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Complimentary

LAKE PLACID LAKE PLACID • KEENE VALLEY • SARANAC LAKE

Summer

2016


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Welcome!

to Simply Lake Placid magazine… The inaugural issue!

A

s I review the final pages before it heads off to the press, I can’t help but think about the beautiful region and great people that this magazine represents. The idea to launch Simply Lake Placid (SLP) germinated about a year ago while satisfying my voracious appetite after a day of climbing some of the region’s best crags. I don’t know if it was the mouthwatering smell of barbecue, or the enormous calories burned in the mountains, but that meal at Smoke Signals still stands out as one of the best! Our goal at SLP is to cover the People, Places, and Lifestyle that make this region truly one-of-a-kind. The publication will be published bi-annually, with distribution dates in summer and winter. The important thing to note here, is that this is YOUR magazine… I want to hear from you… Please send me suggestions of people living interesting lives and those with extraordinary homes or businesses. Drop me a line and a photo or two, and I’ll be in touch: CBeatty@SaratogaPublishing.com In this edition, as with all future editions, you will find a little something for everyone… If you want to enjoy one of the many events that draw tourists from across the country, turn to page 10 and see which ones pique your interest. Are you into architecture? Flip to page 42 and explore some truly unique Adirondack homes. Are you a people person? Kick back and enjoy our ‘Living the ADK Life’ section beginning on page 28. For the outdoorsman, or woman, you will love our ‘Got Mountains’ section beginning on page 62. And… If you are newly engaged or know someone who is, check out ‘Real ADK Brides’ beginning on page 76 for Details, Ideas & Advice, along with great stories and photos of local weddings. See the Contributors Page to find out how to submit your Adk Wedding for possible submission in a future issue! I’d like to close with a THANK YOU to all of our advertisers that make it possible to offer this great publication – free of charge – to our readers. Please mention us by name when visiting their businesses. So without further ado…grab a cool lemonade, go to your favorite Adirondack Chair and enjoy! Simply Lake Placid is your go-to magazine for the best this region has to offer.

Chad Beatty

Publisher & Owner of Saratoga Publishing

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LAKE PLACID LAKE PLACID • KEENE VALLEY • SARANAC LAKE

Owner/Publisher Chad Beatty General Manager Robin Mitchell Creative Consultant Chris Vallone Bushee Creative Director Alyssa Jackson Advertising Design Morgan Rook Graphics Department Alyssa Jackson Andrew Ranalli Morgan Rook Advertising Sales Erin Boucher Jim Daley Cindy Durfey Chance James Contributing Writers Mim Frantz Jenna Whitehill Matt McDonald David Delozier Photographers ROOST/adirondackusa.com Glen Allsop of Christian OTH Studio Nancy Battaglia Jordan Craig Linda Cusma Monica Donovan Eve Event Photography Due West Photography Matt McDonald Kevin McAvey Truckeloo Photography Paul Reynolds saratogaphotographer.com Francis Zuber Published by

Saratoga TODAY Newspaper Five Case Street, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866 tel: (518) 581-2480 fax: (518) 581-2487

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Simply Saratoga is brought to you by Saratoga TODAY Newspaper, Saratoga Publishing, LLC. Saratoga Publishing shall make every effort to avoid errors and omissions but disclaims any responsibility should they occur. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means without prior written consent of the publisher. Copyright © 2016, Saratoga TODAY Newspaper

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CONTRIBUTORS NANCIE BATTAGLIA Nancie Battaglia is an award winning freelance photographer living in the Adirondack Mountains of upstate New York. Published extensively, her work has appeared in Sports Illustrated, the New York Times, National Geographic, Adirondack Life and beyond. . Her work encompasses lifestyle, architecture, features, news, and sports, including eleven Olympics. As an active person she enjoys hiking, skiing, paddling, triathlons and all things outdoors. Post office box 229 lake placid new york 12946, 518-523-3440 nbphotog@northnet.org or nbphotog@roadrunner.com

CHRIS BUSHEE Chris is the Managing Editor of most of the 18 magazines that Saratoga TODAY publishes yearly, as well as the “Queen of all things Bridal.” Send her your submissions for REAL ADK BRIDES at cBushee@SaratogaPublishing.com for possible inclusion in upcoming issues! With Owner / Publisher Chad Beatty doing all the heavy lifting on this inaugural issue, she enjoyed just tweaking the final publication and is looking forward to experiencing the Lake Placid region for herself ...someday soon!

JORDAN CRAIG Jordan is an enthusiastic photographer and avid hiker on track to walk 1,000 miles this year. An appetite for variety has led him, camera in hand, across the Eastern US, Asia, and Latin America. Jordan seeks the illumination of life Jesus speaks of when He said, “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.” In the winter months he studies at the School of Business and Economics in Plattsburgh. During the summer he calls Lake Placid home, living in a small town with big dreams.

DAVID DELOZIER Dave is known as the eco-local guy around town, as he published the "eco-Local Living mag from 2008-13. Dave and his wife Brenda "walk the walk" having converted their small suburban Saratoga Springs residence into a Permaculture homestead, integrating elements such as edible landscaping, PV solar power & micro-farming. Dave is now a certified Permaculture Design Consultant and looks to help others who are seeking a more healthy, grounded and resilient lifestyle. ecolocal@gmail.com.

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MIM FRANTZ Mim Frantz, of Lake Placid is a journalist, event coordinator (junipereventsanddesign.com) and yoga instructor (mimyoga.com). When she’s not writing, planning or in a warrior pose, she can be found enjoying outdoor adventures with her husband and three young sons. She is a former professional figure skater and works to bring that same passion, drive, artistry and grace to all of her endeavors.

ALYSSA JACKSON Alyssa is our magazine designer, here at Saratoga TODAY… no easy task with 18 mags a year! She does it effortlessly and manages to do freelance design on the side too. She lives in Hadley with her parents and dog Toby. Alyssa is so thankful for her family who has always encouraged and motivated her to follow her dreams and sends them her love!

MATT McDONALD Based out of Plattsburgh, Matt is relatively new to the freelance writing scene. He has written for national and regional outdoor and tourism publications, and as often as he can, he’s skiing, hiking, camping, slacklining and trail running (when motivation is high) throughout the Adirondacks and the Northeast. His first overseas escapade to India and Nepal has him looking to expand his international adventures—but the Adirondacks will always be one of his favorite places.

JAMIE WEST-McGIVER Jamie West-McGiver graduated from Syracuse University with her Masters in Social Work. After 10 years working in her field, she decided to retire from her position in an elementary school to pursue passions that allowed her more time outdoors. She owns a photography business, Due West Photography and also SUP Sackets Harbor, a Stand Up Paddleboard shop on Lake Ontario. She loves paddling, rock and ice climbing, hiking, skiing and checking her ego on a mountain bike. Jamie resides in Lake Placid with her husband Justin and their rescue dog, Blu.

JENNA WHITEHILL Jenna is just starting out as a freelance writer living in Plattsburgh. She is working towards a graduate degree to become an English teacher but will continue to freelance during and after her studies. When she is not writing, she can be found outside fishing, hiking, or planning her next trip.

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LAKE PLACID LAKE PLACID • KEENE VALLEY • SARANAC LAKE

Architecturally Speaking

SUMMER 2016

LAKE PLA CID A Sarato

ga TODA Y Publica

LAKE P LACID

• KEE NE VAL LE

Y • SA RAN

Summer

2016

SUMMER EVENTS 12

Equine

18

Ironman

24 Rugby 26

Lacrosse

LIVING THE ADK LIFE 29

Home Grown Olympian

32

Lake Placid Animal Hospital

38

Noon Mark Diner

HOME & GARDEN

GOT MOUNTAINS? 64

Take a Walk

67

Set Your Sights On 46!

69

Camping 101

72

Slide Science

REAL ADK BRIDES 78

Maya & Manny

82

Caley & Tom

51

Riggi Tree House

86

Bridgett & Bill

54

Farm to Fork

90

Worth The Wait!

92

Wedding Insider Rustic Wedding Tips

82

Engaged Q&A

Juniper Hill Asgaard Farm saratogaTODAYnewspaper.com

Cover ph o provided tos by...

ROO adironda ST/ cksusa.co m, Paul Rey nold & Due W s e Photogra st phy

Architecturally Speaking

Sugar House Creamery

AC LAK E

42

Fledging Crow

tion

BRIDAL

76-97

HOME & GARDEN

41-61

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Lake Placid

2016

Summer

Events.

Lake Placid is the perfect destination for a family vacation, friendly reunion, or weekend in the woods. It is also a region filled with world class activities and events, drawing visitors from across the country. Here is a look at some of the bigger summer events.

June 27 - 29 Lake Placid Summit Youth Classic LAX

lakeplacid.com/events/lake-placid-summit-youth-classic

July 2 - 4 I Love BBQ Festival

lakeplacid.com/events/i-love-bbq-festival

Have fun and enjoy all that we have to offer…

June 12:

Lake Placid Marathon and Half lakeplacid.com/events/lake-placid-marathon

June 28 - July 10 Lake Placid Horse Shows lakeplacidhorseshow.com

See pages

12-17

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July 24

Ironman Lake Placid

lakeplacid.com/ironman-lake-placid See pages

18-23

July 29 - 31 Can Am Rugby

All updated events are at: lakeplacid.com/events

saranaclake.com/events/can-am-rugby-tournament

See pages

19-20

Aug 1 - 7

Lake Placid Summit LAX lakeplacid.com/events/summit-lacrosse-tournament

See pages

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21-22

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Lake Placid is home to two of the nation’s most prestigious equine masterpieces - the Lake Placid and I Love New York Horse Shows. Watch as world class riders and horses vie for over $550,00 in prize money and awards!

