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Water Street Glassworks & Harbor Shores

Water Street Glassworks & Harbor Shores

Golf Cart Sculpture Tour

Golf Cart Sculpture Tour

Saturday, April 9, 2011

Saturday, April 9, 2011

Call 269.925.5555 To reserve your “tee time”

Call 269.925.5555 To reserve your “tee time”

$40 per person

$40 per person


140 Water Street, Benton Harbor, MI 49022

www.waterstreetglassworks.org


April 9, 2011


Golf Cart Sculpture Tour April 9, 2011 A Fundraising Event for Water Street Glassworks a regional school, studio and gallery dedicated to the fire-arts of glass and metal Written by Greg Ladewski Illustrations by Jerry Catania Layout by Sarah Hess Forward by Anne Odden

copyright © 2011, Anne Odden, Water Street Glassworks

Welcome to the sculpture tour of the newly completed Jack Nicklaus Signature Golf course. Those of us who do not golf wonder: What makes it a signature golf course? In the next 1½ hours, you will experience the answer. The large portion of the acreage you will traverse was once the heart of heavy industry. It is fitting, therefore, to see the instillation of sculptures, or tee-markers, which pays homage to the past “rust belt” industries through the use of Corten steel. The two bridges you will cross are also made of this material, steel that oxidizess quickly in a formula that seals its surface, protecting the steel from future corrosion. The wide variation in landscapes (prairie, dunes, lake, two rivers, woodlands, and wetlands) are highlighted in this course. Indeed, you will travel through a naturalist’s dream: the most ecologically diverse county in Michigan. The temperate micro-climate, created by prevailing westerly winds and the proximity to Lake Michigan, lets Berrien County boast some of the richest soil in the world, and acre for acre, the most diverse farm produce in the Midwest. The diversity of its natural plant life is, if anything, even more impressive; the golf tee-sculptures celebrate this fact, as you will see. Each tee-marker is inspired by a plant, grass or tree found within the boundary of each hole. Master Glassblower Jerry Catania and metal artist Josh Andres completed these markers in a remarkably tight timeframe – basically two months from Harbor Shores commission to delivery for the opening of the full 18 hole course on July 1st, 2010. The fundamental purpose of the tee-markers is to tell the story of Jack Nicklaus’ remarkable eighteen Major tournament titles. We have included the plaques’ inscriptions in these pages along with the sponsors who helped fund the sculpture project.


Day Lily Though often mistaken for a wildflower, the Day Lily is the only purely ornamental and fully “domesticated” plant honored with a sculpture. The Day Lily’s proliferation and wide range is reflected in its alternative names: Roadside Lily, Railroad Lily, and even Outhouse Lily! The Day Lily sculpture is as notable for its interlaced, curved, sweeping metalwork as for its vivid glass. By the time Day Lily was commissioned, the artists enjoyed the full confidence of their patrons. This, in turn, gave the artists the confidence to create this large, bold, “introduction” to the future clubhouse and to the markers that follow. Some observers liken the see-through sculpture to a harp or even a musical clef with flower “notes,” but this resemblance was not necessarily intentional. “I wanted a sweeping form that your eyes would just naturally follow,” says Catania. “But I do like music, so who knows?” The sweeping metal lines may also describe a golfer’s swing: smooth, strong, and precise. fer’s swing: smooth, strong, and precise.

Dedicated to the Whirlpool Foundation by Jeff and Judy Noel


HOLE 1: (New England) Aster The spectacular Aster at Hole 1 is a stunning introduction to the seventeen markers that follow. Viewing the seven-foot sculpture up close is like seeing the delicate, tiny flower through a microscope. Glass predominates, as the petals’ intense, translucent purples “pop out” against the duller browns of the Corten steel stem. True to the New England Aster after which the marker is patterned, the petals are narrow at the base and fan out toward the tips. In fact, each “petal” is a flower (and eventually, a seed) in its own right, a detail evident in Catania’s interpretation. The Aster, a “ray flower,” reflects the star pattern for which it is named. The artists highlighted the intricacy and importance of each petal-flower by spacing them out, rather than clumping them together. The resulting, stylized Aster bloom has a deceptively simple, almost naïve quality. “Ask a child to draw a flower,” Catania remarks. “Chances are you’ll get something like this. I wanted the first tee marker to have this most basic form.” Ironically, the lovely New England Aster, given pride of place at Hole 1, is related to the dandelion, that bane of homeowners and groundskeepers. In fact, with over 150 varieties, the aster family is one of the most prolific, highly evolved and successful plants. Jerry Catania’s concept drawing emphasized the Aster’s star-like, archetypal form. He then created the eleven purple petals “as large as I could make them.” He dropped them off at Josh’s studio and left for a two-week teaching assignment. “It was a mystery to me what Josh would make of it,” he recalls. When I finally saw the finished work, I was tickled.”


MEET THE ARTISTS

Josh Andres

Jerry Catania


1980 PGA Championship – 17th Major Dedicated to Benton Harbor Street Ministry /Band of Brethren by Dr. Marcus Robinson and Pamela Miller To cap an unforgettable season and the fifth time Jack Nicklaus won two major championships in the same year, the Golden Bear dominated the field at Oak Hill for a record-shattering PGA Championship victory. Not only did Nicklaus tie Walter Hagen with his fifth PGA Crown, he did so with a seven-shot win over Andy Bean that is the largest margin of victory since the PGA went to stroke play in 1958.

1986 Masters – 18th Major Dedicated to The Boy and Girls Club of Benton Harbor by Jeff & Marcia Fettig and Jack & Jan Sperbeck Jack Nicklaus will tell you today that his most memorable major championship victory also happens to be his last. Told his clubs and his game were too rusty to compete, a 46 year-old Nicklaus put together a stirring final round of 65 to win the 1986 Masters and his sixth green jacket. Historians and fans still contend that his victory, just like the man, is the greatest in the game’s history.

Water Street Glassworks would like to thank Harbor Shores for their support of this special event, and for promoting the arts by integrating sculptures within the design of The Jack Nicklaus Signature Golf Course. We would like to offer a special thanks to Mark Hesemann, Ross Smith and Joen Brambilla for their assistance and support in planning this event.


HOLE 2: Rose Pink Legend says that when Eve was expelled from Eden, she took one flower, a rose, as a reminder of the Garden’s beauty. Originally white, the rose turned pink when it pricked Eve’s finger as she carried it away with her. This rare flower’s essence is captured in the deep, varied red glass petals and the elegantly woven metal vines and stems. Flowers and stem are set against a cutout metal shape that suggests a bud vase. The Celebration logo, swirling yellows and reds, rises proudly from the top of the vase, like another flower. The Rose Pink marker uses the “shield” model that was originally planned for all the sculptures. Catania’s luscious, dark pink flower is pressed into the solid shield, rather than backlit or freestanding. The glass bloom is subdued instead of flashy, and best-seen when viewed close-up – rather like the flower it honors. The Celebration logo, rather than the rose flower, rises from the vase-shaped shield.


HOLE 3: Sunflower The artists chose a true native plant, the “common” sunflower with its star-shaped leaves. (The more familiar, massive, round-headed sunflowers sold at farmers’ are actually hybrids from Russia). The sunflower is a masterpiece of architectural strength. Able to grow up to a foot in one day, the comparatively thin stalk, which can reach five feet tall or higher, has stalk cells designed to hold up the plant’s heavy, seed-crammed head. The sculpture highlights this paradox by making the Corten stalk disproportionately thick compared to the as-yet immature flower. Native Americans and pioneers prized the Sunflower for its usefulness as well as its beauty. Its seeds, food for bird and beast alike, produce valuable cooking oil. Dried, they make a tolerable coffee substitute. Its yellow flowers make delectable honey and a vivid dye. Sunflower stalks can be made into strong textiles and even paper; the leaves, which make nutritious animal fodder, have been dried and smoked like tobacco. To this day the sunflower remains an important commercial crop in Michigan. According to Greek mythology, the Sunflower honors Clytie, a nymph who fell madly in love with Apollo, the sun god. Apollo spurned her love, and she wasted away, her eyes always fixed upon the sun. To this day, the Sunflower always keeps it head turned toward the sun, and symbolizes adoration. The Sunflower is visible to kayakers and canoeists on the river, creating the “happy accident” experience that typifies public art.


1975 Masters – 13th Major Dedicated to Community Partners of the Consortium for Community Development by Heartland Alliance In what many still consider to be the finest final-round duel in Masters’ history, Jack Nicklaus outlasted Johnny Miller and Tom Weiskopf in 1975 for his record-setting fifth green jacket. Miller and Weiskopf fell a shot shy of Nicklaus, whose 40-foot birdie on the 16th hole Sunday and his leap of celebration remain one of the indelible images from the Golden Bear’s storied career.

1975 PGA Championship – 14th Major Dedicated by Friends of the New Territory Arts Association For the fourth time in his career, Jack Nicklaus won two major championships in the same year and he did so by adding another chapter to his celebrated history at Firestone Country Club in Akron, Ohio. Nicklaus recorded one of his five career victories at Firestone, helped by a third-round 67 that created an eight-shot swing between himself and second-round leader Bruce Crampton.

1978 British Open – 15th Major Dedicated to Harbor Habitat for Humanity by Mike & Cathy Thieneman The adoring Scottish fans were hanging from windowsills and chanting Jack Nicklaus’ name as he made his way up from the 18th fairway of the Old Course at St. Andrews for his second win at the anointed home of golf. Jack Nicklaus’ 1978 victory was his third and final Open Championship win and completed his third tour of the career Grand Slam.

1980 U.S. Open – 16th Major Dedicated to Cornerstone Alliance by Abonmarche The loud chants of “Jack is Back” reverberated through the galleries that lined the fairways at Baltusrol Golf Club in 1980. Jack Nicklaus’ first major championship win since 1975 and record-tying fourth U.S. Open Crown would come with a revamped swing that led to a firstround 63 and a new Open scoring record of 272.


1971 PGA Championship – 9th Major Dedicated to Twin-Cities Area Catholic School Fund by Leslie Eisen Miller & Mark A. Miller Legends, present and future, were paired together during the 1971 PGA Championship, when Gene Sarazen, on the eve of his 69th birthday, played with Jack Nicklaus. Sarazen and Nicklaus represented two of the five players who have won the career Grand Slam. With his victory at PGA National in 1971, the Golden Bear secured his place in golf history by becoming the only player to complete the Grand Slam twice.

1970 British Open – 10th Major Dedicated to the Readiness Center by Carol Hake Jack Nicklaus began what is still considered one of the most dominating seasons in golf history, when he won the 1972 Masters for his record tying fourth green jacket. The three-shot win at Augusta National was one of his two major championship victories that year and one of seven wins overall in 1972.

1972 U.S. Open – 11th Major Dedicated to Planned Parenthood by Wood, Wenham and Henderson Consultants Jack Nicklaus returned to Pebble Beach to win his third U.S. Open Crown and tie his idol Bobby Jones, for most major championships at 13. His 1-iron to inches on the 17th hole in the final round is still considered one of the greatest shots in majors history. With the Open win, and because the PGA Championship was held in February the year prior, the Golden Bear simultaneously held three of the four major championship trophies.

1973 PGA Championship – 12th Major Dedicated to Soup Kitchen and Homeless Shelter by David and Brenda Whitwam Jack Nicklaus made golf history and set the standard for major championships with his record 14th victory. This memorable win at Canterbury in Nicklaus’ native Ohio included an eightunder-par performance in the final three rounds and a four-shot margin of victory.


HOLE 4: (Water) Lily Unlike the upright “stem-and-flower” works at other holes, the Water Lily marker is oriented horizontally. Andres’ goal was to create the illusion of a plant immersed in the water – to create the “feel” of water by the placement of the leaves. The water lily’s stems and leaves thrust upward to the single, yellow and white glass flower that establishes the “surface.” Water Lily becomes a cascading fountain in the rain, as water fills the hollows in the sculpted leaves and trickles down. The single white and yellow flower suggests springtime. Most markers put their “best face forward” for approaching golf carts. The Water Lily is an exception, equally attractive from any vantage. It is well worth the time to pause and admire this work of art close up. A Native American myth said that the Water Lily was a star that fell into the water.


