The outcome should be that we are all striving for the same goal: to provide the best patient care that we can possibly provide. culture shift. If we’re always planting those seeds in all the little things that we do—how we talk - in our actions everyday—we are going to demonstrate that this is the way. This is how we will change how we do things. We will see it in all of these different areas places we interface with. That is where I see the big changes happening. That’s the beauty of the LEADS framework.”

Kyla Avis, rN “The outcome should be that we are all striving for the same goal: to provide the best patient care that we can possibly provide. It doesn’t matter what we call it—the ultimate goal should be the same.”

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“Registered Nurses need to take that risk and have that courage.” Releasing Time to Care© is a program developed by the NHS Institute for Innovation (http://www.institute.nhs. uk/) and Improvement that we are testing in Saskatchewan. It is a patientcentred approach to improving the quality of care on acute care nursing units, by freeing up caregivers’ time for more direct patient care. Check out rTC© online: http://www.hqc.sk.ca/ portal.jsp?VZejh2TfFosmWoH660fFPT bIzbf0QflQkuwK4QbZaJveYgnWT8wYa VVvI5thiwzu **LEAN: The core idea is to maximize customer value while minimizing waste. Simply, lean means creating more value for customers with fewer resources. Check out leAN online: http://www. lean.org/whatslean/ LEADS: The leADS Framework represents the key skills, abilities, and knowledge required to lead at all levels of an organization. It aligns and consolidates the competency frameworks and leadership strategies that are found in Canada’s health sector and other progressive organizations. Check out leADS online http://www.leadersforlife. ca/leads-framework

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H e a lt H Q u a l i t y c o u n c i l

Five Reasons Why You Should Take IHI Open School Online Courses

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he Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) created its online Open School (www.ihi.org) to give students and professionals in health care around the world easy access to information about quality improvement, patient safety, patient- and family-centred care, and leadership. Here’s why you should take a look at what they’re offering: 1. It’s perfect for continuing competency development:  Foundational competency #22 of the RN continuing competency personal assessment form asks you to assess the degree to which you “integrate quality improvement principles and activities into nursing practice on an ongoing manner”. Taking these courses will enable you to develop knowledge and practical skills in the application of quality improvement science into your nursing practice. 2. It delivers top-shelf content: The courses are written by worldrenowned faculty in quality improvement. Information is relayed with a mix of reading and videos and the courses include reallife stories that help to make the content real. 3. It will give you a great head start: Our entire health care system is adopting continuous improvement as a new way of working. All

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professionals, support staff, and leaders will be a step ahead if they have been introduced to quality improvement and measurement for improvement through the IHI Open School. 4. It’s free! Thanks to a provincial license purchased by the Health Quality Council, enrollment is free for anyone living in Saskatchewan until June 30, 2013 ($250/person value). Over one hundred people in our province have already registered. 5. It’s flexible: Complete as many of the courses as you like, on your own time, and anywhere there is Internet access. Length of the courses varies, but most will take you a total of 15-30 minutes to complete. Here’s what some of your colleagues have to say about IHI Open School: The Fundamentals of Improvement course showed me that learning about quality improvement (QI) needn’t be intimidating. The courses are designed so that anyone can take them; you don’t have to have any previous knowledge or experience in QI. - Taryn Lorencz, RN, MN, Patient Quality of Care Measurement Coordinator/Educator, Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region

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I completed the courses on Patient Safety and Quality Improvement from the IHI Open School as part of my orientation to the Quality Management Department.  It introduced me to the language of quality improvement (QI) and one of the most important things I learned is to look beyond the obvious to find the many factors that could be contributing to lessthan-optimal quality of care. - Holly Samuel RN, BScN, Quality Improvement Nurse Educator, Prince Albert Parkland Health Region

I particularly liked the course on patient- and family-centred care (PFC 101: Dignity and Respect). We plan to encourage staff to take this course as we roll out a patient- and family-centred care initiative in our health region. The Open School is for anyone who wants learn about the fundamentals of quality improvement and has 20 minutes here and there to spend on the courses. - Donna Cook RN, Patient Quality of Care Measurement Coordinator/ Educator, Prince Albert Parkland Health Region

For more information, visit the Institute for Healthcare Improvement web site, www.ihi. org, or the Health Quality Council web site, http://www.hqc.sk.ca (go to Improving Quality>IHI Open School).


s a s k atc H e wa n s u r g i c a l i n i t i at i v e

Building Momentum: Saskatchewan Surgical Initiative Releases Year Two Report

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he Saskatchewan Surgical Initiative has released a Year Two Progress Report that shows excellent progress at the mid-way point of the four-year initiative. At a news conference held at Saskatoon City Hospital on May 22, former Health Minister Don McMorris and health system leaders applauded the momentumbuilding in transforming the surgical care system, while also recognizing that much work is still ahead. Health system partners are committed to ensuring that by 2014, all patients have the option of receiving surgery within three months, and that they receive patient centred, quality care every time. As of March 31, 2012, 97 per cent of patients received their surgery within 12 months, all regions were using the Surgical Safety Checklist more often and more accurately, and clinical pathway development expanded to prostate cancer and urogynecology conditions. In addition, three more groups of surgeons were pooling referrals, 124 physicians and their offices were participating in Clinical Practice Redesign, and more people were visiting the revamped Specialist Directory to find surgeon wait time information to assist in their decision making.

