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MELTING POINT

PORT FOLIO

Sarea Mahmoud M00450333


C l i e n t ’s

R o b e r t

H a r r i s

Client

C o m m e n t

“Hello there. We are a government funded group dedicated to promoting contemporary craft, makers, artisans and artists, helping individual makers to establish themselves as active professionals, build careers, and ultimately demonstrate the value of creative craft. We do this in a number of ways, by helping to organise exhibitions, by publishing articles in magazines and websites promoting the latest innovations in craft, and by being a resource where creative craftspeople can meet and share their ideas. We also mentor craftspeople, with support workshops to help them get established. We want to do something more, we want you to help us do it. Craft and making is experiencing a real resurgence, you can see this if you look at the growth in craft sales websites like https://folksy.com/ and https://www.etsy.com/ - these are like online crafts fairs with thousands of handmade items for sale, but there’s a problem. This is a difficult subject to raise, but we believe that design ability, creativity and skill, are powerful and important factors in the making of beautiful considered contemporary objects. The online craft fairs do have lots of good work on show but the majority of pieces are not contemporary and creative, but are instead rather homemade. New designers and makers are leaving university and wanting to start out on their own, new businesses, making and selling directly to the public, but they have to compete with the thousands of people who craft without that depth of background that formal learning gives you. Compare this to your own profession, an Interior Designer studies three or four years to prepare them for the real world, they experiment, train, explore and learn. Now, that doesn’t stop someone else, untrained, decorating their own home does it. But it does mean that it’s difficult to compare a room designed by an untrained person and that designed by a professional. This is how we feel, we are excited that so many people want to make and sell their work, but we want to promote and support those individuals who do so as their profession and their life, those that have dedicated themselves through life long study.

Robert Harris


Site Information “Although we will be providing you with information about a particular building on Upper Street, you should remember that your client sees this as the first of many centres they will use over the next few years, so you should see this building as generic, meaning that your design should be able to work in any building with a similar form. The building as been chosen because it is typical of so many London High Streets, and indeed can be found across hundred of towns across the UK. IMPORTANT – you are therefore to assume that the current interior appearance of the building itself plays no part in your design process, you can imagine the interior as blank, brick walls with timber joist floor construction.” “You are to design a live/work space that has two equally important abilities – to help support creative makers in the promotion of their work – and to help the public to engage with contemporary, individually made objects and items, seeing them as an exciting and inspiring way of adding individuality to their own lives. You will include facilities for two to three craftspeople makers to live (sleep, eat, cleanse, socialise) and work (workshop/studio spaces) and display their work (exhibition/gallery). The space should include something to attract in passers by (café), and a meeting space for other makers to arrange meeting with potential purchasers of their work. Motivate the maker – inspire curiosity in the public: as the public move through the spaces you create they should see, feel, hear the seductive urgency of the ‘made’ object (rather than the manufactured object).”

Client’s comment

“The building will promote not only the residents artists work but also that of the large group of Melting Point approved creative, craftspeople and makers. The idea will be that the outreach centre will be the place to meet with a maker, so a person wanting to commission a special piece could see the centre as the place to go to search out that person, and to meet them there over the process of the pieces creation.”


