Page 1

PRACTICAL IDEAS FROM THE EXPERTS

FEBRUARY 2017 £3.40

E T ADVIC EXPER

TH E I NE Z MAGA A TH TI’S T AN DIETIO VED APPR

EAT MORE and LOSE WEIGHT Our experts explain how THE NEW G PLAN

The good gut diet to

BEAT the BLOAT

12

foods to get you

HEART SMART

VEGAN FRIENDLY

Tips to steal and easy recipes to try

3 Vegetarian spicy Mexican bean soup

PLUS healthyfood.co.uk

l SPIRALIZERS

Best buys revealed l The truth about

PROTEIN POWDERS l How much SALT

in that tomato PASTA SAUCE?

Chicken and couscous stuffed peppers

Vanilla rice pudding

In the kitchen with Tom Daley


What do the customers think?

this is how thousands of Brits

lower

their cholesterol naturally! Maria, 50 I’ve recommended Betavivo to all my friends who are looking for a healthy breakfast, rich in both fibre and protein.

Mary, 58 After one year of eating this cereal my cholesterol has been reduced from 15% risk to 5 % I am so pleased in fact I’m over the moon!!

Betavivo is not your ordinary oat product... A daily portion of Betavivo cereal is scientifically proven to lower cholesterol1. A unique way of treating Swedish oats and a patented composition. The cholesterol-lowering power of Betavivo equals at least three big bowls of porridge!

Liz, 55 I proved to my GP that it worked in lowering my cholesterol.

= As a bonus, the beta-glucan in Betavivo also contributes to reducing the rise in blood sugar after the meal. Find inspiring recipes and more information at www.betavivo.co.uk James, 48 Betavivo helps me lower both cholesterol and blood sugar. I recommend it to friends and family – and also others!

For your heart. Every day. Right now

Buy now at:

promotion at:

One serving of Betavivo cereal gives you the full three grams of oat beta-glucan fibre needed daily to lower cholesterol. Coronary heart disease has many risk factors. Altering one of these risk factors may or may not have a beneficial effect. A varied and balanced diet and a healthy lifestyle are always important. 1

Ref: European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), Parma, Italy. 2009. The EFSA Journal (2009) 1175, 1-9 | *Netigate marketing survey, April 2016


TA L K I N G P O I N T S

hfg

WELCOME O

NE OF OUR FAVOURITE TIMES of the month is when recipe consultant Phil

Mundy is in the office kitchen TESTING OUR RECIPES. First, we get the huge delivery of

ingredients – lugged up three flights of stairs. Then Phil gets to work. What always surprises me is the GENEROUS SIZE OF THE MAIN MEALS. My usual comment is, ‘So this serves six?’, only to find it’s for four (a happy moment). Welcome to the fabulous world of volumetrics (see our feature on p15). To you and me, that’s eating BIGGER QUANTITIES OF LOWER-CALORIE FOODS, instead of a smaller amount of higher-calorie foods, and feeling more satisfied. Make the food swaps dietitian Juliette Kellow

H DS

AWARE TIM

recommends and you’ll be eating a HEALTHIER VARIETY OF FOODS, feel fuller for longer and reach a healthy weight sooner as you’re not depriving yourself. You’ll also feel better for eating less sugar and fat. The other notable diet news of 2017 has to be the rise of the VEGAN DIET. At HFG, we’ve long been fans of eating more plant-based foods, but if you decide to go the whole vegan route and cut out all animal products, including dairy, make sure you DO IT THE HEALTHY WAY. Our WITH THANKS TO GEMMA DOYLE, SARA NORMAN, DEBBIE VOLLER

nutrition editor Amanda Ursell covers the potential dietary pitfalls and how to make up any shortfall in nutrients. One of my fitness aims this year is to WALK AND CYCLE MORE OUTDOORS, so finding out most of us live within six miles of a woodland trail opens up exciting new possibilities (p10). Let us know how your new year plans are panning out in month two. Remember, we’re always here to help you stay on track with healthy resolutions.

No, not the Oscars, but the 2017 HFG Food & Drink Awards. CAST YOUR VOTE for your favourite healthy gadget at healthyfood. co.uk

MELANIE LEYSHON, EDITOR FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 3


CO N T E N T S

IN THIS MONTH’S FEBRUARY

p58

p15 p44 p22 p52

p29

p76 p37 p26 TALKING POINTS 3 Editor’s letter 6 Meet our experts 8 Let’s talk… 92 How I stay healthy Scandi chef and cookbook author Signe Johansen

HEALTH & NUTRITION 10 Health notes 15 Eat more and lose weight Welcome to volumetrics 22 Love your heart Expert advice to protect your ticker

4 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

p54

p78

p84

29 Healthy tips to pinch from the vegan diet Plus recipes 37 Should we power up with powders? The dietitian’s view 40 Diet tips to ease the pain of Crohn’s 44 The G Plan Diet Does it work? 86 Weight-loss star How a new app helped one reader shed 5st 88 Learn the ropes Climbing

RECIPES 46 February recipe index Plus a quick way to shop online

48 Lose weight the healthy way with our calorie-counted plan 52 Weeknight dinners 58 The green dream team Green veg gets interesting 65 Freezer filler Low-cal pizzas 68 Go-to Mexican supper Spiced bean soup with variations 72 Love your lunchbox Ideas beyond sandwiches 78 Sweet nothings Slimmed-down rice pudding and sticky toffee 82 Put it on the menu: raw cacao The healthy chocolate fix 84 In the kitchen with Tom Daley


ISSUE p53

p26

p22

EYE TO EYE MEDIA LTD, Axe & Bottle Court, 70 Newcomen Street, London SE1 1YT SUBSCRIPTION ENQUIRIES 01795 414778 Healthyfood.co.uk/subscribe EDITORIAL ENQUIRIES 020 7803 4128 FAX 020 7803 4101 EMAIL Info@healthyfood.co.uk WEB Healthyfood.co.uk Editor Melanie Leyshon Art director Tina Betts Assistant editor Liz Atkins Senior sub editor Rebecca Almond Editorial assistant/writer Laura Day Nutrition editor Amanda Ursell Recipe consultant Phil Mundy Digital editor Rebecca Brett Assistant web producer Isabella Bradford Digital intern Isabeau Brimeau ADVERTISING SALES Ad director Jason Elson 020 7150 5397 Senior sales Laura Collinder 020 7150 5043 Group head, partnerships Josh Jalloul 020 7150 5040 Regional business development manager Nicola Rearden 0161 209 3629

p56

SHOPPING 12 This month we love 26 How much salt in that pasta sauce? We lift the lid on a storecupboard staple 70 HFG smart swaps Valentine’s Day meal ideas 76 Spiralizers on test

DON’T MISS 91 Coming up in next month’s issue On sale 1 March 94 Subscription offer Get 12 issues for £27.70 and save 32%

p80

96 References 97 Nutrition lowdown 98 5 top facts to take away Our favourite snippets from this month’s issue

READ MORE ONLINE Find hundreds of healthy recipes, health features and blogs about health trends at

HEALTHYFOOD.CO.UK

Managing director Seamus Geoghegan 020 7803 4123 seamus@eyetoeyemedia.co.uk Publishing director Adrienne Moyce 020 7803 4111 adrienne.moyce@eyetoeyemedia.co.uk Consultant editorial director Jo Sandilands Circulation director Owen Arnot 020 7803 4121 Production director Jake Hopkins 020 7803 4110 Marketing consultant Julia Rich 020 7803 4129 Finance director Gary Pickett gary.pickett@eyetoeyemedia.co.uk Finance manager Adam Wright 01733 373135 adam.wright@eyetoeyemedia.co.uk Healthy Food Guide magazine is published by Eye to Eye Media Ltd, Axe & Bottle Court, 70 Newcomen Street, London SE1 1YT, under licence from Healthy Life Media International Limited and its content includes copyright material which is owned or controlled by, and is reproduced under licence from, Healthy Life Media International Limited. The title Healthy Food Guide and the Healthy Food Guide logo are trade marks owned by, and used under licence from, Healthy Life Media International Limited. The views and opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of Healthy Life Media International Limited, its subsidiaries, affiliates or contributors. For licensing enquiries contact Phil Ryan, Healthy Life Media International, phil.ryan@hlmedia.co.nz.

ISSN 2045-8223. Printed in the UK by Southernprint Ltd. Colour origination by Rhapsody. Copyright Eye to Eye Media Ltd. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part prohibited without permission. The publishers cannot accept responsibility for errors in advertisements, articles, photographs or illustrations. Eye to Eye Media Ltd is a registered data user whose entries in the Data Protection Register contain descriptions of sources and disclosures of personal data. This paper is manufactured using pulp taken from well-managed, certified forests. All prices correct at time of going to press. UK basic annual subscription rate for 12 issues, £38.40; Europe and Eire, £55; rest of the world, £60. Back issues cost £5. Member of the Audit Bureau Of Circulations.


E X PE R T S

Get healthy the hfg way Eating and living well for longterm good health – that’s the HFG mission. We don’t believe in short-term fad diets, but making small changes for big gains. Read how our experts can help you...

l

Look for the symbols

on our recipes. They will enable you to pinpoint recipes for your needs. See p47 for more information.

LOW CAL

LOW FAT

We can help you break

l out of yo-yo dieting, as our recipes come in satisfying portion sizes. We use everyday ingredients to make your favourite dishes healthier and no foods are off the menu. We’d never recommend cutting out key food groups, unless you have an intolerance or allergy.

All our recipes

l are analysed by our qualified dietitians and nutritionists, below, and tried and tested by our recipe consultant Phil Mundy. They are created to guidelines set out by the NHS Eatwell Guide for key food groups, to ensure they’re well balanced.

We look at the science

l behind the headlines to clear up and demystify mixed messages about current health issues. Our experts always look at the body of evidence, never just one isolated study.

LOW SATS

vegetarian

LOW SALT

HIGH FIBRE

HIGH

HIGH

PROTEIN CALCIUM

gluten free

HIGH IRON

1

5-A-DAY

dairy free

Meet our experts: qualified dietitians, nutritionists and medical professionals

AMANDA URSELL is HFG’s nutrition editor. She has a degree in nutrition and a post-graduate diploma in dietetics, and is a visiting fellow at Oxford Brookes University.

JULIETTE KELLOW is a registered dietitian who has worked in the NHS and as a consultant nutritionist both in the food industry and within the media.

DR DAWN HARPER works as a GP and runs regular clinics on women’s health and weight management. She appears on Channel 4’s Embarrassing Bodies.

JENNIFER LOW is a dietitian who works as a consultant for the NHS and the private sector. She specialises in eating disorders, IBS and bariatric surgery.

SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR CONTRIBUTING EXPERT PANEL l Tracy Kelly, registered dietitian l Helen Bond, registered dietitian and spokesperson for the British Dietetic Association l Norma McGough, registered dietitian at Coeliac UK l Victoria Taylor, senior dietitian at the British Heart Foundation

6 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017


Crafted with care & packed with the goodness of wholefoods, our delicious bars are bursting with nutritious energy & fibre, rich in Vitamin E and omega 3 with a whopping 5g protein per bar!

Go gaga for goji! Our plump juicy goji berries are rich in vitamin A goodness, vital for healthy skin & immune system.

Grab one to munch on the go from the the free-from aisle of Sainsburys, Tesco, ASDA, Morrisons, in health foods shops, Wholefoods Market and online with Holland & Barrett and Amazon.

Gluten, wheat & dairy free. Suitable for vegetarians & vegans perkierfoods

@perkierfoods

perkier_foods

www.perkier.co.uk


LET’S TALK… hfg

STAR LETTER

DAIRY-FREE INSPIRATION

The free-from shopping pages in the December issue couldn’t have come at a better time as my wife had just been diagnosed with a dairy intolerance and was feeling down about what she could and couldn’t eat. After reading your recommendations she cheered right up, and we’re now making our own meals from scratch with the suggestions and recipes from HFG. Thank you! Letitia Davies

Editor Melanie writes: Don’t forget there are lots more dairy-free recipes at healthyfood.co.uk.

GO TO EONLINE N MONTER THI COM S T healt PETITHIO’S hyfo NS o

d.co. uk

HELP WITH THE BIG FREEZE I wanted to say how brilliant the January issue is – I love reading the new articles on my iPad. I especially loved the freezer guide. I’m always wondering what to freeze and how long to keep stuff. At the moment, my freezer’s fairly full – I know I’ve got things that have been in there for ages! This article will really help when I come to having my clear-outs every few months. Fiona Johnson

EATING PLAN FOR ENERGY I always avidly devour my HFG searching for new recipes. I’m a pescatarian and my husband cooks everything as my MS prevents me from participating. MS eats at my energy reserves, as well as robbing me of mobility, so I’d appreciate some help with healthy eating solutions for a chair-bound life, especially as you always emphasise the importance of exercise. Linda Docherty Editor Melanie writes: Following our diet plan will help you maintain a healthy weight. You’ll also find lots of vegetarian and fish recipes on our website to substitute for the meat dishes. Exercise-wise, try these chair-based workouts at nhs.uk/livewell/fitness/ CONGRATULATIONS documents/chair-workout.jpg The star letter writer wins a healthy cooking set from to get started. Joining a local School of Wok by Dexam, created in partnership with fitness club might also be an chef Jeremy Pang. The set includes a 13in steel wok, idea as you could be shown with textured interior so you can cook with less oil, how to use suitable exercise plus a two-tier bamboo steamer and apron, together machines at your own pace worth over £80. For more info, go to dexam.co.uk. to build up your strength. TELL US WHAT YOU THINK OF HFG (good and bad) and send your tips, pictures and queries to: info@healthyfood.co.uk. Or write to us at: Healthy Food Guide, Eye to Eye Media Ltd, Axe & Bottle Court, 70 Newcomen Street, London SE1 1YT.

8 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017


N E WS A N D V I E WS

YOUR PICS

Gill Souter

These are three of our favourite reader efforts this month – filling and surprisingly tummy trimming

Sara Hobin

enjoyed a hearty plate of baked salmon & veg

Natalie Thomas

got great results with spinach, feta and halloumi Turkish pide

added extra veg to her oven-baked pumpkin and sage risotto

OUR NEWS

We learned how to go dry with good grace, had a go at earlymorning fitness and even had a spot in front of the TV cameras

DRY JAN DEBRIEF

THIS MORNING WITH AMANDA

We did it! We’re not saying Dry January was easy, but team HFG members who gamely took part learned some stuff along the way. Find tips on the blog (and this pomegranate & rosewater spritz in Recipes). EMAIL US info@healthyfood.co.uk

Nutrition editor Amanda Ursell appeared on ITV’s This Morning to chat to Holly and Phil about everyday sugar swaps you can make. Search ‘hidden sugars guide’ on our website for more info.

FOLLOW US @healthyfoodmag

STRETCH YOURSELF

Early birds who love yoga can enjoy a pop-up class run by Yogasphere (yogasphere.eu) with breakfast included at Tibits vegetarian and vegan restaurant in central London. We tried and loved it. Namaste!

TALK TO US ON facebook.com/ healthyfoodguideuk

SHARE PICS ON INSTAGRAM @healthyfoodmag

FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 9


HEALTH NOTES Diet and fitness facts for your wellbeing

Take the tree trail Shake off that winter lethargy and shed a few lbs while you’re at it by heading to the woods. The Forestry Commission is encouraging us to ditch expensive gym memberships in favour of navigating the local terrain out in the fresh air. Turns out half the UK’s population live within six miles of a Forestry Commission site. Find your nearest trail at forestry. gov.uk, plus other walks to try at healthyfood.co.uk/forestwalks.

10 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017


H E A LT H

Drink up!

Eatwell to live longer

WORDS: MEGAN BURNS, LAURA DAY. PHOTOS: ISTOCK

Sticking to the government’s updated Eatwell Guide could prevent 780,000 people developing type 2 diabetes over the next 10 years, a recent study found. What do you need to do to reap the rewards? Eat more fruit and veg and fewer processed meats. Find the Eatwell Guide and how to incorporate it into your diet at healthyfood.co.uk/new-eatwell-guide.

The daily PORTION OF NUTS to eat to reduce the risk of heart disease (by 30%), cancer (15%) and premature death (22%). This amount also makes you 40% LESS LIKELY TO DEVELOP DIABETES. The benefits are found in all nuts, so get cracking!

Many of us start the week determined to drink more water, but our efforts drop off by the weekend, with just 13% of us keeping up the H20 pledge, according to the National Hydration Council. Staying hydrated is one of the easiest ways to feel more alert and energetic, so make time for water: as soon as you wake up and between and during meals to curb overeating. Find plain water a little too, er, plain? Invest in a Citrus Zinger Water Bottle (£20, Amazon) and liven things up with fresh fruit or cucumber to make staying refreshed more palatable.

Beans meanz… weight loss? Swapping meat for plantbased protein could lead to healthy weight loss, say researchers at the University of Copenhagen. The small study found people who ate beans and pulses instead of pork or veal went on to consume 12% fewer calories at their next meal, thanks to the filling combination of protein and fibre.

FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 11


THIS MONTH WE L VE We’ve scoured the shelves for greattasting, nutritious products and selected our favourites to make your weekly shop easier

Choc-nut fiends will love this extra creamy spread, which has a whopping 83% less sugar and half the saturated fat of Nutella. Jim Jams Hazelnut Chocolate Spread, £2.59/350g, Morrisons, Tesco, Ocado Per 100g l 494kcal l 36.6g fat l 7.6g saturates l 8.7g sugars l 0.2g salt

12 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

This high-protein frozen ready meal makes a great quick fix after a workout. Asda High Protein Low Fat Carrot Spaghetti Bolognese, £1.87/400g Per pack l 260kcal l 10g fat

Something to celebrate – an alcohol-free fizz with half the kcal of the real thing. We’ll say cheers to that! Eisberg Sparkling Alcohol-Free Wine Blanc, £4/75cl, Ocado, Tesco

l 4.4g saturates l 15g sugars

Per 125ml glass l 31kcal l 0g fat

l 18g protein l 1.8g salt

l 0g saturates l 7.3g sugars l 0g salt

Pump up breakfast with this new 1% fat milk: it has 10g protein per 200ml, compared with 6.8g in the same amount of semi-skimmed.

This gently-spiced chai is almost as satisfying as a pudding. Or try adding a bag to porridge as it cooks to spice up your morning.

Sainsbury’s Protein Milk, £1.25/1 litre

Tea India Coconut Chai, £2.45/40 bags, Waitrose, teaindia.co.uk

Per 200ml l 99kcal l 2g fat l 1.2g saturates l 10.2g sugars l 0.3g salt

Per cup (made with water) l 0kcal l 0g fat l 0g saturates l 0g sugars l 0g salt


S H O PPI N G

Keep this to hand for an emergency lunch and get one of your five-a-day, plus plenty of green traffic lights.

Batchelors High Veg Lunch Pots, £1.99/280g, widely available

COMPILED BY LAURA DAY. PRICES CORRECT AT TIME OF GOING TO PRESS

Per pot (Tomato Noodles With Moroccan Tagine Sauce) l 327kcal l 7.3g fat l 0.8g saturates l 1.5g salt

This new gluten-free Peroni tastes as beer should – zesty, clean and refreshing.

Vegan and full of fibre, these burgers are a tasty Meat Free Monday staple.

Peroni Nastro Azzurro GlutenFree Beer, £6.50/4x330ml, Tesco, and available at Prezzo and Carluccio’s restaurants

Gosh! Naturally Free-From, £2.27/250g (2 burgers), Morrisons, Tesco

Per 330ml bottle l 138kcal l 0g fat l 0g saturates l 0g sugars l 0g salt

Per 125g burger (Beetroot, Kale & Quinoa) l 184kcal l 7.7g fat l 0.6g saturates l 5.5g sugars l 1.3g salt

Breakfast on the go gets more interesting with this mix of oats, quinoa flakes and flax – and no added sugar. Generous portion, too.