Whether you are looking for ponies ridden by tomorrow’s champions, or members of the U.S. Equestrian Team atop some of the world’s best horses, the Lake Placid Horse Shows have something for everyone.

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Hunter & Jumper Competition The Hunter competition has its roots in the elegant tradition of fox hunting. Beautifully groomed horses and ponies are judged for their manners as well as their style of jumping over natural fences simulating the hunt field. Power and speed are the keys to winning in the Jumper arena where equine athletes compete over obstacles as big as 5’6” in height and as much as 4 feet wide. Described as a cross between the excitement of Thoroughbred racing and the bold speed of downhill skiing, the Olympic sport of Grandprix Show Jumping is something you will not want to miss.

Behind The S

cenes

For a behind the scenes lo ok at the shows, take a guided wa lk ing tour offered Wed nesday, Thu rsday and Friday, at 11 :30 AM. Meet at the LPHS retail booth . The tour w ill last approximate ly 1 hour.

Sponsored by Hannaford Supermarket

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The Details... Action begins at 8:00 AM each show day with classes running simultaneously in four separate rings until approximately 5:00 PM.

Daily admission tickets may be purchased at the entrance gate. You may call the Horse Show office at 518-5239625 for more information. Purchasing tickets in advance is not necessary. They have plenty of general seating available.

Admission to the horse show is $2.00 on weekdays and $5.00 on weekend days. Children under the age of 12 are admitted free.

Discounts for groups of 20 or more. 16  |  SIMPLY LAKE PLACID | SUMMER 2016

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Show Highlights • $75,000 Devoucoux Grand Prix – Presented by Sea Shore Stables • $100,000 Equine Insurance Services/Great American Grand Prix – Presented by Sea Shore Stables • $15,000 USHJA International Hunter Derby – Presented by Eastern Hay & Purina Mills Animal Nutrition

• $30,000 Open Jumper Classics

• $20,000 1.40m Jumper Classes • $10,000 High Amateur - Owner Jumper Classis

• $10,000 High Junior/Amateur - Owner Jumper Classic

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On July 24, athletes from around the world will descend on the village of Lake Placid to test their limits in the 18th Annual Ironman Lake Placid. A favorite among competitors, the Lake Placid Ironman is the second oldest mainland North American full distance Ironman and one of the sport’s most popular courses.

The highly anticipated race begins with pro swimmers entering the water at 6:10 a.m., age groupers at 6:40 a.m. for a 2.4 mile swim across beautiful Mirror Lake, followed by a demanding 112-mile bike leg through the Adirondack Mountains, and ends with a full marathon through the mountains and downtown that ends at the Olympic speed skating oval in the village of Lake Placid.

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Best Place to Watch the Swim Lake Placid Club Drive (near the Lake Placid Club Resort Entrance), Parkside Drive (by the Beach House) and the carpeted section of Lake Placid Club Drive (near Town Hall).

Best Place to Watch the Run Main Street, Lake Placid Club Drive, Cascade Road (Route 73) and finish line in the Olympic Oval.

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Best Place to Watch the Bike Colden Avenue (Main Street side), Main Street (near the Post Office) and River Street (near Route 73 and Lake Placid Club Drive).

Best Place to Watch the Finish At the finish line bleachers on the oval from 9 p.m. - midnight. The final hours are very inspirational and worth staying for!

Interested in volunteering for the event? Go to www.ironmanlakeplacid.com

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Parking Parking is available in several lots with free shuttles to the following drop-off locations: Lot 1 Lake Placid Fire Department near the corner of Old Military and Mill Pond Drive. Lot 2 Lake Placid Elementary Road on Old Military Road, near Station Street. Lot 3 West Valley Road, off Saranac Avenue near Cummins Road. Shuttles run from 4 a.m. Sunday to 1 a.m. Monday. The shuttle drop-off is on Cummins Road, between Olympic Center and the Oval, quarter mile to Main Street, Lake Placid. This location is also where the shuttles run back to parking lots. There are no other pick-up or drop-off locations.

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The Distance

2.4-mile swim

s...

, 112-mile bik e and 26.2-mil e run More than 2 ,500 from 2 5 countries a nd 42 states

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Come join the excitement as more than 100 teams converge on the Adirondacks for a long weekend of competition at the end of July. Saranac Lake welcomes competitors and spectators to our community.

GAME SCHEDULES Friday: Games will begin at 8:00 am and will be played in Saranac Lake Fields 1, 2, 3 Saturday: Games will begin at

8:00 am and will be played in Saranac Lake and Lake Placid ALL fields Sunday: Championship and

semi-final games will begin at 8:00 am and will be played in Saranac Lake & Bloomingdale Fields 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 13 For more details visit: canamrugby.com

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What started out as a small group of lacrosse players wanting to get together to play their favorite game has evolved into a 7-day event with over 230 teams participating! From scholastic contests to seniors, several thousand players and families converge here in Lake Placid for a week of fun competition, camaraderie and family vacations.

LOCATIONS

The games are contested on 13 playing fields at three separate venues.

• North Elba Athletic Fields, (Rt. 73, Recycle Circle) Fields 1-6

• Lake Placid Athletic Fields at the North Elba Horse Show Grounds: (Rt. 73) Fields 7-11

• Northwood School (Northwood Road) Fields 12-13

In 1990 just seven teams played 14 games…In 2016 a total of 550 games will be played during the week-long event! Teams from all over the continent participate in this international tournament. The public is encouraged to get out and see some of the action, Admission and parking are totally free.

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living the

ADK Life... pho to b y

Matt M cDonald

CHRIS MAZDZER | LP ANIMAL HOSPITAL | NOON MARK DINER 28  |  SIMPLY LAKE PLACID | SUMMER 2016

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Chris Mazdzer hasn’t spent more than 20 consecutive days in one location since 2014. He is always on the

move, from one adventure and racing opportunity to the next. One could argue he is chasing something and that is certainly true, he is chasing a dream. Since the age of 8 years old, Chris, now a two-time US Luge Olympian, has spent most of his days sliding, strategizing sliding, or doing supplementary training to support his sliding. Sliding is the verb that describes “doing luge.” Luge is one of the more obscure winter sports, especially in America where it is even less recognized and supported culturally. There are only 17 training tracks in the world and two in the United States: Park City, Utah and Lake Placid, NY. Chris was lucky enough to grow up in Saranac Lake, 8 miles from Lake Placid, and as a youngster who built go-carts, bike jumps, and sled launches in his yard, signing up for a local luge program was a great opportunity for this fearless and active young boy. Luge is practiced supine (face up), feet first, on a finely-tuned, precisely-engineered sled with carefully honed steel runners. Athletes steer the sled down with micro body movements to include leg pressure against the runners and subtle shifts of shoulder pressure. The only opportunity to accelerate the sled is the pull and paddle of the start, where explosive power and strength are the critical components. After the start, the rest of the time is spent on trying to maintain momentum through driving precise lines down the track. To maximize and maintain speed, athletes are trying to keep the sled within an inch or two of an imaginary line down the fastest most efficient path down the track. Every track has its own perfect line, as they are all unique in design.

WRITTEN BY MIM FRANTZ, PHOTOS BY NANCIE BATTAGLIA

Home Grown

There are 10 World Cup events per season, in different countries, which makes it critical that athletes train and compete thoughout the world. Conditions vary from day to day and track to track. The racers, propelled by gravity, descend a succession of iced curves on a twisting and turning concrete track. Sliders can reach speeds upwards of 90-miles per hour. To rise to the top of the field, it takes a fine-tuned body, mind and years upon years of experience. Chris who is now 27 years-old and has been training as part of the the US National Team for the last 12 years.

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I KNOW IT (LUGE) WON’T BE THERE FOREVER AND AT THE END OF THE DAY I AM NOT IN FOR THE FAME AND GLORY. “

As an athlete who in his spare time likes to seek out unique rock climbs where he free-solo’s, and cliff dives over the ocean in Thailand and motorbikes single track trails in Vietnam, Chris admits to being a thrill-seeker by nature. However, he describes himself as someone who takes risks, but very calculated risks. “My friends say I’m lucky that I haven’t been seriously hurt or killed, but I don’t think I’m lucky, I try to be smart,” he describes. Mark Twain once said, “Good judgment is the result of experience and experience the result of bad judgment.” This is a credo Chris says has helped guide him in life and in his Luge career. He describes that no two runs are ever the same and there are ever changing variables including weather, ice conditions, sled tuning, mental state, physical state etc. The more experienced you become as a slider, the more every little variable and correction counts. Chris explained, “When you start you're trying to figure out how to go straight and how not to hit a wall—as you develop you need to learn to be very perceptive and most of all adaptable.” Races are timed to a thousandth of a second, making luge one of the most precisely timed sports in the world. A minor driving error such as being an inch off that perfect line for a moment can be the difference of podium and 8th place. In the last year, Chris has become increasingly consistent and adaptable and able to find that perfect proverbial line. As a result of the World Cup competitions, he is currently ranked 3rd in the world. One highlight of his season was his first-ever World Cup victory at home in Lake Placid this past December. “I can still remember when Chris was named to the US Team, he was strong, dedicated, competitive and fearless. He has steadily improved over the past few years and certainly this year he has 30  |  SIMPLY LAKE PLACID | SUMMER 2016

defined himself as one of the best—in his current position, he should be definitely thinking about the podium for Korea (2018 Olympics), remarked Mark Grimmette, Luge Olympic medalist and US Luge Sport Program Director. “Being smart plays a big part. Most people have the pre-conceived notion to be involved in luge you have to be a renegade, but there is so much study and focus involved, it’s as cerebral as it is physical,” described Gordy Sheer, also a Luge Olympic medalist and US Luge Marketing Director. While earning much more than a Doctorate equivalent in his sport, Chris has also stayed on track with a formal education, a philosophy instilled by his parents (his father is a well known Neurologist is Saranac Lake). This year, Chris was able to close the laptop on several years of online study to proudly earn his Bachelors Degree and is planning on a future career in finance. Chris is proud of his results this past season and says its just starting to actually sink in. He also recognizes that it hasn’t come easy or been without sacrifice. He hasn’t been with family or “home” for a holiday in 15 years. It has been very hard to maintain relationships while traveling and immersed in such an intense environment. He has made his choices consciously, and wouldn’t trade it but admits it can get hard at times. Luckily, he really enjoys the adventure and the travel and when he finds himself with the rare time-off, he can be found visiting temples in Seoul or descending canyons in Utah. He is proud of the fact that these travels have allowed him immerse in many different cultures, it has “unified the world” for him.

