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MUSEUMS ASSOCIATION OF SASKATCHEWAN

WINTER 2013 C A L E N DA R New Workshop Helps You Deal With Mould

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What’s Inside? MAS News ............................. 2 Student Employment .......... 4 Spring Symposium Focuses on Educating for Sustainable Communities ......................... 8 Events Calendar ................... 9 Registration Form .............. 11


MAS News

Winter Calendar 2013

MAS News

Save the date!

>> Mark Your Calendars!

Educating for Sustainability Symposium May 23rd, 2013 Saskatoon Inn

Plan to attend MAS’s Mini-Conference and Annual General Meeting, to be held on May 24th at the Saskatoon Inn. Our Educating for Sustainability Symposium has also been scheduled for the day before the conference on May 23rd at the Saskatoon Inn. Keep an eye on E-Phemera and our website for all of the updates and for your opportunity to register!

2013 MAS AGM & Mini-conference May 24th, 2013 Saskatoon Inn

>> MAS Blog MAS is excited to announce that our blog is now up and running! You can find it at www.saskmuseums.org/MASblog. The blog is an accessible, low-cost way for us to share stories of our own as well as member activities. Our hope for our blog is that it becomes your best source for information about the Saskatchewan museum community —and to make you as excited as we are about the people, events, and museums that help make this province so very special.

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Keep an eye on E-Phemera and our website www.saskmuseums. org for all of the updates and for your opportunity to register!

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MAS Facebook Page MAS is also pleased to announce that we now have our very own Facebook page up and running. Please like our page to receive the latest museum and heritage related news. Our page can be found at: www.facebook.com/ MuseumsAssociationOfSaskatchewan. Does your museum have a facebook page? Let us know and we will like your page as well! <<


Winter Calendar 2013

From Idea to Exhibit and Beyond

New Workshop Helps You Deal with Mould

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eople sometimes think of Saskatchewan as a dry province, but that doesn’t mean we don’t have our fair share of mould. Take one soggy spring, add a vulnerable collection of artifacts—stored, perhaps, in the damp basement or back room of a crumbling heritage building—and you’ve got a recipe for a mould problem. It’s no secret that mould can be the bane of museum collections. It’s a health hazard. It can cause irreparable damage to artifacts and buildings. It spreads and grows quickly, often in hard-to-spot places. Once it’s established, it’s very hard to get rid of—and fragile artifacts are often very difficult to clean without causing damage. This March, join Jane Dalley of Dalley-Frogatt Heritage Conservation Services for a one-day workshop, and learn what you can do to prevent mould—and how to control it when you find it. We’re even offering this workshop twice, so you can select the location (Swift Current or Prince Albert) that’s most convenient for you. Don’t miss out: register now! <<

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Mould Management and Remediation March 6 at the Swift Current Museum in Swift Current OR March 8 at the Mann Art Gallery in Prince Albert Members $80; Non-members $100; Student $60 (must present ID)

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Cover photo: Artist Daniele del Nero’s After Effects is a series of paper sculptures covered with flour and a layer of mould. See more at www. danieledelnero. com/p/after-effects. html.

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Student Employment

Winter Calendar 2013

Student Employment Employment

May-Lin Polk Museums Advisor Museums Association of Saskatchewan

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nce again, it’s time to prepare for the upcoming tourism season. For many, this means applying for summer student funding. Having a summer student is a gold mine of opportunity for not only the museum but also the student themselves. Employing students in the museum provides them with valuable work experience and the opportunity to flex their creative side. For many students, the museum could be their first “real” job that gives them responsibilities they may never had before. Through their employment, they will be provided a broad picture of what it is like to work in a museum. By being able to run public programs and do collections work, they can try out different aspects and discover new interests as well as learn a bit more about themselves. With these experiences they can move forward with employable skills that they have gained. This of course doesn’t mean that you just set your students free. Mentor them. Give them projects and goals, such as getting all your gift agreements signed or creating museum kits for seniors’ homes. Some of these projects are ones that you may already have planned for the year as outlined in your Museum Grant Program application. Giving students valuable tasks and