Targets for 2012-13: • Continue to shorten surgical wait times so that all patients are offered a date for their surgery within six months. • Identify and reduce clinical variation in two surgical and one diagnostic specialty area. • Develop a shared decision-making framework to assist patients and families to become more involved in health care decisions. • Develop and implement two new pathways. One will assess and support men in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. The other will be a uro-gynecological pathway that assists women who experience incontinence and other gynecological complaints. • Continue to improve patient safety by increasing the use of the Surgical Safety Checklist and medication reconciliation,

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improving the measurement of surgical site infections, and developing a provincial strategy to measure patient harm. • Increase the number of surgeons involved in Clinical Practice Redesign™. • Expand the number of specialty groups using pooled referrals to a total of 15. • Continue to train additional OR nurses and plan for future supply to meet demand. The Saskatchewan Surgical Initiative has accomplished a great deal over the past year, but the job is far from finished. The next two years will focus on fulfilling the commitment that no one in Saskatchewan waits longer than three months for safe, quality surgical care. To view the full report, go to www. health.gov.sk.ca/surgical-initiative.

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etHics corner by linda banerjee, rN Nursing Advisor, Practice

Cultural Diversity and Cultural Competence

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ne of the seven primary values identified in the Code of Ethics for Registered Nurses (CNA, 2008) is promoting justice. How do registered nurses (RNs) uphold principles of justice? • They do this by safeguarding human rights, equity and fairness and by promoting the public good. RNs in all domains of practice have ethical responsibilities related to promoting justice and one of these is: “When providing care, nurses do not discriminate on the basis of a person’s race, ethnicity, culture, political and spiritual beliefs, social or marital status, gender, sexual orientation, age, health status, place of origin, lifestyle, mental or physical ability or socio-economic status or any other attribute” (CNA, p 17). The Standards and Foundation Competencies for the Practice of Registered Nurses (2007) also identifies RN responsibilities around cultural safety, cultural diversity and cultural respect in our nursing practice. • Standard 11-Knowledge-Based Practice, competency (52) “Provides care that is culturally safe, demonstrating sensitivity to client diversity and culture.”

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• Standard 111-Ethical Practice (67) Identifies the effect of his/ her values, beliefs and experiences in relationships with clients, recognizes potential conflicts and ensures culturally safe client care. (73) Provides care for all clients respectful of their health/illness status, diagnoses, life experiences, beliefs and health practices. (73) Respects and incorporates the spiritual and religious beliefs and practices of clients into nursing care. In addition to our responsibilities related to cultural diversity and vulnerable populations identified in our Code of Ethics and Standards and Foundation Competencies, our SRNA Council (your representatives) has identified this as a priority END for our membership. • END #2 states that “RNs and RN(NPs) provide individual and family-centered, ethical, compassionate care for the public” and 2.1 “RNs and RN(NPs) provide respectful care to culturally diverse and/or vulnerable populations.” http:// www.srna.org/images/stories/pdfs/ about_us/mission_statement_ web_01_01_2012.pdf

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Why do we need to embrace cultural diversities in health care? Although we have always had cultural diversity in our client population, we are seeing increasing cultural diversity in our province and throughout the country. The population mix has been changing and will continue to change with the arrival of new immigrants from all over the world. Not only will we see increasing cultural diversity in our client population but also in the health care team workforce. How do RNs become culturally competent? A starting point is an understanding of the meaning of the following terms. Culture: Learned, transmitted, inherited values, beliefs, ways of thinking and doing of a particular group of people.


Cultural Diversity: Used to describe variation between people in terms of a range of factors such as ethnicity, national origin, race, gender, ability, age, physical characteristics, religion, values, beliefs, sexual orientation, socioeconomic class, or life experiences (RNAO, 2007). Vulnerable Groups: groups disadvantaged by attitudes and systems in society that create inequities (CNA, 2008) Cultural Competence: A set of congruent behaviors, attitudes, and policies that come together in a system, agency, or among professionals and enables that system agency, or those professionals to work effectively in cross-cultural situations (RNAO, 2007). Cultural competence is a practice matter and requires a mandatory skill set. RNs as well as other health care professionals need to attain appropriate skills in order to embrace diversity and practice competently with diverse groups. It starts with self-awareness about one’s views on culture and sensitivity and ones’ values and beliefs. Values

and beliefs are often subconscious and can influence the dynamics of all interactions. Acquire knowledge of the range of cultural norms, beliefs and values relevant to clients and colleagues as a starting point to foster understanding and further inquiry.   Be aware of the disparities (e.g. health outcomes, access to care, economics, job opportunities) that exist for diverse populations, and understand the factors and processes that contribute to them. Employers and organizations as well as RNs need to create healthy work environments that focus on diversity, culture, team work and common values. In order to achieve cultural competence in the workplace there must be congruency between workforce behaviors, management practices and institutional policies resulting in an organizational environment that is respectful and inclusive of cultural and other forms of diversity (RNAO, 2007). “Embracing cultural diversity in the workplace means a commitment to culturally competent practices that eliminate discrimination and disparity, affirm differences, and actively engage in strategies that draw on the strength of differences”(RNAO, 2007 p 19).

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A very useful resource for individual registered nurses, health care organizations and external bodies is the best practice guideline Embracing Cultural Diversity in Health Care: Developing Cultural Competence (RNAO, 2007). It focuses on creating healthy work environments that will impact positively on patients and organizations.

