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table of contents INTRODUCTION PART A. CONCEPTUALISATION A.1. A.2. A.3. A.4. A.5. A.6.

Design FUTURING DESIGN COMPUTATION COMPOSITION/GENERATION CONCLUSION LEARNING OUTCOMES APPENDIX - ALGORITHMIC SKETCHES

PART B. CRITERIA DESIGN b.1. b.2. B.3. B.4. B.5. B.6. B.7. B.8

RESEARCH FIELD CASE STUDY 1.0 CASE STUDY 2.0 TECHNIQUE: DEVELOPMENT TECHNIQUE: PROTOTYPES RECHNIQUE: PROPOSALS LEARNING OBJECTIVES AND OUTCOMES ALGORTIHMIC SKETCHES

PART C. DETAILED DESIGN C.1. C.2. C.3. C.4. C.5.

DESIGN CONCEPT TECTONIC ELEMENTS FINAL MODEL ADDITIONAL LAGI BRIEF REQUIREMENTS LEARNING OBJECTIVES AND OUTCOMES

REFERENCES

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 240


INTRODUCTION

04

INTRODUCTION My name is Sarah Tan. I am a 3rd year Bachelor of Environments student, majoring in Architecture. Born and raised in Melbourne, I’ve always had a interest in art and design. My hobbies include drawing, graphic design and gaming whenever I have free time.

part a: conceptualisation

My experience with digital design is still somewhat limited and fundamental. While being relatively proficient in the Adobe Suite prior to this course my knowledge of CAD or 3D Modelling programs such as Rhino, AutoCAD and Revit is still very basic from my time in Virtual Environments, Visual Communication and Studio subjects. I look forward to the opportunity of learning Grasshopper as an addition to my skillset. I believe it will be a rewarding program that will allow me to explore new technology and contemporary methods of creating architecture. A new paradigm, that will allow me to grow further as a designer.

part a. conceptualisation 05


PART A1

DESIGN FUTURING

DESIGN FUTURING | DESIGN GUIDELINES Sustainability over the past several years has been the centre of much discussion with the growing concerns for our future and the toll human habitation has had on our planet’s ecosystems. “Creation and destruction is not a problem when a resource are infinitely renewable, but can become a disaster when it is not. “ 1 We have created this condition, reaching a point where now we must acknowledge the limitations of our resources counting to sustain us. In response we have begun to acknowledge the challenges faced ahead to make up for our ‘status quo’ and the sacrifices we have made to maintain our excessive standard of living. 2 We are currently in a phase of transition practice of sustainability has become more apparent in organizational agendas, however society at a large still seem disconnected and complacent with the issues. So what is the role of designers in all this? Solutions are not found by chance but through confronting problems with “design at the front

line of transformative action.” 3 Design is the force that shapes our world, both how we see it and how it operates. Design practice can be an agent to help realize a sustainable future but that alone is not what will secure it. In order for our efforts to be significant a change in thinking is required and design also has the power to do that. Through means such as architecture, we can engage with design to express a message that influences people social, cultural, ethical or even political ideas. 4 We’re not only rethinking about how we design but how we can use it as a medium to redirect attitudes and values. These ideas will be integral to our project as we aim to create design with purpose, integrating sustaina-bility with the idea of it. How can we create an innovative design that will engross visitors to consider how their actions can contribute to ‘futuring’ no matter the scale, individually or collectively? 5 The end goal is to turn this vision of a sustainable city into a reality.

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1-5. Fry, Tony (2008). Design Futuring: Sustainability, Ethics and New Practice (Oxford: Berg), pp. 1–16 6. Ferry, Robert & Elizabeth Monoian, ‘Design Guidelines’, Land Art Generator Initiative, Copenhagen, 2014

DESIGN FUTURING 07


1.26 DENVER JANET ECHELMAN COLORADO 2012

The project was instigated from Echelman’sinterest in handcrafted material beginning with fishing net. She explores materiality with a new approach that seeks to create precise volumetric forms through soft materials. In order to achieve this she collaborates with professionals of other disciplines such as aeronautical engineers to further her understanding of material behavior and how to recreate her vision of the gentle movement within the wind’s choreography. (Fig.1) Furthermore she explores the variables of fishing net machines and methods of lacing.