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projects will not only produce a sense of ownership but also an understanding and awareness of the history your community holds. With technologically savvy summer students, they can also assist you with the scary side of technology by: > Troubleshooting > Choosing and operating computer hardware and software > Setting-up and maintaining your social media page > Digitizing collections > Completing online research > Entering information into a collections management database > Creating a website


Winter Calendar 2013

Barriers The biggest barrier is money. Lets face it. This is probably the number one obstacle on both sides of the situation. While there are many students who do want a museum experience (and will travel to get it!), they need to be able to pay their rent or save for school in the fall. With student tuition fees and debt levels increasing, minimum wage (or near minimum wage) probably isn’t going to be enough.

Student Employment

Having a summer student is a gold mine of opportunity for not only the museum but also the student themselves.

Also consider the message your offered wage sends. Pay needs to reflect not only the quality of work that you expect from them but how much you value their work. There are ways you can offset the cost of paying them more, but this requires planning, such as cheap or free accommodations. This lets students save more for school and can be a great way to supplement a low wage.

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Student Employment

Winter Calendar 2013

When applying for funding, it’s a good idea to spread yourself out; apply to several granting agencies. You may get all of them or only one. In some cases, the granting agency may provide assistance to the student if they are travelling to work for you from a great distance, but you must let the granting agency know ahead of time. There are several funding sources that you can apply to for a summer student: 1. SaskCulture’s Summer Student Works Program > Deadline: April 2. Service Canada’s Canada Summer Jobs > Deadline: February 3. Canadian Heritage’s Young Canada Works in Heritage Organizations > Deadline: February 1 4. Canadian Heritage’s Young Canada Works in Both Official Languages > Deadline: February 1 For those looking to hire interns and give a more advance experience there are additional funding opportunities: 1. Canadian Heritage’s Young Canada Works at Building Careers in Heritage > Deadline: February 2. Canadian Heritage’s Young Canada Works in English and French > Deadline: February With any grant application, calling and talking to the funding agency as you prepare your application will improve your chances of getting funded. Learn about what they have identified as a need, and show how you meet their criteria and guidelines. Carefully fill out your application and get several people to proofread it for you. You must demonstrate that you are accountable for the money and are using it to achieve the granting agency’s goals.

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Winter Calendar 2013

Advertise Where have you been adverting your summer jobs? Places that you could advertise include: > SaskCulture > SaskJobs > Museums Association of Saskatchewan > University of Regina’s Career Centre > University of Saskatchewan’s Student Employment and Career Centre > Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology’s (SIAST) Student Employment Services > Select university departments (such as History, Archaeology, and Anthropology) > With college program coordinators > Rural municipality or town websites > Specific Sport, Culture, and Recreation district websites > Canadian Heritage Information Network job postings > Service Canada Job Bank > Social Media > Word of Mouth

Student Employment

It’s important to advertise early. If you have decided that a post-secondary student is your first choice, know that they are looking for jobs in March and April. While this may seem early, look at your financial situation. Have you received your grant before? What are the chances you will get it again? Do you have a back–up plan in case the funding doesn’t come through? Will the museum be open no matter what?

Determine what kind of student you want and target them. Where would they look? What would interest them?

Resources The Museums Association of Saskatchewan has developed several resources that can help you with the hiring and training of your summer staff. The publication How to Train Your Summer Museum Staff is a workbook that guides you through the presentation of key information that your summer staff will need to know in order to complete their job effectively and represent your institution to visitors. The Job Description Toolkit takes the reader through the process of writing a good job description. There also are examples of jobs descriptions for various positions, including summer staff and interns. These can be viewed on our website (www.saskmuseums.org) under the Resource section.