HOLE 5: Bulrush Nature is not always obvious. Often, the most important plants and animals are inconspicuous, drab and easily overlooked. One of four markers whose only glass element is the Celebration logo, Hole 5’s Bulrush unabashedly celebrates the plant’s spiky and decidedly un-showy structure, as well as its resilient strength. If you appreciate the relative scarcity of insect pests on the course, you should thank, at least in part, the lowly bulrush, duly honored in Josh Andes’ striking, minimalist sculpture. Easily unnoticed and certainly unappreciated, the “workhorse” bulrush is essential to the health of the Harbor Shores wetlands and to the comfort and enjoyment of the golfers. Dragonflies and damselflies, voracious mosquito-eaters, thrive on the bulrush stems and tops. The plant’s intricate root system provides cover for fish fry, tadpoles and frogs, which also feed largely on mosquito larvae. Once nearly crowded out by invasive water species, bulrushes now thrive in their original habitat, thanks to extensive rehabilitation of the wetlands. The “chairmaker’s rush” and the three-square bulrush, with its unique triangular stem, were also re-introduced to the area. The choice of the bulrush for Hole 5 had artists and Harbor Shores’ executives scratching their heads. “My first thought was ‘With all these trees and showy flowers, why in the world choose the bulrush?” recalls Jerry Catania. “I mean, it’s basically a prickerbush.” Course Manager Ross Smith admits, “This was the one sculpture I was worried about. Bulrushes seem kind of, well, ‘blah.’ ” Josh Andres grasped the nettle (so to speak) by celebrating the bulrush’s unapologetic straight lines and prickly personality. Smith, Catania, and especially the naturalists heartily approve of his unorthodox, but fitting, interpretation.


1966 Masters – 5th Major Dedicated to Michigan Works! by KemperSports Jack Nicklaus became the first back-to-back winner in Masters Tournament history, and he won his third green jacket in four years with his 1966 victory at Augusta National. This win would not come until Nicklaus survived 17 lead changes and an 18-hole playoff with Gay Brewer and Tommy Jacobs.

1966 British Open Dedicated to Evergreen Development by Bill and Joen Brambilla Jack Nicklaus completed on of the golf’s rarest feats by winning the final leg of the Grand Slam with his 1966 British Open Championship at Muirfield in Scotland. Nicklaus became only the fourth player to win all four major championships and did so in just his fourth season as a professional. Nicklaus is part of a legendary group – Gene Sarazen, Ben Hogan, Gary Player and now Tiger Woods – that has won all four professional majors.

1967 U.S. Open Dedicated to Berrien Community Foundation by Bob and Anne Gottlieb One of the most dominating U.S. Open performances in history unfolded in 1967, when Jack Nicklaus lowered the U.S. Open scoring record and again raised the bar for major championship performances. The Golden Bear’s powerful 1-iron uphill and into the wind on the Par 5 18th set up a birdie on the 72nd hole to break by one shot Ben Hogan’s 1948 scoring record of 276.

1970 British Open – 8th Major Dedicated to Saint Joseph Public Schools Foundation by Bill and Jane Marohn Three years removed from his last major championship victory, Jack Nicklaus furthered entrenched himself into the hearts of the Scots with his victory on the Old Course at St. Andrews. The wind would come after Nicklaus caught Doug Sanders on Sunday, and then edged him by a shot in an 18-hole playoff when the two traded birdies on the final hole.


1962 U.S. Open – 1st Major Dedicated to the First Tee of Benton Harbor by Mark & Mary Brown, and Jeff & Marcia Fettig Jack Nicklaus entered the professional ranks in 1962 and began his run into the history books with his first professional major championship victory and first professional win at 1962 U.S. Open. He did so in a dramatic fashion by unseating golf’s reigning king, Arnold Palmer, in Palmer’s backyard at Oakmont Country Club in Pennsylvania.

1963 Masters – 2nd Major Dedicated to Hospice at Home by Smith-Dahmer Associates Jack Nicklaus will forever be linked to Augusta National Golf Club. He has become almost synonymous with the Masters Tournament by winning a record six green jackets, the first of which came in 1963. Nicklaus survived difficult weather and course conditions to be become, at age 23, the youngest champion in the first 30 years of the tournament.

1963 PGA Championship – 3rd Major Dedicated to Lakeland Regional Cancer Center by Lupe and Don Hopp In less than two years as a professional, Jack Nicklaus grabbed the third leg of golf’s coveted Grand Slam when he won the 1963 PGA Championship at Dallas Athletic Club. The Golden Bear not only survived a talented field but survived temperatures that soared over 100 degrees. It was so hot that Nicklaus had to hold the Championship trophy with a towel.

1965 Masters - 4th Major Dedicated to Southwest Michigan Symphony Orchestra by Blair and Clare Clark Jack Nicklaus and Arnold Palmer traded green jackets for the third year in a row, as Nicklaus dominated the field and humbled Augusta National with a record-setting victory. Nicklaus’ 17-under-par finish broke Ben Hogan’s record by two, and his nine-shot margin of victory over Palmer set a new standard. The Golden Bear’s third-round 64 tied Lloyd Mangrum’s 25-year-old course record.


HOLE 6: Cattail The tall Cattail that marks Hole 6 is one of the most realistic sculptures on the course, and one of metal artist Josh Andres’ personal favorites. There are three cattails because “we both like to work in threes,” says Andres. Andres modified Catania’s sparse sketch by adding interwoven grasses or rushes near the base, both as a design and structural (strengthening) element. Corten steel is an ideal material for this sculpture, mimicking the color of the mature seed head (sometimes called a “catkin”) and perfectly molded to capture its bumpy texture. Golfers and art lovers may be puzzled at first by the Cattail sculpture at the tee for Hole 6: Cattails are nowhere to be seen! The payoff comes at the end of this long hole, where cattails abound. “The supermarket of the swamp” was naturalist Euell Gibbon’s description of the Cattail. When green, the head can be boiled and eaten like corn on the cob. Its peeled stem is a nutritious food, and the jelly between its leaves reputed has antiseptic properties. The plentiful yellow pollen of the Cattail’s head makes delicious flour for bread and pancakes. Combining Cattail pollen and tubers with ingredients from the Arrow Arum and Water Lily yields a tasty, nutritious,all-natural cake. But for Native Americans’ advice, early European settlers, ignorant of the Cattail’s secret treasure could have starved, literally in the midst of plenty. The Cattail’s nutritional value is not its only virtue. Native Americans dipped the mature catkin in oil and lit it for long-burning torches. Colonists stuffed their boots with cattail down for winter insulation. And in World War Two (and the shortage of imported kapok), Cattail down was among the native plant products used in flotation vests. The spear-like leaves are sharply defined in stainless steel, and Andres’ intricate root system “grounds” the work.


HOLE 7: Arrow Arum “That’s just wild.” (A sightseer’s critique.) The Arrow Arum sculpture, in plain sight on a boardwalk near a public road, is probably the most viewed, and most talked-about, tee marker. It is also the most abstract design, rivaled only by Weeping Willow (Hole 18). The artists zeroed in on the plant’s most notable feature, its arrowhead-shaped leaf. But unlike the realism of the Water Lily, with its life-sized leaves, the Arum’s tiny leaf is expanded a hundredfold and, for good measure, placed on its pointed tip. The result is wonderfully evocative, and open to interpretation. With shiny, nearly mirrored stainless steel crisscrossed by bold Corten veins, it is impossible to miss, even from the road. Though comprised of a single leaf and stem, the sculpture has wonderful “movement,” thanks to the graceful curves of the upside-down leaf’s edge, and the enfolding of the sculpture itself. Here, perhaps more than any other work, the shiny-smooth, manmade quality of stainless steel is pitted against the organic texture of the ochre Corten. From a distance, people have seen it as a butterfly, a bat, a heart, the Celebration logo, or even a knight’s shield. You wouldn’t know what it’s meant to be unless you see the caption. But as soon as you know, it makes perfect sense. The original concept employed only the dark Corten veins. Josh used a “heat and beat” method to shape the open latticework of ¾ and ½ inch metal rods. “I liked the idea of being able to see the natural setting through the piece,” says Catania. But Andres was not satisfied with the skeletal lattice, concerned that the dark form would not be visible in dim light or at a distance. He painstakingly hammered and bent 14 gauge stainless steel plating to the lattice’s exact size and shape. He then welded the two elements together, giving the marker “mass and depth.”


Founded in 1865, the company was a pioneering manufacturer of fruitand vegetable packaging - boxes, crates and baskets, with a factory/mill that was located on West Main Street in Benton Harbor. and vegetable packaging - boxes, crates and baskets, with a factory/mill that was located on West Main Street in Benton Harbor. BUILDING RESTORATION The Hinkley survived the 1960s era of “Urban Renewal” that removed entire blocks of Benton Harbor’s historic architecture at one time. In 1976, the building was in limited use by the time historian Harold Atwood documented the city for the nation’s Bicentennial in 1976. By the 1980’s the Hinkley sat vacant. Eventually a support column in the basement collapsed and a quarter of the building “pancaked” into the basement The interior collapse left two stories worth of debris behind but the outer walls and façade remained intact. The Hinkley was eventually condemned. When Jerry and Kathy Catania purchased the Hinkley building in April 1997, the interior of the building had been exposed to the elements for a decade, stripped of its mechanical systems and was home to a large flock of pigeons.


WHAT YOU ARE SUPPORTING Did you know that Water Street Glassworks hosts FiredUp!, one of the top after-school programs in the nation? Or that this program for at-risk youth, now in its seventh year, teaches responsibility, problem solving and basic business skills, as well as glass blowing, torch work (beadmaking), fusing, mosaics, stained glass, casting, spin casting, welding and forging? Come and see for yourself. Visit Water Street GlassWorks and experience the creative, playful world that anchors Benton Harbor’s vibrant Arts District. Take a tour – take a class! Be tempted by decadent (or heart healthy) artisan Gelato, and shop for colorful glass made on-site. All proceeds benefit the school. Your support today is vital to our Capital Campaign. With your help, we will upgrade our outmoded electrical system, and more importantly, install state-mandated air-exchangers and ventilation hoods. Every business leader, educator and artist knows that facilities matter. Your support will keep Water Street GlassWorks a quality. Every business leader, educator and artist knows that facilities matter. Your support will keep Water Street GlassWorks a quality facility for the years to come. HISTORY OF THE HINKLEY BUILDING The Hinkley Building housed a number of businesses and offices throughout its history that offered such commodities as coal, tea, real estate, insurance and flowers. The Benton Harbor Post Office, a barbershop, a pool hall and even a model car racetrack were in the building at one time. Historically, the Hinkley was situated on the Benton Harbor ship canal and the basement the back of the building onto the docks to board. The “Hinkley Block” was built in 1898 by Myron (1833-1912) and Milton (1863-1946) Hinkley, father and son owners of the Colby-Hinkley Manufacturing Company.


HOLE 8: Dune Grass (Marram grass) Andres considers the Dune Grass sculpture, virtually tucked in among the native beach grasses, to have the best backdrop for any of the markers. “I knew right away I had to make it extravagant,” says Andres. “A single blade of grass wouldn’t work. There had to be a lot going on.” Mature dune grass makes its statement with expansive seas of sweeping grasses covering sand dune or beachfront. Andres’ work depicts individual plugs of grass – rather like those planted in the dune restoration project. The finished sculpture is “busy,” with stalks bent and overlapping in every direction to create the illusion of movement in a breeze. Andres’ steel root systems “ground” the sculpture, and enhance its realism. Andres even welded beach sand into his Dune Grass sculpture, for texture and for symbolism. “Josh did an amazing job of creating such a compelling work based on a plant that has no flower or buds,” marvels Catania. Marram grass, green in the spring and summer, sunburnt gold in the fall and winter, is the quintessential “sand binder.” Unlike other plants, including dune flowers, Marram grass has adapted to being covered up by blowing sand. Far from dying, it simply throws off new shoots that rapidly break the surface. Over time, the resulting network of long, tough roots and generations of covered-over grass stems create thick, tough mats that capture and hold sand like no other substance – better, by far, than sand fences.


HOLE 9: Bluestem Bluestem, another important prairie grass, is celebrated in a cutout, see-through form. In good lighting, the vivid, stained-glass blue green colors are positively luminous. Bluestem is named for the distinctive hue it takes on in spring. Catania’s cutout design highlights the autumn color of the Bluestem’s distinctive “turkey foot” tassel, found on both the Big and Little varieties. Ross Smith was particularly skeptical about the Bluestem marker when he saw it in Andres’ studio. “It didn’t look like much in that dim studio,” he recalls. “But in proper lighting, I saw what they were driving at, and this is now one of my favorites.” Along with Indian Grass, Bluestem is the most common prairie grass, and the most important. Big Bluestem, “chief of the tall grass country,” can grow to ten feet or more -- so high that only a tall man astride a horse could see into the distance. Little Bluestem, half as tall, thrives in mixed-grass prairies and at the edges of Big Bluestem stands. Highly nutritious and (evidently) tasty, both Big and Little Bluestem were staples in the diets of American Bison and other range grazers. To this day, cattle ranchers call Big Bluestem “ice cream for cows.” The fluffy white seeds of the Little Bluestem are among the most valuable food sources for winter birds.