Mid-morning hunger pangs, be gone! These savoury bites are as satisfying as crisps, only with a nutritious 6g fibre in every bag.

Steak night looks leaner with these low-fat, high-welfare cuts: 0.4g fat/100g compared with 4.5g fat in the same weight of sirloin.

Quoats Porridge, £2/60g, quoats.co.uk

Linwoods Snackettes, £1.69/ 30g, Ocado, health food stores

MuscleFood Lite Minute Steak, £4/2 steaks, musclefood.com

Per 60g pot (Date & Pecan) l 225kcal l 6.2g fat l 0.7g saturates l 11g sugars l 0g salt

Per 30g bag (Spicy Tomato) l 164kcal l 12.4g fat l 1.5g saturates

Per 150g (uncooked) l 147kcal l 0.6g fat l 0.3g saturates l 0.2g sugars

l 1.7g sugars l 0.3g salt

FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 13


RESTORE YOUR BODY A metabolism-boosting infusion of nature’s ďŹ nest organic ingredients to detoxify and assist natural weight loss. With antioxidant-rich yerba mate, and psyllium to cleanse the gut and promote healthy digestion.

/heathandheather

@HeathHeatherTea

@heathandheathertea

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NUTRITION

EAT MORE & LOSE WEIGHT! When it comes to dieting, most of us think it’s a case of eating less. But, believe it or not, by making the right sort of changes to your diet, you could get a lot more on your plate and still consume far fewer calories, says dietitian Juliette Kellow

F

OR MOST OF US, losing weight is associated with significantly reducing the amount of food we eat. As a result, we end up with tiny portions that leave us feeling unsatisfied and hungry – which can put paid to our weight-loss efforts. So wouldn’t it be great if we could lose weight without cutting portions – or even eat more than normal? Welcome to the world of volumetrics, a concept developed by Barbara Rolls, a nutritionist from Penn State University in the US. Barbara’s theory is simple: feeling satisfied is directly related to the actual quantity of food we’ve eaten. Regardless of the calorie content,

the more we eat, the fuller we feel. Indeed, numerous studies reveal most of us tend to consume roughly the same weight of food each day. As a result, when we cut down this quantity, it’s unsurprising that we feel deprived. So, say experts, to stay satisfied, we need to eat the same amount of food as usual – but to make up this weight with lowercalorie foods. It’s what experts call eating a lower energy density diet. It may sound complicated but all you really need to know is that it’s about swapping a small portion of high-calorie food for a large portion of lower-calorie food so you end up eating more food in terms of weight, but take in fewer calories. The result is you don’t feel cheated, so you find it easier to stick to your guns. Turn the page to see how to do it, plus other tips on how to stay feeling fuller for longer.

HFG REPORT

THE VOLUMETRICS

THEORY

FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 15


OPTION 1

633g

GIVES YOU

797 kcal

Large full-fat latte + 2 plain croissants with 1tbsp jam NUTRITION NOTES l Low in fibre l High in saturated fat l No fruit or veg

FOR BREAKFAST

eat this…

OPTION 1

l 797kcal l 40.2g fat l 21.7g saturates l 90.9g carbs l 37.3g sugars

l 4.3g fibre l 23.9g protein l 1.5g salt l 531g calcium l 1.8mg iron

S

TUDIES SHOW THE ACTION of chewing helps to fill us, which is why devouring a couple of croissants in six bites while chugging a coffee on the run will fail to give you a full feeling – quite simply, the less we have to chew, the less satisfied we feel (possibly because of the effect chewing has on gut hormones) and the more we eat as a result. Add to

16 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

this that croissants are low in fibre, and you’re more likely to feel hungry and start searching for a snack after an hour or two. Significantly, most of the weight of this breakfast comes from the large latte. We know from research that the calories in fluid don’t seem to fill us up as much as the calories we get from food.


NUTRITION

OPTION 2

755g

GIVES YOU

598 kcal

30g no added sugar muesli with 125ml skimmed milk, 2tbsp fat-free natural yogurt, 1 banana and 80g mixed berries + 2 small slices seeded toast with 1tbsp no added sugar or salt peanut butter + 1 cup of tea with skimmed milk

or all of this OPTION 2

NUTRITION NOTES l Provides fibre l Provides protein l Low-GI carbs l Low in saturates l Provides 2 of 5-a-day

l 598kcal l 17.1g fat l 3.4g saturates l 89.7g carb l 44.8g sugars

l 11.9g fibre l 26.9g protein l 0.9g salt l 498mg calcium l 3.5mg iron

Y

OU GET 120G MORE food with this meal for fewer calories than option 1. This breakfast has almost three times more fibre, too, and is therefore much more likely to keep you feeling full until lunch. It’s important not to worry that it’s higher in total sugars – most of the sugars come from the natural sugars in fruit and milk. Health

experts say we don’t need to worry about cutting down on these, partly because they’re packaged neatly with lots of other good nutrients, such as fibre and vitamins in fruit, and protein and calcium in milk. The carbs in this breakfast have a low GI, so the body has to work hard to break them down, resulting in sustained energy. FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 17


OPTION 1

580g

GIVES YOU

958 kcal

Individual chicken pie + Large (50g) packet of crisps + Can of cola NUTRITION NOTES l 9tsp free sugars l High in fat l 75% of a day’s worth of saturates l No fruit or veg

FOR LUNCH

eat this…

OPTION 1

l 958kcal l 49.8g fat l 15.2g saturates l 113.1g carbs

l 39.6g sugars l 5.6g fibre l 21.1g protein l 2.2g salt l 164mg calcium l 2.3mg iron

A

COMBO OF PIE, CRISPS and cola gives this meal a huge calorie count, combined with large amounts of saturates and sugar but few nutrients. In fact, when it comes to quantity, this lunch is pretty poor – take away the can of cola and you’re left with just

18 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

250g worth of actual food, compared with a massive 650g food in option 2. What’s worse, the food you do get is lacking in protein and fibre, which help fill us up. And the high amounts of fat and sugar also make these types of food very easy to overeat.


NUTRITION

OPTION 2

650g

GIVES YOU

636 kcal

Salad made from 1 grilled skinless chicken breast, ½ small avocado, 1 tomato, ½ small red onion, 15g reduced-fat feta, cucumber and lettuce + 1 wholegrain roll with 2tbsp reducedfat hummus + 125g tub fat-free fruit yogurt + 80g grapes NUTRITION NOTES l Provides three of your five-a-day l High in protein l 35% of your daily need for fibre l High in calcium

or all of this OPTION 2

l 636kcal l 19.6g fat l 5.4g saturates l 59.8g carbs l 32.3g sugars

l 10.6g fibre l 58.7g protein l 1.9g salt l 337mg calcium l 3.3mg iron

T

HERE’S PLENTY OF FIBRE and protein here to keep you full. And, thanks to the sheer quantity of food, you’ll be left munching for far longer. This is helpful for weight loss because it takes the brain about 20 minutes to register you’ve had enough to eat (option 1, which can

be eaten in five minutes, could have you seeking out that chocolate bar before you get the signal that you’re full). You’re also more likely to eat option 2 mindfully – you can’t easily shovel a salad or yogurt into your mouth without cutlery or while on the move! FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 19


OPTION 1

500g

GIVES YOU

994 kcal

Breaded chicken breast + Large portion of chips + A few lettuce leaves + 2 ice cream scoops with 2tbsp chocolate sauce WHY IT’S UNHEALTHY... l Very few vegetables l More than half the recommended daily amount of fat and sats l Nutrient poor

FOR DINNER

eat this…

OPTION 1

l 994kcal l 37.6g fat l 10.4g saturates l 143.6g carbs l 49.9g sugars

l 9.4g fibre l 29.5g protein l 1.4g salt l 189mg calcium l 1.8mg iron

T

HIS PLATE OF CHICKEN AND CHIPS, washed down with ice cream, contains almost 1,000 calories – that’s half the recommended daily amount for women in one meal! These calories come with large amounts

20 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

of fat, saturates and sugars, too, but little in the way of vitamins and minerals. The lettuce leaf garnish doesn’t even come close to providing one of your five-a-day – you need a minimum of 80g of veg (or fruit) to achieve this.


NUTRITION

OPTION 2

766g

GIVES YOU

649 kcal

1 baked salmon fillet + 180g cooked brown rice + 120g baked butternut squash + Salad made from lettuce, tomato, cucumber, carrot and 2tbsp fat-free dressing + 1 peach WHY IT’S HEALTHIER... l Low in low and saturates l Low in salt l High in protein l Provides fibre

or all of this OPTION 2

l 649kcal l 20.6g fat l 3.8g saturates l 79.7g carbs l 22.8g sugars

l 10.8g fibre l 41.6g protein l 1.1g salt l 136mg calcium l 3.1mg iron

T

HIS MEAL IS YET ANOTHER example of how cutting calories doesn’t have to mean cutting quantity. In fact, reducing calories can provide a fantastic opportunity for boosting your intake of vitamins and minerals and

leave you feeling far more satisfied, if you choose the right foods. This meal provides plenty of nutrients, combined with less fat, sugar and salt. Once again, this meal will take you longer to chomp through, helping satiety.

SAVE 850kcal A DAY! OUR EXAMPLES should make it easier to put together your own nourishing, satisfying meals. Yes, you may have to spend a little more time cooking – and eating! – meals, and buy more fruit and veg (although this will be offset by spending less on fatty and sugary processed foods). But changing these three meals saves around 850 calories in one day. Doing this every day could result in a staggering weight loss of over 6st in a year! And the best bit? You’ll be eating an extra 460g food every day, or 168kg in a year… FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 21


LOVE your HEART

Whether you’re a heart patient, you want to help someone with heart disease, or you’re simply interested in reducing your risk, here’s what you need to know…


H E A LT H

*THESE DAYS, LDL CHOLESTEROL IS SOMETIMES REPLACED WITH ‘NON-HDL CHOLESTEROL’, WHICH REFERS TO ALL THE DISEASE-CAUSING PARTICLES, NOT JUST LDL. YOUR NON-HDL CHOLESTEROL SHOULD BE 4MM/L OR LESS. FIGURES STATED MAY BE LOWER FOR PEOPLE AT HIGHER RISK OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE

W

l Be physically active

HEN WAS THE LAST less likely than men to call 999 if TIME you gave your they’re having a heart attack. heart some TLC? If ‘Perhaps this is because they you’re young and healthy, it’s all tend to be less aware of the too easy to ignore the risk of symptoms,’ says Tracy. ‘It’s true, developing heart disease. But the before the menopause our risk life we lead now – the food we eat, is lower than men’s due to the exercise we take and lifestyle heart-protective effects of decisions we make – can predict oestrogen. But once we’ve been our future heart health. If you’re through menopause our risk rises older, or already have to the level of men’s.’ a heart condition or some Also, Tracy points out, Less than a third the symptoms of heart of the risk factors, it’s all the more important to of women do attack can be different in care for your heart. enough exercise women. ‘We may be more We asked the experts likely to experience it as to protect at the British Heart sickness or indigestion/ their heart Foundation (BHF) and heartburn-like feelings,’ Heart UK, as well as our own expert, she says. ‘We might feel sweaty or GP Dawn Harper, for advice on have radiating pain. But because it preventing cardiovascular disease doesn’t feel like the classic chest (an umbrella term for all diseases of pain, we often dismiss or fail to the circulatory system). Here’s what report it.’ they want you to know… For more information on women and heart disease, download the BHF’s guide: bhf.org.uk/publications/ living-with-a-heart-condition/ women-and-heart-disease. ‘MANY PEOPLE DON’T REALISE cardiovascular disease (CVD) kills as many women as men,’ says Tracy Parker, heart health dietitian at the BHF. ‘We’re three times more likely l Don’t smoke to die of CVD than we are of breast l Control high blood pressure cancer.’ Worryingly, women are l Reduce your cholesterol levels

l Maintain a healthy weight

l Control blood glucose if you

have diabetes

l Eat a healthy, balanced diet with

only moderate amounts of alcohol

l Manage stress (a new study by

Harvard Medical School confirms the link with damage to arteries).

‘Your doctor can help you with some of the above by prescribing medication if, for example, you’ve been diagnosed with high blood pressure or cholesterol,’ says Dr Dawn Harper. ‘But there’s lots you can do yourself, by improving your diet and lifestyle.’ If you smoke, quitting is ‘the single most important thing you can do to improve your heart health’, says Linda Main, dietetic adviser for Heart UK. ‘Smoking lowers levels of good HDL cholesterol, while the chemicals in cigarettes make bad LDL cholesterol much more likely to stick to your arteries and cause heart disease. ‘Exercise, on the other hand, increases HDL cholesterol and, of course, plays a big role in weight loss and maintenance, so it’s important to get more active,’ she adds. It can also reduce blood pressure, cut your risk of diabetes and relieve stress. Speak to your

BE ALERT FOR THE SIGNS

LOOK AT YOUR LIFESTYLE

KNOW YOUR NUMBERS After a GP heart health check you’ll get an overall risk score as a percentage. ‘This figure is made up of measurements such as your cholesterol, blood

BLOOD PRESSURE should be below

TOTAL CHOLESTEROL should be below

140/90

5mm/l

pressure, BMI and other factors including family history,’ explains Tracy. ‘But it’s a good idea to be aware of the individual numbers.’

LDL (bad) CHOLESTEROL should be below

BMI should be

WAIST MEASUREMENT should be below

3mm/l*

19–24.5

80cm (31.5in)

for women

94cm (37in) for men

FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 23


GP about NHS stop common are angina, CVD kills as smoking and exercise many women as heart attack, heart failure programmes. it does men – and abnormal heart Alcohol is another rhythms. There are also that’s over a thing that needs to be quarter of men several inherited heart kept in check: ‘More than conditions. We asked and women 14 units a week can Dawn to talk you through damage the heart muscle over the main terms used and the time, increasing your risk of heart symptoms to watch for… attack or stroke,’ says Tracy. ‘It also contributes to weight gain.’ ♥ CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE Includes CHD (see below) as well as strokes and TIAs, peripheral arterial disease and aortic disease.

HEART CONDITIONS

THE DIFFERENT TYPES of heart condition are known as coronary heart disease (CHD). The most

♥ CORONARY HEART DISEASE

CHD happens when the coronary arteries, which supply your heart, become narrowed by a build-up of fatty material and can Within one year eventually no longer deliver enough blood and of stopping smoking, your oxygen to your heart. This risk of CHD is can cause pain, known reduced by half as angina (see below). If an artery becomes fully blocked and blood supply is cut off completely, a heart attack occurs. If you’re over 40 you can have a free NHS health check to assess your risk of CHD. Your GP will check your blood pressure, cholesterol, talk through your lifestyle and provide practical advice on staying healthy.

♥ READ MORE The BHF’s Heart Matters magazine features a wealth of information and resources, including diet tips and free recipes to help keep your heart healthy. bhf.org.uk/heart-matters-magazine

24 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

in the chest, arm, neck, stomach or jaw. You may also feel breathless. ♥ Heart attack Chest pain; pain in the arms, neck, jaw, back or stomach; sweating; dizziness; shortness of breath; nausea or vomiting. ♥ Cardiac arrest Unconsciousness and inability to breathe normally. ♥ Heart failure Breathlessness, fatigue and swelling of the feet, ankles, stomach and lower back.

♥ Abnormal heart rhythym Heart beating too fast, too slow or in an irregular pattern.

WORDS: HANNAH EBELTHITE. PHOTOS: ISTOCK, GETTY IMAGES

KNOW THE SYMPTOMS ♥ Angina Heaviness or tightness


H E A LT H

FOODS THAT HELP YOUR HEART

OATS

FRUIT & VEG

PULSES

NUTS

The soluble fibre betaglucan in oats helps lower cholesterol. Get your fill in a bowl of porridge or fortified cereal such as Betavivo.

Filling a third of your plate with veg and ditching high-fat puds for fruit and natural yogurt will help keep your saturates intake down.

A recent study found that eating 130g chickpeas, beans and lentils a day can cut LDL cholesterol by 5%.

Nuts contain heart-healthy fats (but they’re high in calories so stick to a 30g portion daily).

FRUIT AND VEG CONTRIBUTE to heart health: studies show people who have at least five portions a day have a lower heart disease risk. ‘It may be that they also tend to be non-smokers, a healthy weight and more active – but it’s still a good reason to get your fill,’ says Tracy. Meanwhile, soluble fibre, found in oats, barley and pulses, helps lower LDL cholesterol. ‘It’s also good to include soya protein such as tofu, and nuts – snack on a handful once a day,’ Tracy adds. Fortified dairy foods such as Flora ProActiv and Benecol claim to lower cholesterol – and there’s good research to support this, says Heart UK’s Linda. It’s thanks to the ingredients known as plant sterols or stanols, which There are over work by preventing the 900,000 women absorption of cholesterol in the UK living in the gut. For optimal with CHD effect you need to have 2–3g daily. ‘They all seem to work slightly differently, so the best way to enjoy them is to include them all, on a regular basis, rather than sticking to one or two,’ she says. For more cholesterol-lowering diet advice, download Heart UK’s Ultimate Cholesterol Lowering Plan at heartuk.org.uk.

PLANT STANOLS or STEROLS Found in products such as Benecol and Flora ProActiv, these help lower cholesterol.

SOYA PRODUCTS High in soluble fibre, these also help stop cholesterol being absorbed into your bloodstream.

FROM THE DIETITIAN We know the Mediterranean diet can lower your risk of heart disease and reduce your risk of another incident if you’ve already had a heart attack. The diet ties in with Tracy Kelly the government’s Eatwell Guide: is a low in saturated fat and rich in registered dietitian wholegrains. The key message is that the type of fat you eat is important, so replace saturated and trans fats with healthier alternatives.

TRACY’S ADVICE:

♥ Cook from scratch

500g (cooked weight) meat a week. Cut back and choose lean cuts, removing any visible fat. ♥ Replace full-fat dairy with low-fat dairy or unsweetened and fortified plant-based alternatives. ♥ Avoid butter, lard, palm oil and coconut oil and limit hard cheese – all of which are saturated. Instead, use small amounts of unsaturated fats such as rapeseed, sunflower or olive oils and spreads. ♥ Include wholegrains, oily fish, beans and pulses.

and avoid processed foods so you can keep tabs on exactly what goes into your food. ♥ Stick to 6g (1tsp) max salt a day. A high intake can increase your risk of high blood pressure. This means not adding salt to meals or cooking, but also checking labels as 75% of our salt intake is already in the foods we buy. Remember, too, that all salt is the same – it doesn’t matter if it’s marketed to look more ‘natural’ or healthy, it’s still sodium chloride.

♥ Don’t eat more than

FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 25


LO R E M

How much

SALT in that pasta sauce? It’s a storecupboard staple that’s settled many a midweek what-to-cook dilemma, but stock up wisely – not all sauces are equal

Tesco Goodness Original Tomato Pasta Sauce, £1/200g

0.2g salt

THE NUTRITION LOWDOWN l AROUND THREE-QUARTERS

l REMEMBER TO WORK out

of the salt in our diet comes from ready-made products – and pasta sauces are among the many foods that contribute to these. So it’s always worth checking labels and choosing products that contain the least salt. l HEALTH GUIDELINES say we should have no more than 6g salt in a day. To help keep your intake within this limit, look for products that have a green traffic light or no more than 0.3g salt per 100g.

how much salt you’ll get in a portion. Take the figure for salt per 100g and divide it by 100. Then multiply this figure by the serving size (for example, for a 500g jar that serves 4, the serving size will be 125g). l PRODUCTS AIMED AT CHILDREN are often free from added salt, which is great news. l DON'T BE FOOLED into thinking organic products are a healthier option – they often have far more salt than non organic! l IT’S VERY EASY TO MAKE A TOMATO SAUCE from scratch with no salt at all. Grab a tin of tomatoes, add a few pinches of dried herbs, some crushed garlic, chopped onion and a splash of red wine vinegar to taste, then heat through.