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR SUMMER MUSEUM STAFF A Practical Manual for Training Seasonal Staff for Your Museum

M U S E U M S A S S O C I AT I O N O F S A S K AT C H E WA N

While hiring a summer student and working along side them seems like a lot of effort, it should be seen as an investment in the community and the next generation. Note: The deadlines for grants are variable. Please double check online before applying <<

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Spring Symposium

Winter Calendar 2013

Spring Symposium Focuses on Educating for

Sustainable Communities

s we face sustainability challenges in our museums, our communities, A and arguably in our whole way of life, it’s time to consider the roles museums can play in helping to create sustainable communities. Education is one of museums’ core functions, and one of the most important things we can do to help people and communities find a healthier, more sustainable path. But bringing communities together to face a challenging future isn’t always easy. In this symposium, we’ll share techniques and ideas to help you become a relevant, dynamic hub in your community, and a site for positive change. Join us as we discuss and demonstrate activities to help your museum become an integral part of a more sustainable community. Hear about and participate in great new ways to engage people across groups, with different interests. It’s even conveniently timed, so you can stay for MAS’s miniconference and AGM the next day.

Symposium Facilitators Marni Gittleman

Exhibit developer, artist and interactive learning specialist Marni Gittleman is passionate about creating experiences that are sensorially inspired, imagination-powered and heart-centered. She has 20+ years of experience from community centers to corporate boardrooms, galleries to the outdoors. A dreamer and a doer, she is curious and constantly weaving connection points between participants, clients, and concepts and resources.

Glenn Sutter

Educating for Sustainability Symposium

>> Date: May 23, 2013 >> Place: Saskatoon Inn and

Conference Centre Saskatoon, SK >> Cost: Members $100; Non-members $125; Students $75 (must present ID)

Glenn Sutter, Curator of Human Ecology at the Royal Saskatchewan Museum (RSM), runs a research, outreach and community engagement program aimed at fostering a “culture of sustainability.” He looks at sustainability – the challenge of living well on a limited planet – from an ecological perspective, thinking about all the players and relationships in a community, an economy, or a landscape, and how those complex systems work. He’s also an adjunct professor at both Saskatchewan universities and a Fellow of the international Leadership for Environment and Development (LEAD) program. <<

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Winter Calendar 2013

Events Calendar

Events Calendar Certificate Program

Fees for one-day course >> MAS members: $60 ($50 each if two or more from same institution) >> Non-members: $80 >> Student: $40 (must present ID)

Fees for two-day course >> MAS members: $100 ($90 each if two or more from same institution) >> Non-members: $140 Course times for the Certificate >> Student: $75 (must present ID) Program: 9:30am to 4:30pm

Museums and Education >> April 5 at the Barr Colony Heritage Cultural Centre in Lloydminster Learn about the role of the museum as an educational institution. You’ll also learn about responding to current issues, planning and designing audience-appropriate education and public programs, and how to write an education and public programming policy. Online Museums and Community >> February 18 – March 15 Explore the changing place museums hold in our communities. You’ll learn current practices for planning, assessing, and implementing museum-community initiatives. You’ll also learn skills and share ideas about determining community and audience needs, working with diverse groups, and developing a community engagement plan. Online Museums and Education >> TBD (online) Learn about the role of the museum as an educational institution. You’ll also learn about responding to current issues, planning and designing audience-appropriate education and public programs, and how to write an education and public programming policy. COMING THIS FALL! Collections Management >> TBD - Coming this fall! In this one-day course, you’ll learn what collections management is, and what activities are involved in it. The course also examines collections management policy and procedures, the laws and regulations affecting the collecting of objects, and the collection documentation process. Museums 101 >> TBD - Coming this fall! This one-day course will familiarize you with Standards for Saskatchewan Museums, focusing on applying the standards to your museum. It will also examine the relationship between your institution, standards, and public trust, as well as standards in a provincial, national, and international context.

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Events Calendar

Winter Calendar 2013

Other Introductory-Level Courses Art of Grant-Writing >> March 22 at Grand Coteau Heritage and Cultural Centre in Shaunavon This workshop provides you with an understanding of how to write effective and successful grant applications. You’ll learn useful techniques to help you tell your story and communicate your goals and plans to funding agencies. MAS members: $50; non-members: $70; students: $30 (must present ID)

February

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* Two courses to choose from * >> March 8 at the Mann Art Gallery in Prince Albert >> March 6 at the Swift Current Museum in Swift Current COMING THIS FALL! Planning a Successful Temporary Exhibit >> TBD - Coming this fall! What does it take to make a temporary exhibit work? This one-day workshop will outline best practices for developing successful, affordable temporary exhibits, with a focus on topical, event-oriented exhibits (e.g., exhibits linked with commemorations or current events).