Hole 18: Weeping Willow Says Andres, “The course starts with a bang at Hole 1, with its outsized, showy, Aster. I knew the experience had to end with a bang – something the golfer would remember, but also something completely different.” The final sculpture, Hole 18’s Weeping Willow, is definitely “something completely different.” At first glance, the Weeping Willow is the most mysterious, even oddest, of the tee markers. The dark, humpbacked silhouette with its drooping tresses has been compared to an elephant, to fireworks, clouds – even to the Addams’ Family’s eerie, hairy “Cousin Itt.” Now, focus your eyes beyond the marker and its inspiration is clear: the magnificent Weeping Willow just across the river, with its signature outline and cascade of branches. Of all of the tee marker flora, Weeping Willow is the only non-native plant. The Weeping Willow is the only “kinetic” (moving) sculpture in the tee marker series. The drooping branches, paired and welded for a three dimensional element, sway and creak in high winds. Along with the Cattail, Weeping Willow is one of the markers most frequently touched by golfers and other viewers. “Ultra realistic” art, that is art that “looks like what it represents,” is not open to interpretation – “it is what it is,” says Susan Wilczak. Stylized art such as the Weeping Willow marker is always open to interpretation, and no two people will see it the same way.


HOLE 17: Hibiscus (Marsh Mallow) “Hibiscus is the antithesis of subtle.” (Restoration Botanist Brian Majka.) The extravagantly large, extravagantly ornate hibiscus inspired perhaps the most visually striking tee marker. Josh overlaid Jerry’s bounteous glass flower with an intriguing, starfish-like steel stamen, in an almost science-fiction touch. While most markers were designed primarily to be viewed from the front (as golfers drive by) the Hibiscus is equally interesting viewed “in the round.” The juice and roots of the African “marsh mallow” were used by ancient Egyptians to soothe sore throats. Later, the plant’s extract was used as a flavoring for a kind of candy known as “marshmallows.” However, today’s puffy white marshmallows toasted over campfires or squished into S’mores contain no actual marsh mallow extract. Curiously, the fruit of a close relat ive in the American South is the Okra, staple of Cajun cuisine.


HOLE 10: Red Oak Red Oak is the most classically “sculptural” of the markers, says metal artist Andres. Like the Arrow Arum and Sycamore markers, which emphasized one element of the plant (leaf shape and peeling bark, respectively), the design features the oak’s trademark: its large, paired acorns. Andres’ massive, threedimensional Corten acorns are some of the largest elements of any sculpture on the course. As with the Cattail heads, the acorns’ rugged caps were perfectly rendered in the dark Corten. Also, like the Cattail heads, passers-by often cannot resist the temptation to pat, tap, rap or rub the textured Corten, to see if it is as velvety soft as it looks. (It is not.) Some think the grand scale of a small section of a twig and a couple of tiny acorns lend the sculpture a mildly humorous quality. The outsized leaf employs thick veining overlaying the flat leaf, a technique similar to the Arrow Arum (Hole 7). Here, however, the steel is dark, rather than mirrored, lessening the contrast of leaf and veins. The Red Oak is considered the “champion” oak, esteemed for its grandeur and its durable, tough wood. With the Sugar Maple (Hole 11), the Red Oak is the “terminal oak” that dominates Michgan’s mature, “back dune” climax forests. Locally, Berrien County’s Red Oak lumber was central to the once-thriving shipbuilding industry, which lasted through the Second World War. Exported to Western states, where it was used for houses and bridges, oak lumber was an important part of Michigan’s economy in the 19th and early 20th centuries.


HOLE 11: (Sugar) Maple The notched, life-sized glass maple leaves on the tee marker has a hidden (and not-so hidden) meaning. Their red-into-green coloring suggests the transition from summer to fall colors. Now count them: eleven in all. Asked if this number is just a coincidence, Catania remarked slyly, “Maybe I was thinking of the eleventh hole, maybe not. Eleven leaves just seemed right. We couldn’t add or take away and keep the balance.” Indeed, Catania recalls, “the eleventh leaf was the hardest one to place.” As depicted, the Maple’s metal branches are large compared to the poured glass leaves, and are highlighted by their rugged texture. The emphasis on the “wood” is intentional. Like the Red Oak, the Sugar Maple’s high-grade lumber was crucial to Michigan’s early economy and growth. In the 19th and early 20th centuries, Michigan maples built many of the cities in the prairie states and the west. To this day, Michigan is a leading producer of Sugar Maple lumber, mainly harvested from sustainable forests. The Sugar Maple is famed for its copious flow of sweet sap in the springtime. In a typical year, a mature tree yields hundreds of gallons of sap, more than any other maple. Better still, Sugar Maple sap is the sweetest of all, meaning more syrup per tree. Even so, it takes about 40 gallons of Sugar Maple sap to produce one gallon of maple syrup. But there’s more. The Sugar Maple is a wonderful fuel tree, burning long and hot. Its dried logs create the unmistakable “Maple Cured” smokehouse taste. Even its ashes are valuable for potash and alkali.


HOLE 16: Black-Eyed Susan Hole 16 celebrates America’s most beloved wildflower, the Black-Eyed Susan. Black-Eyed Susan’s design employs the “shield” form and see-through cutouts, rather like the Bluestem (Hole 9). Here, the flowers’ vivid yellow pops through, like the plant itself in sunshine. While each flower follows the same basic form, each is slightly different in detail. “When you see a field of Black-Eyed Susans, or sunflowers or even Bluestem grass for that matter, each plant looks the same from a distance,” notes Wilczak, public art expert. “But if you look carefully, close-up, you’ll always find something unique, something special, about each one.” While she enjoys full sun, Black-Eyed Susan can tolerate a variety of conditions, from dry prairie to moist ditches and fringes of forest. This variety of the Aster family – cousin to the Sunflower (Hole 3), New England Aster (Hole 1), and even the ubiquitous dandelion -- was prized by Native Americans and pioneers for its medicinal qualities, and was used to treat ailments ranging from snakebites and earaches to worms. Naturalists consider the Black-Eyed Susan a “backbone plant” for its importance to the ecosystem. Its sweet nectar attracts and nourishes butterflies, bees and beetles; its seeds are a rich food for finches and other small birds. Black-eyed Susan is also celebrated in a romantic legend, associated with another wildflower, Sweet William, which blooms at about the same time. As described by poet John Gay: “All in the downs the fleet was moored, banners waving in the wind When Black-Eyed Susan came aboard, and eyed the burly men ‘Tell me ye sailors, tell me true if my Sweet William sails with you.’” Gardeners often plant the two flowers together, and make mixed bouquets with them. To this day, who the original “Susan” was remains a mystery.


HOLE 15: Primrose Primrose was one of the earliest tee markers created by the artists. While using the shield and cutout technique of the Cattail prototype, Primrose was much more complex and laborintensive. With this work, the artists explored and perfected te chniques for integrating the glass and metal elements. Indeed, with Primrose and later markers, both Catania and Andres had to invent or refine new techniques and methods. The result is a particularly happy blend of glass and metal. The outsized pastel petals are radiant, especially when backlit. Based on a design by Catania, Andres created the shield and made the cutouts. He then gave Catania “cookie cutter” outlines of the cutouts. Catania transferred these shapes to sand cast molds, and poured the glass in. The glass pieces were then carefully fitted into the cutouts, and sealed with silicon glue. A striking design element is the lacy see-through quality of the leaves. The artists had originally intended to fill in all of the cutouts with glass. However, once the flower was in place, they realized that the remaining, delicate cutouts nicely integrated the background into the viewer’s experience. “The beautiful leaf clusters of the primrose are remarkable for their wonderful symmetrical arrangement and … are a perfect pattern for the modeler, the sculptor, decorator or wood-carver.” William Hamilton Gibson, 1892. The artists’ elegant rendition confirms the venerable Mr. Gibson’s opinion.


HOLE 12: Sassafras (Mitten tree) The Sassafras tee marker, depicting the tree’s three distinct leaf shapes tumbling to the ground, is a particularly happy marriage of steel and glass. “I was glad the designers included Sassafras,” said Catania, “because I’ve always called it the ‘Michigan tree’(for the mitten-shaped leaf.)” A rounded metal shield encases the three leaf cutouts. Andres and Catania collaborated to find just the right angle and spacing for the three different leaf types. Catania then made molds of the cutouts, cast the variegated green glass leaves, and fitted them into the marker. The sassafras is one of the first trees to appear on the fringes of dunes (making it a so-called “early succession dune species”). Fast growing and attractive, the tree has long been touted as a medicine, flavoring and food. Sassafras tea is valued for its soothing and calming effect, and the aromatic root is the flavoring for sarsaparilla, or root beer. Its twigs, when scratched, emit an aroma reminiscent of “Fruit Loops.” Louisiana’s spicy Cajun cooking uses ground Sassafras leaves (called “file,” and pronounced “fee-lay”) for hearty File Gumbo. A member of the extensive Laurel family, the Sassafras is related to such varied plants as the avocado, cinnamon tree, and camphor tree. Sassafras root yields aromatic oil called safrole, as well as other oils and essences. Safrole-based drinks, including Sassafras tea and the original “root beer,” were eventually banned by the Food and Drug Administration as a potential carcinogen. Though this ban has been lifted, all brands of root beer now use artificial flavoring.


HOLE 13: Sycamore Stately Sycamore pleases young and old alike. They dominate a vista with their high canopy and sweeping branches, and with their strong, conveniently spaced, radiating branches, make good climbing trees. Sycamore’s notched leaves, resembling a maple’s but much larger, are also characteristic. But “the Sycamore is all about the bark,” the artists agreed when they received the commission. Unlike markers depicting other trees, Andres’ Sycamore focuses on the trunk, and especially the unmistakable peeling bark, emphasizing it even more by rendering only a section of trunk, rather than depicting a whole tree. This allowed Andres to add exquisite detail, in both texture and color, to the signature bark. Combining stainless steel and Corten, and using metal smithing techniques including cutouts, overlays, twisting and bending, Andres’ Sycamore trunk is a remarkable rendition of its signature bark. All trees shed some bark, as with each spring, a new bark layer grows and swells just beneath the outer surface. The Sycamore takes this “exfoliation” process to the extreme, rapidly growing new bark and just as rapidly shedding the old. The result is the Sycamore’s unmistakable “camouflage” pattern, in tan, gray, brown, white and yellow. The Sycamore is also noted for its resiliency. Chopped down, its stump will quickly sprout new shoots, which in time can develop into a strong new tree in its own right. Catania’s two colorful leaves, spread like waving hands from the plaque, hint at this eagerness for rebirth. Vying with numerous competitors for the honor, the noble Sycamore’s inclusion as a tee marker was locked in after the designers saw this stately tree, visible from the marker.


HOLE 14: Vervain (Wild Hyssop, Simpler’s [Herbalist’s] Joy, Herb of Grace, Herb of the Cross) A favorite aroma for scented candles and soaps, the Vervain (verbena) is a common, but easily overlooked native flower. The artists’ interpretation highlights its buds with a vivid green that “pops out,” as well as its tiny purple flowerets. The sculpture’s symmetry and detail is uncannily similar to the plant’s description in a popular book from a century ago: “With its “beady, rocket-like flowering spikes,” the Vervain is like “an elaborate, equally balanced floral candelabra.” Frederick William Stack, Wildflowers Every Child Should Know (1914), p. 350. The Celebration logo receives special treatment in this sculpture. To emphasize the vivid green glass buds, Catania added a pronounced, sparkly green swirl to the logo’s yellow circle. “Our original instruction was to keep the logo absolutely uniform in color,” recalls Catania. “Over time, the committee members trusted us more and more, and we started adding little touches of color. Everyone seems pleased with the result.” The artists admit that Vervain presented the biggest problem for placing the Celebration logo. “We took turns holding it up various places for the other,” says Catania. Eventually, Andres placed it at the very center. “Looking back, it was the only possible place,” Catania adds. Vervain has a short blossoming “window,” displaying its delicate purple flowers for only six weeks in midsummer. For this time, the riverbanks and meadows are a sea of purple, but before and after, the vervain is virtually unnoticeable. To ensure that the Harbor Shores Golf Course would be attractive all season long, designers planted and restored native flowers and trees that had differing blooming periods. From early spring through fall, golfers and nature lovers will always find beauty on the course and its environs.