ALL VALUES ARE PER

100g

Asda Garlic & Tomato Pasta Sauce, 75p/500g

0.7g salt

Loyd Grossman Tomato & Basil Sauce, £1.94/350g Widely available

0.8g salt 26 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017


S H O PPI N G

Essential Waitrose Tomato & Basil Pasta Sauce, £1.55/555g

0.5g salt

Seeds of Change Organic Tomato And Basil Pasta Sauce, £2.30/350g Widely available

WORDS: JULIETTE KELLOW. PHOTO: GETTY IMAGES

0.7g salt

Morrisons The Best Italian Sundried Tomato Pasta Sauce With Basil & Garlic, £1.40/350g

0.6g salt

Sainsbury’s Tomato & Herb Pasta Sauce, 95p/500g

0.7g salt

Dolmio Bolognese Chunky Tomato & Basil Sauce, £1.70/500g Widely available

0.7g salt

Napolina Tomato & Basil Pasta Sauce, £1.50/350g Widely available

0.8g salt

Barilla Basilico Tomato & Basil Sauce, £2/400g

Organico Tomato & Basil pasta sauce, £2.95/340g

Biona Organic Basilico Fragrant Tomato & Basil Pasta Sauce, £2.69/350g

Available from Tesco and Ocado

Available from Waitrose and Ocado

Available from Waitrose and Ocado

1g salt

1.2g salt

1.4g salt FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 27


K A E P R U O Y REACH E DISTRICT K CONQe U8 peEakRs wTithHthEe HeaLrtATrekkersoffanredgiwstalrak altionl ov. er t £25 Summit th code ‘HF01’ and ge heart disease. Use

s bhf.org.uk/8peak

2 September 2017

© British Heart Foundation 2017, a registered charity in England and Wales (225971) and Scotland (SC039426)


NUTRITION

Healthy habits to pinch from the

WORDS: LAURA DAY, AMANDA URSELL. ILLUSTRATION: ISTOCK

(avoiding the pitfalls) It used to be niche, but as this plant-based diet goes mainstream, we pinpoint the health benefits – and potential nutrition pitfalls. Our guide shows you how to dip in, or go the whole way, including easy vegan recipes from the chefs at healthy fast-food chain Leon

FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 29


OMEWHERE BETWEEN HIPPIES AND HASHTAGS, veganism became cool. In fact, the number of people in Britain switching to this way of eating has surged by 360% over the past decade. But is it good for our health? ‘Observational studies report vegans have significantly lower BMIs, along with cholesterol and glucose levels, compared with omnivores,’ says HFG nutrition editor Amanda Ursell. ‘But we can’t always make like-for-like comparisons as vegans may also be making other healthy lifestyle choices, such as limiting processed foods, not smoking or drinking alcohol.’ Centring any diet on fruit and veg, pulses, wholegrains and unsaturated fats is undoubtedly healthy, but before simply removing meat, dairy and eggs from your plate you need to look out for crucial nutrition shortfalls. ‘If raising children on a vegan diet, also bear in mind that plant-based foods may contain fewer calories per gram,’ says Amanda. ‘We need to make sure children get enough energy from their daily diet, so if in doubt, seek help from a registered dietitian or registered nutritionist.’

THE HEALTH BENEFITS

l Your

five-a-day is a cinch

Not relying on a meat or fish centrepiece means you’re likely to go well beyond the recommended five-a-day quota, giving you extra fibre, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants every day.

l

It’s a more filling diet

A diet that contains plenty of fibre-rich pulses and beans, good fats from nuts and seeds, and protein from tofu makes for longer-lasting satiety as well as helping to stabilise blood sugars.

l

You’ll eat healthier fats

The absence of processed meat or full-fat dairy foods means your diet is potentially lower in saturated fats. Eaten in sensible servings, healthier, unsaturated sources such as avocados, nuts and seeds, all contribute to good heart health.

l You may reduce your risk of disease

Studies show people who follow a plant-based diet are less likely to die from lifestyle diseases including heart conditions, cancer and type 2 diabetes. One reason is that having a healthier BMI makes you less prone to weight-related diseases. A largescale study from Harvard Medical School found exchanging a small amount of processed red meat for plant-based protein reduced the risk of early death by 34%, even in those who adopted at least one unhealthy lifestyle factor, such as drinking, smoking or inactivity. Plus, the increased consumption of legumes, fruit and veg offers protective effects against diseases such as cancer.

FOUR IDEAS TO STEAL RIGHT NOW! the versatility of fruit and vegetables

meals on beans, pulses and legumes

As soon as you remove the mainstays of meat, fish and eggs from the equation, coming up with filling meals based on vegetables is a healthy challenge to embrace. Fresh, canned (in water or fruit juice rather than salted water or syrup), frozen and dried all count. We’ve included three delicious dishes by Leon to give you some inspiration.

‘They provide us with essential amino acids,’ says Amanda. ‘To maximise the amino acids you’re ingesting, you should make sure you have a cereal on the same day (combining kidney beans with rice, for example, although it doesn’t need to be at the same meal, as previously thought).’ The soluble fibre in beans also helps to lower bad cholesterol and stabilise your blood sugar levels.

30 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

with non-dairy milks If you’re substituting cow’s milk, go for unsweetened soya or almond milks. When fortified, dairy-free alternatives are fairly comparable in calcium to cow’s milk, and almond milk is naturally as rich in calcium, although they’re lower in protein. Soya milk is the best dairy-free milk source of protein (3.1g per 100ml versus 3.5g per 100ml in cow’s milk). Note: organic dairy-free milk isn’t fortified due to organic regulations.

nutritionally-poor snacks for nuts All nuts provide protein and fibre without the sugar highs and lows of many other snacks, but eating a variety will give you the widest possible benefits. For example, almonds for calcium (plus recent research found eating a 30g handful of skin-on almonds every day gives the greatest protective effects from disease), and brazils for selenium, needed for strong immunity.


NUTRITION

BIRYANI prep 10 min + soaking cook 25 min + standing serves 4 vegan gluten free dairy free 1 cauliflower, cut into florets 1tbsp olive oil 1tsp cumin seeds 4 cardamom pods, bruised 3 cloves 1 star anise 1 bay leaf 2cm cinnamon stick Pinch ground mace 2 garlic cloves, crushed 2cm piece fresh ginger, grated ½ tsp ground turmeric Large pinch dried chilli flakes 1tsp garam masala 2 parsnips, cut into small chunks 200g butternut squash, peeled and cut into small chunks 100g French beans, trimmed and cut into 2–3cm lengths 10 radishes, halved 100g mushrooms, cut into quarters 200g cooked or canned chickpeas 100g cooked spinach, chopped 50g cashews, soaked in plenty of cold water for 4 hr 50g raisins, soaked in hot water for at least 30 min Pinch saffron, soaked in 2tbsp hot unsweetened almond milk for at least 30 min 1tbsp each chopped fresh coriander and mint, to garnish 1 Blitz the cauliflower florets to form ‘rice’ in a food processor (or use a grater), then set aside. 2 Heat the oil in a large pan over a gentle heat, then add the cumin seeds, cardamom pods, cloves, star anise, bay leaf, cinnamon and mace. Cook for a few min, then add the garlic, ginger, turmeric, chilli flakes and garam masala and cook for another 1 min. 3 Add the parsnips and squash, stir well and cover the pan. Cook

for 10 min, then add the beans, radishes and mushrooms. Cover and cook for another 5 min. 4 Add the chickpeas, spinach and cauliflower rice. Drain the cashew nuts and add to the pan. Turn up the heat and cook for 5 min, stirring well to prevent sticking. 5 Drain the raisins and squeeze out any excess moisture. Add to the pan with the saffron milk. Season well with freshly ground black pepper, then fold through. Cover and stand for 10 min. 6 Sprinkle with chopped coriander and mint, then serve.

5 PER SERVING

316kcal 12.7g fat 2.2g saturates 39.7g carbs 20.8g sugars

12.7g fibre 14.3g protein 0.1g salt 194mg calcium 5.4mg iron

The ingredients list looks long, but it’s mainly the array of spices used to make the dish fragrant. A good quality curry paste could be used instead. Feel free to substitute the vegetables for whatever you have to hand. FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 31


TOFU ADOBO prep 10 min + draining cook 35 min serves 4 vegan dairy free 600g extra firm tofu 1tbsp rice bran oil 5 garlic cloves, sliced 500ml very low salt vegetable stock 50ml tamari 50ml rice or coconut vinegar 3tsp coarsely ground black peppercorns 3 bay leaves 150g french beans, trimmed 1tsp coconut sugar 1tsp cornflour 2 spring onions, chopped

1 Heat the oven to 220°C/fan 200°C/gas 7. 2 Cut the tofu into 1cm thick slices, then cut the slices in half and leave them on kitchen paper for about 1 hr until the excess water has been absorbed. Transfer to a baking tray lined with non-stick baking paper and roast for about 30 min, turning the tofu pieces over halfway through, so they’re browned all over. 3 Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large pan. Add the garlic and cook for 1 min, then add the stock, tamari, vinegar, ground pepper and bay leaves. Bring to the boil, then simmer for about 20 min until the sauce has slightly reduced and thickened.

4 Add the beans, sugar and browned tofu and simmer for another 5 min. 5 Mix the cornflour with a little water and stir into the sauce. Cook for 1 min to thicken the mixture. Sprinkle with the chopped spring onions to serve.

PER SERVING

180kcal 9g fat 2.4g saturates 9g carbs 3.7g sugars

3.2g fibre 15.6g protein 2.2g salt 197mg calcium 2.6mg iron

Cooking meat with vinegar is the traditional ‘adobo’ method of cooking in the Philippines. We’ve simply swapped the meat for tofu. For a heartier meal, serve with rice or cauliflower couscous.


NUTRITION

KEY NUTRIENTS YOU COULD BE MISSING ANIMAL-DERIVED FOODS provide many essential nutrients, so following a vegan diet could put you at a higher risk of deficiencies if you don’t take active steps to replace them. These are the key ones:

VITAMIN B12 Essential for a healthy immune and nervous system. It’s crucial to maintain intakes as symptoms of a B12 deficiency may not show until it’s too late, at which point we can be left with irreversible nerve damage. It’s found in meat, fish, dairy and eggs, but the only reliable sources of B12 in a vegan diet are fortified foods and supplements. Plant-based solutions Include a fortified product, such as breakfast cereal or soya milk, or nutritional yeast flakes and yeast extracts such as Marmite at every meal. If you take a supplement, stick to doses below 2,000mcg.

IRON Lack of iron can cause iron deficiency anaemia and make us tired, stressed and unable to concentrate. As well as meat and other animal foods

such as fish and eggs, it’s found in plant-based foods (although the type in plant-based foods is absorbed less well). By planning carefully, you can reach daily recommended iron intakes with a vegan diet. Plant-based solutions Sources include dark leafy green veg, wholemeal bread and flour, fortified cereals, beans, lentils and nuts (cashews offer the most iron gram for gram), pine nuts and sesame seeds. Vitamin C helps aid iron absorption from plant foods, while compounds in tea can hinder it. So swap tea for a small glass of orange juice with your fortified cereal, for example, and have some berries after a peanut butter sandwich. Getting into a good place with iron before you switch to a plant-based diet is a really good idea, as once you become anaemic through a lack of iron you can’t top up with food alone. See your GP to get a blood test – if you’re bordering on low iron status you can plan by taking supplements before cutting out red meat, for example.

CALCIUM This is all about building and maintaining healthy bones. Dairy is a good source but not the only one.

THREE WORDS OF CAUTION…

Plant-based solutions Nuts and fortified alternatives to milk are your biggest ally (see Four ideas to steal right now! on p30). Dried ready-to-eat apricots and figs also provide calcium, or try tahini (sesame seed paste), thinned slightly with water to drizzle over salads. Chickpeas provide some calcium, too, making hummus with bread a good snacking choice.

OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS These polyunsaturated fats are especially vital for regulating blood clotting, brain and heart health and controlling inflammation. It’s the long-chain fats EPA and DHA (eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid) that have the most direct health benefits. These are found in oily fish such as mackerel, salmon and sardines. Plant-based solutions Shortchain fats called ALA (alphalinolenic acid) are found mainly in rapeseed and flaxseed oils, nuts such as walnuts, pecans and hazelnuts, seeds such as pumpkin seeds, soya and soya products, and green leafy veg. ALAs can be converted into long-chain fats but only small amounts are formed from plant food sources. You could consider a plankton-based supplement – it’s the plankton fish eat that makes them so rich in omega-3s.

TOP MINERALS TO INCLUDE Zinc from bread and cereal

junk food

coconut oil

help from

Products labelled as being vegan-friendly may still be high in calories, sugar and/or fat, so read labels as you would with any other product.

Often assumed to be healthier than other oils, it contains more saturated fat than any other type. Use all oils in moderation, but push coconut oil to the back of the queue!

a registered dietitian or registered nutritionist if you have a compromised immune system, are pregnant or breastfeeding.

products such as wheatgerm and fortified breakfast cereals Iodine Sea vegetables like edible seaweed (take care when pregnant, breastfeeding, weaning and in childhood because levels in some seaweed could be harmful). Vitamin D, which is only found in a small number of foods, such as eggs. Consider a daily supplement containing 10mcg. FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 33


NUTRITION

CAULIFLOWER AND TEMPEH SAMBAL prep 15 min cook 20 min serves 4 vegan gluten free dairy free 1tbsp rice bran oil 3 garlic cloves, crushed 1 onion, chopped 200g tempeh, cut into thin slices 1 small cauliflower, cut into florets 100g edamame beans (you can buy these frozen) 2 tomatoes, skinned and chopped 1tsp tamarind paste 1tsp palm sugar For the chilli paste 4 dried and 4 fresh red chillies 1 red onion, chopped 1 tbsp capers 2 tomatoes, skinned and chopped

1 Blend all the chilli paste ingredients in a food processor. 2 Heat the oil in a large non-stick frying pan or wok, add the garlic and onion and cook for 1 min. Add the chilli paste and bring up to a simmer. Cook for about 10 min, then season well with freshly ground black pepper. 3 Add the tempeh, cauliflower florets, beans, tomatoes and 100ml water, turn up the heat and stir-fry for a few min, making sure the sauce doesn’t catch. Cover and cook over a gentle heat for 5 min or until the cauliflower is just cooked. 4 Stir in the tamarind paste and palm sugar before serving.

3 PER SERVING

227kcal 8.2g fat 0.9g saturates 20.6g carbs 13.3g sugars

9.1g fibre 18.1g protein 0.3g salt 128mg calcium 3.5mg iron

Sambal is an Indonesian chilli sauce and it’s truly explosive. Cut down the number of chillies used if you don’t like it too hot!

Recipes from Leon Fast & Free by Jane Baxter and John Vincent (Conran, £25). Photos: Tamin Jones

34 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017


Le t

k l i a n t g e ! h t o d t i u r f e h t

Why add lots of sugar to something that is deliciously sweet already? Our loyalties lie with the natural avour of the fruit. That’s why we use 30% less sugar than standard jams and pack in 40% more fruit. Visit www.streamlinefoods.co.uk for more information and tasty recipes.


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lifechangingevents


NUTRITION

Should we

POWER UP with powders?

They promise mega nutrients, with a price tag to match, so are protein and ‘superfood’ powders worth buying? Dietitian Jennifer Low looks at the facts

O

You need to ❛HAVE YOUR WITS ABOUT YOU whenever you’re faced with THE WORD ‘SUPERFOOD’, even when it comes to powders

NCE USED primarily by elite athletes, powdered proteins have become increasingly popular with regular gym-goers. At my local gym café, for example, ordinary people, not body builders, are mixing protein shakes after their workout – and they swear by them. The other powdered nutrition trend, fuelled by bloggers, is finding health nirvana through ‘superfood’ powders. More versatile, these can be sprinkled on to porridge, added to soups and smoothies or made into hot drinks. Trendy urban cafés are already serving pink lattes made from ‘superfood’ beetroot powder. What all these powders have in common is that they make big promises. While protein powders are marketed for post-exercise recovery and to boost muscle mass, superfood powders claim other benefits, such as helping you detox with ingredients like cacao, goji berries and spirulina. But – and you may not want to hear this – however beguiling the idea of a quick fix, when it comes to nutrition there’s no such thing, nor is there any substitute for a healthy, balanced diet. You need to have your wits about you whenever you are faced with the

word ‘superfood’, even when it comes to powders. This is because European legislation banned its use on foods and drinks back in 2007, unless accompanied by a specific authorised health claim that’s scientifically proven, and explains to consumers why the product is good for their health. Although the Advertising Standards Authority is tightening up on its use (a complaint over Leon’s ‘Original Superfood Salad’ was upheld) the term is still misused, as is the case with the majority – if not all – ‘superfood’ powders.

On the positive side Protein powders can be useful for occasional nutrition on the go if it’s impractical to carry food around, or if you’re following a particularly intense exercise regime. But, although they will stave off hunger for a while and allow for some muscle recovery, they shouldn’t be used in place of ‘real’ food on a regular basis. As for superfood powders, all contain some antioxidants, vitamins and minerals, and those sold in the UK have had to pass EU regulations. So, if you buy from a reputable UK company, you probably won’t be doing yourself any harm, except for perhaps ending up with a slightly less than healthy bank account! FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 37


NUTRITION

NUTRITION POWDERS Fancy a boost? These are six of the best we’ve tried ADUNA BAOBAB POWDER

NUTRISEED ORGANIC BEETROOT POWDER

10g of this powder, from the fruit of the baobab tree, provides two-thirds of our daily vitamin C need. £7.99/80g, Holland & Barrett Per 10g l 25kcal

Beetroot is naturally high in nitrates, needed to support liver function and carry oxygen around the body. Make a beetroot latte by mixing a few tsp with a little water to make a paste, then top up with hot low-fat milk. £7.49/250g, nutriseed.co.uk Per 10g l 32kcal

NATURYA BLENDS ORGANIC GREENS A blend of barleygrass, spirulina, chlorella and hemp protein powder. 10g provides 100% of your daily vitamin B12 intake, needed for a healthy nervous system. £19.99/250g, Holland & Barrett Per 10g l 37kcal

PROTEIN POWDERS A nutrient-rich, whey-based protein powder available in chocolate, berry, vanilla and naked flavours. £34/1kg, neat-nutrition.com Per 30g l 118kcal l 23.4g protein

Explore the alternatives Athletes and those who exercise regularly will need 20–25g protein after exercising, for maximum muscle protein synthesis and recovery. Ingesting more won’t increase the gains for most people, and while protein powders can help muscles to recover, they are by no means the only way to do this. The amino acid leucine is a key trigger for muscle protein synthesis and recovery. Leucine is naturally present in a glass of milk. This means a post-exercise latte made with 400ml semi-skimmed milk will give you 14g protein. Add alongside it a 30g handful of nuts, which provides 6g protein, and you have a quick and convenient way to

38 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

INNERMOST THE STRONG ONE A range of whey-based protein powders available in handy single-serve pouches. In vanilla or chocolate. £3/40g, liveinnermost.com Per 40g pouch l 147kcal l 34g protein

hit the 20g mark, without the need for protein powders.

Things to look out for... l COUNT THE ADDED CALORIES – most protein powders taste better when mixed with milk rather than water, but every 100ml semiskimmed milk adds around 48kcal. l CHECK THE SALT CONTENT as some powders have high levels. Look for 0.3g or under per 100g.

PULSIN PEA PROTEIN This veganfriendly pea powder can be added to dishes such as soups, porridge and pancakes. £8.99/250g, Holland & Barrett Per 10g l 35kcal l 8.2g protein

l DON’T REPLACE MEALS with powders on a regular basis. Any such regime should be followed under guidance of a registered dietitian or registered nutritionist. l WATCH YOUR WALLET and consider that nutrients provided by powders can be obtained easily and more cheaply from a balanced diet. Let’s not forget, too, that eating food is an important part of our cultural and social lives.