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Chris thinks one of his biggest strengths is his positive attitude. After a bad run, on tough days, throughout the season and even over the years, it is this outlook that has allowed him to persevere. He summarized, “To feel this kind of success and return on my investment in Luge is amazing, I know it (luge) won’t be there forever

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and at the end of the day I am not in for the fame and glory. If I were, I picked the wrong sport. To medal in Korea (Olympics) and to lay it down when it counts, on the most visible world stage would definitely be my goal, then we’ll see what happens.” 

SUMMER 2016 | SIMPLY LAKE PLACID  | 31


Family Profile SARATOGAPHOTOGRAPHER.COM

Lake Placid

Animal Hospital L

HITEHIL

JENNA W TEN BY

ont at the fr nd y l s u io r e u his tail f pares for a week s g a w t Scou y pre ands. his famil g him in good h s a r e t n vin ext cou y are lea end the n p s l il w trip; the e ions. and h the drill is canine compan s w o n k t ith h Scou king laying w mes wal o c g o 2 days p d ther od aits, ano ed, she looks go w t u o c S As ly groom . out fresh nd she knows it a omes , a call c an w ie v r e t lanig he in are for t Allison F ay at p r. e r D p d I n s a d A sick dog another t a s t ju u o is b l. …it in a to action Animal Hospita in s g in r p id s Plac the Lake WRIT

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Dr Flanigan and one of her veterinary technicians, Danielle Brockway in surgery.

Leah Lamoy the in-house groomer.

Dr Flanigan going over an x-ray with a client.

O

riginally from Kinnelon, NJ, John and Allison moved to Warwick, NY located just outside of NYC. Living in a high populated area, they were able to find good jobs and provide their three children with a fun, comfortable lifestyle. While Allison worked in their community as a veterinarian, John owned a business with his brother and had to commute to Manhattan every day to work at the fish market. Though this was a passion of his, working at the fish market was quite demanding. It required working long days and was even dangerous at times. In 2003, they decided to buy a second home on Upper Saranac Lake to try and alleviate the stress of the city. The more they stayed at their camp, the more in love they fell with the area. Since John worked long days and slept the little time he was home, it left Allison with a full time job looking after their three children. For ten years they discussed leaving their hectic lifestyle in Warwick and moving up to Saranac Lake and in 2009, they finally did. With no real plan, the Flanigan family moved into their camp with the assumption that Allison would work at the local veterinary clinic. To their surprise, there was only one vet clinic, and it was quite far from their home. The more John and Allison discussed it, the clearer the idea became to open their own veterinary clinic. Within a few months of moving to the area, John and Allison purchased an old chiropractic office in Lake Placid. This was the perfect place to start a veterinary clinic since it was already set up with exam rooms. They began minor renovations in October 2009 and were able to open in January 2010. They quickly realized just how important this addition was to the community as there were people coming in asking when the clinic was opening while renovations were in progress. John and Allison both own and work within the Animal Hospital. With many years of experience, Allison became the sole veterinarian, while John used his 22 years of experience owning his own business to take on the role of office manager. The veterinary clinic takes domesticated animals (dogs and cats) and does everything from checkups to surgeries. There is never a shortage of patients which Allison was used to, but something she didn’t anticipate was having to take on more serious cases. Coming from a highly populated area, she could always refer an animal to a specialist, while in Lake Placid there is not that kind of luxury. Allison says that in a way it forced her to become a better veterinarian. She had to get good at emergency surgeries because if she does not perform them an animal could die; there simply are no other options. Allison says “There’s nothing that frightens me anymore” and in a way it has become a blessing for her. The new animal hospital poses some challenges, but nothing John and Allison can’t handle. Allison finds herself having to take emergency calls after closing hours which

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One of the kennel staff, Gwen loving on a boarding dog.

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SaratogaPhotographer.com

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neither of them had anticipated. Once again, they quickly realized how a smaller community differs from the city they were used to. There is no emergency clinic animals can go to, leaving Allison with the responsibility to answer these calls. Though it sometimes takes her away from her family, Allison wants to do everything possible to provide for the community even if that means bringing her phone in a plastic bag with her to go kayaking. This love for the community spreads through her entire family as they are all supportive of her dedication. In fact, they are still able to have plenty of bonding time and enjoy the area. After all, that is why they moved up here.

Vet tech, Danielle in the lab.

Brianna walking a doggy day care dog.

Allison says that she and her family love to experience the outdoors and the activities that come with living in Lake Placid. Her children have recently begun mountain biking as well as Nordic skiing. Allison says that living here and being connected to nature is part of who you are. She realizes the passion people have living here, and the impact it has had on her and her family. John and Allison love having their children grow up in such a beautiful community and have absolutely no regrets starting the new chapter of their lives here. Though they loved the area prior to moving, the Flanigan family has a new-found appreciation for Lake Placid now that they are able to experience it as part of the community. It can be stressful and time-consuming, but John and Allison make it work because they know that for their clients, there is no other alternative. Every decision they make regarding the Animal Hospital revolves around accommodating the people of their community. Due to the high demand, John and Allison have recently hired another veterinarian to assist in clinical appointments. Every d However, they ecisi they on do offer many make regar the A services other ding nimal than clinical visits Hospi revol such as grooming, ta v boarding, and accom es aroun l a Puppy Play d modat ing t Group. The Animal peopl he e of Hospital also keeps their a cat up for adoption commu nity. in the waiting room to assist the Tri-Lakes Humane Society and have helped place about 20 cats since they opened. John and Allison adopted all of these services because, over time, they found that the area didn’t really offer them. They strive to have the Animal Hospital be a place that will meet all the needs of the animals they take care of. Having such a strong sense of community was something the Flanigan family was not able to experience in the city. Living in Lake Placid has made them proud to be a part of this community and work towards helping the people they walk alongside in any way that they can. 

Dr. Flanigan examining a dog. 36  |  SIMPLY LAKE PLACID | SUMMER 2016

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ADIRONDACK DIVISION Rail Explorers and the Adirondack Scenic Railroad invite you to enjoy a 6 mile one way journey through the Forever Wild Adirondack Park. Explore the spectacular Lake Colby Causeway, glide through majestic mountain forests and meadows, past the secluded McCauley Pond, and alongside the beautiful Lake Clear. All tickets include a complimentary shuttle bus return. The tour takes approximately 90 mins on the rails, and the shuttle ride is another 30mins, so please allow at least 2 hours in your day for this activity.

ADK SUMMER SCHEDULE Rail Explorers Adirondack Division will be open 7 days per week from June 18 to Sept 5 (Labor Day) We offer 6 tours per day between Saranac Lake and Lake Clear. Tours Depart Saranac Lake at 8:30am, 12:30pm, 4:30pm Tours Depart Lake Clear at 10:30am, 2:30pm, 6:30pm Reservations are available online, or call our Saranac Lake office on 518-460-1444 42 Depot St, Saranac Lake New York, 12983 Tel: (518) 460 1444 www.railexplorers.net saratogaTODAYnewspaper.com

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Noon Mark Diner STORY & PHOTOS BY MATT MCDONALD

NOT A PIE FAN?

The Noon Mark also serves breakfast, lunch and dinner with homemade breads, pastries and jams. On a hot day, spring for the soft serve! 38  |  SIMPLY LAKE PLACID | SUMMER 2016

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There Will

Be Pie... Swing by Keene Valley’s

NOON MARK DINER for a slice of Adirondack lore

A

homemade New York diner with national rapport located in a town with more elevation than people? Pie in the sky.

Literally. The Noon Mark Diner, located on Route 73 in Keene Valley, has built a reputation in the last 35 years—and not just among locals. Sure, there are the Adirondack Trail Improvement Society kiddos and aspiring 46ers who crave pie after their mountain adventures and the backcountry skiers who wolf a slice for breakfast. But then there are the regulars in Alaska and Hawaii.

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For 15 years, the Noon Mark has shipped custom orders to pie mongers in all 50 states. In a business marked by relatively minimal change since its 1981 opening, the expanded market has helped the Noon Mark weather the challenges for a small business in the Adirondack backwaters, from bureaucratic policy shifts to upand-down tourism to occasional competition. Over a 10-month stretch in 2015, owner and founder Lola Porter says the Noon Mark turned out more than 12,000 pies.