References Canadian Nurses Asssociation. (2008). Code of ethics for registered nurses. ottawa, oN: Author. registered Nurses’ Association of ontario (2007). embracing cultural diversity in health care: developing cultural competence. Toronto, oN: Author. Saskatchewan registered Nurses’ Association. (2007). Standards and foundation competencies for the practice of registered nurses. regina, SK: Author.

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Safety Alert Saskatchewan ministry of Health, Saskatchewan regional Health Authorities & Saskatchewan Cancer Agency

Provincial Safety Alerts Patients Leaving the Emergency Room Without Being Seen by a Physician Issue: A 46 year-old patient experienced a fall in the community that resulted in a head laceration and hematoma. The patient was transferred by the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) to a tertiary centre Emergency Room (ER) where the patient was registered and triaged as an urgent case. Because there was a lack of treatment rooms available, the patient was required to wait on a stretcher in the hallway in the attendance of the EMS personnel and two police officers. Approximately 1-1/2 hours later, the patient had not been seen by a physician and requested to leave the ER. Prior to the patient leaving the ER in the custody of the police officers, instructions for follow-up care were provided by a registered nurse to the patient and police officers, and the patient signed the release against medical advice report. The patient was taken to the police cells and the next morning was found by police to be in medical distress. The patient was transported to a tertiary centre in full cardiac arrest where resuscitation efforts were unsuccessful. The patient’s cause of death was determined to be blunt force trauma to the head.

Recommendations: That, in circumstances where an Emergency Room patient who has a high probability for an adverse outcome related to either the presenting complaint or other co-morbidities, has been registered and requests to leave without being seen by the physician: The emergency room physician will be immediately notified of the patients’ intent and be given a brief history of the presenting compliant and other co-morbid conditions. In collaboration with the health care team, the physician will then make a determination of the best course of action; The assessment, observations and communications related to the care of the patient will be documented immediately on the appropriate records. Should you have any questions about this safety ALERT, please contact Denise Grad or Susan Burns, Provincial Quality of Care Coordinators at (306) 787-2718.

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SaSkatchewan MiniStry of health by Nicole Poirier, ministry of Health

Teens, Alcohol and the Brain RNs are ideal professionals to provide front line support to parents with pre-teens and teenagers who are using alcohol and/or drugs. By providing information, you can be a valuable resource to help parents navigate their children through challenging times.

Early Alcohol Use It is best when parents take an active role discouraging alcohol use, particularly among their pre-teens and teenagers. The younger a person starts to use alcohol/ drugs, the greater the chance he/she can develop a dependence on substances later in his/her life. Guiding teens away from alcohol use is also important because alcohol can interfere with brain development and decision-making processes. Our brains develop into our mid-20s. This long period of growth and change means that skills and judgement are constantly evolving. Simultaneously it means that a young brain is vulnerable to the potentially toxic effects of alcohol/drugs.

Encourage parents to have conversations with their pre-teens and teens about responsible alcohol use.

Brain Development When you repeat activities, neuron connections in your brain grow stronger to help you remember things better. We often repeat things because they make us feel good. Alcohol and drugs mimic this good feeling causing the chemical release of dopamine. A teen’s brain is wired for feeling good and for trying new behaviours, so when alcohol/drugs are introduced early on, it can cause a false sense of feeling good and put him/her at risk.

Rates of Brain Development Parts of the brain develop at different rates, which can pose challenges regarding decision making and self regulation. The frontal lobes mature later than the limbic areas. Frontal lobes deal with the areas of reasoning, impulse control and judgement. Limbic areas deal with emotions. Maturation rate differences in these parts of the brain can lead to teens making decisions that place them at risk when they don’t consider negative consequences.

Providing Support Most teens will eventually reduce or stop using alcohol/drugs, but you may encounter parents that are nonetheless concerned. Have parents consider the reasons their teen could be using substances: stress, peer pressure, or to have a sense of belonging or independence. Encourage parents to have conversations with their pre-teens and teens about responsible alcohol use. Parents remain a powerful influence as they can model responsible attitudes and behaviours toward alcohol use through moderation or abstinence. Concerned parents may also contact their physician and local addictions services office, or call HealthLine (1-877-800-0002) if they have questions or concerns.

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by Tracy laschilier, Advancement officer in the College of Nursing at the university of Saskatchewan

Making a Difference While We Learn

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new partnership between the University of Saskatchewan College of Nursing and the North Central Community Association (NCCA) has created a dynamic community health clinical placement for nursing students in Regina. NCCA is located in the heart of North Central Regina, one of Regina’s largest inner-city neighbourhoods. The NCCA is well integrated into the community and offers a wide range of successful and thriving programs.