THE HFG VERDICT Supplements in any form can never match the nutrition found in a balanced diet. The potentially health-benefiting plant compounds such as polyphenols in apples, onions and citrus fruits, and antioxidants in so many foods, from berries and bananas to kale, work together in a way those isolated in tablet or powdered form do not. However, if you need a quick fix or feel you want to supplement your diet, these powders will do no harm; see our recommendations above.

PHOTOS: ISTOCK

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DIET TIPS to ease the PAIN of CROHN’S This painful inflammatory bowel disorder can be debilitating, with flare-ups often coming out of the blue. We look at the diet and lifestyle changes that can help manage the condition


H E A LT H

L

IVING WITH MEDICAL CONDITIONS such as coeliac disease or high cholesterol is, thankfully, getting easier as supermarkets devote whole aisles to gluten-free and low-saturated-fat products. There are dairy-free, egg-free and sugar-free products too… you name it. You’re not, however, likely to find a shelf dedicated to making life easy for those with an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) such as Crohn’s. At least 115,000 people are living with Crohn’s in the UK, but treating the condition (and eating the right foods to prevent recurring inflammation) isn’t easy. That’s probably why so many callers to the main support and self-help group, Crohn’s & Colitis UK (Colitis is the other IBD), turn to them with questions about what to eat.

What happens when you have Crohn’s? IT’S AN AUTOIMMUNE CONDITION that can strike unpredictably and, when it does, causes inflammation in the lining of the digestive system. It can damage any stretch of the journey from the mouth to the back passage, although it’s most likely to affect the later sections of the small intestine (the ileum) or the large intestine (colon). Some sufferers have patches of inflammation, with healthy gut in

between; others have whole stretches of inflamed gut. It’s this inflammation that affects the body’s ability to digest food, absorb nutrients and pass waste. In some cases, surgery is needed.

How is it diagnosed? NOT ALWAYS SIMPLY. Symptoms can vary from person to person, and often mimic other conditions such as appendicitis or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It can start like a stomach upset with sufferers experiencing cramps, diarrhoea or constipation. If stomach pain doesn’t drive people to the doctor, the appearance of blood and mucus in the stools usually does. Blood tests check for signs of infection and inflammation, while stool tests help eliminate conditions such as parasitic infections. Referral to a gastroenterologist is normal, where further tests, such as a colonoscopy (testing the inner lining of your gut), are carried out to provide a firm diagnosis.

Is it the same as IBS? WHILE BOTH CONDITIONS CAN CAUSE STOMACH complaints, IBS doesn’t inflame or harm the digestive tract in the same way as an IBD such as Crohn’s. It’s the inflammation and subsequent damage to the bowel that makes seeking medical help quickly, and

WHO GETS IT AND WHY? You’re most likely to develop Crohn’s in your late teens or during your 20s, or once you’re over 60. The reason isn’t clear, but research suggests a combination of factors, including genetics and immunity issues that attack healthy gut bacteria. It’s thought this autoimmune response could also be triggered by something in the environment: bacteria, a virus, stress, diet… However, as yet there’s no clear evidence that any of these cause the disease directly. It is known, though, that smokers are twice as likely to develop the condition as non-smokers.

THE SYMPTOMS Many of these symptoms can also be caused by conditions other than an IBD. If you experience any of them persistently, don’t attempt to self-diagnose – see your GP. l Diarrhoea l Blood and mucus in stools l Abdominal pain and cramps l Constipation l Nausea and sickness l Loss of appetite and weight l Tiredness and fatigue l Anaemia l Mouth ulcers l Aching and swollen joints l Inflammation of the eye.

TREATMENTS

Steroids to improve symptoms l Immunosuppressants l Surgery may be needed to remove the inflamed section of the digestive system. l

then managing Crohn’s disease, (with medication and/or diet) especially important.

How is it treated? CROHN’S IS CHARACTERISED by symptoms known as flare-ups. While there’s no cure, the disease can be managed with medication, and sometimes surgery, as well as diet and lifestyle changes to give sufferers long periods of remission from flare-ups. Crohn’s treatments (such as immunosuppressants) aren’t without their own problems and side effects, so doctors aim to reduce the dose when symptoms improve, and to help sufferers search for other ways to prevent inflammation and stay symptom free. For many people this is where a careful diet comes into its own. FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 41


THE LINK WITH DIET WE DO KNOW SOME FOODS can make symptoms worse and that it’s a more common problem in the western world, in women and white people. Some researchers are now looking at the link between diet and IBD more closely, having seen the incidence rising in Japan in line with their ever more westernised diet. Other studies have looked at diets high in red meat, fat and sugars, and diets low in fibre. While there’s no clear evidence that any particular food causes the disease (research is ongoing so watch this space), many people with Crohn’s find certain foods trigger and worsen symptoms. According to Isobel Mason, a consultant nurse specialising in gastroenterology who works with Crohn’s & Colitis UK, what to eat is high on the list of sufferers’ concerns.

Find your triggers ISOBEL EXPLAINS THAT the challenge for anyone with Crohn’s is to identify and avoid problem foods, while ensuring they eat a diet that delivers all the nutrients they need. Keep a food diary listing exactly what you’ve eaten and any symptoms. A registered dietitian will then advise whether an elimination diet is worthwhile, and guide you through reintroducing these foods after a short time to see if the symptoms recur or abate. Doctors caution against focusing solely on staying symptom free, though, as this could lead to further problems. If, for example, a sufferer discovers fibrous foods cause problems and therefore steers clear of all fruit and veg, filling up with carbs – effectively a ‘tea and toast’ diet – they could be depriving their body of the foods that help gut function and encourage the growth of friendly bacteria.

42 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

So what to eat? FRUIT AND VEG. Foods rich in insoluble fibre, such as wheat bran, nuts, seeds and beans, are often excluded from Crohn’s diets as they trigger symptoms, but some fibre is essential for a healthy gut and fruit and veg are an important source of this, as well as other nutrients. Include some soluble fibre, such as cooked veg, soft fruits and oatmeal.

l PROTEIN-RICH FOODS. If red or gristly meat, beans and chickpeas are trigger foods for you, get your protein hit from steamed fish, eggs and puréed pulses (hummus style). l MILK AND DAIRY. If lactose is a trigger, opt for unsweetened alternatives such as fortified almond or soya milk with added calcium. l SOME STARCHY CARBS – but take care not to rely on them to fill the gap left by your trigger foods.

CASE HISTORY

❛INFORMATION IS POWER❜ Clare, 38, developed Crohn’s disease when she was 21. She’s since had three operations, two to remove sections of her colon adding up to 30cm. She now manages her condition with medication and diet. ‘I was in my final year of university when I started with what I thought was a stomach bug. At first I thought the stress of my dissertation was part of the problem, but it got worse – the stomach cramps were unlike anything I’d experienced before. When I noticed blood when I went to the toilet, I panicked and rushed to A&E. I was in hospital for two weeks. They thought it was colitis, but when I went back into hospital six months later with the same problem, they diagnosed Crohn’s. I had a pretty rough time when I was having the ops, but now I’m married with two children and, while Crohn’s has changed my life in many ways, I’m determined not to be defined by it. It would be easy to live on the edge all the time, waiting for a stomach bug or a meal to trigger a relapse –

because when that happens it can feel sudden and drastic. The biggest challenge for people with this disease is the lack of clear Crohn’s triggers – everyone’s different. It’s not just a case of cutting out dairy or gluten and knowing you’ll be OK. I can’t eat the healthy salads or raw foods I’d like to – whole nuts and seeds are out and carrots and green beans have to be well cooked. The most fibrous bread I can eat is the 50/50 variety people buy for kids. And alcohol and fruit juice have a massively negative effect. You learn the hard way. What might seem fine one day can, if you keep eating too much of it, cause problems because of the cumulative effect. You have to think about the big picture and try to balance a diet that’s healthy but not going to do your gut harm. The most important thing is to get advice. The team at my hospital, which includes a dietitian, are great. Information is power. It gives you the confidence to introduce the things you need in a safe way.’


H E A LT H

FIX YOUR DIET DEFICIENCIES BECAUSE SUFFERERS OF CROHN’S disease can have problems digesting and absorbing food as a result of inflammation in the small intestine, vitamin and mineral deficiencies may occur. IRON is most common deficiency and can result in anaemia, which causes tiredness, shortness of breath on mild exertion, poor concentration and headaches. It’s even more likely if blood is frequently lost in the stools. FIX IT Lean red meat, oily fish, eggs, pulses, fortified breakfast cereals and green leafy veg give us iron. Vitamin-C-rich foods such as citrus fruits, berries, kiwis, peppers and green veg help the body absorb iron from non-meat sources.

WORDS: JENNY HULME. PHOTOS: ISTOCK. MAIN PHOTO POSED BY MODEL

VITAMIN D Studies show Vitamin D deficiency may result in more admissions to hospital and an increased need for surgery. FIX IT Food good for vitamin D include oily fish, such as salmon, sardines and mackerel, eggs and fortified foods. The Department of Health now recommends that everyone considers taking a 10mcg vitamin D supplement. Research has shown that supplements of vitamin D may reduce Crohn’s flare-ups. CALCIUM Some Crohn’s sufferers find they can’t tolerate dairy products because of lactose intolerance. Low calcium intakes can have long term effects on bone health, increasing the risk of osteoporosis. FIX IT Other than dairy, calcium is found in green leafy veg, pulses and nuts and seeds. If dairy is a trigger for you, lactose-free milk is now readily available and has all the calcium of regular milk – or try unsweetened almond products or soya with added calcium. l For vegan food sources of these nutrients, turn to p33.

Eat to beat symptoms MAKING CHANGES to your diet may help to manage some of the more common symptoms of Crohn’s disease: l DIARRHOEA You might not feel like eating or drinking, but it’s important to keep hydrated. If you find certain foods make symptoms worse, then avoid them. Alcohol, caffeine and spicy foods can make diarrhoea worse. l CONSTIPATION Make drinking enough fluids a priority as this will soften stools. Adding more fibre to your diet may also help, but speak to your doctor or dietitian first.

Will a low-FODMAP diet work? A FODMAP DIET is increasingly being used to help treat the symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome: read about it at healthyfood.co.uk/article/can-alow-fodmapdiet-help-ibs. It stands for Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides And Polyols – all of which are food types that are eliminated, then gradually reintroduced. At present, though, there’s not enough evidence to suggest a low-FODMAP diet is helpful for people who have Crohn’s disease. If you’re interested in the possibility of an elimination diet working for you, it’s important to speak to a registered dietitian first.

Where to get help CROHN’S & COLITIS UK is a national charity with 50 local groups throughout the UK. It supports anyone affected by Inflammatory Bowel Disease. To find out more, get advice and download free handbooks including Food And IBD, visit crohnsandcolitis.org.uk or call 0300 222 5700. FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 43


DIET W TCH

THE

PLAN DIET

Reboot your good gut bacteria and you could benefit from improved immunity and a slimmer waistline. Amanda Ursell looks into the diet promising weight loss with extras…

T

HE NEW G-PLAN DIET, created by nutritionist Amanda Hamilton, claims to be a book for ‘anyone and everyone who yearns for food freedom, a flatter tummy and glowing health from the inside out,’ not to mention dropping some of those unwanted lbs for life. Is it another fad, or can this new diet fulfill these promises?

What’s the premise? THERE’S NO DOUBT that 2016 has been the year of ‘gut news’. Studies are increasingly linking the large intestine with a range of health issues, including a potentially fascinating relationship with weight gains and losses. The G-Plan authors draw our attention to the idea that the trillions of bacteria in our gut – which make up our individual bacteria fingerprint known as our ‘microbiome’ – are not only essential for digesting food and making vital enzymes and vitamins,

44 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

but also potentially affect the calories we absorb. This links the health of our gut directly to weight issues and problems such as bloating and other symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

What does it involve? THE G-PLAN IS a 21-day programme divided into three stages: Rest, Re-wild and Rebalance. The initial five-day Rest phase is designed to give your digestive system ‘downtime’ by not eating ‘gut irritants’ (such as chilli). This is followed by a nine-day Re-wild period, when you introduce ‘gut boosters’ to feed good gut microbes, allowing them to reproduce and thrive. Finally, in the remaining seven-day Rebalance phase, you bring in some of the foods and drinks you cut out in the first five days, and learn to think about your future approach to weight and gut health.

What can you eat? THE REST PHASE Meals are based on plant foods, wheat-free grains and protein to help you feel fuller for longer. No processed foods, added sugar, gluten, dairy, carbonated beverages (even fizzy water) or vegetables from the nightshade family (including peppers, potatoes, tomatoes and aubergines). Coffee and alcohol are out, too. A TYPICAL DAY A banana and gluten-free oat, berry and almond milk smoothie for breakfast. A lunch of vegetable and ginger casserole with quinoa. And for dinner, a creamy broccoli pesto soup. THE RE-WILD PHASE Now you introduce more diversity into your daily diet with microbefriendly ‘gut-soothers’, including prebiotic vegetables and fermented probiotic ingredients such as kefir and pickles.


NUTRITION

A TYPICAL DAY A coconut and cinnamon chia pot for breakfast, followed by a lunch of pan-fried tuna with tofu or eggs with green beans and kefir dressing, then Spanish-style chickpeas for dinner. THE REBALANCE PHASE Here you concentrate on eating prebiotic and probiotic gut-friendly foods, and begin to reintroduce dairy, gluten and chilli at two-day intervals. A TYPICAL DAY Breakfast of apple and cinnamon pancakes, Lebanese lentil soup with goat’s cheese for lunch, and vegetable frittatas with a fresh green salad for dinner.

THE VERDICT ❛

It seems likely that the G Plan Diet will lead to an improvement in overall nutrition and natural weight loss

PHOTOS: ISTOCK

So is it really an effective weight-loss diet? AMANDA HAMILTON, who has been using the G-Plan Diet in her nutrition clinics for some years now, reports that clients lose 8–10lb in 21 days on average. The more weight someone has to lose, generally the faster it comes off – but if you only have a couple of pounds to shed, chances are you’ll lose less weight. By following the plan, you’ll move towards a new way of eating and get into the habit of cutting out cakes, sweets, biscuits and puddings. Instead, you’ll be tucking into balanced meals and eating sensible serving sizes, thus naturally taking in fewer calories. If, as the G-Plan authors hope, the foods on the menus also help to change your gut microbes in a way that may help your body to alter the way it deals with calories, this could conceivably give you an extra calorie-burning boost. Either way, you can expect a steady 1–2lb a week weight loss over the 21 days – and a continuing loss of a similar scale as you take your new style of eating forward into the coming months, if you have more to lose.

The trillions of ❛ bacteria in our gut

make up our individual bacteria fingerprint known as our microbiome

RESEARCH LOOKING at lean and obese sets of twins has revealed that the lean twins appear to have a larger and more diverse microbial community in their colons than obese twins, who have far fewer ‘useful’ microbes. In addition, studies on mice have shown that gut bacteria from thin humans can slim mice down. When germ-free mice had microbes from a lean person placed in their intestines they stayed lean, while those given microbes from obese people gained weight. When the microbes were then exchanged between the mice, the weight situation reversed. Gut microbes have also been linked to blood sugar levels and hormones that trigger sensations of fullness and hunger. While research is in its early stages and we can’t yet say that changing the microbial world in our guts will be a solution to the obesity crisis, it seems likely that following the G-Plan Diet will, for many people, lead to an improvement in the quality of their overall nutrition and, at the very least, lead to natural weight loss. At best, it may just provide an extra boost to gut health and help with symptoms of IBS such as bloating. But it’s vital for anyone with these symptoms to seek medical advice to eliminate other potential causes before attempting to deal with symptoms through diet alone.

The G Plan Diet by Amanda Hamilton and Hannah Ebelthite (Aster, £8.99) is out now. Photo: Adrian Lawrence FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 45


R EC I PE S

FEBRUARY

WHAT TO COOK THIS MONTH Our recipe consultant Phil Mundy uses everyday ingredients to create easy, tasty recipes. Each dish is analysed by HFG nutrition editor Amanda Ursell

ALL RECIPeEdS

cook d e and tasttest r u in o kitchen

IF YOU ONLY MAKE ONE THING... This hearty soup is ❛a great way to use up

those winter staples while keeping the fat, salt and calorie counts in check (p62).

melanie leyshon editor


R EC I PE S

RECIPE INDEX

THE VEGAN DIET 31 Biryani 316kcal 32 Tofu adobo 180kcal 34 Cauliflower and tempeh sambal 227kcal WEEKNIGHT DINNERS 52 Grilled salmon with quinoa and bean salad 597kcal 53 Quick falafels 409kcal 54 Chicken and couscous stuffed peppers 411kcal 55 Seafood paella 389kcal 56 Veggie ‘steak’ stew with dumplings 337kcal THE GREEN DREAM TEAM 60 Roasted fennel and chicken traybake 335kcal 60 Shaved sprout salad with prosciutto and poached eggs 321kcal 61 Warm fennel, mushroom and barley salad 336kcal 62 Chard and butter bean soup 280kcal 63 Brussels sprouts, squash and blue cheese pasta 349kcal 63 Lamb and chard pies 471kcal FREEZER FILLER: PIZZA 66 Pizza base and sauce 253kcal

p34

67 Chicken and spinach pizza 350kcal 67 Courgette and mushroom pizza 327kcal

GO-TO MEXICAN SUPPER 69 Mexican bean soup with salsa and tortilla chips 367kcal 69 With paprika and cream 366kcal 69 With carrot, orange and mint 350kcal LOVE YOUR LUNCHBOX 72 Broccoli, salmon and herb muffins 203kcal

73 Chicken, chickpea and roasted butternut squash salad 261kcal 74 Smashed black bean, avocado and rocket wraps 320kcal

DOUBLE MAKEOVER SPECIAL 79 Vanilla rice pudding 205kcal 80 Sticky toffee pudding 208kcal RAW CACAO 82 Chai-spiced hot chocolate 145kcal 82 Black forest crumbles 249kcal 82 Speedy chicken chilli 634kcal TOM DALEY 84 Chocolate brownie 55kcal 84 Banana and pecan muffins 213kcal TURN THE PAGE for nutrition editor Amanda Ursell’s monthly diet plan

SAVE TIME SHOPPING Find hundreds more recipes at healthyfood.co.uk. Did you know you can order your shopping straight from the website? Just choose your recipes, then at the bottom of the ingredients list pick your favoured retailer and click on ‘add to shopping list’. The ingredients will automatically go into your shopping basket (you can edit it if you already have any items). Prefer to shop in store? You can create a shopping list to print out and take with you – or have it emailed.