Front Nine

Back Nine


Tour the natural landscapes of Harbor Shores Golf course and see the tee markers created by local artists Jerry Catania of Water Street Glassworks and Josh Andres. Guests will enjoy a leisure self guided tour through the course in their own golf cart while they read about the surrounding landscape that inspired these breathtaking sculptures. Harbor Shores is the only golf course in the country to incorporate public art into the design of the course. After the tour guest are invited back to Water Street Glassworks to meet the artists, watch glassblowing demonstrations and to indulge in refreshments including a gelato from GelatoWorks. Proceeds from this event will help fund the capital campaign for a state mandated ventilation system and electrical upgrade.

Call (269) 925-5555 To purchase tickets 140 Water Street, Benton Harbor, MI 49022 www.waterstreetglassworks.org

Tour the natural landscapes of Harbor Shores Golf course and see the tee markers created by local artists Jerry Catania of Water Street Glassworks and Josh Andres. Guests will enjoy a leisure self guided tour through the course in their own golf cart while they read about the surrounding landscape that inspired these breathtaking sculptures. Harbor Shores is the only golf course in the country to incorporate public art into the design of the course. After the tour guest are invited back to Water Street Glassworks to meet the artists, watch glassblowing demonstrations and to indulge in refreshments including a gelato from GelatoWorks. Proceeds from this event will help fund the capital campaign for a state mandated ventilation system and electrical upgrade.

Call (269) 925-5555 To purchase tickets 140 Water Street, Benton Harbor, MI 49022 www.waterstreetglassworks.org

Tour the natural landscapes of Harbor Shores Golf course and see the tee markers created by local artists Jerry Catania of Water Street Glassworks and Josh Andres. Guests will enjoy a leisure self guided tour through the course in their own golf cart while they read about the surrounding landscape that inspired these breathtaking sculptures. Harbor Shores is the only golf course in the country to incorporate public art into the design of the course. After the tour guest are invited back to Water Street Glassworks to meet the artists, watch glassblowing demonstrations and to indulge in refreshments including a gelato from GelatoWorks. Proceeds from this event will help fund the capital campaign for a state mandated ventilation system and electrical upgrade.

Call (269) 925-5555 To purchase tickets 140 Water Street, Benton Harbor, MI 49022 www.waterstreetglassworks.org

Tour the natural landscapes of Harbor Shores Golf course and see the tee markers created by local artists Jerry Catania of Water Street Glassworks and Josh Andres. Guests will enjoy a leisure self guided tour through the course in their own golf cart while they read about the surrounding landscape that inspired these breathtaking sculptures. Harbor Shores is the only golf course in the country to incorporate public art into the design of the course. After the tour guest are invited back to Water Street Glassworks to meet the artists, watch glassblowing demonstrations and to indulge in refreshments including a gelato from GelatoWorks. Proceeds from this event will help fund the capital campaign for a state mandated ventilation system and electrical upgrade.

Call (269) 925-5555 To purchase tickets 140 Water Street, Benton Harbor, MI 49022 www.waterstreetglassworks.org


Water Street Glassworks & Harbor Shores

Water Street Glassworks & Harbor Shores

Golf Cart Sculpture Tour

Golf Cart Sculpture Tour

Saturday, April 9, 2011

Saturday, April 9, 2011

Your Tee Time Is: ___________

Your Tee Time Is: ___________

Water Street Glassworks & Harbor Shores

Water Street Glassworks & Harbor Shores

Golf Cart Sculpture Tour

Golf Cart Sculpture Tour

Saturday, April 9, 2011

Saturday, April 9, 2011

Your Tee Time Is: ___________

Your Tee Time Is: ___________


YOUR TICKET ENTITLES YOU TO: -

Sculpture Tour at Harbor Shores at scheduled Tee Time Keepsake Sculpture Tour Booklet One small gelato at GelatoWorks One Regular Coffee at GelatoWorks

Raffle tickets will be sold separately for glass pieces created in the studios of Water Street Glassworks Raffle tickets are $20 each. 12:00 – 3:00 p.m. 2:00 – 6:00 p.m. 5:30 p.m.

YOUR TICKET ENTITLES YOU TO: -

Raffle tickets will be sold separately for glass pieces created in the studios of Water Street Glassworks Raffle tickets are $20 each.

Tour at Harbor Shores Reception at Water Street Glassworks Raffle Drawing

12:00 – 3:00 p.m. 2:00 – 6:00 p.m. 5:30 p.m.

You do not need to be present to win.

Water Street Glassworks,140 Water Street Benton Harbor, MI 49022 (269) 925-5555

Sculpture Tour at Harbor Shores at scheduled Tee Time Keepsake Sculpture Tour Booklet One small gelato at GelatoWorks One Regular Coffee at GelatoWorks

Raffle tickets will be sold separately for glass pieces created in the studios of Water Street Glassworks Raffle tickets are $20 each. 12:00 – 3:00 p.m. 2:00 – 6:00 p.m. 5:30 p.m.

Tour at Harbor Shores Reception at Water Street Glassworks Raffle Drawing

You do not need to be present to win.

Water Street Glassworks,140 Water Street Benton Harbor, MI 49022 (269) 925-5555

Tour at Harbor Shores Reception at Water Street Glassworks Raffle Drawing

You do not need to be present to win.

Water Street Glassworks,140 Water Street Benton Harbor, MI 49022 (269) 925-5555

YOUR TICKET ENTITLES YOU TO: -

Sculpture Tour at Harbor Shores at scheduled Tee Time Keepsake Sculpture Tour Booklet One small gelato at GelatoWorks One Regular Coffee at GelatoWorks

YOUR TICKET ENTITLES YOU TO: -

Sculpture Tour at Harbor Shores at scheduled Tee Time Keepsake Sculpture Tour Booklet One small gelato at GelatoWorks One Regular Coffee at GelatoWorks

Raffle tickets will be sold separately for glass pieces created in the studios of Water Street Glassworks Raffle tickets are $20 each. 12:00 – 3:00 p.m. 2:00 – 6:00 p.m. 5:30 p.m.

Tour at Harbor Shores Reception at Water Street Glassworks Raffle Drawing

You do not need to be present to win.

Water Street Glassworks,140 Water Street Benton Harbor, MI 49022 (269) 925-5555


Twilight in the Garden 2012


Curatorial Statement There are many aspects of an artist’s life that influence the creative investigations that they explore through their work. It often goes unsaid however the role that a shared studio environment plays in the development of an artists work. Twilight in the Garden is an exhibition that showcases the current work of students, staff and artists associated with water street glassworks and metal studio. This exhibition highlights the influential role that a dynamic shared studio environment plays in the development of a unique and diverse visual language of working with glass and metal in artistic exploration that is often collaborative. Twilight in the Garden celebrates the evolution and uniqueness of water street glassworks studio environment. This exhibition showcases a broad spectrum of fine art glass sculptures, vessels, functional work and metal work created by artists associated with water street glassworks using a myriad of processes including blown, torched, fused, casting, welding and assemblage. Unique also to this exhibition is the spectacular garden setting. as a result, viewers can actively participate in the work, drawing upon their own experiences and creativity to access the intended meaning of each work. Visitor expectations are challenged; their imaginations are stretched and offered a new way of experiencing both plants and art. As you walk among the trees and flowerbeds you may find yourself confronted by a flower shimmering in the light…or in a bog…a dragon finds its way atop an old stone wall. this may sound like the kind of thing alice might have stumbled upon down the rabbit hole – but actually, this is in the heart of Twilight in the Garden: to experience the unexpected, to see the talents of creative minds challenged by a magical setting. Exhibiting sculptural works under a canopy of trees, along the shores of Lake Michigan, intermingled with Tropical and Native plants, provides this exhibition with an inspiring presence which cannot be achieved in a gallery setting. Page 2 • Water Street Glassworks • Twilight in the Garden • August 18, 2012


The art is inspired by the natural world but given a twist and interacts perfectly with the plants that surround them. Textures, surfaces and colors are added to metal works making them shimmer playfully. As the light changes throughout the day, the works alter-they pick up colors from their surroundings in a very subtle and beautiful way. These dynamic works draw the viewer’s attention and entice them to walk deeper into the gardens to discover more. Hence the title of this exhibition, Twilight, the time of day when a special light occurs and the glass and metal captures and comes alive with the distinctive quality of the ambient light. This exhibition came together as an educational and social experience as well as an opportunity to encourage public participation in and engagement with their local visual culture. How can contemporary art and cultural organizations connect with the public and demonstrate value and relevance in everyday life? We can do this by inviting people to actively engage as cultural participants, not passive consumers. As more people enjoy and become accustomed to participatory learning and entertainment experiences, they want to do more than just “attend” cultural events; when people can actively participate with cultural organizations, those places become central to cultural and community life.” Since its inception Water Street Glassworks has been an influential force in the creative development of students, artists and teachers alike. Through the arts Water Street Glassworks has played a pivotal role in the changing face of Benton Harbor showing that art has the power to transform community. I invite you to discover and experience and enjoy…Twilight in the Garden. Susan Wilczak, Curator

Water Street Glassworks • Twilight in the Garden • August 18, 2012 • Page 3


WATER STREET GLASSWORKS Water Street Glassworks is a non-profit, fine-art glass and metal school, gallery, and public access studio located in the Benton Harbor Arts District. We offer Classes, Exhibits, Events highlighting the art of glass and metal along with the award winning after-school program, Fired Up! All proceeds from this event benefit the operations and programming at Water Street Glassworks.501(c)(3) non-profit organization BOARD OF DIRECTORS Anne Odden, President Barbara Pence, Vice-President Pamela Harper, Treasurer Catherine Pampalone, Secretary Ken Flowers Jacquie Johnson Kerri LeRoux Tony McGhee Dar Davis Margie Mattice Harold Bragg Tamara Phillippe Sarah Hess, Executive Director Co-Founders Jerry & Kathy Catania Special thanks to: Rhonda Snowaert in making a crazy dream become a magical, Twilight in the Garden. Susan Wilczak for guiding Water Street Glassworks artists into a new, unimagined journey. Lynne Clayton for keeping the journey on course and the waters calm with laughter and kindness. Leslie Hilmer & Danielle Brown, for without whom the twilight would not sparkle so clearly. And to the artists who participated, thank you for having the courage to cross your boundaries and discover the power behind the passion. You inspire us every day! Page 4 • Water Street Glassworks • Twilight in the Garden • August 18, 2012


PARTICIPATING ARTISTS Jerry Catania Robert Catania Daniel Christy Aaron Closson Heidi Closson Cynthia Fielding Jan Kimball Cynthia McKean Margie Mattice Carolyn O'Hearn Richard Thomas John VanAmerongen Rebecca Wehmer Eli Zilke

FIRED UP! ARTISTS Otis Cornelius Mahalah Fuller Dajanae Greely Oalliyah Hornes Stephen Nickel Mika Page Emma Schaper Allen Warren

Water Street Glassworks • Twilight in the Garden • August 18, 2012 • Page 5


JERRY CATANIA

LD SO

Jurassic Jewels cast glass & steel. $700.

For the Birds cast glass & steel $700.

Jerry Catania's 2 works can be viewed in the "Autumn Garden".

Page 6 • Water Street Glassworks • Twilight in the Garden • August 18, 2012


ROBERT CATANIA

Binary Seat cast glass & cement $900.

Nordic cast glass & cement $900.

Robert Catania's 2 works can be viewed in the "Autumn Garden".

Water Street Glassworks • Twilight in the Garden • August 18, 2012 • Page 7


AARON CLOSSON

HEIDI CLOSSON

Butterfly Bench steel $1,500. Carbonic Life steel $2,700.

Interrupted steel & copper $1,100.

A. Closson and H. Closson's work can be viewed in the "Sculpture Garden", the "Fall Garden", and the "Asian Garden". Page 8 • Water Street Glassworks • Twilight in the Garden • August 18, 2012


CYNTHIA ALTON FIELDING

Red Weave kiln-formed glass & steel • H 6' x W 8" $1,250 ea.

Untitled

SO LD

Blue Ice in Orange

Fiery Dragon kiln-formed glass & steel • H 12" x W 5' $2,400.