Ott said a variety of community agencies, community members and volunteers joined forces to offer a full day of services to the homeless population of Regina. “The NCCA provided an ideal setting for our students to experience a different kind of nursing,” explained Jaime Mantesso, Clinical Coordinator, U of S Southern Saskatchewan Campus in Regina. Clinical groups get involved in almost all of the programs offered with and by NCCA including Project People, Transition to Trades, the

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community garden, Care and Share seniors’ meals, Go Green Roughriders partnership, and the Food Bank. Mantesso praises the commitment and work of the students. “It is very gratifying to see the positive impact that students can make on the agency or organization, its clients and, most importantly, the community it serves. The reciprocation is evident as students come away with a wonderful and enriching experience!” Jenelle Ott, a fourth-year nursing student in Regina, was inspired by her community health experience at NCCA. For her, the highlight was working on the Project People initiative, Community4Connection. Ott said a variety of community agencies, community members and volunteers joined forces to offer a full day of services to the homeless population in Regina. Services included foot care, dental cleaning, first aid, mental health and addictions counselling, street guides, clothing and hygiene items, legal aid, and more. Project People also ensured hot meals and childcare were available. “It was amazing to see everyone come together in one place for the community to provide accessibility to health services,” she said. Saskatoon U of S nursing students, Andrea Collins and Jennifer Cowie, were also profoundly affected by

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their community health placement experience. They worked with community partners to collaborate and provide outreach health services to the city’s core neighbourhood. Working closely with a diverse population allowed a direct insight into the broad determinants of health and gave them a more expansive view of nursing and community. One of the major projects that Collins and Cowie were involved with was the organization of a street health fair. More than 12 community agencies

“Our vision was to create an atmosphere that welcomed people of the community to learn more about the different services available to them,” said Collins. participated and it coincided with a free flu clinic and barbecue. “Our vision was to create an atmosphere that welcomed people of the community to learn more about the different services available to them,” said Collins. “Organizing the street health fair was a great experience. It introduced us to new people and community


agencies and resources. Everyone was supportive to help make this happen,” Cowie added. Prince Albert U of S nursing student Virginia Deobald participated in a community health senior practicum in Shellbrook, where she worked in both home care and public health. Deobald experienced the breadth of community nursing by participating in numerous healthrelated activities from performing physical assessments to delivering health education presentations. The practicum also provided the opportunity to work as part of a

health-care team, which Deobald valued most. “Working as a team with other health-care professionals to promote best practices and positive changes in a community is just as important as the individual tasks and assessments we do,” she said.

“Organizing the street health fair was a great experience. Everyone was supportive to help make this happen,” Cowie added.

It is through a strong network of community health clinical placements that U of S College of Nursing students can make practical, immediate contributions that improve the health of individuals and populations in various communities across Saskatchewan. These opportunities provide students with the challenges and rewards of making a difference and seeing the results first-hand. Community health nurses partner with people where they live, work, learn, meet and play to promote health.

Saskatoon nursing students left to right: Andrea Collins and Jennifer Cowie.

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SRNA ANNUAL MEETING

and CONFERENCE T hank you Sponsors and Exhibitors!

SrNA gratefully acknowledges the following sponsors and exhibitors for the 2012 Conference “Be the Voice – Quality and Safety” SILVER Health Careers in Saskatchewan SIAST Nursing Division BRONZE Allied Printers ltd. College of Nursing, university of Saskatchewan evolution Presentation Technologies HJ linnen Associates ltd. Saskatchewan union of Nurses (SuN) REFRESHMENT BREAKS First Nations university of Canada Health Quality Council (HQC) regina Qu’Appelle Health region (rQHr) Strategian Innovation loGIK Sun Country Health region Tech markets Inc.

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Exhibitors Canadian Nurses Association Canadian Nurses Protective Society College of Nursing Correctional Service of Canada Global Village Treasures Health Canada Health Careers in Saskatchewan Heartland Health region Human resource Services - recruitment and retention NuCerity International Philips lifeline regina Gideon Auxiliary regina Qu’Appelle Health region reseau sante en francaise de la Saskatchewan (rSFS) rxFiles Academic Detailing Program Saskatchewan Association for Safe Workplaces in Health Saskatchewan Coalition for Tobacco Control Saskatchewan Nurses Foundation Saskatchewan union of Nurses (SuN) Saskatchewan Health Information resources Partnership (SHIrP) SIAST Nursing Division SrNA Practice SrNA registration Strong Thunderbird original Art u Weightloss WorkSafe Saskatchewan

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S ummary of Scimeca’s Keynote Presentation On May 3rd, 2012, Paula Davies Scimeca, RN, MS provided a compelling opening address to over 250 attendees at the 95th Annual Meeting and Conference of the Saskatchewan Registered Nurses Association (SRNA). The theme of this three-day event, which was held in Regina, Canada, was “Be The Voice – Quality and Patient Safety.” Scimeca opened her address, saying, “When I leave here, I want to know that I left the very best behind in Canada as far as information on the prevalence of substance use disorders in nurses; factors that make nurses more susceptible to the brain disease of addiction; and a vision of initiatives that can help nurses individually and collectively decrease the incidence of drug diversion by nurses.” Key points included in Scimeca’s presentation were: • Statistics on violations reported to the National Council of the State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) in the U.S. between 1996 and 2006. • Findings of the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey (OSDUHS) which are consistent with similar surveys of students in the U.S. • The phenomenal increase in use of prescriptions for chronic non-cancer pain over the past fifteen years.