Guide to recipe symbols & nutrition analysis vegetarian gluten free dairy free suitable for freezing

0.3g salt or less per 100g At least 6g fibre per 100g or 3g fibre per 100kcal

450kcal or less for a main course; 300kcal or less for breakfast; and 150kcal or less for a starter, snack, drink or dessert

At least 20% of the calories come from protein At least 30% of the RDA per serving

PHOTO: GETTY IMAGES

3g fat or less per 100g 1.5g saturates or less per 100g 5g total sugars or less per 100g

At least 30% of the RDA per serving

1

The number of portions of fruit and/or veg contained in a serving

l Nutrition is calculated using McCance and Widdowson’s The Composition of Foods, Seventh Edition, but may vary slightly depending on your ingredients. l All recipes are approved by Diabetes UK as suitable for people with diabetes. l We use standard UK measurements, where 1tbsp is 15ml and 1tsp is 5ml. l For gluten and dairy-free recipes, we recommend you check all product labels. l In vegetarian recipes with cheese, use a vegetarian substitute if you avoid animal rennet. l Our freezing symbol means a recipe can be frozen for up to 3 months. Thaw and reheat until piping hot. FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 47


LOSE WEIGHT the Amanda Ursell HFG NUTRITION EDITOR

WEEKDAY MEALS p31

OUR MENU PLAN is designed to help you MEAT lose around 1lb a week FREE MONDAY (and more if you have BREAKFAST 300kcal a lot to lose). It includes 2 slices wholemeal toast with 1tbsp no added sugar or salt peanut at least five portions of butter and 1 apple fruit and veg a day, and SNACK 179kcal two portions of fish 30g handful unsalted cashews, each week, one of them peanuts or almonds oil rich. We also make LUNCH 303kcal sure you get enough 1 broccoli, salmon and herb muffin vital nutrients, such as (p72) with a large green salad. Plus calcium. And, as we use 1 banana many of the delicious SNACK 147kcal 170g pot fat-fat Greek yogurt and recipes in this issue, 1 small pear there’s no deprivation involved. Over the DINNER 571kcal 1 serving biryani (p31) with a warm page, you’ll find wholemeal pitta. suggestions for the Plus a 100g pot TOTAL crème caramel weekend and the kcal following weeks…

1,500

48 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

p52

TUESDAY BREAKFAST 335kcal 2 poached eggs on a slice of wholemeal toast, plus a 150ml glass orange juice

SNACK 150kcal 1 banana and 1 oatcake

LUNCH 281kcal Sandwich made with 2 slices granary or wholemeal bread spread with 1tsp reduced-fat mayonnaise, then topped with 20g grated reduced-fat cheddar, 1 small tomato and some cucumber, both sliced, and 1tsp Branston pickle or similar

SNACK 99kcal 1 skinny latte made with 300ml skimmed milk, plus 1 apple

DINNER 597kcal 1 serving grilled salmon with quinoa and bean salad (p52)

TOTAL kcal

1,462


R EC I PE S

HEALTHY WAY

WE DIET PEKLY from L AN expeour rt

p63

p69

p67

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

BREAKFAST 400kcal

BREAKFAST 358kcal

BREAKFAST 400kcal

2 slices toasted fruit loaf with 50g low-fat cream cheese, plus 80g grapes and a cappuccino or latte made with 300ml skimmed milk

Porridge made with 40g oats and 300ml skimmed milk, topped with 10g chopped toasted almonds and 10g raisins

40g bowl bran flakes with 3 dried apricots and 1 grated apple, served with 200ml skimmed milk

SNACK 88kcal

SNACK 100kcal

1tbsp pumpkin seeds

1 rye cracker and 2tsp reduced-fat hummus

30g reduced-fat cheddar with carrot sticks and 1 sliced pear

LUNCH 467kcal 1 serving Mexican bean soup with salsa and tortilla chips (p69). Plus 1 banana

LUNCH 351kcal

LUNCH 409kcal

25g bar 70% cocoa dark chocolate

100g chopped avocado flesh mixed with 1 chopped tomato, freshly ground black pepper and a squeeze of lemon juice, then stuffed into 1 wholemeal pitta

DINNER 412kcal

SNACK 120kcal

Medium baked potato, flesh mashed with black pepper and lemon juice, topped with 150g plain cottage cheese and diced spring onion, served with salad. Plus 2 fruits of your choice

3 brazil nuts and 1 apple

SNACK 136kcal

TOTAL kcal

1,503

DINNER 471kcal 1 lamb and chard pie (p63)

SNACK 196kcal

2 slices wholemeal bread with 10g low-fat spread, sandwiched with 1 chopped hard-boiled egg mixed with 1tsp reduced-fat mayonnaise, and lettuce. Plus 1 apple

SNACK 180kcal 2 oatcakes, each spread with 1tsp reduced-fat hummus, with 80g sliced pepper

TOTAL kcal

1,458

DINNER 343kcal 1 serving courgette and mushroom pizza (p67) with a large green salad

TOTAL kcal

1,470

FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 49


WEEKEND MEALS p55

NOW KEEP GOING... p60

AROUND 300kcal EACH

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

BREAKFASTS

BREAKFAST 305kcal

BREAKFAST 421kcal

Berry muesli crumble

1 wholemeal pancake with 1tbsp natural fromage frais and 80g berries

1 warm croissant with 1 sliced banana, plus a latte made with 300ml skimmed milk

1 black forest crumble (p82), served with ½ 170g pot fat-free Greek yogurt

SNACK 154kcal

High-fibre fix

170g pot fat-free Greek yogurt with grapes

Mix together 50g All Bran cereal, or similar, with 30g chopped pitted dates and 1 chopped apple, then pour over 200ml skimmed milk and top with 1tbsp low-fat natural yogurt

SNACK 119kcal 20g reduced-fat cheddar with grapes

LUNCH 300kcal Quickly fry some chopped red chilli in spray oil. Transfer to a bowl. Spray the pan again, then fry 1 chopped spring onion (green part only) with 2 eggs. Serve on a slice of wholemeal toast, sprinkled with the chilli and black pepper, with a tomato salad

LUNCH 335kcal 1 serving roasted fennel and chicken traybake (p60)

French toast SNACK 150kcal 3 brazil nuts and 1 apple

SNACK 195kcal

DINNER 371kcal

40g mixed nuts

Warmed wholemeal pitta filled with 75g avocado, 1 small tomato, a small chunk cucumber and 1 spring onion, all diced, then mixed with a drizzle of balsamic vinegar and ground black pepper

DINNER 521kcal 1 serving seafood paella (p55) with a green salad. Plus a 170g pot fat-free Greek yogurt and a handful of berries

TOTAL kcal

1,440

TOTAL kcal

1,431

AFTER YOU’VE FOLLOWED our menu planner for a week, create your own using the ideas on the right. Choose ONE breakfast, ONE lunch, ONE dinner and TWO snacks each day. Plus have an extra 300ml skimmed milk in skinny coffees or shakes. 50 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

Whisk 1 egg with a pinch each ground cinnamon, Splenda sugar alternative and ground nutmeg. Dip 2 slices wholemeal bread into the egg mixture, then fry in a non-stick pan sprayed with oil for 2–3 min each side. Top with 2tbsp low-fat natural fromage frais and sliced apple, peach or pear

Boiled eggs 2 boiled eggs with 1 slice wholemeal toast spread with 1tsp low-fat spread. Plus 1 orange

Sausage sandwich Sandwich 1 grilled reduced-fat sausage, sliced lengthways, and 1 sliced tomato between 2 slices wholemeal toast spread with mustard


R EC I PE S

p32

LUNCHES Tofu adobo

p56

AROUND 400kcal EACH

1 serving tofu adobo (p32) with a wholemeal bread roll. Plus 1 apple

DINNERS Veggie stew

AROUND 500kcal EACH

1 serving veggie ‘steak’ stew with dumplings (p56), served with a medium baked potato

Quick caesar salad Rub the cut side of ½ garlic clove over 1 slice wholemeal toast, then cut the toast into small squares. Mix with a handful shredded crispy lettuce, 100g cooked skinless chicken, cut into chunks, 10g shaved parmesan, 1 chopped anchovy and 2tbsp reduced-fat caesar dressing

Roast dinner Serve 100g lean roast beef, lamb, chicken or turkey with 150g roast potatoes and 2 portions of vegetables such as brussels sprouts, carrots, spring greens or courgettes, plus a little gravy

Egg and chips Salmon and fennel on sourdough Mix 1tbsp fat-free natural fromage frais with 1tsp each horseradish sauce, lemon juice and snipped fresh chives. Stir in 100g canned salmon (drained) and ½ fennel bulb, grated, season with black pepper and mix. Spread on to 1 slice toasted sourdough bread. Plus 1 apple

PHOTOS: ISTOCK

Fish and sweet potato mash Mash 100g peeled, chopped and boiled sweet potato with 1tsp wholegrain mustard, 1tbsp chopped fresh parsley, 1 finely chopped spring onion and 1tsp extra-virgin olive oil. Serve with 100g firm white fish, grilled, and a green salad with a drizzle of balsamic vinegar

Serve 120g cooked low-fat oven chips with 2 grilled large flat mushrooms, 2 grilled tomatoes seasoned with black pepper and worcestershire sauce, and 2 tomatoes fried in spray oil in a non-stick pan

Chilli spaghetti Cook 70g spaghetti in a pan of unsalted water according to the pack instructions. Spray a non-stick pan with oil, then stir-fry ½ diced onion, ¼ finely chopped deseeded chilli and a handful broccoli florets for 5 min or until softened. Add 1 crushed garlic clove and fry for 1 min more. Toss with the drained spaghetti, then sprinkle with 1tbsp grated parmesan and serve with salad

SNACKS

AROUND 100kcal EACH

Vary your two snacks each day to keep it interesting l 2 squares (15g) dark chocolate with 50g strawberries l 1 banana and a 20g handful grapes l 170g pot fat-free Greek yogurt l 4 brazil nuts l 1 apple with a 15g chunk reduced-fat cheddar

l 1 oatcake with 1tbsp reduced-fat hummus and a small carrot cut into sticks l Latte made with 300ml skimmed milk l 25g bag Walkers baked crisps l 20g Low-sugar Cheerios, or similar, mixed with 10g sultanas l 1 slice wholemeal toast spread with a 16g Dairylea triangle l 1 slice malt loaf with 1 peach l 40g snack pack dried apricots l 1 digestive biscuit and a handful raspberries l 1 hard-boiled egg with 1 crispbread l 1tbsp pumpkin seeds FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 51


R EC I PE S

WEEKNIGHT DINNERS

FAMILYteMEALS d! sor

Each month, we bring you a batch of healthy, quick and easy midweek suppers, with meat, chicken, fish and veggie options to please everyone

Grilled salmon with quinoa and bean salad

Grilled salmon with quinoa and bean salad prep 15 min cook 10 min serves 4 gluten free 4 x 150g skinless salmon fillets 250g pack ready to eat quinoa 400g can lentils in water, drained 400g can cannellini or black eyed beans in water, drained 150g rocket 4tbsp chopped fresh flatleaf parsley ½ red onion, finely sliced 1 small avocado, flesh chopped ½ cucumber, sliced

52 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

1tbsp balsamic vinegar For the yogurt sauce 150g low-fat natural yogurt Juice ½ lemon, plus wedges to serve 2tsp chopped fresh mint ¼tsp ground cumin 1 Heat a non-stick griddle or frying pan over a medium-high heat, then cook the salmon fillets for 4 min on each side or until done to your liking. 2 Meanwhile, heat the quinoa according to the pack instructions, then put in a large bowl. Mix in the lentils, beans, rocket, parsley, onion, avocado and cucumber. Drizzle

with the vinegar, then toss gently. Mix the sauce ingredients in a bowl. 3 Serve the salmon and salad, seasoned with pepper, with the sauce and lemon wedges.

2 PER SERVING

597kcal 30.3g fat 5.9g saturates 35.4g carbs 7.3g sugars

12.1g fibre 45.9g protein 0.3g salt 254mg calcium 6.1mg iron


Quick falafels prep 15 min cook 10 min serves 4 vegetarian dairy free 1 small onion, quartered 1 garlic clove ½ x 25g bunch fresh flatleaf parsley 400g can chickpeas in water, drained 1tbsp plain flour 1tsp ras el hanout spice mix 1tbsp olive oil 4 large tortilla wraps or round pittas 150g reduced-fat hummus ½ small iceberg lettuce, shredded 2 tomatoes, sliced 1 small red onion, thinly sliced 250g tub fresh tabbouleh (from the chiller aisle in supermarkets) Hot chilli sauce (optional) 1 To make the falafels, blitz the onion, garlic and parsley in a small food processor. Add the chickpeas, flour and ras el hanout, then blend until just combined. Season with ground black pepper. Remove the mixture from the processor and knead on a clean board or worksurface until well combined. Shape the mixture evenly into 12 small balls. 2 Heat the oil in a large non-stick frying pan and set over a medium heat. Cook the falafels for 5–10 min, shaking the pan gently occasionally, until evenly brown on all sides. 3 Meanwhile, warm the wraps or

Quick falafels

pittas, and mix the hummus with 2tbsp water in a bowl to thin slightly. 4 To serve, top each wrap or fill each pitta with 3 falafels (halved, if you like), lettuce, tomato, onion and tabbouleh. Spoon over the thinned hummus and drizzle with hot chilli sauce, if using. Serve any extra salad, tabbouleh, hummus and falafels on the side.

2 PER SERVING

409kcal 14.2g fat 2.6g saturates 59.1g carbs 6.9g sugars

12.3g fibre 14g protein 1.8g salt 165mg calcium 4.2mg iron

FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 53


R EC I PE S

Chicken and couscous stuffed peppers prep 15 min cook 30 min serves 4 400g can chopped tomatoes 200g baby spinach 125g uncooked couscous ½ x 25g bunch fresh basil, chopped 200g cooked skinless chicken breast, shredded 4 large peppers 150g ricotta, stirred until smooth

50g reduced-fat cheddar, grated 120g mixed leaves, 2tbsp olive oil and 2tbsp balsamic vinegar, to serve 1 Heat the oven to 200°C/fan 180°C/ gas 6. Combine the tomatoes and spinach in a large heatproof dish, then cover and microwave on high for 2 min to wilt the spinach. Stir in the couscous, basil and chicken, then leave to stand for 5 min. 2 Meanwhile, slice the tops off the peppers and set aside. Scoop out and discard the seeds and membrane. Put the peppers in a non-stick baking tray.

3 Spoon the couscous mixture into the peppers, then top with the ricotta and cheddar. Position the pepper tops so they cover half of the filling, then bake for 25–30 min until the peppers are tender and the filling is hot. 4 Serve the peppers with the mixed leaves, with the olive oil and balsamic vinegar in a bowl on the side for drizzling over. Tip If you have any filling left over, put it in a lightly oiled, small ovenproof dish, cover with foil and bake alongside the peppers.

4 PER SERVING

411kcal 15.7g fat 5.8g saturates 39.8g carbs 15.2g sugars

Chicken and couscous stuffed peppers

6.9g fibre 30.3g protein 0.5g salt 305mg calcium 3.5mg iron


R EC I PE S

Seafood paella

Seafood paella prep 10 min cook 15 min serves 4 500g pack mussels in white wine sauce 1tbsp olive oil 1 red pepper, diced 1 chilli, sliced 2tsp paprika Pinch saffron, chopped (optional) 300g vine tomatoes, chopped 2 x 250g packs ready to heat brown rice 100g baby spinach 150g frozen peas 300g cooked peeled and deveined king prawns Lemon wedges, to serve 1 Heat the mussels according to the pack instructions, then drain reserving the liquid. Keep the mussels warm. 2 Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large non-stick paella pan, frying pan or

wok over a high heat. Cook the pepper, chilli, paprika and saffron (if using) for 2–3 min. Add the tomatoes to the pan and cook, stirring occasionally, until the tomatoes are soft. Add the reserved liquid from the mussels together with the rice, spinach and peas. Stir until the rice and peas are heated through. Add the prawns and heat through for 1 min. Stir in the mussels and heat for 1 min more. 3 Serve the paella with lemon wedges to squeeze over.

2 PER SERVING

389kcal 9.1g fat 2.5g saturates 55.3g carbs 7.3g sugars

6.8g fibre 25.1g protein 2.2g salt 165mg calcium 4.2mg iron

FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 55


R EC I PE S

Veggie ‘steak’ stew with dumplings prep 15 min cook 25 min serves 4 vegetarian

Veggie ‘steak’ stew with dumplings

1 PER SERVING

337kcal 9.6g fat 2.4g saturates 39.6g carbs 5g sugars

56 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

13.5g fibre 19.8g protein 2.1g salt 237mg calcium 2.6mg iron

1 Heat the oil in a large saucepan over a medium heat. Add the mushrooms and cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 min or until golden. Add the Quorn and cook for 3–4 min. Stir in the broccoli, mustard and gravy, then bring to a simmer. Stir occasionally. 2 Meanwhile, make the dumplings. Put the flour and dried herbs in a bowl. Rub the spread into the flour with your fingertips until the mixture resembles coarse breadcrumbs. Stir in the milk to form a firm but sticky dough, then turn the dough out on to a floured worksurface. Roll the dough into 8 even dumplings, then put on top of the stew. 3 Cover the pan with a tight-fitting lid and simmer over a low heat, allowing the dumplings to steam, for 12–15 min. Serve garnished with chopped fresh parsley. Tip Serve the stew with your favourite steamed veg on the side.

RECIPES: JOANNE TURNER. PHOTOS: MARK O’MEARA

1tbsp olive oil 400g mushrooms, sliced 300g Quorn steak strips or chicken-style pieces 200g tenderstem broccoli, chopped into 5cm lengths 1tbsp wholegrain mustard 30g reduced-salt vegetarian gravy granules mixed with 500ml boiling water Chopped fresh parsley, to garnish For the dumplings 175g wholemeal self-raising flour ½tsp mixed dried herbs 40g low-fat spread 125ml skimmed milk


actionforcharity

Cycle India women V cancer 3–13 November 2018

Visit the Taj Mahal | Sleep in Indian Palaces | Finish in the Pink City of Jaipur

Join the next Women V Cancer cycle challenge in India and raise funds to fight breast, cervical and ovarian cancers For more information and to register online:

www.actionforcharity.co.uk

01590 677854

|

info@actionforcharity.co.uk

Registered Charity Nos: Breast Cancer Care: 1017658/SC038104, Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust: 1133542/SC041236, Ovarian Cancer Action: 1109743/ SC043478. Women V Cancer is established under the Charities Aid Foundation Charity No. 268369. ATOL protected No 10456. To take part you need to pay a registration fee of £299 and raise minimum sponsorship funds of £3,200.

ction for charity

lifechangingevents


THE GREEN DREAM TEAM Roasted fennel and chicken traybake

Give new life (and interest) to green veg with these tasty recipes and silence those ‘no more sprouts’ groans


R EC I PE S

Shaved sprout salad with prosciutto and poached eggs


Roasted fennel and chicken traybake

Shaved sprout salad with prosciutto and poached eggs

Shaved sprout salad with prosciutto and poached eggs prep 10 min cook 5 min serves 4

Roasted fennel and chicken traybake prep 15 min cook 1 hr serves 4 dairy free 1tsp fennel seeds, crushed Zest 1 lemon Pinch chilli flakes 2 garlic cloves, crushed 400g skinless and boneless chicken thigh fillets 1 large fennel bulb, shredded 1tbsp extra-virgin olive oil 100ml very low salt chicken stock 200g cherry tomatoes, halved 4 x 200g sweet potatoes 350g green beans 100g baby spinach 1 Heat the oven to 200°C/fan 180°C/gas 6. Combine the fennel seeds, lemon zest, chilli and garlic in a bowl. Add the chicken and turn to coat in the spice mixture. 2 Put the shredded fennel in a medium baking dish and drizzle with the oil. Top with the coated chicken, then add the stock to the dish. Bake for 1 hr or until the chicken is cooked and the fennel is tender (cover with foil if the chicken browns too quickly). Add the cherry tomatoes to the dish for the last 15 min of cooking time. 3 Meanwhile, line a large baking

60 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

tray with non-stick baking paper. Scrub the sweet potatoes and pat dry with kitchen paper, then prick all over with a fork. Put them in the prepared tray and bake for 40–45 min, turning halfway through, until soft when pierced with a skewer. 4 When the chicken and sweet potatoes are almost done, steam the beans and wilt the spinach. 5 Slice the sweet potatoes in half, then serve with the chicken and fennel, green beans and spinach.