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Porter counts on warm-weather boons to balance the cold months. While pie sales hit 200 per day in summer, she can be forced to borrow money in long winters. Altogether, Noon Mark pie comes in more than 30 flavors, most offered with regular or crumb crust. Lola says after three decades, only three people know the entire recipe, which she’s adapted into a gluten-free version. My friends in Colorado choose strawberry rhubarb, a perennial favorite, while Jan Wellford, a Keene Valley athlete who holds the High Peaks speed record, prefers blueberry crumb. As Lola schemes a paint job and locals in puffy jackets and hiking boots seat themselves in the dining room, her granddaughter Mindy refills my coffee and drops off my slice of raspberry rhubarb crumb, cut from the boxed pie I’ll bring back to Plattsburgh. Mindy goes with raspberry crumb— until the kitchen cooks up an apple raspberry cheese special. Before I leave, a guy I camped with over the winter stops at my table to say hello. Then another. Mindy laughs with customers at the end of the counter. Lola tells me her favorite pie is a custard version she sometimes cooks up in summer—one she doesn’t ship.

...Guess you'll have to come in and try that one for yourself! 

40  |  SIMPLY LAKE PLACID | SUMMER 2016

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PHOTO BY LINDA CUSMA

H&G

ARCHITECTURALLY SPEAKING | TREE HOUSE | FARM TO FORK saratogaTODAYnewspaper.com

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Architec 42  |  SIMPLY LAKE PLACID | SUMMER 2016

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cturally SPEAKING

Follow us as we explore some of the area's unique spaces...

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WRITTEN BY DAVID DELOZIER, PHOTOS BY LINDA CUSMA

Crafting a Legacy

a Great Camp for the 21st Century The Adirondacks have long been the playground for the rich and famous. The turn of the 20th century saw the construction of many luxury wilderness outposts, now known as the Great Camps. William West (WW) Durant is known as the father of the great camp style, fashioning the rustic style from the indigenous wood and stone to create Camp Pine Knot and Camp Sagamore at Raquette Lake. Here, the industrialists and banking magnates of the day would escape the hustle and bustle of their city lives to relax with family and friends, and play hunter and fisherman in the abundant woods and lakes.

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The allure of the woods and the waters that drew the well-heeled over one hundred years ago still apply today. And the rustic style that WW Durant envisioned lives on in the new era of Great Camps being built here at the turn of the 21st century. Lake Placid has become a hotbed of activity for the new era of great camp construction. Host to two legendary Olympic rounds, the village nestled within the High Peaks is an international destination, and attracts those who desire a wilderness escape but also want a little more social interaction than in Durant’s day. And with Mirror Lake at its front yard and Lake Placid in the backyard, with mighty Whiteface Mountain as the backdrop, it’s easy to see why the village of Lake Placid is the address of choice for those who want it all. Mirror Lake Drive, which encircles the lake of its namesake, is the target locale for the new Great Camps of the 21st Century. The older homes are slowly being razed and replaced by a new vision of the old Great Camp style. The estate at 134 Mirror Lake Avenue is perhaps the finest example of this new-meets-old fusion. Nestled on a private

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peninsula jutting into scenic Mirror Lake, yet just a short, minutes-long walk from the heart of beautiful Lake Placid Village, this manor home is an architectural wonder, a marvel of ultramodern technology, and a stunning example of elegant decor. Just as Durant did in his day, the owners sought out the best of Adirondack craftsmen to create a masterpiece of modern style and function, while paying homage to the old-school rustic heritage of the Great Camps. Brilliantly designed by visionary architect Andrew Chary of Saranac Lake, built to detailed specifications by Peter Moles of Cascade Builders, and impeccably decorated by renowned interior designer (and founding light of the Adirondack Style Renaissance) Ann Stillman O’Leary, this exquisite property is undoubtedly one of the most unique and beautiful homes you will find anywhere in the Adirondacks, if not the world. The home was built from the ground up in 2005 on the tidy parcel — slightly under one acre, with 325 feet of lakefront shoreline — after plans to renovate the original house located on the grounds were abandoned, in favor of a brand new project. And undoubtedly that project has achieved its goal in spectacular fashion. Nothing has been overlooked in creating a domestic paradise which is at once private, but not secluded; elegant, yet casual; classic, yet completely modern. The home is large (11,000 sf), yet retains an intimacy within its multitude of rooms so that each space is comfortable and homey. Centerpiece to the home is the Great Room, with a floor to high vaulted ceiling window wall that exposes a majestic saratogaTODAYnewspaper.com

view out onto Mirror Lake. A massive native stone fireplace to the right provides a sense of warmth and strength to offset the adjacent open exposure. Hand-hewn mortise and tenon beams hold up the all wooden ceiling, from which hang custom black iron chandeliers made by the Chicken Coop Forge. The Great Room flows naturally into the home to encompass the kitchen and dining area. To the left is a circular sitting perch that allows for a more intimate view outward to the native landscaped yard and lake below. It’s the perfect place to sit and enjoy the morning coffee! To access the upper and lower floors, one has a choice to make. A custom crafted wrought iron staircase with railings designed and handmade by local metallurgist David DeSantis seems the obvious choice, as it commands attention right there in the great room. But for those who may be weary from the walk back and forth downtown, the central glass-enclosed elevator may be the better choice. A push of a button is all it takes to glide between floors and to take in the majesty of all the craftsmanship along the way. There are six bedrooms in all, each with on-suite baths. Careful attention was given to each to maximize the natural lighting and the view to Mirror Lake. The master suite boasts a commanding view of Mirror Lake and the distant High Peaks beyond. Double French doors can be thrown open to let in the mountain breezes, giving an open air feeling to the intimate space. Like in the Great Room, a sitting porch is adjacent to the big-view window wall, this one featuring a woodstove that will beat back the chill of the long Adirondack winters. SUMMER 2016 | SIMPLY LAKE PLACID  | 45


The two garden level bedrooms feature hideaway Murphy beds so as to maximize functionality and space. The upper floor guest bedrooms are directly accessible from the sitting area overlooking the Great Room. Each bedroom has its own bath, appointed with custom tilework and luxury bath fixtures. While the views are the main event in this house, entertainment is a close second on the “wow” meter. The Olympic Game Room is named for the custom wood carved panels featuring the winter Olympic sporting events, lovingly produced by sculptor John Bryan of Yarmouth, Maine. A billiard table, card room and wet bar will keep the adults happy here. Custom light fixtures by Peter Fillerup of

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Wild West Studios illuminate the space. Down on the garden level is a second game room with foosball, ping-pong and another wet bar. Here the children can let loose in their own space. For those who want the ultimate in relaxation, there is also a spa room in which to unwind. Special fog-proof glass ensures that the killer view remains unimpeded whilst the steamy tub soothes your body. The attention to detail and craftsmanship of the interior extends into the outdoor living space as well. From the Garden Level, a spectacular handcrafted stone patio with gas fireplace and built-in propane grill make for the perfect summer chill space. Custom wrought iron railings and metalwork surround the patio, painstakingly crafted by Agost Raulli of Raulli’s Ironworks. From the patio, a walking path descends down to the custom boathouse at the water’s edge. Mirror Lake is regulated to restrict motorized boats – with an exception for electric motors. In one of the two bays is the owner’s electric boat, which quietly tours the placid waters without disruption of peace and tranquility. With its old world craftsmanship and timeless design, this modern Great Camp is akin to its cousins of the Durant era; however, being a modern incarnation, it has all the bells and whistles of today’s technology. There is a state-of-the-art Lutron control system for

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all the lighting; a deluxe Crestron media control system that pipes music throughout the home and outdoor spaces; a Kaleidescape media system with over 500 movies makes every room a home theater; radiant floor heating for maximum comfort in any season; and yes, Wi-Fi throughout the home. In a word, this place is “amazing.” WW Durant himself would be amazed to see this 21st century version of what he started. And he’d be equally amazed at what the modern day Adirondack craftsmen can do, using the same natural materials that he used to fashion the rustic style that he dreamed up from these Adirondack woods and waters.  Interested in making this place your place? It’s available now at Select Sotheby’s Realty. Go to lakeplacidestate.com for a video tour.

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Build It

and They Will Come

WRITTEN BY CHAD BEATTY, PHOTOS BY JORDAN CRAIG

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T

Tucked into the Adirondack Mountains is a 47 acre compound aptly named Casa Di Paradiso, or House of Paradise. The owners of this Lake Placid estate are Michele and Ron Riggi of Saratoga Springs, NY. The compound, which has grown over the thirty years they have owned it, is as unique and creative as the owners themselves. During that time, a 70-foot underground tunnel was constructed that connects the main house to the guest house so everyone stays warm in the frigid winter temperatures. After that, two more homes were built for their growing family and friends to stay on the compound without having to travel. Other fun projects they built are an indoor hot tub, a toboggan run for outdoor winter fun, a tennis court for hot summer days, and both an indoor and outdoor shooting range. The newest addition to this family estate, pictured throughout these pages, is a one-of-a-kind custom built treehouse by Scheefers Adirondack Builders. “We always wanted a lookout tower, but that wasn’t possible… so the next best was a tree house!” said Michele. If you want the exclusive first look inside this treehouse paradise, be sure to pick up the winter edition of Simply… Lake Placid magazine.

Due out - November 2016. 