• Implications regarding the pediatric onset of substance use disorders. • The significant deficit in education nurses and student nurses have regarding alcohol and other drug disorders. • The need for nurse leadership, academia, health systems and other stakeholders to promote safety and wellness initiatives geared specifically to the challenges nurses and future nurses face. • The safety and wellness of nurses and student nurses is the foundation upon which optimal patient outcomes and public safety rests. The theme, “Be the Voice – Quality and Patient Safety” was woven throughout the conference, particularly in a panel presentation that was followed by a persuasive closing keynote by renowned Canadian lawyer, Maureen McTeer, who reinforced the need for improved self-care for all nurses and challenged nurses to demand a seat at the table regarding health-care policy and decision making. Left to Right: Shirley mcKay, rN; Paula Scimeca, rN; Thomas Scimeca

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SRNA ANNUAL MEETING and CONFERENCE C ongratulations to the 2012 Award Recipients. When the Millennium Awards were introduced in 2000, they were linked to nurses in the past who made significant contributions to the profession of nursing. The impetus for our professional association in Saskatchewan came from a small group of eight dedicated nurses. The Millennium Awards have been named after these worthy founding members.

RUTH HICKS AWARD FOR STUDENT LEADERSHIP

GRANGER CAMPBELL AWARD

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Vania Wasyliw, NePS student on behalf of the Saskatoon Nursing Students‘ Association

Congratulations to Danita Lang, rN.

his award is given to a nursing student who has made significant contribution and demonstrated leadership as a student leader. Congratulations to the Saskatoon Nursing Student Association.

his award honours Granger Campbell who graduated from the Montreal General Hospital and was a member of the first SRNA council in 1917 and the superintendent of nurses at the Saskatoon City Hospital.

NORA ARMSTRONG AWARD

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he Nora Armstrong Award for Health Advocacy was established in honour of Nora Armstrong. Nora Armstrong is remembered for her Regina City Health Department employment where she began in 1914 and remained there for about 30 years. She organized well-baby clinics and initiated the tuberculosis clinics. Congratulations to Valerie Crickett, rN

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HELEN WALKER AWARD

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he HELEN WALKER AWARD FOR INNOVATION IN NURSING was established in honour of Helen Walker who was superintendent of nurses in Yorkton Queen Victoria Hospital from 1910 to1921.

Congratulations to the University of Saskatchewan, College of Nursing, Master of Nursing Team Top row left to right:

middle row left to right:

bottom row left to right:

Lynnette Leeseberg Stamler, PhD, rN, FAAN Mary Ellen Andrews, PhD, rN(NP) June Anonson, PhD, rN Sandra Bassendowski, edD, rN Lalita Bharadwaj, PhD Joyce Davidson, PhD, rN Glenn Donnelly, PhD, rN, eNC(c)

Robin Evans, PhD, rN PNC(c) Linda Ferguson, PhD, rN Donna Goodridge, PhD, rN Kari Greenwood, mSN, rN(NP) Lorraine Holtslander, PhD, rN Tammy Morrison Cindy Peternelj-Taylor, mN, rN

Bruce Atamanenko Louise Racine, PhD, rN Karen Semchuk, PhD, rN Mark Tomtene Tony Tung, DNP, rN(NP) Pat Wall, MSN, rN(retired) Phil Woods, PhD, rPN

More information on the 2012 awards: http://www.srna.org/events/srna-recognition-awards

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SRNA ANNUAL MEETING and CONFERENCE MENTORSHIP AWARD

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he award is presented to a SRNA practicing member who exhibits exceptional mentoring abilities in any of the nursing domains: clinical, education, research, administration and policy. Mentorship is described as a fundamental form of human development where a mentor invests their time, energy and personal knowledge to assist another person called a ‘mentee’, in their professional growth and development. Mentors have a high degree of motivation and commitment to the profession and the growth of others within the profession. The mentor helps the mentee to “be all that we can be.” The mentor uses a supportive, interactive relationship to increase the knowledge, skills and goals of the mentee.

EFFIE FEENY AWARD FOR NURSING RESEARCH

Congratulations to left to right: Cindy Peternelj-Taylor, rN; Sandra Petit, rN; Bernie Bolley, rN; (marilyn reddy, rN accepted the award on behalf of her colleague bernie bolley, rN); and Rosalie Tuchsherer, rN.

ELIZABETH VAN VALKENBURG AWARD

HONORARY MEMBERSHIP

H

onorary Membership is a prestigious SRNA’s award granted by Council in accordance with Bylaw IV – Membership, Section 6 (SRNA Bylaws, 2009) to an individual in recognition of distinguished service to the registered nursing profession.

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ffie Feeny was a school nurse in Prince Albert and was instrumental in developing the School Hygiene Branch of the Department of Education.

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Congratulations to Dr. Vivian Ramsden, rN

Congratulations to Dr. Lois Berry, rN

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his award recognizes the work of Elizabeth Van Valkenburg who in 1907 organized the school of nursing in the Regina General Hospital.

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Congratulations to Pat McLean, rN Pat mclean, rN retired as the executive Director and Chief executive officer of the Canadian Nurses Protective Society in may 2010, 22 years after founding the organization in 1987 under the auspices of the Canadian Nurses Association.


r e g i s t r at i o n r e n e wa l Tips for a Smooth Registration Renewal Help the SRNA achieve its goal of a paperless registration renewal: Note: Rn(nP) members - the Rn(nP) renewal form is not currently available online. Please submit the paper Rn(nP) renewal form to the SRna office.

1

Visit www.srna.bz for access to the SrNA membership Profile module. This provides access to your personal information, including your 2013 registration renewal form. Access is gained with a user ID and Password. There is a “forgot password” link, if you need your user ID and password sent to you.

2

if you have never registered online please call the SRna office and provide an email address so your login information can be emailed to you. information related to Registration Renewal, the continuing competence Program and approved Practice is available at www.srna.org.