Cynthia Fielding's 5 works can be viewed in the "Bog Garden", "Asian Garden", and "Lake Garden"

Fiery Dragon Sm. kiln-formed glass & steel • H 8" x W 40" $1,400.

Water Street Glassworks • Twilight in the Garden • August 18, 2012 • Page 9


SO LD

CAROLYN O'HEARN

Who's Counting kiln-formed glass, steel, stone $650.

CYNTHIA FIELDING

Beauty kiln-formed glass, copper $200.

Both Fielding and O'Hearn's works can be viewed in the "Asian Garden".

Page 10 • Water Street Glassworks • Twilight in the Garden • August 18, 2012


SO LD

JAN KIMBALL

Flora Blue fused glass & ceramic • H 33" x W 10" $190.

Flora Trio fused glass & ceramic • H 36 - 40" x W 22" $360 each.

Flora Totum fused glass & ceramic • H 5' x W 18" $1,800.

Jan Kimball's 3 works can be viewed in the "Bog Garden". Water Street Glassworks • Twilight in the Garden • August 18, 2012 • Page 11


CYNTHIA MCKEAN

www.cynthiamckean.com

Wing steel • H 11' x W 4' $9,500.

Untittled steel • H 46" x W 34" $2,800.

Wave Runners steel • H 22" x W 34" $2,300.

Cynthia McKean's e works can be viewed in the "Bog Garden", the "Autumn Garden" and the "Lake Garden".

Page 12 • Water Street Glassworks • Twilight in the Garden • August 18, 2012


MARGIE MATTICE

LD SO Beneath the Fern dalles de verre & steel • H 4 x W 5.5" $1,800.

Awe of the Beholder handblown glass & steel • H 6 x W 4 $2,400.

Margie Mattice's 2 works can be viewed in the "Formal Tropical Garden" and the "Autumn Garden".

Water Street Glassworks • Twilight in the Garden • August 18, 2012 • Page 13


CAROLYN O'HEARN

Cascade kiln-fused glass & stainless steel H 9.5' x W 7.5' $8,400.

Carolyn O'Hearn's work can be viewed in the "Lake Garden"

Page 14 • Water Street Glassworks • Twilight in the Garden • August 18, 2012


RICHARD THOMAS

Flame dalles de Verre & steel • H 60" x W 37" $1,400.

Flame dalles de Verre & steel • H 42" x W 36" $1,400.

Wave dalles de Verre & steel • H 37" x W 32" $1,400.

Richard Thomas' 3 works can be viewed in the "Formal Tropical Garden". Water Street Glassworks • Twilight in the Garden • August 18, 2012 • Page 15


JOHN VANAMERONGEN

Bower Study welded steel • H 7' x W 4.5 $7,000.

John VanAmerongen's work can be viewed in the "Sculpture Garden".

Page 16 • Water Street Glassworks • Twilight in the Garden • August 18, 2012


REBECCA WEHMER

Canna handblown glass & bamboo installation $1,500.

Rebecca Wehmer's work can be viewed in the "Lake Garden".

Water Street Glassworks • Twilight in the Garden • August 18, 2012 • Page 17


ELI ZILKE & DANIEL CHRISTY

Parasite handblown glass & steel ' $8,000.

Eli Zilke & Daniel Christy's work can be viewed in "Bog Garden".

Page 18 • Water Street Glassworks • Twilight in the Garden • August 18, 2012


ELI ZILKE & RICHARD THOMAS

Propora handblown glass & steel • H 14' x W 3' $9,450.

Eli Zilke & Richard Thomas' work can be viewed in "Formal Tropical Garden".

Water Street Glassworks • Twilight in the Garden • August 18, 2012 • Page 19


LD SO

FIRED UP! ARTISTS & JERRY CATANIA Otis Cornelius Mahalah Fuller Dajanae Greely Oalliyah Hornes Stephen Nickel Mika Page Emma Schaper Allen Warren

Tiger Lilies handblown glass & steel ' $900.

Eli Zilke & Rchiard Thomas' work can be viewed in "Formal Tropical Garden".

Page 20 • Water Street Glassworks • Twilight in the Garden • August 18, 2012


FIRED UP! AFTER-SCHOOL TEEN GLASS PROGRAM Water Street Glassworks is proud to offer Fired Up! as an after-school glass program for the area youth. Truly a unique opportunity, teens learn the art of glassblowing, fusing, beadmaking or stained glass afterschool from mid-September through June Fired Up! is not your typical after-school program in that we ask students and parents to make a two-year commitment to the program. Fired Up! is similiar to an AP fine arts course and is therefore an intensive study of the medium, studio work, the business of art, teamwork and social skills. The art of glass is one that requires focus, forgiveness, patience and teamwork. Our passion for the program shows through the caliber of instructors we choose, the skills that are applied and the support of the organization. During the Fired Up! school year, students participate in two semester-end exhibitions every winter and spring at Water Street Glassworks. At their opening reception discuss their work, demonstrate their skills, interact with guests and welcome family members. The Fired Up! experience culminates annually in a professional marketing and entrepreneurial experience a the Krasl Art Fair on the Bluff in St. Joseph.Becoming Members of the Creative Community Fired Up! students learn to become teen entrepreneurs and practice the “business of art” through hands-on creative learning. Students are encouraged to actively participate in the creative community of the Benton Harbor and St. Joseph by selling their work at summer (July) and fall (September) art fairs, through their semester-end exhibits (December & April), and selling of their work in the Water Street GelatoWorks Gallery. The gallery component of GelatoWorks is a year around retail venue for glass art created at our school and a marketing tool for our mission, educational programming, youth job training, event s and exhibits. In addition to selling their work, students have the opportunity to volunteer in the gelato shop behind the counter. A part of the Fired Up! program is also personal and community responsibility. Although most of our students have received this program tuition-free all students are required to give back to the program in two ways. First, 30% of sales of student work are returned to the program, and second, students spend a few hours each semester making production glass pieces to be sold at art fairs to benefit the program. Fired Up! plays a big role in our organization and is the foundation of community commitment. We invited you to come visit the studios and talk to our students about their work and their experiences in the program.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT! Water Street Glassworks • Twilight in the Garden • August 18, 2012 • Page 21


MAESTRO SPONSORS

SERVENTE SPONSORS

EDUCATIONAL SPONSORS


FIRED UP!

NOTES:

AFTER-SCHOOL TEEN GLASS PROGRAM

“The technical demands of glass make it the ideal vehicle for personal change”, laud the Cataniaʼs. is an intensive fine arts program, where Middle School and High School students are offered instruction in the art of glass and the business of art. students also gain life skills which include: Self-Confidence Patience Self-Evaluation Dedication Trust Leadership Teamwork Philanthropy Problem Solving Public speaking Entrepreneurship Job skills We are a small program with BIG results. is made possible through generous donors like YOU!

Who We Are Water Street Glassworks & GelatoWorks is a non-profit, glass arts studio gallery & educational facility welcoming visitors of all ages to experience the exciting world of glass. Through the vision of our Founders, Jerry and Kathy Catania, Water Street Glassworks opened its doors to the public in 2004. The Fired Up! afterschool teen glass program was created by the Catanias as a way of giving back to their hometown of Benton Harbor. Located in the heart of the rejuvenated Benton Harbor Arts District, Water Street Glassworks offers itself as an anchor to the progressive Benton Harbor renewal through the arts movement.


Get FIRED UP!

YOU can support the students’ learning and their program by visiting the Fired Up! student-run gallery, GelatoWorks. GelatowWorks is a classroom for the business of art portion of their program. Proceeds from GelatoWorks, assists in funding the Fired Up! program. Fired Up! after-school teen glass program is made possible through public and private funding. If you would like information on how you may support the program, please call our office for more information.

We are located in the Benton Harbor Arts District at 140 Water Street Benton Harbor, MI 49022

(269) 925-5555 For more information on our public adult and teen classes, please visit our website at

waterstreetglassworks.org Or Facebook page at

facebook.com/WSGlassworks Or see us in action at

youtube.com/WSGlassworks

Benefits of Sponsorship YOU become a partner in offering an award winning organization and life changing teen program that has proven to be a successful anchor in the Benton Harbor Arts District and continues to grow. Your Name will be recognized on our sponsorship wall and listed in our semester class catalogs as a sponsor of the after-school teen glass program for the year(s) of sponsorship.

Water Street Glassworks is also home to the nationally recognized, Fired Up! an after-school teen glass program. Listed as on the top 50 after school programs in the country in 2009 by President’s Council on Arts, Culture and Humanities. Fired Up! students learn the art of Glassblowing, kiln-formed glass, stained glass, or flame-working and the business of art, after school, from mid-September through July. Currently up to 30 students can apply each year to participate in the program. Students, along with their families submit an extensive application, attend an open house, interview with faculty before they are selected to join the Fired Up! program. The program requires that the students commit to two years in the program where they receive a minimum of 180 hours per year of individual instruction, training and exposure to the world of glass art and the business of art. As part of the business of art, students participate and organize two semester-end exhibitions every December and April at WSG, where they display their work, demonstrate their skills, and interact with guests. Students also participate in exhibitions with other arts organizations and learn the process of submitting their work, developing a portfolio and negotiating with galleries and organizations in displaying their work.

Level of Sponsorship Sign up for: _____

MAESTRO

$1,800

_____

SERVENTE

$ 900

_____

GARZONE

$ 450

_____

OTHER

$______

NAME: __________________________________________ ADDRESS: _______________________________________ CITY/STATE/ZIP: _________________________________ PHONE: _________________________________________ EMAIL: __________________________________________ CHECK# _________ MC/VISA# _______________________________________ 3 DIGIT SECURITY CODE# ___ ___ ___


Water Street Glassworks

Water Street Glassworks

Water Street Glassworks

Water Street Glassworks

Fired Up!

Fired Up!

Fired Up!

Fired Up!

After-school teen glass program

After-school teen glass program

After-school teen glass program

After-school teen glass program

Fired Up! Students learn the art of Glassblowing, kiln-formed glass, Stained glass, or flameworking and the business of art, after school, from mid-September through July. Students and their families commit two years to the program.

Fired Up! Students learn the art of Glassblowing, kiln-formed glass, Stained glass, or flameworking and the business of art, after school, from mid-September through July. Students and their families commit two years to the program.

Fired Up! Students learn the art of Glassblowing, kiln-formed glass, Stained glass, or flameworking and the business of art, after school, from mid-September through July. Students and their families commit two years to the program.

Fired Up! Students learn the art of Glassblowing, kiln-formed glass, Stained glass, or flameworking and the business of art, after school, from mid-September through July. Students and their families commit two years to the program.

“The technical demands of glass make it the ideal vehicle for personal change” – founder, Jerry Catania

“The technical demands of glass make it the ideal vehicle for personal change” – founder, Jerry Catania

“The technical demands of glass make it the ideal vehicle for personal change” – founder, Jerry Catania

“The technical demands of glass make it the ideal vehicle for personal change” – founder, Jerry Catania

Teamwork Patience Trust Job Skills Leadership Philanthropy

Self-Evaluation Dedication Self-Confidence Problem Solving Entrepreneurship Public Speaking

This transformational and creative process improves more than just technical skill – itʼs a whole new outlook on life!

Teamwork Patience Trust Job Skills Leadership Philanthropy

Self-Evaluation Dedication Self-Confidence Problem Solving Entrepreneurship Public Speaking

This transformational and creative process improves more than just technical skill – itʼs a whole new outlook on life!

Teamwork Patience Trust Job Skills Leadership Philanthropy

Self-Evaluation Dedication Self-Confidence Problem Solving Entrepreneurship Public Speaking

This transformational and creative process improves more than just technical skill – itʼs a whole new outlook on life!

Teamwork Patience Trust Job Skills Leadership Philanthropy

Self-Evaluation Dedication Self-Confidence Problem Solving Entrepreneurship Public Speaking

This transformational and creative process improves more than just technical skill – itʼs a whole new outlook on life!


YOU can support the students始 learning and their program by visiting the Fired Up! student-run gallery, GelatoWorks.

YOU can support the students始 learning and their program by visiting the Fired Up! student-run gallery, GelatoWorks.

YOU can support the students始 learning and their program by visiting the Fired Up! student-run gallery, GelatoWorks.

YOU can support the students始 learning and their program by visiting the Fired Up! student-run gallery, GelatoWorks.

GelatowWorks is a classroom for the business of art portion of their program. Proceeds from GelatoWorks, assists in funding the Fired Up! Program.