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Stats:

• 30 feet high at the top step • 45 feet high at the roof peak • Two flights of stairs, totaling 35 steps. • 320 square feet inside • 6 months to build (excluding the winter months, only fall and spring) PHOTOS BY JORDAN CRAIG

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Farm to Fork. DUE WEST PHOTOGRAPHY

Fledging Crow WRITTEN BY JENNA WHITEHILL

B

ased in Keeseville, NY, Fledging Crow has provided the Lake Placid area with unique, fresh vegetables since 2008. They produce a wide range of veggies from heirloom tomatoes to specialty Asian greens. Their vegetables are distributed to five different farmers' markets as well as a multitude of other vendors through the local CSA. For Fledging Crow, location plays a big role in the farm’s success. With such a high tourist population in Lake Placid, they are able to distribute a large amount of vegetables to the area each year. Also, alongside their five greenhouses, the higher temperatures of the Champlain Valley provide a longer growing season which is both rare and valuable in the North Country.

www.fledgingcrow.com 122 Robare Rd, Keeseville, NY 12944 54  |  SIMPLY LAKE PLACID | SUMMER 2016

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Farm to Fork. DUE WEST PHOTOGRAPHY

Sugar House T Creamery WRITTEN BY JENNA WHITEHILL

he Sugar House Creamery lies on a quaint farm in Upper Jay and works year-round to provide the Lake Placid area with decadent, all-natural cheeses. This farmstead creamery rests on twenty-five acres which is plenty of land for the twelve head of cattle that are milked here. Located in the high peaks, there is not a lot of farmland, though for the Brown Swiss cattle raised on the farm, this presents no challenge. Brown Swiss cattle, originally from Switzerland, are used to the weather and terrain the high peaks have to offer. This allows the Sugar House Creamery to produce different flavors of cheese each season that are specific to the Upper Jay area.

www.sugarhousecreamery.com 18 Sugar House Way, Upper Jay, NY 12987 56  |  SIMPLY LAKE PLACID | SUMMER 2016

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Farm to Fork. DUE WEST PHOTOGRAPHY

Juniper Hill WRITTEN BY JENNA WHITEHILL

B

ased in Westport, NY, Juniper Hill provides vegetables to the businesses and people living in northern New York. The 700 member CSA they work with allows their vegetables to be distributed across multiple counties and farmer’s markets. Summer is the busiest time of year for the farm with 50 acres of certified vegetable and one acre of greenhouses to assist in a longer growing season. The weather of Upstate New York does present a challenge for vegetable farms, but Juniper Hill is happy to have clean air and clean water which others are not so fortunate to have. Coming up on their 7th year in business, Juniper Hill is proud to provide safe and fresh vegetables to Lake Placid and the surrounding communities.

juniperhillfarmcsa.com 82 Loukes Rd, Wadhams, NY 12993 58  |  SIMPLY LAKE PLACID | SUMMER 2016

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Farm to Fork. DUE WEST PHOTOGRAPHY

Asgaard Farm WRITTEN BY JENNA WHITEHILL

T

he Asgaard Farm is known for its healthy agricultural practices in raising all of the animals and producing delectable cheeses. The farm is home to 52 goats that are milked every spring all the way through December. Throughout the year, the milk produces a wide variety of cheeses that are distributed throughout multiple farmers' markets, stores, and even local restaurants. The farm was purchased in 1988 and has only improved every year since. At its core, the farm has a deep appreciation for producing pure, all-natural products and loves providing these products for the surrounding communities.

www.asgaardfarm.com 74 Asgaard Way, Au Sable Forks, NY 12912 60  |  SIMPLY LAKE PLACID | SUMMER 2016

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Got Mounta photos by Kevin McAvey

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Yes, we do!

ains?

HIKING | CAMPING | SLIDE SCIENCE saratogaTODAYnewspaper.com

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Take a Walk: 5

FAVORITE DAY-HIKES IN THE HIGH PEAKS

WRITTEN BY MATT McDONALD, PHOTOS BY MATT McDONALD AND KEVIN McAVEY

From classic vistas and elegant waterfalls to alpine summits with panoramic views, the High Peaks region offers a rich supply of day-trip options.

CLEMENTS POND ROUND-TRIP DISTANCE: 3 miles DIFFICULTY: Easy PAYOFF: Secluded ponds PARKING: Free, Styles Brook Rd.

Easy

This mellow out-and-back hike is an unsuspecting gem. You’ll find more beaver activity than crowds. Cut in 2010, the trail climbs gradually from Styles Brook Road (off 9N between Keene and Upper Jay) through white pines and intersecting brooks to a ridge at 1,750 feet. Enjoy a water break alongside impressive cliffs before descending switchbacks through dense trees to the peaceful alcove of Clements Pond. Brave the makeshift rowboat—complete with duct-taped leaks and coffee cans for bailing—on the pond’s north end, or bask in the sun while the pup takes a dip. (Hint: Fancy yourself an angler? The 2.6-acre pond has been stocked with brook trout.) 64  |  SIMPLY LAKE PLACID | SUMMER 2016

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Moder

ate

INDIAN HEAD AND RAINBOW FALLS ROUND-TRIP DISTANCE: 11 miles DIFFICULTY: Moderate PAYOFF: Views of the Ausable Lakes and one of the ADK’s tallest waterfalls PARKING: Free, St. Huberts parking area/trailheads (Adirondack Mountain Reserve) Walk up Ausable Club Road and hang a left onto Lake Road in front of the clubhouse. From here, it’s a nip over three miles to your turnoff. If that sounds like a lot of dirt road, hang in there. You’re headed for two of the Adirondacks’ most majestic (and photogenic) features. Before you reach the boathouse, you’ll leave the road and follow a short trail to the base of Rainbow Falls, where Cascade Brook tumbles 150 feet into the gorge below. Yes, you’ll probably get misted. Next, head back to the road and climb 700 vertical feet to the Indian Head promontory. With Lower Ausable Lake far below and Upper Ausable Lake glistening in the distance, you’re allowed at least one selfie. Rather than retracing your steps, descend via the Gill Brook trail for more waterfalls. (Hint: If you can spare the time and leg power, hike 0.25 miles beyond Indian Head to Fish Hawk Cliffs, where you’ll look back at the Indian’s head.)

NOONMARK MOUNTAIN Moderate

ROUND-TRIP DISTANCE: 5.6 miles DIFFICULTY: Moderate PAYOFF: Vast, exposed summit surrounded by 46ers. PARKING: Free, St. Huberts parking area/ trailheads (Adirondack Mountain Reserve) From the trail register across from the Ausable Club fairways, follow a private driveway for 0.2 miles before bearing right onto an old forest road. Gaining 2,175 vertical feet along 2.4 miles, the trail meanders through open hardwoods before climbing into cedar corridors carpeted with lush moss. Noonmark is one of the most scenic non-46ers in the region, and you’ll earn the 360-degree views as you top a series of rock ramps in the last quarter mile. On the summit (3,556 ft.), claim your lunch rock and kick back. (Hint: Flat-topped boulders on the south end of the summit make prime yoga spots.)

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Advan

ced

DIX MOUNTAIN

ROUND-TRIP DISTANCE: 13.6 miles DIFFICULTY: Advanced PAYOFF: Possible views of the Great Range, Green Mountains (VT) and White Mountains (NH) PARKING: Free, Round Pond/Dix Mountain Trailhead, Rt. 73 At 4,867 feet, Dix is the sixth highest High Peak, and many 46ers consider it one of their favorite summits. The trail from Route 73 climbs around Round Pond and follows the Boquet River on rolling terrain past more ponds, open meadows and myriad tree species. At 4.2 miles, the trail steepens after the Boquet River Lean-to as it heads for the slides on Dix’s north face. The last 1,600 vertical feet are arduous, with eroded rock underfoot and exceedingly steep grades. When you reach it, the narrow summit ridge feels gloriously remote, and it’s frequented by fewer people than some others of the highest 46er summits. Bottom line: This varied hike is a must-do if you’ve got the drive—and shoes—for it. (Hint: For aspiring 46ers looking to knock off all five summits in the Dix Range, approach from the south via Elk Lake Road.)

Advan

ced

MACINTYRE RANGE AND AVALANCHE PASS ROUND-TRIP DISTANCE: 12.1 miles DIFFICULTY: Advanced PAYOFF: Two (or three) 46er summits and one (or two) lakes. PARKING: $10, Adirondack Loj

Follow the trail from the Adirondack Loj 3.5 miles to the 4,587-foot summit of Wright Peak. Though not a mandatory stop, Wright serves as a serene spot for a break and offers a prime portrait of the day’s high point: 5,114-foot Algonquin Peak, one of only two Adirondack mountains to eclipse 5,000 feet of elevation. Less than a mile later, when you crest the state’s second-highest summit, you’ll find a bald expanse of curved rock and endangered alpine vegetation to go with an up-close look at the scarred north face of Mount Colden. If you found crowds on the way up, you’ll lose most of them from here—the 2.1-mile descent to Lake Colden is steep and secluded. When you reach the trail junction below 3,000 feet, hang a left and navigate the craggy shoreline of the iconic Avalanche Lake. A last photoshoot at the muddy beach on the lake’s northeast side and a final climb to Avalanche Pass, and it’s all downhill to the car. (Hint: Add a summit and a lake by extending your route to Iroquois Peak and around Lake Colden.)  66  |  SIMPLY LAKE PLACID | SUMMER 2016

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Set Your Sights On

46!