3

have your Rn and Rn(nP) hours calculated for the time period december 1, 2011 to november 30, 2012.

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employer Paid Fees – complete your renewal information online and select “employer paid” and submit to the SRna office by october 10, 2012 to ensure your fees are eligible to be paid by your employer.

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note: if you are on leave (ie Maternity) your employer may not cover your fees. Please check with your payroll/human resources to discuss your options.

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Member Paid Fees – complete your renewal form (including fee payment) by november 1, 2012 to ensure that you will be licensed for december 1, 2012.

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note: all 2012 Rn and Rn(nP) licences expire november 30, 2012.

compliance with the continuing competence Program is mandatory. See the SRna website for program requirements.

5

Read the good character questions carefully. if you answer “Yes” to either question, ensure you provide additional information as requested.

registration renewal will be available mid-September, 2012

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Public survey

2012 SRNA Biennial Public Survey researcher: Strategian-innovationloGIK Summary of Findings Strategian-innovationLOGIK conducted a practice and public perception survey for the Saskatchewan Registered Nurses’ Association (SRNA). This is the fourth Practice and Perception research report since 2006. The results are drawn from a survey of respondents across Saskatchewan. In total, there were 405 respondents in 2012, compared to 401 respondents in 2010, and 605 completions in 2008. The profiles are adequately distributed by gender, age, household income, location and education, and are representative of the population in question. Change in level of nursing care (End 2.0) • There has been a small shift in the opinion of level of care provided byRNs. Fully, 17.3% of respondents responded “better” in comparison to 21.6% in 2008. Although the percentage was lower in 2012, the change was not statistically significant. • Fewer respondents indicated “worse” in 2012, 13.6% in comparison to 26.0% in 2010. This change was statistically significant, which means that fewer respondents think that the level of care provided by nurses is worse in 2012 compared to 2010.

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Partners in a Health Care System (End 3.0 and 3.2) * Overall, level of agreement to the question, “currently, more RNs are needed in the Province’s health care system,” was rated high scoring a mean of 4.21 out of 5. * The public opinion responses suggest that there is still strong support for more nurses being needed, but the trend suggests less support compared to previous years. Professional Practice: The Health Care Setting (End 2.2, 1.3.1, 2.0, 1.1) • “I always know who the RN is, when one is present in a health care setting,” and “RNs consistently introduce themselves personally to friends or family,” had lower means (3.15 and 3.57 respectively).

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• There were no statistically significant changes noted between 2010 and 2012, although there appears to be a minor downward trend in the means for the question, “I have confidence in the professional ability of RNs” as the mean has gone down in each survey years (2006, 2008, 2010 and 2012). • New statements in 2012 included, “I receive enough information from RNs to make decisions about my health care,” “RNs and RN(NP)s involve me and my family in planning my care,” “RN and RN(NP)s support me to make informed decisions about my health,” and “The RN and RN(NP)s always wear a name tag with first and last name and RN title.” The reported means were 3.61, 3.48, 3.75 and 3.47 respectively.


Public Confidence: Comparison to Other Professions (End 1.1) • The level of confidence in the competence in various professions has maintained a similar pattern since 2006. To note, the level of confidence in RNs has decreased slightly from 2010 to 2012 from 4.14 to 4.04, however, the difference is not statistically significant. • All professions scored lower in 2012. The ranking of pharmacists having the highest mean score, followed by RNs and doctors has not changed in any of the years that the survey has been done.

Nurse Practitioners: Awareness and Attitudes (End 1.1, 3.2) • When it pertains to performing minor surgical procedures, promoting how to live a healthy lifestyle and ordering diagnostic tests, the majority of respondents have a high level of comfort; 3.94, 4.29 and 3.79 mean responses respectively, when seeing a Nurse Practitioner. • The same cannot be said for prescribing drugs and assessing and diagnosing illnesses. While these are still favourable (3.31 for both) they are markedly lower. The means declined in all questions with the exception of Professional Practice: Client Service ordering a diagnostic test where Outcomes (End 1.2.2, 2.0, 2.1) the mean increased slightly from • The perception of client service from 2010. However further statistical RNs has increased slightly from tests concluded that none of previous surveys for three of the the changes from 2010 were questions asked. The only mean statistically significant. that declined was the question, • 71.9% of the respondents believe “when I get health care from a that the Province should have RN, I am treated fairly,” (mean in more Nurse Practitioners in the 2012 was 4.19 compared to 4.24 in health care system. This percentage 2010). is high, but down from 2010 • Overall the high means indicate a (85.0%). strong perception of client service for RNs. Public Support for a Public Health System (End 4) • In response to the question for support of a publically-funded health care system, the mean response level was 4.19, slightly lower than 2010 and 2008 (4.30). The difference between the means was not statistically significant.

SrNA

SRNA Awareness and Understanding of Its Role (End 1.0) • 52.8% of the respondents indicated they were aware that the SNRA could be contacted if they had a concern about the competence or conduct of RNs in the province compared to 55.1% in 2010. • In terms of regulation, 44.4% of respondents either somewhat or strongly supported RNs being able to self-regulate. This is compared to 18% who neither support nor oppose and 21.7% who somewhat oppose. • Respondents were also asked questions related to SRNA perceived responsibilities. The top three responsibilities perceived by respondents were “Enforcing a code of ethics or ethics standard for RNs” (88.1%), “Addressing concerns about RNs” (87.9%), and “Setting standards for how RNs should practice” (85.7%). The lowest responses for “Yes” were for “Licensing RNs” (74.1%) and “Setting boundaries for what RNs can do as part of their work” (76.5%).