4 PER SERVING

335kcal 7.3g fat 1.6g saturates 49.9g carbs 8.4g sugars

11.4g fibre 9.8g protein 0.5g salt 104mg calcium 4.1mg iron

80g prosciutto 4 eggs 100g kale, finely shredded 150g brussels sprouts, trimmed and finely shredded ½ red onion, thinly sliced 2 baby gem lettuce, torn 30g parmesan, shaved 4 slices wholegrain bread or toast, to serve For the dressing 1tbsp extra-virgin olive oil 1tbsp dijon mustard Juice 1 lemon 1 Heat the grill to high. Put the prosciutto on a baking sheet in a single layer. Grill for 1–2 min until golden and crisp, then set aside. 2 Bring a pan of water to a gentle simmer. Reduce the heat so the water is just steaming, then create a whirlpool with a spoon. Break the eggs, one at a time, into the water and cook for 2–3 min for a runny yolk, or until done to your liking. Transfer the eggs to a plate with a slotted spoon. 3 Meanwhile, combine the dressing ingredients in a small bowl and season with ground black pepper. 4 Arrange the kale, sprouts, onion and lettuce on 4 plates, drizzle with the dressing, then top with the prosciutto, parmesan shavings and poached eggs. Sprinkle with ground black pepper, then serve with the bread or toast.

1 PER SERVING

321kcal 15.4g fat 4.8g saturates 23.5g carbs 4.9g sugars

6.3g fibre 23.4g protein 2.4g salt 251mg calcium 2.9mg iron


R EC I PE S

Warm fennel, mushroom and barley salad prep 15 min cook 25 min serves 4 vegetarian 175g pearl barley 2 garlic cloves, crushed 500ml very low salt vegetable stock 1tbsp sunflower seeds 1tbsp pumpkin seeds 1tbsp olive oil 1 large fennel bulb, finely sliced 2 shallots, sliced 250g mushrooms, sliced 175g frozen sweetcorn 2tbsp chopped fresh flatleaf parsley 2 spring onions, sliced 4tbsp low-fat natural yogurt

Warm fennel, mushroom and barley salad

1 Put the pearl barley in a medium pan with the garlic and stock, set over a medium heat and bring to a simmer. Cook, covered, for 25 min or until the barley is tender and the liquid is absorbed. 2 Meanwhile, set a large non-stick frying pan over a medium-high heat. Add the sunflower and pumpkin seeds and cook, stirring, for 1–2 min until lightly toasted. Transfer to a plate and set aside. 3 Add half the olive oil to the frying pan and return to a medium heat. Add the fennel and cook for 5–6 min, turning once, until tender and golden. Transfer to a plate. Add the remaining oil to the pan and cook the shallots and mushrooms for 5–6 min until tender and golden. 4 Cook the sweetcorn according

to the pack instructions. When the barley is cooked, divide everything among 4 plates, sprinkle with the chopped parsley, toasted seeds and spring onions, then serve with the yogurt and a sprinkling of ground black pepper.

2 PER SERVING

336kcal 12.1g fat 2.3g saturates 50g carbs 8.5g sugars

11.6g fibre 9.9g protein 0.2g salt 105mg calcium 2.8mg iron


Chard and butter bean soup

Chard and butter bean soup prep 15 min cook 40 min serves 4 vegetarian 1tbsp olive oil 1 leek, sliced 1 celery stick, chopped 1 large carrot, chopped 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped Pinch chilli flakes 1tbsp chopped fresh rosemary 2 very low salt vegetable stock cubes dissolved in 1.5 litres boiling water 200g chard, shredded 400g can butter beans in water, drained 4 slices wholemeal sourdough bread 100g ricotta 2tsp dijon mustard 30g reduced-fat cheddar, grated

1 Heat the oil in a large saucepan over a medium heat. Add the leek, celery and carrot and cook, stirring, for 10 min or until soft. Add the garlic, chilli and rosemary and cook for a further 1 min or until fragrant. 2 Add the stock to the pan, cover and simmer for 20 min. Add the chard and butter beans, cover again and simmer for 5 min or until the chard is tender. 3 Meanwhile, heat the grill to high. Grill the bread on both sides until golden. Combine the ricotta, mustard and cheddar in a small bowl. Top the toasts with the cheese mixture, then grill until the topping is warm. Serve with the soup.

2 PER SERVING

280kcal 9.8g fat 4.1g saturates 34.4g carbs 6.1g sugars

9.4g fibre 13.5g protein 1.2g salt 254mg calcium 3.3mg iron


R EC I PE S

Lamb and chard pies

Brussels sprouts, squash and blue cheese pasta

Brussels sprouts, squash and blue cheese pasta 

3 Mix the roasted veg into the pasta. Divide among 4 serving plates, garnish with the chives and serve.

prep 15 min cook 30 min serves 4 vegetarian

RECIPES: SALLY PARKER. PHOTOS: MARK O’MEARA

500g butternut squash or pumpkin, peeled and diced Cooking oil spray 350g brussels sprouts, quartered 250g penne 125ml hot reduced-salt vegetable stock 100g Philadelphia Lightest 40g stilton, crumbled 2tbsp snipped fresh chives 1 Heat the oven to 220°C/fan 200°C/gas 7 and line a large baking tray with non-stick baking paper. Put the squash or pumpkin in the prepared tray and lightly spray with oil, then roast for 15 min. Add the sprouts, spray with a little more oil and cook for a further 15 min or until tender and golden. 2 Meanwhile, cook the pasta in a large saucepan of unsalted boiling water according to the pack instructions until al dente. Drain, then return to the pan. Add the stock and cheeses to the pasta, stirring gently to melt the cheeses.

2 PER SERVING

349kcal 6.9g fat 3.3g saturates 59.8g carbs 9.5g sugars

9.9g fibre 16.3g protein 0.5g salt 143mg calcium 2.3mg iron

Lamb and chard pies  prep 15 min cook 2 hr serves 4 dairy free 1tbsp olive oil 1 large onion, sliced 2 garlic cloves, crushed 500g lean lamb steaks, diced 2 large carrots, sliced 2tsp ras el hanout 3tbsp tomato purée 400g can chopped tomatoes 400g can chickpeas in water, drained 200g chard, chopped Cooking oil spray 3 fresh filo pastry sheets (135g)

1 Heat the olive oil in a large saucepan over a medium heat. Cook the onion and garlic for 5 min or until soft. Add the lamb and carrots and cook for 4–5 min until browned. Stir in the ras el hanout and tomato purée and cook for 1 min more. 2 Add the canned tomatoes and 5tbsp water to the pan, then cover and simmer for 1 hr 30 min, stirring occasionally. Stir in the chickpeas and chard and cook for a further 2 min or until the chard is just wilted. 3 Heat the oven to 190°C/fan 170°C/gas 5. Lightly spray 4 small pie dishes (or one large pie dish) with oil, then divide the lamb mixture among them. Cut each filo sheet into quarters, then scrunch lightly and arrange over the lamb. Spray the filo with oil, then bake the pies for 15–18 min until golden.

4 PER SERVING

471kcal 17.1g fat 5.2g saturates 46.3g carbs 14.9g sugars

10.7g fibre 35.8g protein 1g salt 155mg calcium 5.3mg iron

FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 63


Mix up your morning It only takes a little plant-based twist with Alpro to make your breakfast more exciting ARE YOU AN eternal snoozer who always has cereal in a rush? Or do you go to the gym first thing, then eat after your workout? However you do breakfast, Alpro’s tasty and healthy* plant-based range can inspire you each morning. Try adding deliciously healthy** Alpro Almond

Unsweetened drink to granola with a sprinkle of seeds, or top plant-protein-rich Alpro Simply Plain soya alternative to yogurt with sliced banana and a little honey. Or try this quick and easy recipe for a deliciously fruity smoothie bowl.

Cherry & almond smoothie bowl PREP 5 MIN SERVES 1 ½ small banana, sliced 80g cherries, stoned and halved (defrosted if frozen) 150ml Alpro Soya Original drink 2tbsp oatmeal 15g almonds, roughly chopped A little honey, to serve (optional) 1 Put half the banana slices into a blender along with 50g of the cherries, the Alpro Soya Original and the oatmeal. Blend until smooth. 2 Pour the mixture into a shallow serving bowl and top with the remaining banana slices and cherries. Sprinkle with the almonds and drizzle with honey, if using. PER SERVING ● 351kcal 13.6g fat ● 1.5g saturates 41.9g carbs ● 20.4g sugars 4.6g fibre ● 13g protein ● 0.1g salt TIPS If you prefer a slightly nuttier flavour, swap the Alpro Soya Original drink with Alpro Almond Unsweetened drink. *Source of calcium, which, as part of a balanced diet and lifestyle, is needed for strong bones. **Source of calcium and vitamin E. Vitamin E is an antioxidant that contributes to the protection of cells from oxidative stress.

Visit alpro.com/uk to discover more tasty recipes on Alpro’s Creative Kitchen page or follow @Alpro on Instagram


R EC I PE S

FREEZER FILLER

PIZZA! ALL LOW CA INCLUDL! I TOPPINGNG S

Get ahead for DIY pizza night and whip up a batch of our freezer-friendly dough and sauce, ready to top off with pick-and-mix healthy toppings

FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 65


Pizza base and sauce

You will need...

prep 25 min + proving cook 30 min makes 8 pizzas (each serves 1) vegetarian dairy free For the sauce 1tbsp olive oil 1 large onion, chopped 2 celery sticks, sliced 3 garlic cloves, crushed 400g can chopped tomatoes 1 carrot, chopped 1 bay leaf 3tbsp chopped fresh basil 1tsp dried oregano For the base 2 x 7g sachets fast-action dried yeast ½tsp sugar 450g plain flour, plus extra for dusting 1tbsp olive oil, plus extra to grease

1 Pizza base and sauce

2 Chicken and spinach

3 Courgette and mushroom

66 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

1 To make the sauce, heat the oil in a large saucepan over a medium-high heat. Add the onion, celery and garlic and cook for 5 min. Add the tomatoes and cook for a further 2 min. 2 Stir in the remaining sauce ingredients, bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 15 min or until the sauce is thickened, stirring often. Remove from the heat and discard the bay leaf, then purée the sauce with a stick blender until smooth. Set aside to cool. 3 While the sauce is cooking, prepare the base: put the yeast, sugar and 250ml lukewarm water in a large bowl. Set aside for 15 min or until the mixture is frothy. 4 Sift the flour into the yeast mixture, then

add 1tbsp oil and mix. Turn the dough out on to a lightly floured board or worksurface, then knead until smooth and elastic (about 5 min). Return the dough to a lightly oiled bowl, cover and put in a warm place until doubled in size (about 30 min). Heat the oven to 220°C/ fan 200°C/gas 7 and line 2 large baking sheets with non-stick baking paper. 5 Punch down the dough, then knead again for 1 min. Divide the dough into 8 equal portions and form into balls, then press or roll each ball into 18–20cm pizza bases. 6 Put the pizza bases on the prepared baking sheets (you may need to work in batches), then put in the oven for 3–4 min to part-bake. Remove from the oven and cool on wire racks. 7 Once cool, spread the pizza sauce over the bases. Wrap the pizza bases individually in clingfilm, then foil. Freeze for up to 6 weeks, clearly marked with the date. Thaw, then top with one of the following ideas…

1 PER PIZZA BASE

253kcal 3.7g fat 0.7g saturates 51.3g carbs 5.3g sugars 4g fibre 6.8g protein 0g salt 81mg calcium 2mg iron

RECIPES: JO BRIDGFORD. PHOTOS: MELANIE JENKINS, ISTOCK

1


2

Chicken and spinach

You will need...

prep 15 min cook 10 min makes enough for 4 pizzas 75g cooked skinless chicken breast, shredded 75g asparagus, sliced into 5cm pieces 50g button mushrooms, sliced ½ small red onion, thinly sliced 75g reduced-fat cheddar, grated 4 pizza bases (see left), thawed 50g baby spinach, roughly chopped

1 Heat the oven to 220°C/fan 200°C/gas 7. Divide the chicken, asparagus, mushrooms, onion and cheese among the pizza bases. 2 Cook for 10–12 min until the bases are crisp and the toppings hot. Top with the spinach and some black pepper to serve.

1

3

R EC I PE S

Courgette and mushroom

You will need...

prep 15 min cook 10 min makes enough for 4 pizzas vegetarian 125g cherry tomatoes, halved if large ½ small courgette, thinly sliced 50g button mushrooms, sliced ½ small red onion, thinly sliced 75g reduced-fat cheddar 4 pizza bases (see far left), thawed Small handful fresh basil leaves, to garnish

1 Heat the oven to 220°C/fan 200°C/gas 7. Divide the tomatoes, courgette, mushrooms, onion and cheese among the pizza bases. 2 Cook for 10–12 min until the bases are crispy and the toppings hot. Garnish with the basil and a grind of black pepper.

2

PER PIZZA

PER PIZZA

350kcal 8.8g fat 3.5g saturates 52.5g carbs 6.2g sugars 4.8g fibre 18.8g protein 0.4g salt 263mg calcium 2.5mg iron

327kcal 8.2g fat 3.3g saturates 53.8g carbs 7.3g sugars 4.9g fibre 13g protein 0.4g salt 259mg calcium 2.5mg iron

FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 67


GO-TO MEXICAN SUPPER hfg

This warming vegetarian soup includes a healthy serving of beans to keep you feeling fuller for longer. Try a different topping each time!

COVEPRE RECI

Mexican bean soup with salsa and tortilla chips

68 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017


R EC I PE S

Mexican bean soup with salsa and tortilla chips prep 20 min cook 30 min serves 6 vegetarian Olive oil spray 1 onion, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 1½tsp chipotle paste 1tsp ground cumin 900ml vegetable stock made with 2 very low salt cubes 600g canned chopped tomatoes 500g canned kidney beans, drained and rinsed 450g canned black beans, drained and rinsed 200g frozen sweetcorn Lime wedges, to serve For the tortilla chips 3 small soft flour tortillas Olive oil spray For the salsa 1 small ripe avocado Juice and zest 1 lime

1 fresh green chilli, seeds removed, finely sliced 3tbsp fresh coriander, roughly chopped 1 Heat the oven to 200°C/180°C fan/gas 6. Spray a large pan with oil and put over a low-medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and cook for 8 min or until very soft. Add the chipotle paste and cumin and cook for 1–2 min until fragrant. 2 Add the stock and tomatoes and bring to the boil, then simmer for 15 min or until the liquid has reduced slightly. Add the beans and sweetcorn and cook for a further 5 min. 3 Meanwhile, make the tortilla chips. Cut the tortillas into small triangles and spray on both sides with oil. Lay the triangles in a single

layer on a baking sheet, then toast in the oven for 4–6 min, without turning, until golden and crisp. Keep an eye on them as they can burn easily. 4 For the salsa, cut the avocado into small cubes, put in a bowl with the lime juice and zest, chilli and chopped coriander. 5 Serve the soup hot in bowls with the salsa and tortilla chips, with the lime wedges on the side.

3 PER SERVING

367kcal 8g fat 2g saturates 48.8g carbs 9g sugars

15g fibre 18.1g protein 0.6g salt 147mg calcium 4.9mg iron

RECIPES: MONIQUE LANE, PHIL MUNDY. PHOTOS: TAMIN JONES, ISTOCK

Try these two alternatives to the salsa topping Paprika and cream In a bowl, mix 6tbsp low-fat soured cream (such as Yeo valley) with a good pinch smoked paprika, 2tbsp chopped coriander and 100g cucumber, finely diced.

Carrot, orange and mint In a bowl mix 1 large carrot, grated, with ½tsp ground cinnamon, zest and juice ½ orange, 2tbsp roughly chopped fresh mint and 1tbsp extra-virgin olive oil.

3

3

PER SERVING (inc soup + tortillas)

366kcal 7.8g fat 3.2g saturates 49g carbs 9g sugars

14g fibre 18g protein 0.6g salt 157mg calcium 4.8mg iron

PER SERVING (inc soup + tortillas)

350kcal 5.9g fat 1.5g saturates 50g carbs 9.7g sugars

14.5g fibre 18g protein 0.6g salt 143mg calcium 4.8mg iron

FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 69


VALENTINE’S MEAL HEARTBREAKER

Prawn cocktail with marie rose sauce

334 kcal

27g fat

CUPID’S CHOICE

SAVE 101kcal 14.9g fat

233 kcal

12.1g fat

Grilled prawn & chickpea salad

LUNCH LIGHT Have a two-egg omelette with salad leaves to stave off hunger without that too-full feeling – never the best way to start a romantic evening.

BEAT THE

776 kcal

Medium sirloin steak cooked in oil, with fried fine-cut chips

46g fat

Medium glass of prosecco

150 kcal

1.9 units

70 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

SAVE 514kcal 36.8g fat

SAVE 69kcal 0.9 unit

262 kcal

9.2g fat

81 kcal 1 unit

Grilled steak with roasted vegetables (uses lean beef)

Devon lemonade: 25ml gin topped with soda water, elderflower cordial, lime and mint

BLOAT During the day, avoid fizzy drinks and sparkling water, which can leave your stomach feeling and looking bloated. Instead, sip tea (normal or herbal) and still water.


NUTRITION

If you’re planning a meal to impress (but want to feel your best on date night), try our lighter options. Find the recipes at healthyfood.co.uk

HEARTBREAKER

COMPILED BY: ROSE CONSTANTINE SMITH, AMANDA URSELL. PHOTOS: ISTOCK

Chocolate fondant

Shortcrust pastry chicken pie

Apple crumble with a scoop of vanilla ice cream

422 kcal

25g fat

662 kcal

40.7g fat

336 kcal

11.8g fat

hfg SMARTS SWAP

CUPID’S CHOICE

SAVE 283kcal

139 kcal

17.8g fat

7.2g fat

SAVE 274kcal

388 kcal

33.1g fat

SAVE 98kcal 2.4g fat

7.6g fat

238 kcal

9.4g fat

Chocolate mousse

GO EASY Resist the temptation to nibble on nuts, crisps, olives and fancy breads – or you’ll start clocking up the calories before you get to your main course. They’ll also make you feel thirsty and more likely to speed-drink.

PACE Chicken pie (topped with filo pastry)

Apple, rhubarb and ginger crumble (with low-fat Greek yogurt)

YOURSELF Eat slowly during dinner. This will help you to avoid overindulging, then feeling so full that all you’ll want post-meal is a snooze!

FIND THE RECIPE at healthyfood. co.uk (search by title given here)

FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 71


Broccoli, salmon and herb muffins

LOVE YOUR LUNCHBOX Packed lunches looking a little lacklustre? Break the ham sarnie routine with our tempting trio of ideas to prep the night before. Make enough to share, or single serves to last a few days

Broccoli, salmon and herb muffins prep 15 min cook 30 min + cooling makes 4 150g broccoli florets 5 eggs 2½tbsp plain flour Zest 1 lemon 40g light feta, crumbled 170g can skinless and boneless salmon, flaked 50g frozen spinach, thawed, squeezed of excess moisture and chopped 2tbsp snipped fresh chives 100g mixed salad leaves, to serve

72 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

1 Heat the oven to 180ºC/fan 160ºC/ gas 4. Lightly grease and line 4 x 200ml ramekins or pudding moulds with non-stick baking paper. 2 Steam the broccoli for 2 min, then roughly chop and set aside to cool. 3 Whisk the eggs and flour together in a medium bowl until combined. Stir in the lemon zest, feta, chopped broccoli, salmon, spinach and chives. Ladle the mixture evenly among the prepared ramekins or moulds. Bake for 25 min or until the muffins are puffed and golden. 4 Cool for 10 min, then turn out and cool completely on a wire rack. Cover and chill. Pack with a salad.