If you’re ready to take your hiking to a new level, or want to begin your ‘Bucket List’

keep reading... A 46er is someone who has climbed the summits of the 46 peaks over 4,000 feet in elevation in the Adirondack Mountains of northern New York State. Climbing the 46 is about more than just receiving a patch for the accomplishment. It is a personal challenge that will reward you with memories and friendships that will last a lifetime. The history of the 46ers dates back to the 1920s, when only twelve of the 46 peaks had trails, and when one could spend all day hiking, and not see another person. Since then over 7,000 people have registered their climbs to become Adirondack 46ers. If you choose to take on this adventure, just remember to climb safely and respect the environment. Want to become a 46er? Go to: adk46er.org. You will be assigned a correspondent who serves as a mentor throughout your quest to become a 46er.

If you carry it in, carry it out.

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One of the advantages of hiking during the summer is the opportunity to munch on the wild berries that often grow in grassy areas on the side of the trails and on some of the open summits. This is especially true on the upper slopes of Blueberry Mountain in Keene Valley.

Leave no trace.

The 46 Peaks: Rank

Mountain

Elevation (ft.)

Rank

Mountain

Elevation (ft.)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Marcy Algonquin Haystack Skylight Whiteface Dix Gray Iroquois Peak Basin Gothics Colden Giant Nippletop Santanoni Redfield Wright Peak Saddleback Panther TableTop Rocky Peak Macomb Armstrong Hough

5344 5114 4960 4926 4867 4857 4840 4840 4827 4736 4714 4627 4620 4607 4606 4580 4515 4442 4427 4420 4405 4400 4400

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46

Seward Marshall Allen Big Slide Esther Upper Wolf Jaw Lower Wolf Jaw Street Phelps Donaldson Seymour Sawteeth Cascade South Dix Porter Colvin Emmons Dial Grace Peak Blake Peak Cliff Nye Couchsachraga

4361 4360 4340 4240 4240 4185 4175 4166 4161 4140 4120 4100 4098 4060 4059 4057 4040 4020 4012 3960 3960 3895 3820

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Camping 101:

How to sleep outside in the High Peaks and Northern Adirondacks — and love it. WRITTEN & PHOTOGRAPHED BY MATT McDONALD

P

resident, adventurer and naturalist Theodore Roosevelt wrote, “There are no words that can tell the hidden spirit of the wilderness that can reveal its mystery, its melancholy and its charm.” As an outdoor writer more than a century later, I can attest that people are still trying to describe the wonder of the wilderness. More importantly, after a couple of industrial and technological revolutions, they’re still going outside. Almost half of all Americans (142.4 million) participated in some outdoor activity in 2015, according to the Outdoor Foundation. The top-ranked aspirational activity among non-participants? CAMPING. So for people itching to go sleep in the woods, good news: As one of the most spectacular and well-protected regions in the country, the Adirondacks offer true—and accessible—wilderness. The honey-dipped shores of the Saranac Lakes at sunset, the rugged vistas of the High Peaks. Chances are, you’ll get hooked. But keep in mind: Wilderness isn’t always the elegant muse Roosevelt described. Just swallow your first blackfly or trudge through your first downpour. As vice president in 1901, Teddy learned of William McKinley’s imminent death at Lake Tear of the Clouds on Mt. Marcy and became president in the Adirondack backcountry. In the woods, unpredictable happens—along with the most memorable moments.

Welcome to Camping 101. saratogaTODAYnewspaper.com

Camping Rules and Guidelines - The Basics -Camping is prohibited within 150 feet of any road, trail or body of water except at areas designated by a “camp here” disk. -Lean-tos are available on a first come first served basis and can’t be used exclusively. -Use pit privies provided near popular camping areas and trailheads. If none are available, dispose of human waste by digging a hole 6”-8” deep at least 150 feet from water or campsites. Cover with leaves and soil. -Do not use soap to wash yourself, clothing or dishes within 150 feet of water. -Leave plants and wildlife undisturbed. -Don’t feed wildlife. -Camping is prohibited above 4,000 of elevation between December 15 and April 30. Find the full list at dec.ny.gov. SUMMER 2016 | SIMPLY LAKE PLACID  | 69


Choosing Your Style To plan your first camping trip, start with two basic questions: Where will you camp, and how will you get there? For most people, this means choosing between car camping—pitching your tent near or next to your vehicle— and the graduated rucksack approach known as primitive camping. While the former requires fewer logistics and less attention to detail, the latter can give you more places to go and fewer neighbors once you arrive.

By Car

Car camping is an accessible, low-risk way for inexperienced campers to enjoy the Adirondack Park. Look for campgrounds, where you’ll be able to park your vehicle at a designated tent site, owned and operated by the Department of Environmental Conservation. You’ll find amenities beyond the picnic table and fire pit. DEC campgrounds include flush toilets or outhouses, day-use areas, firewood for sale, boat launches and, in some cases, hot showers. Campgrounds charge an overnight fee, typically in the $17$22 range.

By Foot

Ditching the car means you’ll need to carry camp in a backpack (and a couple totes if the walk is short). While more demanding than the campground approach, primitive camping offers the potential for greater variety and adventure, along with the chance to make your own destination. As long as you’re on state-owned Forest Preserve land, you can pitch your tent just about anywhere—and the Wilderness and Wild Forest areas near Saranac Lake, Lake Placid and Keene Valley cover more than 450,000 acres.

Camping 101: The Gear Whether you’re a newbie or a grizzled old-timer with a dusty aluminum-frame backpack in the garage, the myriad options in today’s camping gear could overwhelm your ambition. Consider how you’ll be camping. You don’t need a self-inflating, ultralight sleeping pad at a campground, but it will save space and weight for long trips with a full pack. Keep things simple. Start with the essentials. Then spring for gadgets that will make the experience easier and more fun. This isn’t the DMV—it’s camping.

The Essentials A TENT. If you only plan to car camp, you have the freedom to be decadent. Look for models that will give you enough space, and consider getting a tent with a capacity greater than your group size. You can take the same approach for primitive camping, but you also need to consider packaged weight and packed size. The tent should fit in your pack with the rest of your gear and weigh no more than three pounds per person. Let the kiddos give it a test run in the backyard so you can practice setting it up. A GROUND CLOTH. The ground cloth, or footprint, lays between your tent and the ground, providing extra protection from rocks, pinecones and the elements. A tarp or sheet of plastic works well for car camping, and many backpacking tents come with an integrated footprint. A SLEEPING BAG. Sleeping bags are rated for various temperatures, so pick a bag that’s designed for temps at least 10 degrees colder than the chilliest night you’ll camp. It’s easier to unzip a 20-degree bag on a warm night than to make a 40-degree bag warmer. Look at mummystyle for versatility. A SLEEPING PAD. The smaller it packs, the better—unless you’re car camping, where full-on air mattresses are fair game. Aim for a packed size smaller than your sleeping bag. A BACKPACK. For primitive camping, you need a pack that fits comfortably and carries what you need it to. Try it on before you close the deal, and make sure you get the right capacity. A 40- to 50-liter model should do the trick. Go bigger for extended trips. LIGHT. To avoid tripping over roots on your way to a midnight pee, make sure you’re well-equipped with light (and extra batteries). 70  |  SIMPLY LAKE PLACID | SUMMER 2016

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Headlamps are golden, and solar-powered lanterns come in all shapes and sizes.

WATER. At campgrounds, you should have access to water taps (so don’t forget some bottles or jugs). Carrying water adds weight fast, so for primitive camping, plan to boil water or invest in a purification system. Some models use a filter, like the Katadyn Hiker Microfilter ($74.95, katadyn.com), while the SteriPEN Adventurer Opti ($89.95, steripen.com) purifies water with UV light.

The Extras You’ll find more gadgets in a camping section than in a James Bond movie. Some accessories will legitimately improve your experience—but not all of them. Here are some winners.

THE MULTITOOL. You’ve seen the basic Swiss Army knife, but have you seen the version with 14 features, including can opener, screwdriver and corkscrew? Numerous companies sell similar tools. Have fun with this one. THE SHELTER. Rain falls regularly in the Adirondacks, and a pop-up shelter or lightweight tarp means you don’t have to sit in the tent when it does. THE TABLE. Most campground sites include picnic tables, but out in the woods, you could be left fixing dinner on a log. Check out lightweight, collapsable options like the Helinox Camping Table ($128, helinox.com). Cupholders included. THE STUFF SACKS. Available in all sizes and colors, these organizational wizards will keep your clothes separate from your kitchen. Spring for the waterproof models. THE CHAIR. If you don’t want to settle for a picnic table bench or log, check out portable camping chairs. You may not need to look further than the Crazy Creek Original Chair ($50.50, crazycreek.com).

Camping 101: The Fare If you’re new to the camp meal scene, you’re about to get in on a secret. Food tastes better when you’re outside, especially after you hike trails or paddle a kayak. With a fire pit and cooking grate—and a car to carry cookware—you could have a full kitchen at a campground. And although you may have to forgo the cast iron skillet and huevos rancheros, the backcountry should be no less delectable.

The Lowdown Do not pass go, do not make your first camp—until you understand the do’s and don’ts. You shouldn’t be camping if you can’t do it responsibly. This means carrying out what you carry in, the “leave no trace” approach, and following general DEC rules and guidelines and posted regulations at state campgrounds.

Be safe. Have fun. And welcome to the wild. 

Where to Gear Up The Mountaineer 1866 NYS Route 73, Keene Valley Eastern Mountain Sports 2453 Main Street,

What’s for Dinner?