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Mid- to Advanced-Level Courses Mould Management and Remediation This one-day workshop will equip you with the knowledge and skills to help stop mould problems from occurring, and enable you to identify and remedy mould problems when they do occur. MAS members: $80; non-members: $100; students: $60 (must present ID)

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Digital Photodocumentation of Museum Collections (Canadian Conservation Institute) >> TBD - Coming this fall! This workshop explains how to digitally photograph cultural objects to meet conservation and documentation requirements. It includes information on how to choose proper photographic equipment; the various types of digital cameras and how they function; different light sources and their influence on colour; assorted lighting techniques; and setting up a digital workflow. The importance of combining all these elements in an appropriate manner to consistently produce accurate images is also discussed.

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Registration Form

Winter Calendar 2013

Register early. Space is limited for all courses - please register by the registration deadline and register early to ensure your space! Registration forms can be found at the end of the calendar and on our website. We can also fax you a registration form. We accept registrations via fax, e-mail or mail. If you are mailing your form, please call us to reserve your space.

Please print First Name:

Last Name:

Institution / Affiliation: Address: Province:

City: Postal Code:

Phone:

*Please provide either an e-mail address or a fax number. E-mail:

Fax:

q Add me to your mailing list Certificate Program *Pricing order: Member, If 2 or more from same institution, Non-Member, Student

q Museums and Education

>> April 5 at the Barr Colony Heritage Cultural Centre in Lloydminster >> $60/$50/$80/$40

q Online Museums and Community >> February 18 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; March 15 >> $60/$50/$80/$40

Other Introductory-Level Courses

q Online Museums and Education >> TBD (Winter) >> $60/$50/$80/$40

q Collections Management >> TBD (Fall)

q Museums 101 >> TBD (Fall)

q Art of Grant-Writing

>> March 22 at Grand Coteau Heritage and Cultural Centre in Shaunavon >> $50/$70/$30

Mid- to Advanced-Level Courses Mould Management and Remediation *Two courses to choose from*

q Planning a Successful Temporary Exhibit >> TBD (Fall)

q March 8 at the Mann Art Gallery in Prince Albert q Digital Photodocumentation of Museum >> $80/$100/$60

q March 6 at the Swift Current Museum in Swift Current >> $80/$100/$60

Collections (Canadian Conservation Institute) >> TBD (Fall)

Form continues on back of page

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Registration Form

Winter Calendar 2013

Payment may be made with VISA, MasterCard, cheque or cash. Please make cheques payable to Museums Association of Saskatchewan. Payments are not processed until course is completed. If you require an invoice, please indicate this on your registration form. Cancellation Courses may be cancelled due to insufficient enrollment - if you see a course you would like, please enroll right away! Refunds The registration fee will only be refunded if you withdraw your application five days prior to the course date or if the course is cancelled. In cases of weather conditions, illness and family emergencies, the five-day requirement may be waived by MAS. MAS reserves the right to cancel any course at any time for any reason. The Association cannot guarantee continuation of any program should funding cease. The availability, date and location of the course offerings are subject to change at any time. Payment: Cheque

Money Order / Cash

Card Number: Expiry Date:

Please print MasterCard

VISA Cardholder: Signature:

Please send invoice to: Same as above

Certificate Program Fees All prices include GST. Fees for one-day course >> MAS members: $60 ($50 each if two or more from same institution) >> Non-members: $80 >> Student: $40 (must present ID) Fees for two-day course >> MAS members: $100 ($90 each if two or more from same institution) >> Non-members: $140 >> Student: $75 (must present ID)

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Return one form per person to: Museums Association of Saskatchewan 424 McDonald Street, Regina, SK, S4N 6E1 Fax with credit card information to (306) 780-9463 or email mas@saskmuseums.org or phone (306) 780-9279 Toll free in SK: 1-866-568-7386


MAS Winter Calendar 2013