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resources Revised Saskatchewan Immunization Manual (SIM) available online at: http://www.health. gov.sk.ca/immunization-manual. As the primary immunization resource for public health personnel and other health care providers, health care students and post-secondary institutions in Saskatchewan, the newly revised SIM, released on April 23, 2012 provides current evidence-based recommendations for immunization practice.  The online SIM sections are intra-linked electronically, and externally-linked to various resources, including the Saskatchewan Communicable Disease Control Manual and the most current version of the Canadian Immunization Guide.  The revised SIM meets the 14 immunization competencies noted in the Immunization Competencies for Health Professionals document (Public Health Agency of Canada, 2008).  Health care professionals are encouraged to bookmark the online SIM for quick reference. The implementation of the revised SIM provides evidence-based and standardized immunization-related information, and will help ensure that Saskatchewan residents continue to receive publicly funded immunization services.  Please direct any comments or questions to Loretta van Haarlem, RN, Public Health Nursing Consultant at: Loretta.vanhaarlem@ health.gov.sk.ca.

National Expert Commission Update http://www.cna-aiic.ca/ expertcommission/pages/commissionupdate-april-2012/

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Nurse Practitioner Campaign The SRNA is excited to partner with the Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) to raise awareness about nurse practitioners (NPs) and how they can improve access to quality health care and reduce wait times: NP Campaign http://www.cna-aiic.ca/en/canadiannurses-association-says-its-about-time/

SRNA Skin and Wound Special Interest Group (SWING) Check out the new SWING website for group contact and membership information: www.skinandwound.org. Watch for a members-only section featuring wound care resources, both assessment and educationally based. The group offers webinars and are willing to advertise wound care workshops. Membership information to join SWING is available on the website and the cost to join the group is $30.00 per year. To offer constructive feedback on possible improvements or information on wound and skin care that would be helpful to you as a practicing professional please contact Donna Flahr, RN, SWING President at donnaflahr@hotmail.com

Staff Mix Framework Resource A new collaborative resource, Staff Mix Decision-making Framework for Quality Nursing Care, available from Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) is ready to help nurse managers and others ensure their staff members are being used effectively. It provides guiding principles for making decisions on a day-to-day and long-term basis, outlines factors to consider about clients, staff and the organization, and recommends a process for assessing, planning,

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implementing and evaluating staff mix. http://www.cna-aiic.ca/en/ improve-your-workplace/staffing/staffmix-framework/

Primary Health Care System Announced The Government of Saskatchewan announced an investment of $3.6 million to strengthen primary health care services in the province: http:// www.health.gov.sk.ca/primary-healthcare

The Saskatchewan Mental Health Coalition is a voluntary, non-governmental umbrella organization of mental health agencies and individuals, including self-help groups, family support groups and professional associations from across the province. The mission of the Coalition is to promote positive communication and support networks among all nongovernmental agencies and groups providing mental health related programs and services. This is a great initiative that requires little commitment beyond a meeting every few months. If you are interested in mental health, advocacy work or community development I encourage you to get involved with the Coalition. This is a great opportunity to network with other professionals and make a difference. Contact (306)-525-5601 or daven@cmhask.ca for further details.


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Association of ists uage Patholog ists 7th Avenue 1C2 katchewan S4R

90 .saslpa.ca tel.net or www an College of Therapists 218 Street, Suite S4R 1X3 askatchewan 3359 a

A New Name for Continuing Nursing Education Continuing Nursing Education, College of Nursing announced its official name change to Continuing Education and Development for Nurses (CEDN) in May, 2012.

Brochure available on ‘Caring for Saskatchewan People in a Competent and Ethical Manner’ You may have seen this brochure in Saskatchewan Health Care Caring an Facilities. The for Saskatchew brochure People represents a in a collaborative Competent endeavor and Ethical involving Manner all of health NETWORK OF regulatory L NA SIO INTER-PROFES S ORGANIZATION REGULATORY bodies in the (NIRO) 2 province, as 201 y uar Issue Date: Jan well as the Provincial Quality of Care Coordinators/ Acute & Emergency Services Branch/ Ministry of Health and the Ombudsman Saskatchewan. This group collectively is called the Network of Inter-Professional Regulatory Organizations (NIRO). The brochure is directed at the public that is accessing health care and provides

information as to the authority and responsibility of the 27 health related regulatory bodies in the province to regulate their professions. It outlines options to follow should there be concerns regarding the conduct of a health professional during the delivery of health care and then

SrNA

provides contact information for all of the participants involved in the development of the brochure itself. All groups involved have also agreed to post this brochure on their WEB sites. The brochure is available on the SRNA website at www.srna.org

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s r na n e w s /l e t t e r

to t H e

e d i to r

SRNA News Farewell to Nursing Advisor, Practice, Linda Banerjee, RN. A tremendous resource, Linda has been with the Association for over ten years. Congratulations to Linda in her future endeavors. Genie Mintram says goodbye to the SRNA. With over three years experience in the Association, Genie headed up the records management operations among other administrative functions. Best wishes to Genie in new challenges ahead. Helping RNs Work SMART SRNA hosted four sessions over two days on March 7 and 8, 2012 in Regina. A total of 114 RNs participated in sessions on: Behavioural Styles; Emotional Smarts; Stress Management and Emotional Wellness; and Assertive Communication in the Workplace. Watch the SRNA website for more information on the upcoming sessions scheduled for October 15/16, 2012 in Saskatoon. SRNA Regional Workshop Join the SRNA Council and staff for a day of information and discussion about your professional association, RN and RN(NP) scope of practice, documentation, code of ethics, continuing competence program and competence assurance. The Regional Workshop will be held in Saskatoon on October 10, 2012 from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Watch your email and the SRNA website for registration information or contact Debbie at dcummings@srna.org.