GelatowWorks is a classroom for the business of art portion of their program. Proceeds from GelatoWorks, assists in funding the Fired Up! Program.

GelatowWorks is a classroom for the business of art portion of their program. Proceeds from GelatoWorks, assists in funding the Fired Up! Program.

GelatowWorks is a classroom for the business of art portion of their program. Proceeds from GelatoWorks, assists in funding the Fired Up! Program.

Fired Up! After-school teen glass program is made possible through public and private funding. If you would like information on how you may support the program, please call our office for more information.

Fired Up! After-school teen glass program is made possible through public and private funding. If you would like information on how you may support the program, please call our office for more information.

Fired Up! After-school teen glass program is made possible through public and private funding. If you would like information on how you may support the program, please call our office for more information.

Fired Up! After-school teen glass program is made possible through public and private funding. If you would like information on how you may support the program, please call our office for more information.

We are located in the Benton Harbor Arts District at 140 Water Street Benton Harbor, MI 49022

We are located in the Benton Harbor Arts District at 140 Water Street Benton Harbor, MI 49022

We are located in the Benton Harbor Arts District at 140 Water Street Benton Harbor, MI 49022

We are located in the Benton Harbor Arts District at 140 Water Street Benton Harbor, MI 49022

(269) 925-5555

(269) 925-5555

(269) 925-5555

(269) 925-5555

For more information on our public adult and teen classes, please visit our website at

For more information on our public adult and teen classes, please visit our website at

For more information on our public adult and teen classes, please visit our website at

For more information on our public adult and teen classes, please visit our website at

waterstreetglassworks.org

waterstreetglassworks.org

waterstreetglassworks.org

waterstreetglassworks.org

Or Facebook page at

Or Facebook page at

Or Facebook page at

Or Facebook page at

facebook.com/WSGlassworks

facebook.com/WSGlassworks

facebook.com/WSGlassworks

facebook.com/WSGlassworks

Or see us in action at

Or see us in action at

Or see us in action at

Or see us in action at

youtube.com/WSGlassworks

youtube.com/WSGlassworks

youtube.com/WSGlassworks

youtube.com/WSGlassworks


Water Street Glassworks & GelatoWorks is a non profit, glass arts studio, gallery & educational facility welcoming visitors of all ages to experience the exciting world of glass.

For more information regarding our events, studio & classes, please check out our website at www.waterstreetglassworks.org or call our offices at 269-925-5555


WINTER & SPRING 2014 SEMESTER CATALOG

140 Water Street, Benton Harbor, Michigan 49022 (269) 925-5555 www.waterstreetglassworks.org

school, studio and gallery dedicated to the glass and metal “fire arts” CLASSES & WORKSHOPS FOR STUDENTS AGE TEEN TO ADULT EVENTS AND EXHIBITIONS

WATER STREET GLASSWORKS • WINTER & SPRING 2014 • Ph: 269-925-5555 • www.waterstreetglassworks.org • Page 1


Water Street glassworks winter & spring 2014 nEWS & events

SAIC: FIRE & ICE

Benton Harbor spring art hop events

Exhibition & Performance Saturday, January 18, (6 – 9pm) Come in from the cold and experience the beauty and magic of Fire & Ice for yourself. See creativity in action and marvel at the diverse artistic results of this two-week glass intensive at WSG with students from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. This is a one-night exhibit, reception and performance, that you won’t want to miss! This event is free and open to the public.

Friday, March 14, (6 - 9pm)

* "WEEKEND WARRIORS": Opening Reception Weekend Warriors are WSG's most dedicated group of adult students. It's not their profession, but it's certainly their passion! Weekend Warriors is on display in the Dorris Akers Gallery, March 14 - April 19.

*WSG art hop Glass Sampler:

Create your own glass art during Art Hop! Sample up to four very different ways of working with glass for a small fee. • PULLED GLASS FLOWER - $40. • GLASS PAPERWEIGHT - $60. • GLASS BEADS - $15. • SMALL FUSED GLASS PANEL - $15. All Sampler materials are provided. No experience is required. Projects will start on the ½ hr. We suggest you pre-register for a time slot as space availability varies.

*GELATOWORKS RE-OPENS FOR THE SEASON!

Celebrate the spring re-opneing with some Irish cheer at GelatoWorks and savor some St. Patrick’s Day-inspired flavors among the many delicious created by Palazzolo's artisan gelato created in Fennville, Michigan.

Spend Valentine's Evening In support of the Fired Up! after school teen glass program. WSG cordially invites you and your Valentine to a swingin’ good time in The Oak Room at the Citadel.Located at 91 Hinkley Street. Enjoy heavy hors d’oeuvres, cash bar, desserts and gelato. Dance to the swingin’ tunes of the Ed Bagatini New Swing Orchestra. Bid to your hearts' desire on Live and silent auction items. Fired Up! students have created heartwarming pieces available for purchase. Guests will also receive a special glass gift! $75 per person, limited to 100 guests. Call 925-5555 for tickets.

FIRED UP! SPRING EXHIBIT & DEMONSTRATION NIGHT Reception: Saturday, April 26, (6 - 8 pm) Exhibition April 26 - May 10 in the Dorris Akers Gallery Celebrate the accomplishments of Fired Up! teen glass artists as they exhibit their most recent work and perform live demonstrations in four different studios. Applications for Fall 2014 enrollment will be available. Staff will be on hand to answer questions about the program. Fired Up! is available to youth 12 - 17 throughout Berrien County. This free event is family-friendly and open to the public.

Page 32 • WATER STREET GLASSWORKS • WINTER & SPRING 2014 • Ph: 269-925-5555 • www.waterstreetglassworks.org


Water Street gELATOWORKS Winter & spring 2014 NEWS & EVENTS

WATER STREET GLASSWORKS STAFF Administration and Operations: Lori Csintyan, Office Manager & Registrar May Schultz-Reed, Fired Up! Coordinator Becky Wehmer, Studio Manager Eli Zilke, Studio Technician Staff Instructors: Jerry Catania, Glassblowing Eli Zilke, Glassblowing May Schultz-Reed, Stained Glass Carolyn O'Hearn, Fused Glass Becky Wehmer, Flameworking & Glassblowing

*New!* Make it for Mom Saturday at Water Street Glassworks! Saturday, may 03 Make a memorable gift to give to mom or grandma this Mothers' Day at "Make It For Mom Saturday" at Water Street Glassworks. Choose 1, 2 or all 3 classes!

GelatoWorks: Fired Up! GelatoWorks Team

A Heartfelt thanks to the many volunteers who help our organization grow and continue serve the community.

=NIGHT LIGHT (1 - 2pm) Instructor: Marion Maier Create a special night light for Mom to light the way for Mother's Day! No experience required. Limited to ages 12 - 16. All materials provided. $25.

=BEAD BRACELET (2 - 3pm) Instructor: Becky Wehmer Use a torch to make glass beads and create a dazzling bracelet for Mom to wear this Mothers' Day. No experience required. Limited to ages 12 - 16. All materials provided. $25.

=STAINED GLASS SUNCATCHER (3 - 4:30pm) Instructor: May Schultz-Reed Make a beautiful stained glass suncatcher to display in a window for Mom to enjoy everyday. No experience required. Limited to ages 12 - 16. All materials provided. $25.

WATER STREET GLASSWORKS • WINTER & SPRING 2014 • Ph: 269-925-5555 • www.waterstreetglassworks.org • Page 32


Water Street glassworks WINTER & SPRING 2014 vISITING ARTISTS

Pearl Dick Pearl Dick was born in Toledo, OH in 1977 where she believes that glass was initially ingrained in her consciousness. Her family moved to Southeastern CT when she was nine and she considers New England her home. Pearl studied glass and painting at Alfred University in New York and moved to the Pacific NW upon graduation in 1998 to pursue a career in glass art. In 2003, Pearl relocated to Chicago, where she realized her first major artistic achievements in her debut at SOFA Chicago in 2005 and her first solo show at Habatat Gallery in 2006. Her work has since been exhibited in galleries, public art exhibitions and private residences throughout the US. In 2007, Pearl was integral in the inception of the Glassworks Program through Cooperative Image Group­­a local non­profit organization providing arts education to youth in underserved communities throughout Chicago. She is currently the Artistic Director of Ignite Glass Studios in Chicago where she continues her artistic practice along with the development of educational and community outreach programs.

Kait Rhoads Kait Rhoads received her BFA from Rhode Island School of Design in 1993 and her MFA from Alfred University in 2001. In 2001 She traveled to Italy on a Fulbright grant to study sculpture in Murano, Venice. She lives and works in Seattle WA. Collections: Seattle Art Museum, Corning Museum of Glass and Carnegie Museum of Art.

Form & Function, Kait Rhoads

Page 54 • WATER STREET GLASSWORKS • WINTER & SPRING 2014 • Ph: 269-925-5555 • www.waterstreetglassworks.org


Water Street GLASSWORKS cLASS rEGISTRATION & student requirements

WSG CLASS REGISTRATION INFORMATION All courses require pre-registration and are based on Eastern Standard Time. REGISTRATION BEGINS JANUARY 02, 2014 OFFICE HOURS: Tuesday thru Friday, 10am-5pm; Saturday, 12am-4pm Sunday & Monday, Closed REGISTER: by phone (269) 925-5555 or in person during office hours. We do not accept online or email registrations at this time. PAYMENT: due no more than 5 days after registration and must be made through the office. (Instructors are not responsible for payments) We accept Visa, Master Card, Cash or Check made payable to: Water Street Glassworks 140 Water Street, Benton Harbor, MI 49022 CANCELLATION: refunds given up to 7 days prior to class. PARKING: parking and entrance to studio are in back of the building. SPECIAL NOTICES: • Future prices are subject to change due to fluctuations in utility prices. • We reserve the right to cancel, reschedule or adjust class levels according to demand, weather, illness or equipment failure. You will be sent a confirmation once enrollment requirements are met or if a class is cancelled. • Your payment is held until enrollment is met. If a class is cancelled your payment will be returned, refunded or destroyed. • All students must sign a liability waiver on the first day of class

Class Safety Requirements

The following safety precautions apply to all artists and students in all Water Street Glassworks' classes and studios, regardless of experience:

• Protective eyewear is required and provided. Prescription eyeglasses are acceptable. • Wear only non-flammable fabrics; 100% cotton is recommended. • Long pants/jeans are required. No shorts. • Wear long-sleeved shirts or short sleeves with arm protection (Kevlar sleeves are provided). • Wear closed-toe, non-skid shoes and socks. No sandals. • No jewelry or acrylic nails allowed. • Long hair must be tied back.

WATER STREET GLASSWORKS WILL BE CLOSED FOR THE HOLIDAYS: December 22 thru January 1 WATER STREET GELATOWORKS IS TAKING A WINTER HIATUS. LOOK FOR GELATO TO RETURN TO THE CASE FRIDAY, MARCH 14 IN TIME FOR THE BENTON HARBOR SPRING ART HOP AT 6PM CLOSINGS DUE TO WINTER WEATHER: Water Street Glassworks will close when Benton Harbor Public Schools close due to winter weather conditions.

WATER STREET GLASSWORKS • WINTER & SPRING 2014 • Ph: 269-925-5555 • www.waterstreetglassworks.org • Page 54


Water Street GLASSWORKS studio rental information

STUDIO RENTAL REGISTRATION All courses require pre-registration and are based on Eastern Standard Time. REGISTRATION BEGINS JANUARY 03, 2014 REGISTER: by phone or in person. No email registrations for the hot shop during the first week of registration. PAYMENT: due no more than 5 days after registration. CANCELLATION: refunds given up to 7 days prior to rental. PARKING: parking and entrance to studio are in back of the building. SPECIAL NOTICES: • Future prices are subject to change due to fluctuations in utility prices. • We reserve the right to cancel, reschedule or adjust rental slots according to demand, weather, illness or equipment failure. You will be contacted if a rental slot is cancelled. • If a rental slot is cancelled by WSG, your payment will be returned, refunded or destroyed. • All renters must fulfill class matriculation requirements for each studio and be approved by for renting by Studio Manager.

Contact the Studio Manager: (269)925-1944 - OR - via email: becky@waterstreetglassworks.org glassblowing studio RENTAL

FUSED GLASS STUDIO RENTAL ages 12 & up)

Glassblowing studio rental hours are available only to students who have successfully completed Glassblowing 4 at WSG (or equivalent from another studio) and can safely demonstrate a proficient level of skill. Contact the office for an interview/ audition. Sign up with a partner or one will be assigned to you. STUDIO LIMIT: 4 renters per session. $70 per person, per session, shared bench.

