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Sarah Kiyoko Yoshida


Part I.

Architecture


1/4� scale

Truss

Floor

Lateral beams

Wall framing

Wall Panels


Co-Work Offices Culver City, CA, 2014

The focus of this project was the development of a structural system. The building is based on a three-dimensional modular grid. The hexagonal modules, when clustered together, form a series of robust trusses capable of spanning the open plan ground floor of the building, while producing cellular individual offices in within the structure above.

This Page: structure study model Opposite: rendering


Module Structure

West Jefferson Co-Work Office 412 Studio Co-Work M.Arch I Winter 2014 West Jefferson Office

Module Structure

UCLA Department of Architecture and Urban Design 412 Studio M.Arch I Winter 2014Mirzaeian, Mohamed Sharif & Roger Sherman Neil Denari, Narineh UCLA Department Architecture TA ChinofWei Chang and Urban Design Neil Denari, Narineh Mirzaeian, Mohamed Sharif & Roger Sherman TA Chin WeiSarah Chang Yoshida Sarah Yoshida

1/4� scale 1/4� scale

Floor

Truss Truss

Floor

Lateral beams Lateral beams

Wall framing Wall framing

Wall Panels Wall Panels

Top: diagrams of module structure Below: model of one structural bay


Module Aberration Studies Module Aberration Studies

1

Module #4

Module #4

Top: module aberration studies Below: study of aberrated module blocks

1

2

2

3

3

4

4

5

5

6

6

7

7

8

8


This Page: study model of modules as configurable system Opposite: three module scheme studies in isometric, elevation and plan


Hex Module Studies SchemeModule A Hex Studies

Scheme B

Scheme C

Scheme A

Scheme B

Scheme C

Scheme A

Scheme B

Scheme C

Front Elevation Front Elevation Front Elevation

Site Plan Site Plan Site Plan


Plan truss section

open section

Left: massing model on site Right: plan Opposite: sections


Section 1

Section 1 Section 1

Section 1

Section 2

Section 1 Section 1

Section 2 Section 2

Section 2

Section 2 Section 2


This Page: layered vault contours Opposite Left: elevation Opposite Right: 3D printed model


Fractal Vault

A formal study of the vaults of Laon Cathedral Professor Georgina Huljich, 2013 It can be argued that the form of ribs, and therefore the fractal reaches It can be argued that the form of Laon Cathedral indicates a potential rule set, or in fact multitudes of Laon Cathedral indicates a potential a stopping point. The second material potential rule sets, for generating vaulted forms through fractal geometry. If a fractal rule set is rule set, or in fact multitudes of potential limitation, the 1/8� minimum printable extracted from the overall composition of the cathedral, and then re-applied to its singular crossing rule sets, for generating vaulted forms thickness of the 3D printer, introduce an what is the form that results? What is the limit of the Laon cathedral fractal? What is the limit of throughtower, fractal geometry. If a fractal additional constraint that gives precise the fractal applied to an object that must be produced by 3D printing technology? rule set is extracted from the overall dimension to this iteration of the fractal composition of the cathedral, and then form. Fractal geometry is infinite, but bytower, introducing the parameters of this project as geometric re-applied to its singular crossing New constraints emerged during constraints, the form encounters a physical limitis in the form of material thickness. Establishing some what is the form that results? What the design process that furthered the features of theLaon vault as constant, particularly the ribs, introduces a limitation -- the object cannot the limit of the cathedral fractal? object’s fractal definition gave the form than fractal the thickness of the ribs, and therefore the fractal reaches a stopping What iscontain the vaults limitsmaller of the applied an identity of its own. Vault, rib, boss to an object that must be produced by point. The second material limitation, the 1/8" minimum printable thickness of the 3D printer, and column, the various elements of 3D printing technology? introduce an additional constraint that gives precise dimension to this iteration of the fractal form. the precedent vault were maintained, Fractal geometry is infinite, but and maintained their relationships to New constraints emerged during the design process that furthered the object's fractal definition by introducing the parameters of this one another, but rather than being form an identity of its own. Vault, rib,the boss andstagnant, column, the various of the precedent theyelements become the push and project gave asthegeometric constraints, vault were maintained, and maintained to one another,that but rather than being the form of forces generate form encounters a physical limittheir in relationships the pull they become the push Establishing and pull forces that generate formwhole. of the new whole. Columnseschew their the the new Columns form ofstagnant, material thickness. eschew theirof structural and spatial and become a geometric byproduct of the formal structural and spatial properties and some features the vault asproperties constant, process, expressing the asymmetries embedded inathe form. become a geometric byproduct of particularly the ribs, introduces limitation -- the object cannot contain the formal process, expressing the vaults smaller than the thickness of the asymmetries embedded in the form.