UPPER STREET

UPPER STREET

The buildings in Upper Street are unusual to the modern day build-

What have we done to Upper Street? That was my question. My an-

ings. There are concrete structures alongside brick structures; Victo-

swer is, we brought modesty to it, not by choice, but because over-

rian windows alongside modern day windows, 20th century doors

time, things had to change. Yet the beautiful Victorian buildings are

alongside 21st century doors, and the buildings speak Victorian

still standing tall on the outside, but of course the interiors have a

with a hint of modern. Buildings attached beside one another, yet

modern change to it. The streets feel narrower, and I thought to my-

signifies different meanings. They’re mainly tall, if not a little differ-

self, is it the busyness? This question was playing on my mind, and

ent in heights, and many are narrow. I witnessed the old and the

the only way to find out was to visit the street in a less busy time, so

new Upper Street with the smooth touches I felt within the benches,

I decided to visit the street overnight, and realised what made the

and the harsh rough touches I felt with some of the bricks, and I

street feel so narrow. It was in fact the amount of cars, car parking

looked around, and with my imaginations, I could see the 1920’s in

bays, and people, but mainly the changes in the ground, the add-

that space such as, minimal cars, horse and carriage, woman in long

ed stairs, and added pavements, as well as added trees that were

dresses, and men wearing capes and hats, the roads being wider

standing as tall as the buildings. Tell someone that hasn’t visited Up-

due to less cars, and people walking on the streets as there weren’t

per Street that its narrower due to the above reasons, they might

pavements. All I could imagine was Upper Street being spacious

not believe it until they see it with their own eyes, just like I did.

with clean air. I came back to reality, and saw a hectic street, cars beeping, breaking, and moving with music on blast, sirens loudly in my ears, people running around in different direction, children crying, people speaking different languages, and a florist trying to make a living outside of the station in a kiosk stand in the cold, and dry weather, with pollution in the air.


HISTORY RAINY HISTORY “During the 19th century Upper Street’s rows of houses were rebuilt as commercial premises, at first catering for the growing local population and later attracting customers from further afield. The street’s non-stop commerce prompted the rector of St Mary’s church to found the Lord’s Day Observance Society in 1831. Despite Islington’s ever-diminishing status as a residential district, Upper Street’s outfitters and drapers grew in prestige, and their trousseaux and underclothes were especially highly prized. A section of the street was rebuilt in widened form and lined with substantial terraces of shops, while smart new frontages were added to the surviving older premises – but at night the many public houses catered to an increasingly disreputable clientele.”

A rainy day of 1900 in Upper Street, oh how different it looks from now. The gothic architecture buildings towering, people walking alongside cars that all look almost the same, and double-decker buses one behind another. Streets looking wider, with no signs of trees around, why? Why aren’t there trees? My answer is, because the population was small, and the street wasn’t as busy and as covered in pollution as now.


Antony Gromley

Artist Inspration

Antony Gormley is widely acclaimed for his sculptures, installations and public artworks that investigate the relationship of the human body to space. His work has developed the potential opened up by sculpture since the 1960s through a critical engagement with both his own body and those of others in a way that confronts fundamental questions of where human beings stand in relation to nature and the cosmos. Gormley continually tries to identify the space of art as a place of becoming in which new behaviours, thoughts and feelings can arise.

“But I have been interested in asking what is the nature of the space a human being inhabits. What I try to show is the space where the body was, not to represent the body itself.�


Gallery Insprations


WORKSHOP

Workshop Inspration

Why concrete?

I’ve chosen for the basement where the workshop is based to be concrete material overall because concrete is classed as natural material, which relates back to the space feeling more crafted. Also concrete is a solid material, and the craftsmen will be using a lot of tools banging onto one another, and due to concrete being a solid material it wont be breakable.


Timber flooring and ceiling

Why timber?

For the cafÊ, gallery and living space I’ve chosen timber flooring and ceiling, this gives the visitors a chance to feel the flow from space to space, and gives a good transition to the spaces. Also, timber is a natural material, which gives the space an overall feel of craft.


Micro Apartments

Precedence Living space


Insprations


Design Development


THINKING...


Third floor, Living space Third floor, Living space

Second floor, Living space

First floor, Gallary space

Basement, Workshop

Second floor, Living space

First floor, Gallary space

Basement, Workshop


Section drawing of design development. Showing the views from inside and outside of the building.


Bathroom Bedroom

Workshop Second Floor 0

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Living room Kitchen Bedroom

First Floor 0

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Meeting room Gallery/ Cafe Entrance

Ground Floor 0

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Artist’s break spot

A

Workshop

Basement Floor


Living space

Long Section Roof terrace/ Bar/ Cafe

First Floor 0

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Bedroom Balcony

Gallery

Second Floor 0

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Ground Floor 0

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Bedroom

Workshop

Basement Floor 0

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First Floor Mezzanine 3

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Short Section


CONCEPT

The Overlapping Interaction of spaces


Street perspective view


Gallery

Cafe

Workshop

Section sketch


Space Idea Sketches


Final Floor Plans at 1:100

Ground Floor 0

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First Floor 0

Basement Floor 0

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Final Design Sections

Final Floor Plans at 1:100

Third Floor 0

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Second Floor 0

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Final Proposal Elevations


Journey...