Fusing studio rental hours are available to students (12 & up) who have successfully completed Beginning Fused Glass and can safely demonstrate a proficient level of skill or by faculty approval. There is no formal instruction during studio rental. Bring your own supplies, use our tools and leave your projects to be fired. We’ll make it easy for you! $10. per hour

Weekdays: Mondays & Fridays, (2-6 pm) Tuesdays & Thursdays, (6-10pm) WEEKENDS: Saturdays Jan. 25, (2-6pm) Feb. 08 & 22, (2-6pm) March 01, (1-5pm) March 08, (2-6pm) April 03, 17, 24 & 31, (2-6pm) April 05, (2-6pm) April 12 & 19, (10am-2pm & 2-6pm) May 03, 17, 24 & 31, (2-6pm) weekends: Sundays Jan 26, (2-6pm) Feb. 09 & 23, (2-6pm) March 09, (2-6pm) March 30, (10am-2pm & 2-6pm) April 04, 06 & 18, (2-6pm) April 11 & 27, (10am-2pm & 2-6pm) April 13, (4-8pm) May 04 & 18 (2-6pm)

STAINED GLASS STUDIO RENTAL (Ages 12 & up) Stained glass studio rental hours are available to students (12 & up) who have successfully completed Beginning Stained Glass. There is no formal instruction during studio rental. You can rent studio time and work on your project independently using our tools. You must supply your own glass, lead, copper foil and zinc. $10. per hour

FLAMEWORKING STUDIO RENTAL (Ages 12 & up) Flameworking studio rental hours are available to students (12 & up) who have successfully comleted Flameworking 2. Tools and glass are included. There is no formal instruction during studio rental. $12. per hour for Hot Head torch. $15 per hour for Minor torch. Make arrangements in advance to use a Minor torch.

Rental times for the Fusing, Stained Glass and Flameworking Studio are available by appointment. Please call the Studio Manager at (269)925-1944 to make arrangements.

Please inquire for additional times available. Page 76 • WATER STREET GLASSWORKS • WINTER & SPRING 2014 • Ph: 269-925-5555 • www.waterstreetglassworks.org


Weekend Glassblowing Ages 15 & above

WSG Matriculation Sequence For Glassblowing • Glassblowing instruction in both the four-week and weekend formats is sequenced into four courses: Glassblowing 1, 2, 3 and 4 • Tutoring is available in between each session if you or the instructor feel additional experience is needed, to progress to the next level. • After successful completion of either sequence, you are eligible for studio rental, which allows access to the glassblowing studio in four-hour reserved time slots. GLASSBLOWING 1: Weekend Workshop Saturday & Sunday, January 25 & 26, (9am - 2pm) - or Saturday & sunday, april 05 & 06, (9am - 2pm) Instructor: Jerry Catania This hands-on workshop introduces the art of glassblowing to the beginner. Learn skills and techniques for manipulating molten hot glass into vessels. Lectures and demonstrations augment studio instruction. You will work in teams of two because good teamwork is an important aspect of an efficient and safe glass studio. No experience required. All materials are provided. $250.

GLASSBLOWING 2: Weekend Workshop Saturday & Sunday, February 08 & 09, (9am - 2pm) - OR Saturday & Sunday, April 26 & 27, (9am - 2pm) Instructor: Jerry Catania Practice desired shapes and learn an introduction to color as you build on the basic techniques and skills learned in Glassblowing 1. Prerequisite: Glassblowing 1. All materials are provided. $250.

GLASSBLOWING TUTORING Instructor: Becky Wehmer or Eli Zilke If you have completed a glassblowing level but still feel a little behind, we now offer tutoring! Becky or Eli will work with you one-on-one to determine where you are having the most difficulty and help you improve your skills. Contact the Studio Manager at 269-925-1944 or via email (becky@ waterstreetglassworks.org). $70 / hr.

GLASSBLOWING 3 : (Bit Work) Weekend Workshop Saturday & Sunday, February 22 & 23, (9am - 2pm) - OR Saturday & Sunday, May 03 & 04, (9am - 2pm) Instructor: Jerry Catania Move beyond the basic vessel and focus on the techniques and teamwork necessary to accurately and safely apply "bits" such as handles, feet, wraps and prunts. Exercises to develop these skills will be applied to your own design interests. Prerequisite: Glassblowing 2. All materials are provided. $250.

GLASSBLOWING 4 Adv. Techniques - Refining Form & Craft: Four-Week Course Saturday & Sunday, march 08 & 09, (9am - 2pm) - OR Saturday & Sunday, May 17 & 18, (9am - 2pm) Instructor: Jerry Catania This course builds on the basic color and shaping techniques covered in the Glassblowing 2 & 3. Incalmo, wraps, cane pick-ups, optical mold designs, cane drawing, etc. will be covered. Prerequisite: Glassblowing 3. Bring your own color. $250.

WATER STREET GLASSWORKS • WINTER & SPRING 2014 • Ph: 269-925-5555 • www.waterstreetglassworks.org • Page 76


Weekday Glassblowing ages 15 & up

GLASSBLOWING 1: Four-Week Course Mondays, January 20 - February 10 , (6 - 8:30pm) - OR Mondays, March 31 - April 21, (6 - 8:30 pm) Instructor: Jerry Catania This hands-on workshop introduces the art of glassblowing to the beginner. Learn skills and techniques for manipulating molten hot glass into vessels. Lectures and demonstrations augment studio instruction. You will work in teams of two, because good teamwork is an important aspect of an efficient and safe glass studio. No experience required. All materials are provided. $250.

SPECIAL TOPICS AGES 15 & UP

*New!*

ITALIAN STEMWARE: WEEKEND WORKSHOP

Saturday & Sunday, February 01 & 02, (10am - 5pm) Instructor: Eli Zilke Push your own limits! Learn how to blow thin cups, stems, and feet to assemble into goblets - one of Italy's proudest traditions. Prerequisite: Glassblowing 3. $240.

GLASSBLOWING 2: Four-Week Course Mondays, February 24 - March 17, (6 - 8:30pm) - OR Mondays, April 28 - May 19, (6 - 8:30pm) Instructor: Jerry Catania Practice desired shapes and learn an introduction to color as you build on the basic techniques and skills learned in Glassblowing 1. Prerequisite: Glassblowing 1. All materials are provided. $250.

GLASSBLOWING 3 : (Bit-work) Four-Week Course Wednesdays, January 22 - February 12, (6 - 8:30pm) - OR Wednesdays, April 02 - 23, (6 - 8:30 pm) Instructor: Jerry Catania Move beyond the basic vessel and focus on the techniques and teamwork necessary to accurately and safely apply "bits" such as handles, feet, wraps and prunts. Exercises to develop these skills will be applied to your own design interests. Prerequisite: Glassblowing 2. All materials are provided. $250.

GLASSBLOWING 4 Adv. Techniques - Refining Form & Craft: Four-Week Course Wednesdays, February 26 - March 19, (6 - 8:30pm) Instructor: Jerry Catania This course builds on the basic color and shaping techniques covered in the Glassblowing 2 & 3. Incalmo, wraps, cane pick-ups, optical mold designs, cane drawing, etc. will be covered. Prerequisite: Glassblowing 3. Bring your own color. $250.

ADVANCED CANE & MURRINI: WEEKEND WORKSHOP Saturday & Sunday, February 15 & 16, (10am - 4pm) Instructor: Eli Zilke Learn to produce decorative cane and murrini, including your own personal signature murrini to use in your future masterpieces. Prerequisite: Glassblowing 3. $210.

PAPERWEIGHT WORKSHOP Saturday, March 01, (9am - 1pm) Instructor: Jerry Catania Learn basic forming and color application techniques used in traditional and contemporary paperweight designs. Learn to use woodblocks and paperweight paddles as shaping tools. Color techniques include: optically-molded frit, wraps, colored powders and bubbles. Prerequisite: Glassblowing 2. $175. SPIN TO WIN: CENTRIFUGAL CASTING Sunday, March 02, (10 am - 4pm) or sunday, may 25, (10am - 4pm) Instructor: Jerry Catania Apply the principle of centrifugal force to ladle cast glass and voila! - you get one-of-a-kind, beautiful bowls. Form bowl shapes in sand and press in patterns to create “one-use” molds. Pour in the glass and “spin” for a “winning” functional work of art. Expect to make several pieces. No experience required. $150.

Please See Page 6 For Studio Rental Information Page 98 • WATER STREET GLASSWORKS • WINTER & SPRING 2014 • Ph: 269-925-5555 • www.waterstreetglassworks.org


special Topics aGES 15 & UP

*New!*

*New!*

Saturday & Sunday, March 15 & 16, (9am - 6pm) Visiting artist: Kait Rhoads This two-day workshop will explore two specific elongated forms in glass: long-necked bottle and the cone. On the first day, clear glass will be used in order to fully explore the mechanics/choreography of creating these forms. On the second day, color will be incorporated into the forms to make it even more exciting! Teamwork will be emphasized as the teacher has a foundation of Italian style glassworking. Students will adapt the physics of how glass functions to "work smarter not harder". Prerequisite: Glassblowing 3. $375.

Saturday & sunday, May 10 & 11, (9am - 5pm) Visiting artist: Pearl Dick In this introductory level hot sculpting course, students will learn how to bring their sketches to life in hot glass. Bitwork, garage assembly and color applications will be covered as well as strategic puntying and collaboration. Prerequisite: Glassblowing 2. Bring a sketchbook and a butter knife. $325.

FORM & COLOR: WEEKEND WORKSHOP

HOT SCULPTING THE BUBBLE: WEEKEND WORKSHOP

SCULPTURE FOR THE GARDEN: three-DAY WEEKEND WORKSHOP Friday, March 28, (5 - 8pm) & Saturday, March 29, (10am - 4pm) & Sunday, March 30, (10am - 4pm) Instructors: Jerry Catania & Lou Mark Create your own ladle-cast glass and forged/fabricated metal sculptures for the garden in this intensive weekend workshop, Start by learning how to ladle molten glass into sand molds and move on to metal forging and welding. Expect to complete one or two garden sculptures by the end of the weekend. Dress for mess! No experience required. $290.

KEEP YOUR EYE ON THE BALL Sunday, April 13, (11am - 4pm) Instructor: Becky Wehmer Think "out loud" through the process of effective and efficient glassblowing. What am I making? What will I need? How to I communicate with my partner? It's all about looking ahead. Learn a few ergonomic posture tricks along the way and we'll save some time to address your special concerns. Prerequisite: Glassblowing 3. $110.

GLASSBLOWING FOR FUSERS & FUSING FOR GLASSBLOWERS: Two-Week Course Saturdays, May 24 & 31, (10am - 2pm) Instructors: Carolyn O'Hearn & Eli Zilke Week number one: Fusers design and pull cane pull murrini in the hot shop while Blowers create pattern bars in the fusing studio. Week number two: Fusers will incorporate their cane into a fused piece, and Blowers will incorporate their pattern bars into a blown piece. Prerequisite: Glassblowing 2 for glassblowing studtents Beginning Fused Glass for fusing students. Bring your own color. $175.

WATER STREET GLASSWORKS • WINTER & SPRING 2014 • Ph: 269-925-5555 • www.waterstreetglassworks.org • Page 98


FLAMEWORking FLAMEWORKING (ages (AGES 12 & UP)

FLAMEWORKING 1: WEEKEND WORKSHOP Saturday & Sunday, January 25 & 26, (1 - 4pm) Instructor: Becky Wehmer Learn basic methods and techniques of making glass beads using a Hot Head torch. Shape, mold and decorate molten glass into beads for use in jewelry. Learn stringers, dots, textures and more! Instruction includes lecture, demonstration and lots of hands-on studio time. No experience required. $115.

*New!* INTRODUCTION TO THE MINOR TORCH: WEEKEND WORKSHOP

Saturday, February 15, (10am - 4pm) Instructor: Gina Edwards Learn the basics of beadmaking on the more technically advanced, propane/oxygen Minor Torch. Learn safety, adjusting the flame and a variety of embellishment techniques that will give you a solid foundation to build on. A brief lecture will be followed by demonstrations and plenty of Minor torch time. No experience required. $125.

*New!* FLAMEWORKING 2: TWO-WEEK COURSE

mondays, February 03 & 10, (6 - 9pm) Instructor: Becky Wehmer Expand on what you learned in Flameworking 1 using the Hot Head torch. Techniques such as twisties, dot patterns and demonstrations of specific techniques will be included. Prerequisite: Flameworking 1. $115.