PER SERVING

203kcal 9.2g fat 3.2g saturates 7.8g carbs 1.2g sugars

2.6g fibre 22.8g protein 1.1g salt 132mg calcium 2.3mg iron

Other good things to pack l Rice cakes with reduced-fat

cheese and tomatoes l Low-fat passionfruit yogurt l Sunflower seeds


R EC I PE S

Chicken, chickpea and roasted butternut squash salad

Chicken, chickpea and roasted butternut squash salad prep 15 min cook 30 min + cooling makes 3 gluten free dairy free 350g peeled and chopped butternut squash (1 medium) Cooking oil spray 1tsp ground coriander 400g can chickpeas in water, drained 1 roasted red pepper in brine from a jar, drained and chopped 2tbsp lemon juice 100g baby spinach 1tbsp extra-virgin olive oil 150g cooked skinless chicken breast, shredded in large chunks

1 Heat the oven to 200ºC/fan 180ºC/ gas 6 and line a small baking tray with non-stick baking paper. Put the squash in the prepared tray, spray with oil and sprinkle with the ground coriander. Roast for 25–30 min until golden and tender, then set aside to cool completely. 2 Combine the roasted squash with the chickpeas, red pepper, lemon juice, spinach and olive oil in a bowl. Divide the salad among 3 airtight containers, top with the chicken, then chill for up to 3 days.

3 PER SERVING

261kcal 8.7g fat 1.4g saturates 24.3g carbs 7.1g sugars

8.2g fibre 23.5g protein 0.4g salt 145mg calcium 3.2mg iron

Other good things to pack l Crispbread with no added sugar

or salt peanut butter l Low-fat natural yogurt with fresh

raspberries and coconut FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 73


R EC I PE S

Smashed black bean, avocado and rocket wraps

Smashed black bean, avocado and rocket wraps

½ x 400g can black beans in water, rinsed and drained 2 spring onions, thinly sliced 1 tomato, diced Pinch chilli flakes 1 small avocado, peeled and stone removed 1tbsp lemon juice 2 large wholemeal wraps 1 carrot, grated 40g rocket or baby spinach

74 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

1 Put the black beans in a medium bowl and mash with a fork, leaving some texture. Stir through the spring onions, tomato and chilli. 2 In a separate small bowl, mash the avocado with the lemon juice until smooth. 3 Lay the wraps on a clean worksurface or board, then spread half the mashed avocado down the middle of each wrap. Top with the black bean mixture, then the grated carrot and rocket or spinach. Roll up the wraps, slice in half, then wrap in clingfilm or kitchen paper and put in 2 lunchboxes. Cover and keep in the fridge until ready to eat.

2 PER SERVING

320kcal 13.9g fat 3.7g saturates 38.6g carbs 7g sugars

15.2g fibre 11.4g protein 0.6g salt 138mg calcium 3.5mg iron

Other good things to pack l Unsalted almonds l Hard-boiled egg with seeds l Satsuma l Hummus with vegetable crudités

RECIPES: CHRISSY FREER. PHOTOS: MARK O’MEARA

prep 15 min makes 2 vegetarian dairy free


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SPIRALIZERS ON TEST

If you haven’t had a go at turning veg and fruit into oodles of spaghetti-like ribbons (aka spiralizing), our guide is for you – as well as any courgetti pros looking to upgrade


S H O PPI N G

HAND-HELD

HORIZONTAL-HOLD

VERTICAL HOLD

ELECTRIC

we tested

we tested

we tested

we tested

how it works

how it works

how it works

The veg is held in place horizontally between a metal ring at one end and a spiked disc at the other – then you just turn the handle. Makes light work of spiralizing even the firmest vegetables, such as sweet potatoes and swede, leaving a thin core of uncut veg. Different blades make thick or thin noodles and store neatly within the machine. Suction pads hold it securely to the worktop, but you have to put a shallow bowl or plate at the end to catch the spiralized veg.

This uses gravity to cut the veg, which is held on a spike below the blade and collection container. The blade is cone-shaped, so you’re left with a small cone of uncut veg at the end instead of a long thin core.

Veg is pushed through a feeder tube with a plunger on to a spinning coneshaped blade, then the noodles fall into a container below. Easy to use, but you have to trim fruit and veg to fit the tube. Makes quite chunky noodles, which are good for cooking as a pasta substitute or roasting.

Oxo Good Grips Hand-held Spiralizer From £11.99, John Lewis, Lakeland, Amazon

WORDS: NICHOLA PALMER. PHOTO: ISTOCK. PRICES CORRECT AT TIME OF GOING TO PRESS

how it works Your hand does the twisting with the help of a spiked holder to keep the veg secure and your hand safe. The simplest and most compact model (just 9cm high and 8cm in diameter), it comes with a one-size, fixed blade to make spaghetti-thick strands. It’s comfortable to hold and does the job well. Leaves a thin core of uncut veg.

good for

l Making courgetti to serve one or two people or small quantities for garnishes l Compact storage l Value for money

any downsides? l Ideal for a single

courgette or carrot, but after that your wrist will probably start to ache.

Spiralz Spiralite Vegetable Spiralizer £22.95, Amazon

good for

l Larger vegetables

l Making lots of noodles

l Use by children (under supervision) l Easy assembly/cleaning l Good value l Versatility

any downsides?

l A bit bulky to store.

Betty Bossi Vegetable Spiralizer £34.99, Lakeland

good for

l Salad lovers – the

noodles are quite fine, so good for eating raw l Neat and tidy, as cut veg go straight into the container l Needing little effort

any downsides? l Veg have to be cut to

fit the machine l Slotting the outer ring into position is a little fiddly.

Kenwood Spiralizer Around £39.95, Currys, John Lewis, Tesco Direct

good for

l Making robust pasta swaps for a low-carb diet l Easy assembly/cleaning l Needing no effort

any downsides? l Quite bulky (about the

size of a coffee machine)

l Smaller pieces tend to

spin inside the cone.

3 WAYS TO BETTER SPIRALIZING l CHOOSE straight, firm vegetables, or trim into

even-size chunks l TRIM both ends of the vegetable or fruit so

it sits securely in the spiralizer l GO TO healthyfood.co.uk/5-vegetables-to-

spiralise for ideas that go beyond courgette…

FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 77


DOUBLE MAKEOVER SPECIAL Nothing says ‘I love you’ like a traditional pud without the unhealthy fat, right? We’re spoiling you with a choice of two...

SWEET NOTHINGS Vanilla rice pudding


R EC I PE S

Vanilla rice pudding prep 5 min cook 50 min serves 4 vegetarian gluten free

RECIPES: LOTTIE COVELL, PHIL MUNDY. WORDS: ROSE CONSTANTINE SMITH. PHOTOS: MAJA SMEND, TOBY SCOTT

100g pudding rice 750ml skimmed milk 1tsp vanilla bean paste or extract 2tbsp runny honey or to taste 170g pot fat-free Greek yogurt, to serve 1 Put the pudding rice, milk and vanilla paste or extract in a large pan that has a lid. Bring to a gentle simmer over a very low heat, stirring. 2 Cover the pan with the lid and simmer for 45–50 min, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking at the beginning and more often as the rice swells, until the rice is tender and the consistency is creamy. Stir in 1tbsp of the honey until evenly mixed.

3 Divide the rice pudding among 4 serving bowls, then top each portion with yogurt and a drizzle of the remaining honey to taste. Swirl through and serve.

HFG RICE PUDDING PER SERVING

CLASSIC RICE PUDDING PER SERVING

205kcal

386kcal

0.8g fat

17.3g fat

0.3g saturates

10.8g saturates

40.3g carbs

50.3g carbs

19g sugars

27.1g sugars

0.3g fibre

0.3g fibre

11.8g protein

11.2g protein

0.2g salt

0.4mg salt

281mg calcium

340mg calcium

0.1mg iron

0.2mg iron

HOW WE MADE IT HEALTHIER Rather than using the classic combination of full-fat milk and double cream, we USED SKIMMED MILK to keep the fat content down. To get that indulgent creaminess, we swirled through just enough fat-free Greek l

yogurt before serving. l We swapped sugar for honey, which has a sweeter taste, meaning we could use less of it, and allowed the natural sweetness of the warm milk and vanilla to come through. This REDUCED

THE TOTAL SUGAR content by 8g per serving. l Traditional rice pudding recipes are baked in the oven with butter dotted on top, but we DITCHED THE EXTRA FAT and simmered ours gently on the hob instead.

FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 79


R EC I PE S

Sticky toffee pudding prep 10 min + soaking cook 35 min serves 6 vegetarian 80g pitted dates, roughly chopped Oil, for greasing 1tsp vanilla bean paste or extract 1tsp ground cinnamon 60g low-fat Greek yogurt 4tbsp maple syrup 2 large free-range eggs, beaten 1tsp black treacle 115g self-raising flour ½tsp bicarbonate of soda For the toffee sauce 125ml light evaporated milk 1tsp maple syrup 1tsp black treacle 1 Put the dates in a medium heatproof bowl and pour over 80ml boiling water. Soak for 20 min or until plump and cool. 2 Heat the oven to 170°C/fan 150°C/gas 3½ and brush a 1 litre ovenproof dish with oil. Put the dates and any soaking liquid from the bowl, plus all the remaining

pudding ingredients in a food processor and blend until smooth. 3 Pour the batter into the prepared dish, then bake for 30–35 min until the sponge has risen and is firm. 4 Meanwhile, for the toffee sauce, put the evaporated milk in a small pan over a gentle heat and simmer for 10 min or until reduced by half. Stir in the syrup and treacle. Spread over the pudding. Tip Serve with extra yogurt on the side, if you like.

HFG STICKY TOFFEE PUDDING PER SERVING

CLASSIC STICKY TOFFEE PUDDING PER SERVING

208kcal

478kcal

3.4g fat

28.5g fat

1.3g saturates

18g saturates

38.5g carbs

54.8g carbs

22.4g sugars

40.5g sugars

1.7g fibre

1.7g fibre

7.5g protein

4.2g protein

0.6g salt

1g salt

163mg calcium

91mg calcium

1.5mg iron

1.1mg iron

HOW WE MADE IT HEALTHIER l Sticky toffee pudding is usually laced with sugar, but we used just a little maple syrup and treacle to give enough flavour and sweetness for almost HALF THE SUGARS per portion.

80 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

l We skipped the butter and cream used in many toffee sauces and instead used light evaporated milk. We also swapped the butter in the classic pudding recipe for LOWFAT GREEK YOGURT, giving

not only a light texture but also a pudding that’s much lower in fat and saturates. l To keep the FAT AND CALORIES LOW, we served our pudding with low-fat yogurt instead of custard or ice cream.


Sticky toffee pudding


TURN 4 INGREDIENTS CHAI-SPICED HOT CHOCOLATE

TAKES

5

MIN

PUT IT ON THE MENU

RAW CACAO

Chocolate in its purest form, raw cacao may be just the thing to satisfy those cravings

Twinings Spicy Chai, £2.49/20 bags

Sweetened Almond Milk, £1.25/1 litre

BLACK FOREST CRUMBLES

TAKES

10

MIN

C

ACAO IS THE RAW UNPROCESSED BEAN of the Theobroma tree. Cold-pressed and unroasted, it’s ground into powder or chopped into small pieces called nibs. Use raw cacao powder as a cocoa replacement, but use a little less as the flavour is more intense. Unlike cocoa and chocolate, cacao isn’t sweetened, so for desserts blend it with naturally sweet ingredients such as bananas, dates and dried fruit, or use a little unrefined sweetener. Stirring a tablespoon of cacao into casseroles and chilli con carne at the end of cooking will add depth of flavour. Cacao nibs, meanwhile, are great for nibbling (in moderation!), and livening up porridge, muesli or yogurt. Use them as you would chocolate chips in baking, and try sprinkling a few over salads, instead of nuts. Rich in magnesium, which contributes to a reduction of tiredness and fatigue, cacao nibs are also great for antioxidant flavonoids, linked with normal blood pressure.

Frozen Blackforest Fruit Mix, £2/500g

SPEEDY CHICKEN CHILLI

Pure Clear Honey, £2.14/454g

TAKES

15

MIN

FLAVOUR BURST

Choc Chic Blissful Blends Cinnamon £7.99/250g, chocchick.com Blend with warm water, add to smoothies or use to make spiced hot chocolate for a quick fix. Per 10g l 33kcal l 0.9g fat l 0.5g saturates l 0.2g sugars l 0g salt

82 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

British Chicken Mini Fillets, £2.25/251g

Smoky Chipotle Beans With Quinoa Meal Soup, £1.80/400g


S H O PPI N G

INTO CHOCOLATE LOVERS’ TREATS Selected from

145kcal PER SERVING prep 1 min cook 4 min serves 1 Put 1 chai tea bag in a small pan with 250ml sweetened almond milk and heat gently until just simmering. Turn off the heat and leave to stand for 3 min, then remove the tea bag. Using a small hand whisk, whisk in 1tbsp raw cacao powder and reheat until hot. Pour into a mug and add a cinnamon stick to stir. Lucy Bee Organic Raw Cacao Powder, £7.50/250g

Cinnamon Sticks, £1/12g Selected from

249kcal PER SERVING prep 5 min cook 5 min serves 4 Tip the frozen fruit mix into a pan and heat gently until thawed and warmed through. Add 2tsp honey and stir well. Divide the fruit and juices among 4 bowls. Mix together 150g muesli and 25g cacao nibs, then sprinkle over the fruit to serve.

Wholewheat Muesli, £2.32/1kg

Natural Days Cacao Nibs, £2.26/100g Selected from

634kcal PER SERVING

Heat a large non-stick frying pan over a medium-high heat and spray with oil. Add the chicken fillets and stir-fry for 5 min until golden. Add the soup and bring to the boil, then reduce the heat, cover and simmer for 5 min or until the chicken is cooked through. Stir in 1tbsp cacao powder and the brown rice and heat through for 3 min or until piping hot. Food Thoughts Natural Cacao Powder, £3/125g

Microwaveable Brown Rice, 55p/250g

FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 83

WORDS: NICHOLA PALMER. PHOTOS: ISTOCK

prep 2 min cook 13 min serves 2


R EC I PE S

In the kitchen with

TOM DALEY

He’s the buff Olympic diver that won the nation’s heart long ago, and now he’s catering for our sweet tooth with these lighter teatime treats. Lucky us…

A slightly healthier chocolate brownie prep 10 min + soaking cook 18 min makes 25 vegetarian 50g each pitted dried prunes and dates 1tsp vanilla extract 40g cocoa 35g oats, whizzed in a blender until fine 30g ground almonds 2 medium eggs 1tsp baking powder 75g unrefined light soft brown sugar 100g Greek yogurt 20g dark (70% cocoa solids) chocolate chips 50g blueberries 1 Soak the prunes and dates in 100ml just-boiled water for 30 min. Heat the oven to 200°C/ fan 180°C/gas 6 and line a 20cm


square baking tin with non-stick baking paper. 2 Whiz the prunes, dates and the soaking liquor in a food processor to make a purée. Transfer to a bowl, then mix in the vanilla extract. 3 Add the cocoa, blended oats, ground almonds, eggs, baking powder, sugar and yogurt. Whisk everything together with a balloon whisk to make a smooth batter, then scrape all the mixture into the prepared baking tin and level the surface. 4 Sprinkle over the chocolate chips and blueberries, then bake for 18 min or until set. Remove from the oven but leave in the tin to cool for 10 min, then transfer to a board to cool a bit more. Slice into 25 squares while still warm and serve.

MUFFIN RECIPE HAS BEEN ADAPTED USING LOW-FAT SPREAD AND SKIMMED MILK IN PLACE OF BUTTER AND FULL-FAT MILK

PER BROWNIE

55kcal 2.3g fat 0.9g saturates 7.1g carbs 5.8g sugars

0.7g fibre 1.7g protein 0.1g salt 19mg calcium 0.5mg iron

Banana and pecan muffins prep 10 min cook 25 min makes 8 200g wholemeal flour 2tsp baking powder 50g sultanas 25g pecans, chopped 300g ripe bananas 25g runny honey 100g Greek yogurt 100ml skimmed milk 1 medium egg 60g low-fat spread, melted then cooled for 5 min 1 Heat the oven to 200°C/fan 180°C/gas 6. Line a muffin tin with 8 paper muffin cases. 2 Put the flour, baking powder, sultanas and chopped pecans in

a bowl and stir everything together. 3 In a separate bowl, mash the bananas and honey together until smooth. Stir in the yogurt, milk and egg. 4 Add the wet mixture to the flour mixture, then pour the melted spread over the top. Using a large metal spoon, quickly fold everything together until the ingredients are roughly mixed (see tip). 5 Divide the mixture among the muffin cases. Bake the muffins in the oven for 20–25 min until risen and golden on top, and a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean. Remove from the tin and leave to cool on a wire rack until just warm. Tip When folding all the ingredients together, there should still be a few floury patches. The mixture will look

claggy – but don’t worry, it’s meant to be like that. The secret to muffins is to have a light touch and not to try to get a completely smooth mixture. PER MUFFIN

213kcal 7g fat 1.8g saturates 33.8g carbs 15.2g sugars

3.4g fibre 6g protein 0.5g salt 65mg calcium 1.1mg iron

l Recipes from Tom’s Daily Plan by Tom Daley (HarperCollins, £16.99)

FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 85


hfg CASE STUDY

LOST

5st 3lb (33kg)

WEIGHT-LOSS

STAR Brenda, 68, from Surrey

❛After I took early retirement my weight rocketed❜

BEFORE

A more sedentary lifestyle made Brenda’s weight struggle harder, until she found a new one-to-one app that helped her take control of her health

lots of different diets over the years and would often manage to lose weight, but I could never keep it off. After I took early retirement, a more sedentary lifestyle and a relaxed diet – including more sweet treats – meant my weight rocketed to nearly 20st. My family became worried as I was struggling with mobility, and my daughters were concerned that I wouldn’t be able to keep up with my grandchildren. Of course, I wanted to make a change for them, but I also wanted to do it for myself. I hated not being able to go into shops and buy nice clothes. My self-esteem was at an all-time low, and everything felt like a big effort. Joining a weight-loss group had never really worked for me in the past, but I knew I needed some form of help as

I was finding it too hard on my own. So I decided to get professional help – and that’s when I found registered dietitian Lucy Jones.

A smart new approach Lucy explained to me that there’s not one ‘best’ diet, but that success comes with finding what works for us individually. She gave me lots of information on portion sizes, meal planning, recipe ideas and even my plate size, as well as suggestions on how to build up my activity levels. Lucy also suggested I try a new smartphone app called Oviva, which she has been involved in developing. It provides one-to-one coaching with a nutritionist. Through the app, Lucy would be able to support me each day while I got on with my life, rather than having to attend appointments. She’s found this has helped

86 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

AFTER people achieve greater changes – and stick to them. I was apprehensive, as technology isn’t really my thing – I didn’t even own a smartphone! But, as I’d tried every diet under the sun and needed a new approach, I decided to give it a go. My daughter helped me buy a smartphone and it was simple to get the app.

My pocket dietitian The best bit about the Oviva app is that it’s tailored to me – it’s like carrying Lucy around in my pocket. She can see my day-to-day eating habits and give positive suggestions about what I could do differently in specific situations. I share pictures of what I eat with Lucy and ask her questions, and she gives

HEIGHT

5ft 7in (1.7m)

WEIGHT BEFORE

19st 12lb (126kg)

WEIGHT NOW 14st 9lb (93kg)

BMI BEFORE 44

BMI NOW 32

NAME HAS BEEN CHANGED. PHOTOS: ISTOCK

L

IKE SO MANY PEOPLE, I’D TRIED


H E A LT H

WHAT I’M COOKING THIS WEEK…

Pineapple and prawn stir-fry

‘This takes less than half an hour from start to finish and I love the flavours, with the natural sweetness of pineapple. You can swap the prawns for chicken if you fancy a change.’ Find this and lots more healthy prawn recipes at healthyfood.co.uk

5

WAYS BRENDA LOST IT EXERCISING SAFELY

I joined a gym and worked with a personal trainer to understand the exercises I can do without hurting my knees. CUTTING DOWN ON SWEET STUFF

I swapped desserts for fruits and yogurts to help lower my sugar and fat intake. RETHINKING PORTIONS

me daily feedback. Talking to her every day really keeps me going. Knowing she’ll be looking at everything I eat helps with discipline and makes me conscious about what I’m putting on my plate. I soon found I’d made some permanent changes that make healthy eating much easier. I’ve stopped snacking between meals and cut down on empty carbs such as white bread, and my fridge is always stocked with vegetables.