High Peaks Cyclery

YOU’LL NEED: -a campfire burned to a bed of coals -a roll of aluminum foil -tongs -a knife -a cutting surface -plates or bowls -your choice of vegetables, meat, etc. -a cooler (optional)

Lake Placid

2733 Main Street, Lake Placid

TRY THIS CAMPGROUND FAVORITE: Foil dinners.

Chop assorted veggies and wrap them in foil with sauces, spices, bread and so on. Foil dinners allow creativity—I cooked up half a leftover turkey club with barbecue sauce, onions, carrots, potatoes and mushrooms. Close any gaps in the foil, and place the wrapped goodies on the bed of coals. After about ten minutes, carefully flip the foil with the tongs. When the contents of the foil are cooked through, unwrap the package onto a plate and enjoy with your favorite brew (here’s a vote for Saranac Pale Ale). saratogaTODAYnewspaper.com

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Slide Science STORY BY MATT MCDONALD, PHOTOS BY FRANCIS ZUBER

Hiker said to the mountain:

““Hey, where'’d you get that scar“”

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T

hick thunderheads choked Giant Mountain on June 29, 1963, but the loudest rumble didn’t come from the sky. When afternoon showers became evening tumult, dumping more than six inches of rain on Giant’s 4,626-foot summit, mud, trees and boulders tumbled 325 feet over Roaring Brook Falls. Picture it next time you snap photos from Route 73 of the falls, now flanked by sheer rock, and the peak’s west face, bruised and scarred. Slides, these swaths of exposed mountainside, mark the Adirondack landscape. Tour the High Peaks region, from the Whiteface gondola to any view of the Great Range, and you can’t

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miss them. Equally as characteristic, though, are the conditions that form the slides—notoriously thin soil on top of smooth anorthosite, an igneous rock also found on the Moon, clinging to steep slopes. It’s a simple formula. When heavy rain saturates the soil, the resulting mush moves downhill on the waterslide below. Trees and rocks in the slide path take a ride. Fortunately for hikers, precipitation, though common, rarely reaches the magnitude needed to wash away hillsides. Records indicate that rain fell at a rate near three inches per hour on that Saturday in ’63. In 2011, Tropical Storm Irene poured more than seven inches of rain onto the High Peaks, swamping the Keene area and clearing more slides. Curt Stager, professor of natural sciences at Paul Smith’s College, says these and a few other recent rain events aside, most slides probably date to the end of the last ice age around 12,000 years ago. “When the land was coming out from under the ice sheets, there would have been more slides happening,” he says. And because the valley below Giant was a lake at the time, the ice age also left conditions for another kind of slide. When snowmelt and heavy rain permeated clay-rich soil on a low elevation slope of

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Little Porter Mountain, 82 acres of soil and rock began sliding slowly—a few inches to a foot per day—and damaged several homes in Adrian’s Acres outside Keene Valley. A land shift rather than a washout. Stager says that because clay is slippery when wet, clay-rich soil becomes unstable when water saturates it. “You can find clay in the soil at lower elevations with lake or ocean deposits,” he says. “You find it a lot around Montreal and Lake Champlain.” But being wary of the ingredients and possible locations for slides wouldn’t make predicting where they will occur an exact science—or anything close. Stager says that’s especially true for the high-elevation variety. “We’d have to know the peaks under their skin in a way we don’t know,” he says. “We can expect more slides during the next big rainfall.”

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If there’s a silver lining to slides, beyond some mystical quality they add to New York’s most wild place, it’s the outdoor recreation they can attract. Roaring Brook Falls has become a classic climb. Bennies Brook Slide serves as a ramp up Lower Wolfjaw that some people find more interesting than the trail. A narrow Irene-born slide on Mount Colden called The Couloir beckons backcountry skiers. The North Face of Gothics Mountain offers a playground for multisport mountaineers. Several guiding services offer courses and trips built around adventuring on slides.

So whether they Fill you with ambition or dread, slides tell the story of the mountains we love—and they’ll evoke bolder Floods to do it. 

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Maya & Manny Valentin

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Our Story WRITTEN BY JENNA WHITEHILL, PHOTOS BY MONICA DONOVAN, EVE EVENT PHOTOGRAPHY

Marriage can be a life-changing decision that requires a lot of thought and a lot of love. For Maya and Manny Valentin, the decision to get married came as a mutual agreement. It would only bring them closer together which became a focal point of their wedding. It was very important to both of them that they kept Manny’s mother’s maiden name, Valentin, which they honored by getting married on Valentine’s Day. Since they wanted to bring the two families together at a winter wedding, Lake Placid became the ideal destination. It allowed both Maya and Manny’s family members to meet through fun outdoor activities. Having a wedding in the Adirondacks, however, can come with its challenges which Maya and Manny were unfortunate to experience. The activities they had planned for their families surrounding the day of the wedding were all canceled due to such frigid temperatures. Also, the morning of their wedding Smoke Signals had a flood which is where their reception was arranged to be held. Though this sounds like a terrible start to their wedding, it turned out that they couldn’t have picked a better place to have it. A few hours after receiving the news of the flood, Maya and Manny got a phone call saying Smoke Signals would still cater for them, and the location was moved to the High Peaks Resort. As for the outdoor fun they had planned before and after the wedding, both Maya and Manny’s families were able to find other things to do around Lake Placid which allowed them all to meet and even brought many of them closer together. When faced with some tough situations “Everyone was very accommodating and they all just chipped in to help” Manny says. Their wedding day was truly a celebration of people coming together both in family and community. saratogaTODAYnewspaper.com

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Caley & Tom

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Our Story WRITTEN BY JENNA WHITEHILL, PHOTOS BY CHRISTIAN OTH STUDIOS

While visiting a friend in Hawaii, Tom Petty took advantage of the scenic destination and proposed to his girlfriend, Caley. After a beautiful proposal in Hawaii, the couple decided to switch gears and have their wedding in a place they both love; surrounded by high peaks and sparkling lakes. Caley grew up visiting Lake Placid in the summer while Tom grew up near the Catskills allowing him to visit similar areas. Their love for mountains, lakes, and trees continued as they both attended college in Middlebury, VT. Living in Manhattan, Caley and Tom are unable to experience the mountains as often as they had before. With such a prominent part in both of their lives, they decided to have a wedding in the area that they cherish most. When it came to the day of their wedding, the clouds moved in and it appeared as if their outdoor ceremony would get rained out. Just as the wedding party began to walk down the aisle, the sun peaked through the clouds and brightened up the ceremony just long enough for Caley and Tom to say their ‘I Dos.’ After their wedding, Caley and Tom stayed in Lake Placid to experience the many attractions that drew them there in the first place. Having the wedding in September allowed them to see the gorgeous fall colors on the mountain trails. After many visits to various mountain ranges Caley and Tom were able to create one of their most memorable visits ever. saratogaTODAYnewspaper.com

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Details LOCATION Ausable Club, St Hubert’s NY

PHOTOGRAPHER Glen Allsop, Christian Oth Studios, New York NY

WEDDING GOWN Oscar de la Renta via Bergdorf Goodman

FLOWERS East Branch Organics, Keene NY

TRANSPORTATION Value Van Taxi

CAKE Lady M Confections, New York NY

HONEYMOON Spain and Kenya

ADVICE FOR OTHERS Maintain a sense of gratitude. Balancing the interests, priorities and feelings of so many people was stressful at times, but remembering how lucky we were to have family, friends, love, health and each other reminded us as to what the night was truly about!

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Bridget & Bill Redeker

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Our Story WRITTEN BY JENNA WHITEHILL, PHOTOS BY PAUL REYNOLDS

The Saturday following Thanksgiving, Bridget and her family were met with a crisp chill in the air, as they set out on one of her favorite traditions, to find a Christmas tree. As she searched through the trees, Bridget found one in particular that stood out from the rest. It was lit up beautifully with carolers singing nearby as her soon to be husband, Bill, greeted her on one knee and asked her one question to which she answered yes. Bridget loved this time of year and being around nature making this the perfect proposal. Growing up, she and her family would often take trips to Lake Placid creating memorable family experiences. With both Bridget and Bill’s families living in different states, they knew they wanted to have a destination wedding, and, for Bridget, there couldn’t have been a better choice than Lake Placid. The wedding was held at the Lake Placid Lodge which provided a spectacular view of the lake during the ceremony and a tent for the reception that created an elegant atmosphere as they dined outside. They were surrounded by trees, just as Bridget had envisioned, with all of the luxuries and comfort that Lake Placid has to offer. “Our wedding day was perfection,” Bridget says, “surrounded by nature’s beauty and the people Bill and I love the most.” While Bridget was already in love with the area, Bill had never visited Lake Placid until a few months before their wedding. When he was finally able to experience the scenery and community, he fell in love with it to. In a place they both love, with the people they love, Bridget says, “It is “a day that I will cherish forever.” saratogaTODAYnewspaper.com

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Details LOCATION The Lake Placid Lodge (Ceremony in the Artisans Circle, Cocktails in the Baby Bootlegger and porch, Dinner in a tent on the porch, Dancing in the Adirondack Room).

PHOTOGRAPHER Paul Reynolds (love him!)

WEDDING GOWN Monique Lhuillier “Liza” with a custom bolero

FLOWERS Heather Coffin of East Branch Organics

CAKE My friend and talented local Lake Placid baker Karen Cooper

HONEYMOON New Zealand trip is being planned for this coming year

ADVICE FOR OTHERS If I could give advice to a couple planning their wedding, it would be.... The best thing that we did was hire a wedding planner / coordinator, it was such a good investment. She really helped take any burden and stress off us so we could really enjoy the day.

