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Sitting up, leaning your body to the left or right is very efficient and acro and free‐ style pilots are really aware of this, but this implies other types of movement, when we are ‘lying down’. In a cocoon harness, we simply ‘roll’ around the axis of our body with minimal inertia. The feedback from the wing can be more perceptible too, be‐ cause it can easily make us ‘roll’ around our head to foot axis. But above all, steering with your legs outs‐ tretched in a cocoon which is in contact with your whole body, lets you react more precisely with it. In addition to steering through the controls and the harness, the pilot can react to the wing with their legs, for example by pushing with one of their feet, they can exert a small amount of force on the wing on the yaw axis to rein‐ force the start of a turn.

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The optimal adjustment isn’t an exact science, especially as far as the length of the cocoon is concerned. As a general rule, when the pilot locks their outstretched legs, the cocoon should be under tension. This therefore corresponds to a length equal to the length of the pilot’s legs minus 1-3 cm. When the pilot releases their legs completely, they automatically bend a bit. A harness which holds the pilot’s legs straight, without any effort from the pilot, would be very uncomfortable according to Kortel Design’s tests. As far as the angle of attack of the cocoon is concerned, there are two possibilities: either exactly along the axis of the airflow, i.e the glide angle (below left), or slightly above, so that the pilot’s face will be sheltered in the lee of the cocoon (below). During the development of the Kannibal Race II, Kortel tried to optimise it to give as high a range of angle of attack as possible (right).

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Cocooning (English)  

Amongst other subjects, in this issue, we made an interesting observation: cocoon harnesses (especially the lightweight ones), are taking of...

Cocooning (English)  

Amongst other subjects, in this issue, we made an interesting observation: cocoon harnesses (especially the lightweight ones), are taking of...

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