Issuu on Google+

Losing Traditions

There’s no arguing that traditions and customs are a significant part of countries’ national identities. Many people identify a country with it’s traditions. For example, people identify the respect of elders with Asian countries or people might associate politeness with Canada. But it’s not just the traditions that make a country what it is. It’s its language, its history, its people and simply its geographical location. Traditions are a significant part of a country’s identity but it’s not everything. Besides, the world is become more and more diverse. Every country is becoming more and more diverse. Basically, cultures, traditions and customs are spreading throughout the world. This is inevitable. This means that certain traditions that were once just existing within a country are becoming international whether it’s within the region, continent or the world. What I’m saying is that traditions are becoming less and less a part of specific countries’ identity and more and more international. Furthermore, I don’t agree with the statement that traditions should be “preserved at all costs”. You can’t force traditions to be preserved. The traditions that should be preserved will be preserved. These are the traditions that are cherished and popular. Then there are traditions that are becoming less and less popular that eventually die out, as they should. It’s all about adapting and evolving. People will change as the country changes. Sasan Dehkhoda


Losing traditions response