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Engaged JORDAN CRAIG VIDEO & PHOTOGRAPHY

Ruth Fleszar & John Jetty

Wait

worth the WRITTEN BY

JENNA WHITEHILL

When you think of a bride and groom you may picture a couple in their mid-twenties buying a big white gown and planning a 200 person wedding. For engaged couple John Jetty and Ruth Fleszar, the story is not so traditional but is just as beautiful.

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ohn and Ruth had each been previously married, had children, and been divorced well before they even met each other. They each were experiencing life as a single parent with a full time job ensuring that their children were on the right path to success. It wasn’t until after their children were out of high school when they met online in 2014. Recognizing their similarities in life and character, they connected rather quickly and are now planning a wedding for summer of 2017 in Lake Placid.

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The couple chose Lake Placid as the destination for their wedding for a few reasons. Since their first meeting, John and Ruth have had to commute just to see each other. John works as a dentist in Waterloo, NY and Ruth is a Program Manager in Corning, NY. Living so far apart, they were forced to spend a lot of time together when they did meet. One of the first places they went away to together was a horse show in Lake Placid. The area also provides a central location for both John, Ruth, and all of their children. They are planning a rather small wedding with only family. Since they are starting a new chapter in their lives, they want it to be more of a family gathering than a celebration of a marriage. It is important to both of them that their children and grandchildren are able to come together to embrace this occasion. They both agree that their values are different from when they each first got married, and they have “the benefit of experience,” John says, that keeps these values centered on their new family. 

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Wedding Insider

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adirondack weddings...

Rustic Elegant Touches

A

WRITTEN BY MIM FRANTZ

Wedding and Event Planner Juniper Events & Design PHOTOS BY TRUCKIELOO PHOTOGRAPHY

current trend in weddings is departing from formal tradition and creating a look, feel and flow that is both personal and allegorical. Couples today are more established and often own their own homes and have been together many years before deciding to marry. As a result, they actually have an identity together; therefore their partnership has a story they want to tell their guests. They want the entire day or weekend to be a reflection of their interests, lifestyle and values. For couples who are either from the Adirondacks or retreat to the area for a destination wedding --they seek to host in the area because of a deep connection to nature and the outdoors. Therefore, natural elements are big players in the design of many regional weddings. Some trending natural touches include many nods to Adirondack landscape and birch trees, with their distinctive elegant white bark, are often sought in décor.

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Natural birch logs

Easy to come by in the region... They can be gathered from the woods, or dried professionally and purchased from a specialty wood supplier. There are many local carpenters that can be contracted to help with design or often a father of the bride or groom steps up to the plate in this department.

Slices of logs

Log “cookies” that come in various diameter and width can be used for a multitude of purposes: charger plates, candle holder centerpieces, dessert display plates, cake base, tiered cupcake stands, log pedestals to hold lanterns and arrangements.

Trees and branches

Also effective, as they soften hard angles in rooms and tents and fill large spaces. If you have access to saplings that might need some thinning or pruning anyway (it is illegal to cut on state land), such saplings, with leaves or not, can be zip-tied to tent posts and up-lit, creating a warm glow and intricate patterns of cast light. These saplings can also be used with string lights woven through the branches for a festive, evening accent. Also saplings, even in-bloom with cherry and apple blossoms make an extraordinarily elegant DIY trellis. For those that would rather not cut saplings, live, potted trees are available to purchase or even rent from garden centers and depending on the season will be with leaves or without.

Adirondack Chair

Another unique regional idea is to have guests sign an Adirondack chair with a permanent marker and later finish with a polyurethane seal so it can be used indoors or outdoors, to preserve the memories for a lifetime.

Evergreens

Omnipresent in the North Country... They make great accents in floral arrangements, table-scape or mantles and go a long way since they are dense and lush and often fragrant as well (specifically balsam). To avoid a wintery or holiday look, mixing evergreens with other plant greens such as Seeded Eucalyptus can add variety and dimension.

Ferns

A lighter, more delicate green, also found in the natural landscape... They are elegant, intricate and versatile: décor on a cake, tucked in a pocket fold napkin, potted as a centerpiece, or even fiddlehead ferns (the infancy stage that has a modern, spiral -like appearance) can be incorporated into floral arrangements and used as a boutonniere. Moss, like ferns, comes in many varieties, textures and shades and looks great as a background for place cards and even as on its own as a decorative element. Another artistic, cascading green (that also comes in purple) is Hanging Amaranthus. It is a fall green, not found in the woods but is grown locally. Amaranthus creates that timeless English Garden look and can draped over chandeliers, mantels or cascading out of elevated urns.

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Mercury Glass

To blend the rustic with elegant, it is helpful to juxtapose the natural elements with more refined touches. The perfect balance to the “earthy” look is Mercury glass... The versatile aspect of this vintage-looking shimmery glass is that it is both silver and gold. It catches natural light and candlelight and creates warmth and class without being overwhelmingly glitzy. There are mercury glass candleholders of many varieties and lovely urns available to rent from a florist or purchase independently.

Place settings

Another place for a timeless touch is in the place setting... Mix and match vintage china can add color and charm and can be collected from thrift shops and even rented from local rental companies.

Less traditional table arrangements

To add more character, reception layouts are also trending in less traditional table arrangements... Long rectangular or varied-size layouts including wooden farm tables are replacing the conventional, round banquet tables. As for the actual numbering of the tables, numbers are being replaced with creative personal touches, a local favorite are mini trailhead signs naming High Peaks.

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Rustic Seating

In other rustic regional trends for the outdoor ceremony, white folding chairs give way to rustic benches, cut logs, and even blanket-covered hay bales.

Canvas-style tents

Known as, “sailcloth or Sperry” style, are popular today and offer a more natural appearance... This type of tent has less of an “industrial” feel - the material is more like a canvas fabric that is light permeable. The tent is supported by wooden posts instead of the typical metal and overall has a warmer feel. For frame tents, a “liner” can soften the space to add elegance and can be accented with a rustic antler chandelier.

Locally grown flowers and foods

Utilizing seasonal and are another way to highlight the Adirondacks: a local maple cream wedding cake, or a salad of farm-grown pea shoots with local chevre…are some creative choices. In the summer months, many caterers plan menus around what is available from the local farms. Some of the best ideas for inspiration for the rustic, elegant, Adirondack wedding may come from Pintrest, The Knot, or even your next walk in the woods. Take some time in nature and get inspired. 

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Engaged Q&A DUE WEST PHOTOGRAPHY

Trisha Beamish, 30 & Matthew Dunn, 32

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Q. Hometown:

WRITTEN BY MIM FRANTZ

Wedding and Event Planner Juniper Events & Design

Trisha grew up in Saranac Lake, NY. Matthew grew up in Pueblo, CO.

Q. Current residence:

We recently purchased our first home in August of 2015 in Ballston Spa, NY.

Q. Occupation:

Trisha is a High School Counselor at Queensbury High School. Matthew works at Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory in Schenectady, NY as a Mechanical Engineer.

Q. How did you meet?

We met in March of 2012. Matt suggested that our first date be going out to a trivia night at a local pub in Schenectady, NY. I wasn’t sure how that was going to work but it was the best first date! We had so much fun.

Q. What do you like most about your bride?

I love that Trisha is my best friend and she always seems to know what I am thinking before I say it out loud. She’s always there supporting me through life’s ups and downs.

Q. What do you like most about your groom?

Matt is thoughtful and caring. He always goes above and beyond to support me with whatever I may need. He has a great sense of humor too, we love to laugh together.

Q. Why did you choose the Adirondacks to marry?

We have taken many trips up to visit Trisha’s family in Saranac Lake and Lake Placid. It is a close drive from where we live and love every time we get to come up. It was not something we had to think long about where we would be married. We both instantly knew that it would be in the Saranac Lake-Lake Placid area.

Q. Why did you choose St. Agnes and the

Lake Placid Club Golf Course/Crowne Plaza? We looked into many different options for places to get married as well as having the reception. We went to a friend’s wedding at St. Agnes in February of 2015 and absolutely loved the church. We knew this would be a wonderful place to have our ceremony. We looked at multiple venues in Lake Placid for the reception. We took into account a lot of pieces but ultimately chose the Lake Placid Club due to their beautiful views of the mountains and ski jumps as well as their package they offered. This is going to be a destination wedding as nearly all of our guests are coming from out of town. Especially Matt’s family from Colorado and Pennsylvania. We cannot wait for everyone to experience Lake Placid in the fall and enjoy all the different activities the area has to offer.

Q. How did you pick the date?

We both knew we 100 percent wanted a fall wedding because of the beautiful fall foliage in the Adirondacks. There is nowhere else like it! We looked to find a date that was close to peak leaf season. When we saw the available dates we really loved 10-1-16.

Q. What you have enjoyed about the wedding planning process?

One thing that we are really happy that we decided to do was to take our time planning. We were engaged in December of 2014 and will be married in October of 2016. We were able to take time and choose all the different things that were important to us for our special day. We feel that it has made the whole process less stressful by taking time to plan.  saratogaTODAYnewspaper.com

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LAKE PLACID LAKE PLACID • KEENE VALLEY • SARANAC LAKE

See you in November... Kevin McAvey

Due West Photography

Due West Photography

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