Section

Diagonal Section

This Page: diagonal section Opposite: plan and fractal layers


Left: crossing tower and gallery section vaults Below: gallery vault and column geometry detail Opposite: analysis of Laon Cathedral columns, nave and aisles

Nave, Aisle and Crossing Tower


Column Types

Column Types

Triforium Level Triforium Level A A

Gallery Level Gallery Level B B

colonnettes colonnettes

A A

B

B

compound piers

basic unit columns

compound piers

basic unit columns

C

C

D

D

E

E

F F

Ground Level Ground Level C C

C C

D

D

E

E

full height 19 ft.

full height 19 ft.

Basic unit columns with uniform height and proportion Basic unit columns with uniform height and proportion

B

2/3 height 12.7 f.t

B A

2/3 height 12.7 f.t 1/3 height 6.3 ft.

1/3 height 6.3 ft.

A F

Basic unit columns divide to form colonnettes Basic unit columns divide to form colonnettes

F

3x height 57 ft.

3x height 57 ft.

Basic unit columns combine to form compound piers

Basic unit columns combine to form compound piers

D

E

F

D

E

F


The UNdesigned Eco-Center

Student proposal for retail, public resource center, auditorium and workshop for UNdesigned, an eco-conscious clothing designer. Berkeley, CA, 2007 Taking inspiration from the garments of this Berkeley clothing designer, the structure of this multi-use building resembles gathered layers of cloth, which lend their dynamism to a great variety of spaces. Several areas of the building are planted, including a roof lawn, bamboo lining the interior of the retail windows, and a small lawn for the owner’s dog

nestled between the public and private spaces. The form evolved from a series of 2D and 3D investigations of the properties of fabrics - a flexible skin taking the form of the structure beneath, or a malleable plane that reacts under tension and compression to take on new character.


This Page: detail of faรงade, shop displays, and auditorium Opposite: South, West and East elevations


Clockwise From Top Left: skirt by UNdesigned; model side view; model layers; study model of painted 2-ply laminated wood. Opposite: laminated wood form finding model


Museum for Joan Miro’s Hirondelle Amour Student project sited in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, 2006

Working from the painting to form an initial concept, contortion clearly emerged as a tectonic theme that is not only critical to the form and narrative of the painting, but also intriguing in translation to three-dimensional architectural forms. Angular and spiraling forms within the painting became the basis for a dedicated micro-museum.

Top: Joan Miro, Hirondelle Amour, 1934 Bottom: site model

A one-foot wide concrete bicycle path crosses the grass to connect the sidewalk and the painting. Rather than lead to the door, it slices through two concrete walls and points directly to the painting itself. With approximately 200 square feet of interior and 600 square feet of exterior space, the building additionally becomes a museum of the natural surroundings.


This Page: model details Opposite: model with roof and model with roof removed


Top: study model Below: plans, lower and upper floors Opposite: front elevation, roof plan and regulating geometry


Model of Diller + Scofidio’s Slow House Built in collaboration with Nate Miller, 2006

This model of Diller+Scofidio’s unbuilt Slow House was completed as a precedent study in a UC Berkeley undergraduate architectural design studio. As the project was never

built, some details, including the roof, required us to take the liberty of completing the missing pieces of the puzzle with our own design.


Drawings of Diller+Scofidio’s Slow House


Part II.

Artworks


This Page: Portrait of E.A. Poe pencil on paper, 2004 Opposite: Two Birds woodblock print, 2006


This Page: X-ray Mouse oil on canvas, 2006 Opposite: Macbeth oil on canvas, 2006-2007


Portfolio, May 2014