Street View

As I walk down the street, my eyes are immediately drawn to a figure through a large window. A life size sculpture appears to be suspended upside down in the air. The figure intrigues me to move towards the window and on closer inspection an inverted human sculpture is hung on the wall. I peer through the window around the room and see hand movements from down below, hand movements of the same artist’s that created the masterpiece that aroused my curiosity. As I follow the windows along the building, I see a desk by the workshop down below, where it looks to me as if a deal has been closed and one of the sculptures will be entering a new home. At eye level, I see a cafÊ, where many people from several different backgrounds are sat down admiring the scenery and pointing to the same sculpture that brought me in. Window by window I create my own story line of what this building has to offer, but first let me take a step further and enter the crafted space. A step in was a step closer to feeling the sculpture, and exploring the space.


Workshop and Cafe Visuals As I enter, under my feet is timber flooring, and in front of me are brick walls, which feel original, maybe as original as 100 years old. To my left, is the Café, I walk towards the counter to purchase a drink, then take steps to get closer to the sculpture that my eyes can’t seem to get enough of, and my hands can’t reach, all whilst my ears are listening to tools banging onto one another. I want to explore this building, I tell myself. As I walk away from the sculpture, I hear people speaking above me, as they’re looking down into the café. I continue walking, and get to a spiral of stairs; where do I go? Do I go down, or up? A moment later, I decided to walk down the stairs, where I heard tools being used, as I get there, I see two craftsmen making sculptures, again, human size sculptures. I wanted to study the space, so I began to feel the concrete walls, which felt fresh, and new, I immediately realised that this basement has been renovated for the craftsmen to work in. I took closer steps, towards the light that was coming from the same window that had initially brought me into this building. My body stood still, whilst my eyes gazed around. At this point, you’re probably wondering what I saw. I see something that can’t be erased from my memory just like many childhood memories that I still see to this day… I see everything, everything one must know about the building, from how the craftsmen put their hands to work, to the unfinished sculptures, and the complete sculptures, to the café, and even further up to the gallery; What an overlapping interaction of spaces, I told myself. Step by step, vision by vision, touch by touch and feel by feel, I feel at home, but not an everyday home, but in fact, a one of a kind type of home.


Gallery Visuals I sip on my coffee, and take the stairs back up, this time, further up, to a space that looked and felt like a gallery. Stepping in, I came eye to eye with a sculpture that I felt is telling me a story, a story of why it is the way it is, and how it was formed into that particular shape or how many untold hours were put into it. I could see care was put into this sculpture, a care as deep as a mothers love for her child. I explore the gallery further and walk towards the barriers, where my ears pick up conversations between visitors whilst seated sipping on their beverages. Here my eyes were once again welcomed by the overlapping interaction of spaces, but this time, from above, and not below. And certain stories were unknown from above and below, just like the sculpture that I came eye to eye with and the artist’s sweating whilst crafting the human size figures; This building is almost like seeing and feeling the character or presence of another space while in another, but with a hint of the unseen above and below the ceilings. I walked back to the stairs slowly, as my head kept on turning back to see that sculpture one last time, so it could be a vision in my head, along the lines of everything else my eyes captured today.


Living Space Visuals

After a long day of banging tools against each other, putting my hands and mind to work, and making sculptures that feed the cravings of the eyes, I come back to my living space, to rest and relax my mind for another fresh day. Walking up the wooden stairs with bare feet clears my mind, because not only do I feel craft in my working space, I also feel it in my living space.


Axonometric View


Model/Sculpture


Door Hinge Detail Drawing


Melting Point

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