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Letter to the Editor Accolades to the SRNA for hosting this year’s outstanding annual general meeting and conference.  The theme, Be the Voice: Quality and Patient Safety, set the stage for three days of thought provoking presentations  and discussions about our ongoing goal to think and enact quality and patient safety into our daily practice. We were reminded about how each of us has a responsibility to be the VOICE, advocating for the patients, ourselves and our profession. Besides these powerful messages, gratitude and collaboration were also a part of the conference. Every day and night Registered Nurses do amazing things, whether it be with patients, students, research or leadership. We must take time to recognize, acknowledge and celebrate our many contributions. Thank you to the SRNA team for all of your efforts! Ann-Marie Urban, PhD, RN

SRNA Directory Phone/Toll-free

(306) 359-4200/ 1-800-667-9945

Fax:

(306) 359-0257

E-mail/Website:

info@srna.org/www.srna.org

Internationally Educated Nurses

international@srna.org

RN Registration

register@srna.org

Renew RN Registration

renew@srna.org

Nursing Examinations

exams@srna.org

Competence Assurance/ Discipline/Investigations

professionalconduct@srna.org

Member Links

links@srna.org

SRNA Newsbulletin

communications@srna.org

Executive Director

execdir@srna.org

General Enquiries

info@srna.org

Nursing Practice

practiceadvice@srna.org

S u m m e r 2012


u P co M i n g e v e n t s 2012 SEPTEMBER

NOVEMBER

8

8–9

16 – 17

Face-to-Face HIV & Hepatitis C Education Event, Prince Albert Exhibition-East Hall-Prince Albert, SK

4th Annual – Implementing Best Practices for Pain Management in Saskatchewan

Save The Date InterD 5 at TCU Place in Saskatoon, SK

http://www.usask.ca/nursing/cedn/calendar/ NoN_eVeNTS/Save%20the%20date%20 September%208%202012%20PrINCe%20 AlberT%20update.pdf

http://www.usask.ca/nursing/cedn/ calendar.php

25 and 26 2012 SUN Innovators Conference, Saskatoon http://sun-nurses.sk.ca/governmentrelations/first-initiative/2012-innovatorsconference

OCTOBER 10 SRNA Regional Workshop in Saskatoon http://www.srna.org/events 10 – 11

www.usask.ca/nursing

Continuing Education and Development for Nurses, Saskatoon, SK http://www.usask.ca/nursing/cedn/ programs/2012-2013%20Conferences/ Arthritis/Arthritis_Conf_2012.php 15 – 16 Helping RN’s Work SMART at Sandman Hotel, Saskatoon, SK www.srna.org/events/upcoming-events 29 – 30 Solution Focused Treatment of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder at Moose Jaw Union Hospital Solarium 6th Floor www.srna.org/events/upcoming-events http://www.skcp.ca/CeC%20Notices/ Solution%20focused%20PTSD%20oct%20 29-30%202012.pdf

College of Nursing

Health Education

at the College of Nursing

The University of Saskatchewan, College of Nursing delivers innovative programs in an interdisciplinary context – designed and taught by expert faculty – resulting in the most comprehensive nursing education in Saskatchewan. With learn where you live options, a strong study abroad program, and robust health research, we are a nursing community that works together to make a difference locally, provincially, and around the world.

Undergraduate

Graduate

Continuing Education

Discover the new Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) and Post-Degree BSN programs and experience the advantage of working and collaborating with students and faculty from other health science disciplines.

The Master of Nursing and PhD in Nursing programs are rewarding opportunities to conduct original research, impact patient and health outcomes, and influence the next generation of nurse practitioners.

Our continuing education unit addresses learning needs of practicing nurses throughout the province. Education programs are enriched through specialized instructors, on-site, and distance learning options.

Southern Saskatchewan Campus Central Saskatchewan Campus Prince Albert Campus

Regina Region

Saskatoon Region

SrNA

Prince Albert Region

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Northern Saskatchewan Campus

La Ronge and Ile-a-la-Crosse

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It’s Just a Click Away! 2013 Online Renewal

(Available mid-September 2012) Renew your registration, update your profile, and pay your fees at www.srna.org. Change your default password make it personal.

Need your password?

Click

“Forgot Password”

at member log-in and your password will be emailed to you, assuming we have your current email. If we don’t, send it to us at info@srna.org or call 1-800-667-9945.

Why renew online?

It’s green, secure, simple and fast! (help SRna achieve its goal of a paperless Registration Renewal) For the 2014 registration renewal year, it will be mandatory for all SRNA members to renew their license online.

reTurN uNDelIVerAble mAIl To: Saskatchewan registered Nurses’ Assoc. 2066 retallack St. regina, SK S4T 7X5

Publication Agreement #40005137


SRNA NewsBulletin Summer 2012