It’s got me moving, too It’s not just my diet that’s changed. I also use the app to keep track of my activity and

share this with Lucy, too. Before I started, being overweight was putting extra strain on my knees, so even walking was difficult. This last year has seen me join a gym and get a personal trainer. Now I work with my trainer every week as well as doing some additional gym sessions and I’m fitter than I’ve been in a long time. Over the past year, I’ve lost 5st 3lb, but I’ve still got some way to go. The biggest challenge for me is willpower – but it feels different this time as Lucy’s there for me. It’s much easier to keep going when you’ve got somebody in your pocket cheering you on!

IF YOU’D LIKE TO TRY THE APP YOURSELF… Find out more about Oviva personal nutritional coaching at oviva.com. Prices start at £30 per month. Alternatively, sign up via the app (download it from the App Store or Google Play).

and the proportions of types of foods. I aim for half a plate of veg, a quarter of lean proteins and a quarter of wholegrain/ high-fibre carbs. MAKING SWAPS

Instead of a thick slice of toast, now I’ll choose ‘thins’ and I bake potato skins instead of frying up chips. KEEPING A BALANCE

I make sure I allow myself treats and occasional nights off. Being flexible helps me feel I can keep going. FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 87


LEARN the ROPES

It’s a full-body workout that builds mental and physical strength – and puts a smile on your face. Hannah Ebelthite looks at the benefits of climbing

88 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017


F I T N E SS

GOING UP? CHOOSE YOUR CHALLENGE There’s something for everyone, from those who prefer a gentle ascent to climbers who like to be vertically challenged:

HILL WALKING

Our intrepid reporter Hannah gets to grips with the wall

S

EEN A CLIMBING WALL at your local leisure centre and thought, ‘I’d love to try it but daren’t’? Perhaps you’re a keen walker who’s always wanted to tackle something steeper but doesn’t know where to start. It may seem like an activity for super-fit adventurers, but climbing has many forms and it’s accessible to almost anyone. ‘Climbing is a very inclusive sport,’ says Rob Adie, climbing walls and competitions officer at the British Mountaineering Council (BMC). ‘It’s open to people of all shapes, sizes and fitness levels; young, old or disabled. Whatever limits you think you may have, you’ll surprise yourself at how much you can do.’

❛wallA climbing session

typically costs around £10 (less if you join a club) so it’s relatively cheap, too.

MIND & BODY BENEFITS ‘Climbing builds strength, stamina, flexibility, balance and co-ordination,’ explains coach Jez Tapping, head of climbing at the Westway Sports & Fitness Centre in London. ‘It counts as a cardiovascular workout and it’s mentally challenging, too.’

On the rise…

l 400 CLIMBING walls in the UK. l 35 MILLION REGULAR climbers worldwide –

10 million more than in 2013.

l 301,300 PEOPLE in England aged 14 and over

go mountaineering (which includes hill walking, indoor climbing and rock climbing) at least once a month, up from 256,100 in 2013.

HIKING IS A WONDERFUL WAY to take in some of the world’s finest scenery. In the UK alone, you’re spoilt for choice when it comes to locations, such as Snowdonia, the Lake District, the Peak District, the Yorkshire Dales and the Scottish Highlands. Follow the trails and you’ll get a fantastic cardiovascular and bodyweight workout, not to mention the feel-fantastic benefits of fresh air and nature to soothe your soul. Once you’re kitted out with some walking shoes or boots, sun protection, lightweight layers and waterproofs, you’re good to go. You’ll need to know how to use a map and compass (your phone and GPS should only ever be a back-up), and you should always work out your route and plan according to the weather. Whether you like to walk alone, with a partner or in a larger group, it’s worth joining a hill-walking club. You can learn from others, find out about less-well-trodden routes, share transport and meet like-minded people. The BMC can help you find a club (thebmc.co.uk), or use social networking site meetup.com to find other keen hikers and planned walking events.

INDOOR CLIMBING WALLS ‘IF YOU KNOW A CLIMBER, ask them to take you to a wall and show you some simple climbs,’ suggests Rob. ‘Or book yourself a beginner’s session or course. Wear comfortable, lightweight clothes and borrow some shoes specifically made for climbing (most climbing centres offer them for hire), as they’ll really help. Once you can safely use the ropes to support a partner, you can sign into any centre and climb. Or there are automatic machines where you don’t need a partner.’ Many climbing centres also have bouldering walls. These are much shorter and bordered with thick crash mats, so you can climb up and along them without the need for ropes. Bouldering is a good way to get to grips with climbing if you don’t have a head for heights. The National Indoor Climbing Award Scheme (NICAS) is designed to promote climbing development and accredit individual achievement on artificial climbing structures. It can be used as a starting point for people wishing to take up climbing and FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 89


F I T N E SS

ROCK CLIMBING CLIMBING OUTDOORS can involve scrambling over steep terrain, tackling craggy rocks, bouldering or scaling and then abseiling down sea cliffs. ‘For many, rock climbing outdoors is a natural progression from indoor walls or outdoor hill walking,’ says Jez. ‘Start by going with someone who’s experienced at outdoor climbs, or join a club that can lend equipment and literally show you the ropes.’ Or you could visit mountain-training.org and hire your own coach or mountain guide. Lots of clubs have huts in prime locations and routes on well known climbs will be roped out for you. You’ll find plenty of outdoor climbing walls and centres around the UK. The National Mountain Sports Centre at Plas y Brenin in Snowdonia is worth a trip – there are lots of courses and holidays on offer.

FIND OUT MORE VISIT the British Mountaineering Council website to find your nearest wall or club, learn about kit, watch videos about techniques or find out where you can climb outdoors (thebmc.co.uk).

WHY YOU SHOULD TRY CLIMBING HFG asked Team GB climbers – and our Tokyo hopefuls – what the sport can give us: ALEXIA BASCH, 17, from London, is a boulderer on the GB Climbing Team. ‘It doesn’t matter how strong you are mentally and physically, climbing will certainly improve both. It really builds your self-belief. At first you’re a bit scared – even I still get scared – and that’s only natural. But climbing is so rewarding because you can get to the top. It’s an achievable goal. You have to be completely in the moment, focused on yourself and not others, which makes for great stress relief.’

MOLLY THOMPSON-SMITH, 18, from London, is captain of the GB Climbing Team and the UK’s number one lead climber in the Senior Women and Junior Female categories. ‘Climbing is a confidence booster. A lot of adults start to question themselves or let their fears take over. I often hear people say, “I don’t think I can do it,” but chances are they can. Just go to your local climbing wall, hire a pair of shoes and have a go! There are lots of videos online to learn techniques, but just trying it and learning from others is the best way.’

SHAUNA COXSEY MBE, 23, from Cheshire, is the reigning International Federation of Sport Climbing (IFSC) Boulder World Cup Champion. ‘Climbing makes you feel like a kid again – it takes you back to scaling trees and climbing frames. I started out lead climbing [see below] but moved to bouldering when I was 16. I love it because you don’t need anyone else or any ropes. So many women are getting into climbing now and finding a healthy lifestyle. It tones you from head to toe and engages your brain – there’s no monotony.’

SWOT UP FOR TOKYO: the three Olympic climbing disciplines l LEAD CLIMBING is done

l BOULDERING ROUTES, also

l SPEED CLIMBING is a sprint

on a long route with a rope for protection. You get one attempt at each route, clipping your rope on to the wall as you go, and score points according to the highest hold you get to in six minutes.

known as ‘problems’, are short but highly gymnastic climbs, often on a wall with an overhang, involving difficult moves. The aim is to complete a problem, without falling off, in fewer attempts than the others.

race performed on long routes with a rope for protection. The route is always the same and competitors can train as much as they like on it. Then, when it comes to competition day, the fastest to the top wins.

90 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

PHOTOS: ISTOCK, ALEX MESSENGER/BMC

mountaineering, and is open to everyone aged seven and up (nicas.co.uk). If you want to climb more, consider joining a club (staff at the centre can advise you) and even a competition team.


LO R E M

IN MARCH’S

Shape up for

SPRING

T NEXUE ISSSALE ON AR 1M

GET CARB CLEVER Know your slow from your low GIs KITCHEN MAKEOVER Tips to clean up your act

Butter bean and vegetable stew

WORK OUT AT WORK Fitness to slip into your day YOUR SPRING RECIPE COLLECTION H Trend alert: noodles in jars H Lower-cal chicken enchiladas H Make more of mushrooms H Lighter cookies and biscuits

Plus H iron in fruit and veg H acai H coffee-shop swaps H


HEALTHY Signe Johansen Food anthropologist, chef and author

The American-Norwegian chef has a thoroughly Scandinavian (and infectious) outlook on wellbeing

W

hat does ‘healthy’ mean to you? I FIND THE TERM really controversial these days. Health is worth trillions in business but not many people seem to know what it means. I was brought up in Norway, where to be healthy meant enjoying everything in moderation. Unfortunately, it’s old-fashioned advice, but we’re not a culture that jumps on dieting bandwagons – we’re just careful not to overdo it. We enjoy what we eat and make sure we stay active.

Scandinavians always look so glowing and healthy, and you’re no exception! Has it always been the case? SINCE CHILDHOOD, I’ve always been very active. My parents have photos of me skiing in nappies! I’ve never been skinny, though, and my weight has fluctuated throughout my 20s and 30s. But I have more energy than ever. What difference do you notice between British and Nordic attitudes to health? THIS IS SLIGHTLY TOUCHY GROUND and I don’t want to over-generalise… But Nords tend

THREE THINGS I LOVE

BREAKFAST If I had to choose out of the three meals, it has to be breakfast. I don’t feel myself until I’ve had it!

FOOTBALL I really love football (I used to play at university). Now I’m tempted to set up a women’s five-a-side – why do men get to have all the fun?

92 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

CHICKEN NOODLE SOUP There’s nothing better when you’re feeling under the weather. I love making my own from a chicken carcass and any veg I happen to have.

Let’s talk about this fascination with hygge. There’s more to it than hot chocolate and cosy fireplaces, right? HYGGE [pronounced hoo-gah] taps into that sense of an alternative way of living that’s beneficial. People want to look after themselves and in a world that’s changing dramatically hygge helps people grasp the idea of living well, taking time out and nurturing themselves. There are three principles of hygge I’d recommend getting started with: Social A feeling of contentment, of coming together and nurturing and looking after others. Home space In 2017 I think we’re going to see the rise of the home body. We’ll be spending more time at home to get this sense of stepping back and retreating into domesticity. Think about your interiors and make it a happy place to live in. This is why Scandi design is so great – we had to come up with functional items because of the amount of time we spend indoors during the cold seasons, but we wanted it to be beautiful, too! Health Eat as seasonably as you can and allow yourself a treat now and then. Don’t be a martyr, just enjoy good home cooking and look after yourself. There’s a Swedish word, lagom, which means perfect equilibrium, or having that instinct of having just enough and not overindulging. Why are Brits becoming more intrigued by this Scandi lifestyle? WE’RE LIVING IN interesting times. I feel there’s a pushback against the

AS TOLD TO LAURA DAY. PHOTOS: GETTY IMAGES

HOW I STAY

to perceive the body in terms of how it functions rather than the way it looks. Poop and periods aren’t considered taboo, and there’s no sense of shame, guilt or embarrassment about the body. We’re quite blunt people and it seems this has translated to how we think about our bodies.


TA L K I N G P O I N T S

❛There’s a pushback

against the clean eating ideals that dominated last year. Nordic chefs are going back to timehonoured methods

clean eating and living ideals that dominated last year. We all need to live a little bit. Scandinavia has a lot to be proud of in terms of standard of living, public health, longevity – all these measurements are of a successful, healthy society, and I think Brits are saying, ‘why can’t we have that?’ And what about Nordic food? NORDIC CHEFS and food writers are going back to the basics of time-honoured methods. It’s all the things our grandparents did: fermentation, pickling, preserving and baking bread, including sourdough. It all went out of fashion

when we got fridges and supermarkets. Sometimes we forget Britain is a northern European country, and the produce you grow is very similar to Norway – seafood, berries and vegetables. So when we talk about the trend for Nordic food, it’s more a question of why did it take so long to get here? The food is easy to prepare, so it isn’t about how many hours you spend in the kitchen. My mother said Nordic food is the best fast food in the world – if you’ve got pickles and crispbreads you can always rustle up a simple, naturally nourishing meal in minutes.

We imagine your pantry is well stocked… What would we find in it? YES, HAVING A WELL-STOCKED larder is important, and mine is full of international flavours. Eggs are my absolute favourite ingredient. They’re satisfying, nourishing and you can do so much with them. For emergencies I always have Peter’s Yard crispbreads. They’re the kind of thing my grandmother would make, but as these are so good, why would you? They’re really great for canapés. And of course I have lots of spices. I really love cardamom, caraway and nutmeg. If you have plenty of spices you can really lift so many meals – soups, stews, casseroles and even toppings for cakes. They’re particularly important in healthy recipes, which I often see using lots of vegetables and protein but missing spices. It’s curious because simple ingredients like that need to be amplified, and spices are the way to do it. How do you stay active? I TRY TO DO A BIT of everything because if I stick to one thing I get bored. To the Nords the outdoors is always preferable to the gym because you get the added psychological benefits of being outside and seeing nature, as well as vitamin D. I do a mix of long hikes, walking in the park, open water swimming, yoga and pilates. I’ve even had a go at archery and this year I want to try rock climbing. Women tend to get really worked up about being good at something or achieving something with exercise. I think you just need to find something that works for you – if you’re not a runner, don’t run! If you find a whole range of things you enjoy, do all of them. l Head to healthyfood.co.uk/blog for Signe Johansen’s crab and rye nordic salad, created for Sainsbury’s – perfect hygge. FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 93


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REFERENCES Your guide to the research behind this month’s stories and features

HEALTH NOTES p10 l http://journals.plos.org/ plosone/article?id=10.1371/ journal.pone.0167859 EAT MORE & LOSE WEIGHT p15 l Mattes, R D and Campbell, W W (2009) Effects of food form and timing of ingestion on appetite and energy intake in lean young adults and in young adults with obesity. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 109 (3), 430-437. DOI: 10.1016/j. jada.2008.11.031 l Miquel-Kergoat, S et al (2015) Effects of chewing on appetite, food intake and gut hormones: A systematic review and metaanalysis. Physiolongy & Behavior, 151, 88-96. DOI: 10.1016/j. physbeh.2015.07.017 l Clark, M J and Slavin, J L (2013) The effect of fiber on satiety and food intake: a systematic review. Journal of the American College

96 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

of Nutrition 32 (3), 200-211. DOI: 10.1080/07315724.2013.791194 l Leidy, H J et al (2015) The role of protein in weight loss and maintenance. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 101 (6), 13205-13295. DOI: 10.3945/ ajcn.114.084038 DIET TIPS TO EASE THE PAIN OF CROHN’S p40 l NHS Choices. Crohn’s Disease. http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/ Crohns-disease/Pages/ Introduction.aspx l Ananthakrishnan, A N (2013) Environmental triggers for inflammatory bowel disease. Current Gastroenterology Reports 15 (1), 1-11. DOI: 10.1007/ s11894-012-0302-4 l Ananthakrishnan, A N et al (2013) Normalization of plasma 25-hydroxy vitamin D is associated with reduced risk of surgery in Crohn’s

disease. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases 19 (9), 1921-1927. DOI: 10.1097/MIB.0b013e3182902ad9 l Yang, L et al (2013) Therapeutic effect of vitamin D supplementation in a pilot study of Crohn’s patients. Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology 4 (4), 1-8. DOI: 10.1038/ctg.2013.1 l Jorgensen, S P et al (2010) Clinical trial: vitamin D3 treatment in Crohn’s disease- a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study. Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics 32, 377-383. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365 2036.2010.04355.x THE G-PLAN DIET p44 l Science 06 Sep 2013: Vol. 341, Issue 6150. DOI: 10.1126/ science.1241214 l Nature. 2009 Jan 22;457(7228):480-4. DOI: 10.1038/nature07540. Epub 2008 Nov 30


T H E FAC T S

NUTRITION LOWDOWN We cut through the science to help you work out how our recipes – and the foods you buy in the supermarket – fit into a balanced, healthy diet

JUST LIKE PRE-PACKED FOODS, all our recipes provide detailed nutrition information for a typical serving. But how does that compare with your total daily needs for energy, protein, fat, carbs and certain vitamins and minerals? Provided you stick to the serving size we recommend for each recipe, the easiest way is to compare the nutrition information for each recipe with the Reference Intake (RI). You’ll gradually see this term being used on food labels in place of Guideline Daily Amounts (GDAs). The RIs are benchmarks for the amount of energy (kilocalories), fat, saturated fat, carbohydrate, sugars, protein and salt we should have each day. The RIs for fat, saturates, sugars and salt are the maximum amount you should have each day, while you should aim to meet the values for carbs and protein each day. There is no RI for fibre but health experts recommend we have 30g a day. Although everyone is different and has different needs for energy and nutrients, the RIs are designed for an average adult, so there’s only one set of values. See the table, right, for the figures. We also analyse our recipes for calcium and iron – this is because these two nutrients are often low in people’s diets in the UK. We can see how much a recipe contributes to our daily needs for calcium and iron by comparing

WHAT IF I WANT TO LOSE WEIGHT? The only way to shed the pounds is to take in fewer calories than you use up, so your body draws on its fat stores to supply it with enough energy. To lose 1lb (0.5kg) of fat you need to create a calorie deficit of 3,500kcal. This means cutting your calorie intake by just 500kcal a day should help you lose 1lb (0.5kg) a week – so, for example, women should lose this amount of weight each week on 1,500kcal and men on 2,000kcal. If you’re also more active, you can expect it to be a little more. However, nutrition experts agree that for good health in the long term, you shouldn’t lose more than 2lb (1kg) a week. REFERENCE INTAKE

it with Nutrient Reference Values (NRVs), which are starting to appear on food labels in place of Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) – again, there is just one set of values.

ENERGY (kcal) FAT (g)

2,000 70

SATURATES (g)

20

CARBOHYDRATES (g)

260

SUGARS (g)

90

PER SERVING

PROTEIN (g)

50

All our recipes come with nutrition information per serving, so as long as you stick to the serving sizes we recommend, the nutrition information we provide will be accurate.

SALT (g)

6

NUTRIENT REFERENCE VALUE

CALCIUM (mg)

800

IRON (mg)

14

l Individual needs vary considerably, so use this as a general guide only. Ask your GP or doctor to refer you to a registered dietitian if you feel you would benefit from personalised advice. Nutrition is calculated accurately, but may vary, depending on the ingredients used. Only listed ingredients are included in the calculations. FEBRUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 97


T H E L A S T WO R D

5 TOP FACTS to TAKE AWAY

FILLING UP on beans instead of meat at lunchtime could mean you eat less at your next meal p11

Our favourite healthy snippets and tips from the experts in this month’s issue

Looking for a healthy non-dairy milk? SOYA PACKS THE BIGGEST PROTEIN PUNCH with 3.1g per 100ml – not a far cry from the 3.5g in the same amount of cow’s milk p30

LADIES, don’t be blind to the signs of heart attack. Once the menopause arrives and our oestrogen levels drop, our heart disease risk rises to match men’s p23 98 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FEBRUARY 2017

A WHOPPING 75% of the salt in our diet comes from ready-made products. Look for foods with no more than 0.3g salt per 100g to keep tabs on your intake p25 & p26

COMPILED BY REBECCA ALMOND. PHOTOS: ISTOCK, GETTY IMAGES

CRUMBLE lacking the mmm factor? Stirring a spoonful of cacao nibs into the topping adds an indulgent twist. Give our recipe a try! p82


 
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