Fig. 1 Understanding the variables of fish net and methodogy behind patterns.

(Fig.2)

The shape of the 1.26 Denver is derived from data collected from a recent tsunami that had rippled across the entire Pacific Ocean. (Fig.3) She takes inspiration from this shockwave and links it back conceptually as an event that “connects” the western hemisphere. The shape resulting was far more complex than any of her previous works that it could not be represented optimally with the usual steel framework she had employed for her previous projects. 7 This required the search of a material that could maintain structural integrity while remaining soft enough to move fluidly in the wind. These qualities were found in Spectra® fiber 8, A materials of soft fine mesh 15 times stronger than steel that withstand the forces of nature. However at this point in time there was no software that could explain how these complicated net forms would be modelled and how they work with gravity, so it had to be

Fig.2 Aeronautical engineering that , learning how to develop percise shapes in gentle movement.

Fig. 3Tsunami diagram data, imitation of rippling movement.

7.Echelman, Janet, “Janet Echelman: Taking imagination seriously”, 2011. <http://www.ted.com/talks/janet_echelman> 8.Echelman, Janet, “1.26 DENVER”, COLORADO, 2010. <http://www.echelman.com/project/1-26-denver/>

INTRODUCTION 09


INTRODUCTION

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Fig. 4 An early rendition of the software used to create these sculptural net forms. (2011)

Fig. 5 2014 Maya plug-in “JNet” able to simulate geometry, wind movement and lighting effects. Later on in her career in another interdisciplinary collaboration, Echelman worked with Peter Boyer to create their own software a tool called ”JNet.” (Fig.5) It created this net sculpture while running a very fast but accurate simulations for form finding that could calculate structural forces as well as emulates the movement of wind through the net. The program uses embedded information with the specific limitations of net weaving machines from prior exploration in order to ensure fabrication. An understanding of materials allows us to understand its confines so that they can be stretched. Designs are generated by working with this simulation that realistically represents real world parameters. “You don’t know what you’re modeling until the simulation has completed. You have to “work with the simulation” quite directly in order to design.” 9 Peter Boyer

9. Autodesk. “Behind the Scenes of Janet Ec

Through design process urban sculpture is created, one that invites people to linger and contemplate as it fills a void and punctuates a public space.” The 1.26 Denver along with Echelman’s other works encapsulate a journey where she has taken the initiative to create something that is unexpected. She inspires us to explore the bounds of new materials and the advantage of working with other disciplines to realize a project that is both unique and innovative. The sheer wonder of how form is made feasible is just one way she instills curiosity in the viewer. Through it we can learn a lesson on how to engage the audience, open their minds to discovering what lies in the intent of the design and perhaps educate them.

Fig. 6 The Dordrecht energy Carousel by Ecosistema Urbano

DORDRECHT ENERGY CAROUSEL ECOSISTEMA URBANO

This project’s goal was to develop a public space that was unconventional and could excite playful-ness in its users. Spanish architecture firm Ecosistema Urbano designed the Dordrecht Energy Carousel (Fig.6) in response to this brief which functions as an energy-generating chandelier with hanging ropes meant for the participation of children of all ages. The carousel shows an amalgamation of beauty and sustainability which is very relevant to our own goals for the LAGI Design.

It functions so that when kids swing around the carousel, kinetic energy is released and captured through the structure which is stored in the battery underneath the site. (Fig.7) It responds to lighting conditions so that when darkness rolls over the carousel becomes illuminated through self-sustained energy collected in the day. The carousel’s has a varying spectrum of colours (Fig.8) that determine how much energy has been stored, creating a opportunity for two different experiences: at day a bold structure dressed in bright red and at night a feature of colorful LED lights. 10

10. Wronski, Lisa. “Dordrecht Energy Carousel / Ecosistema Urbano” 25 Jan 2013. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=324125>

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The energy carousel isn’t merely a place of leisure but also hopes to be educational. Targeting children from an early age to learn about alternative methods for generating power and simple concepts of sustainability. It uses hands-on interaction allowing people to become involved with the energy process physically. The concept is direct hoping to make people question of what they can contribute to creating a sustainable future just as how their simple have been used to power the carousel.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, id est quis recteque. In stet putent mel, ius ea partiendo tincidunt, cum erat affert ad. Wisi libris est at. Cum et gubergren scripserit, pri salutatus forensibus ad. Ne vim everti utroque, vel et viderer scaevola argumentum. Cu tation melius malorum duo, mea tale inermis appellantur cu, ut impedit probatus complectitur nam.

PART A2

The structure of the carousel also investigates efficiency of materials in construction to further highlight its design. It uses a limited amount of steel and instead tensile integrity is created through the use of ropes and textiles. The design is not only sustainable but effectively communicates a means of interaction and engagement with the audience. I found interest in this design because it works as a public amenity regardless of its pragmatic design points. It is something that can exist outside the context of sustainability of well that makes it raw and attractive thus proving the tag line of LAGI that “Renewable Energy can be Beautiful”.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, id est quis recteque. In stet putent mel, ius ea partiendo tincidunt, cum erat affert ad. Wisi libris est at. Cum et gubergren scripserit, pri salutatus forensibus ad. Ne vim everti utroque, vel et viderer scaevola argumentum. Cu tation melius malorum duo, mea tale inermis appellantur cu, ut impedit probatus complectitur nam.

DESIGN COMPUTATION Dhjghj4 Fig. 7 Diagram of how energy is collected.

DENVER BOTANICAL GARDENS MARC FORNES ‘THEVERYMANY’ DENVER 2012

Fig. 8 Diagram of how energy operates at night.

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1 2 3 4 5 6 2 2 3 4 5 6 7890

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PART A2

DENVER BOTANICAL GARDENS MARC FORNES ‘THEVERYMANY’ DENVER 2012 Later on in her career in another interdisciplinary collaboration, Echelman worked with Peter Boyer to create their own software a tool called ”JNet.” (Fig.5) It created this net sculpture while running a very fast but accurate simulations for form finding that could calculate structural forces as well as emulates the movement of wind through the net. The program uses embedded information with the specific limitations of net weaving machines from prior exploration in order to ensure fabrication. An understanding of materials allows us to understand its confines so that they can be stretched. Designs are generated by working with this simulation that realistically represents real world parameters. “You don’t know what you’re modeling until the simulation has completed. You have to “work with the simulation” quite directly in order to design.” 9 Peter Boyer

9. Autodesk. “Behind the Scenes of Janet Ec

DESIGN COMPUTATION Dhjghj4

Through design process urban sculpture is created, one that invites people to linger and contemplate as it fills a void and punctuates a public space.” The 1.26 Denver along with Echelman’s other works encapsulate a journey where she has taken the initiative to create something that is unexpected. She inspires us to explore the bounds of new materials and the advantage of working with other disciplines to realize a project that is both unique and innovative. The sheer wonder of how form is made feasible is just one way she instills curiosity in the viewer. Through it we can learn a lesson on how to engage the audience, open their minds to discovering what lies in the intent of the design and perhaps educate them.

DORDRECHT ENERGY CAROUSEL ECOSISTEMA URBANO

This project’s goal was to develop a public space that was unconventional and could excite playful-ness in its users. Spanish architecture firm Ecosistema Urbano designed the Dordrecht Energy Carousel (Fig.6) in response to this brief which functions as an energy-generating chandelier with hanging ropes meant for the participation of children of all ages. The carousel shows an amalgamation of beauty and sustainability which is very relevant to our own goals for the LAGI Design.

It functions so that when kids swing around the carousel, kinetic energy is released and captured through the structure which is stored in the battery underneath the site. (Fig.7) It responds to lighting conditions so that when darkness rolls over the carousel becomes illuminated through self-sustained energy collected in the day. The carousel’s has a varying spectrum of colours (Fig.8) that determine how much energy has been stored, creating a opportunity for two different experiences: at day a bold structure dressed in bright red and at night a feature of colorful LED lights. 10

10. Wronski, Lisa. “Dordrecht Energy Carousel / Ecosistema Urbano” 25 Jan 2013. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=324125>

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