TWISTY BEADS Saturday, March 01, (1 - 5pm) Instructor: Becky Wehmer "Twisties" are mini cane for beads! Using soft glass and a Hot Head torch, we will focus on proper heating and handling to get an even, consistent pull. Use your twisties to create beads that look visually complicated. Prerequisite: Flameworking 1. $75.

*New!*

FLAMEWORKING 2: WEEKEND WORKSHOP

Saturday & Sunday, March 08 & 09, (1 - 4pm) Instructor: Becky Wehmer Expand on what you learned in Flameworking 1 using the Hot Head torch. Techniques such as twisties, dot patterns and demonstrations of specific techniques will be included. Prerequisite: Flameworking 1. $115.

MAKING MURRINI Saturday, March 15, (10am - 4pm) Instructor: Gina Edwards Murrini is one of the most intricate ways to add detail to your beads. Through lecture and demonstration, you will Learn to create, pull and cut murrini it into slices, and apply them to a bead. Minor torches will be used in this advanced class and beads will be annealed in the kiln. Prerequisite: Flameworking 1. $125.

HEART OF HEARTS! Saturday, February 08, (9am - noon) Instructor: Becky Wehmer Learn the tips and tricks of making and decorating hearts shapes in celebration of Valnetines Day! Make at least three different styles of hearts and use stringers, dots, frit and a variety of tools to embellish your heart beads that reflect your sense of style. Prerequisite: Flameworking 1. $65.

FLAMEWORKING 1: TWO-WEEK COURSE Tuesdays, February 18 & 25, (6 - 9pm) Instructor: Becky Wehmer Learn basic methods and techniques of making glass beads using a Hot Head torch. Shape, mold and decorate molten glass into beads for use in jewelry. Learn stringers, dots, textures and more! Instruction includes lecture, demonstration and lots of hands-on studio time. No experience required. $115.

ALL THAT GLITTERS: MAKING & USING GOLDSTONE STRINGER Saturday, march 29, (1 - 5pm) Instructor: Gina Edwards It's all about the sparkle! Goldstone stringer creates stunningly beautiful and elegant designs on beads. Learn how to take a chunk of goldstone and pull it into sparkly stringer to embellish their creations. A brief lecture will be followed by demonstrations and plenty of torch time. for Minor torches will be used and the beads wil be annealed in a kiln. Prerequisite: Flameworking 1. $85.

Page 11 10 • WATER STREET GLASSWORKS • WINTER & SPRING 2014 • Ph: 269-925-5555 • www.waterstreetglassworks.org


FLAMEWORKING

fusED GLASS

(AGES 12 & UP)

(AGES 12 & UP)

FLAMEWORKING 1: WEEKEND WORKSHOP

TGIF

Saturday & Sunday, April 05 & 06, (1 - 4pm) Instructor: Becky Wehmer Learn basic methods and techniques of making glass beads using a Hot Head torch. Shape, mold and decorate molten glass into beads for use in jewelry. Learn stringers, dots, textures and more! Instruction includes lecture, demonstration and lots of hands-on studio time. No experience required. $115.

Fridays, (noon - 1pm) Instructor: Carolyn O'Hearn Come and try fused glass projects on your lunch hour - no experience necessary. Design and decorate your pre-cut glass base and we’ll take care of the firing and finishing. No experience required. $25. January 10

4" Coaster

January 17

3" Wasabi dishes (2)

LIGHTHOUSE BEADS

January 24

6" Sushi plate

Saturday, April 26, (10am - 3pm) Instructor: Gina Edwards In this advanced class, create elaborate Lighthouse beads as a focal point to any piece of jewelry. Learn the importance of heat control, shaping techniques and stringer application through lecture and demonstration. Minor torches will be used and beads will be annealed in a kiln. Prerequisite: Flameworking 1. $95.

January 31

4" X 6" photo frame

February 7

6" Bowl

February 14

Pins or pendants (5)

February 21

Nightlights (2)

February 28

4" X 6" suncatcher

March 7

Pocket vase

March 14

6" X 8" cheese tray

March 21

5" Square candy dish

March 28

Garden markers (5)

April 4

Bracelets

April 11

3" Wasabi dishes (2)

April 18

6" Sushi plate

April 25

6" Bowl

May 2

Nightlights (2)

May 9

Pins or pendants (5)

May 16

4" X 6" picture frame

May 23

5" Square snack dish

May 30

Pocket vase

FLAMEWORKING 1: TWO-WEEK COURSE mondays, May 05 & 12, (6 - 9pm) Instructor: Becky Wehmer Learn basic methods and techniques of making glass beads using a Hot Head torch. Shape, mold and decorate molten glass into beads for use in jewelry. Learn stringers, dots, textures and more! Instruction includes lecture, demonstration and lots of hands-on studio time. No experience required. $115.

SCULPTURAL BEADS: WEEKEND WORKSHOP Saturday & Sunday, May 17 & 18, (1 - 5pm) Instructor: Becky Wehmer Go beyond the round bead to create sculptural 3-D shapes. Use your skills to work the bead from the inside out while you gain a better understanding of heat control. We’ll start with the classic fish, sculpting fins eyes and lips and move on to create representational glass sculptures or abstract decorative elements of your choice. Prerequisite: Flameworking 1. $145.

Please See Page 6 For Studio Rental Information

FRIDAY NIGHT FUSING FUN Fridays, (7 - 9:30pm) January, 24 - OR February 28 - OR March 28 - OR APRIL 25 - OR MAY 23 Instructor: Carolyn O'Hearn Play harder! We’ve taken our popular TGIF format and expanded it. Projects are larger and more involved. 8” x 12” platter, 10” square plate, 9” square sushi dish are just some of the Friday night fun projects available. No experience required. $50.

WATER STREET GLASSWORKS • WINTER & SPRING 2014 • Ph: 269-925-5555 • www.waterstreetglassworks.org • Page 11 10


fusED GLASS (AGES 12 & UP)

CREATING A LANDSCAPE 1: TWO-WEEK COURSE FRIDAYS, January 10 & 17 (3 - 5pm) Instructor: Cindy Fielding Use a combination of fusing techniques to build a visuallytextured landscape panel. Prerequisite: Beginning Fusing. All materials provided. $125

PRINCIPLES & PracticES OF FIRING TECHNIQUES Saturday, January 25, (10am - noon) - or Saturday, May 24, (10am - noon) Instructor: Carolyn O'Hearn Learn more about the details of kiln use, shelf preparation, firing schedules, terminology, product selection and a side-byside comparison of variables. Class is a discussion format with some hands-on experience including the determination and programming of firing schedules. Samples and notes provided. No experience required, but some fusing experience is beneficial. All materials provided. $65.

BEGINNING FUSED GLASS: TWO-WEEK COURSE Thursdays, January 16 & 23, (6 - 8pm) - Or Thursdays, March 6 & 13, (6 - 8pm) new instructor: Marion Maier Learn the fundamentals of glass fusing. This introductory evening class focuses on creating good designs, proper use of tools, different types of glass materials and techniques. We’ll complete 2-3 projects. If you have a design idea bring it with you! No experience required. $85.

CREATING A LANDSCAPE 2 Fridays, January 31 & February 07, (6 - 8pm) Instructor: Cindy Fielding Bring your earlier landscape projects for review. We'll discuss what was successful and what changes or improvements you can make in your new creation. Finished projects will be 7" x 12". Prerequisite: Landscape 1. All materials provided. $135.

BEGINNING FUSED GLASS: two-week course SATURDAYs, February 08 & 15 (10am - Noon) - or Saturdays, April 12 & 19 (10am - noon) new instructor: Marion Maier Learn the fundamentals of glass fusing. This introductory morning class focuses on creating good designs, proper use of tools, different types of glass materials and techniques. We’ll complete 2-3 projects. If you have a design idea bring it with you! No experience required. $85.

*New!* DESIGN ELEMENTS

Thursdays, (6 - 8pm) Instructor: Carolyn O’Hearn Focus on individual elements and techniques to include in your fused glass projects. Target those subjects you would like to learn more about and leave those you are already familiar with. Sign up for one, all, or somewhere between. Prerequisite: Beginning Fusing. All materials provided. February 20

Decals: use of, method, prep, programming and printing. Session should result in approx. 2 square feet of glass elements. Bring your laptop if possible , but it is not required.

$80.

February 27

Stencils: use of, limitations, tips & tricks $80. to minimize limitations, shading & twotone. Session should result in approx. 2 square feet of glass elements.

April 10

Paints & Enamels: Includes Glassline, Reusch, powders & precious metals. Session should result in approx. 2 square feet of glass elements.

$80.

April 17 & 24

Pattern Bars: two-week class; briefly cover designing patterns, firing & sectioning to establish groundwork for further investigation. Class will yield a 12" slab of sectioned pattern bar.

$80.

MULTI-LAYER FUSING Saturday, March 08 & 15, (10am - noon) Instructor: Carolyn O'Hearn Learn how to add complexity to your fused projects as you increase visual and physical depth. We will plan and execute designs through the use of multiple layers and firings. Prerequisite: Beginning Fusing. All materials provided. $110.

*New!* REACTIONS IN FUSED GLASS: weekend workshop

Saturday & Sunday, May 10 & 11, (1 - 4pm) Visiting artist: Robin Kittleson Reactions refer to color shifts which occur when glasses of different mineral compositions chemically react with one another. Learn to identify combinations of glass that will or will not react; why this happens and how to exaggerate, or prevent, reactions from occurring. Working with Bullseye sheet, accessory glasses, and metal foils, expect to create a range of samples to use as reference in your own work. Our second day will be dedicated to creating a larger showpiece using our findings from the first day. With technical knowledge, you can learn to control these reactions to create unique variations in your own glass work. Prerequisite: Beginning Fusing. All materials provided. $120.

Page 13 12 • WATER STREET GLASSWORKS • WINTER & SPRING 2014 • Ph: 269-925-5555 • www.waterstreetglassworks.org


stained glass & mosaics (AGES 12 & UP)

BEGINNING COPPER FOIL STAINED GLASS WINDOW TECHNIQUES: three-week course

MOSAIC STAINED GLASS WINDOW: Weekend Workshop

Tuesdays, January 21, 28 & February 04, (6 - 8:30pm) - OR wEDNESDAYS, MAY 14, 21, & 28, (6 - 8:30PM) Instructor: May Schultz-Reed Learn the copper foil stained glass method to create windows and lamps. The first class will be a “quick learning class” to prepare you for creating any leaded glass window. Create a small window as you lean to the tools and techniques in leaded stained glass such as: work surface, pattern prep, cutting, grinding, fitting, soldering joints, framing and pattern design tips. During the second and third class you will execute what you have learned and create a suncatcher. Choose a design from several different patterns. No experience required. All materials provided. $135.

Friday, February 21, (6 - 9pm) & Saturday, February 22, (10am - 4pm) & Sunday, February 23, (noon - 4pm) Instructor: Carolyn O'Hearn Use beautiful pieces of stained glass and repurpose a woodframed window as a work of art for your home or garden. We will cover basic mosaic techniques and adhesives, completing the work with a sanded grout. Windows are available for purchase or bring your own. No experience required. All materials provided except window. $135.

BE MY VALENTINE! Saturday, February 01, (1 - 3:30pm) Instructor: May Schultz-Reed Make three Valentine hearts just in time for Valnetine's Day and give the perfect gift! No experience required. All materials provided. $45.

BEGINNING COPPER FOIL STAINED GLASS WINDOW TECHNIQUES: WEEKEND WORKSHOP Saturday & Sunday March 01 & 02, (1 - 5pm) - OR sATURDAY & SUNDAY, mAY 17 & 18, (1 - 5PM) Instructor: May Schultz-Reed Learn the copper foil stained glass method to create windows and lamps. The first class will be a “quick learning class” to prepare you for creating any leaded glass window. Create a small window as you lean to the tools and techniques in leaded stained glass such as: work surface, pattern prep, cutting, grinding, fitting, soldering joints, framing and pattern design tips. During the second and third class you will execute what you have learned and create a suncatcher. Choose a design from several different patterns. No experience required. All materials provided. $135.

INTERMEDIATE STAINED GLASS: THREE-WEEK COURSE Tuesdays, April 08, 15, 22, (6 - 8:30pm) Instructor: May Schultz-Reed Continue your stained glass experience and improve your technique. Create a 11” x 14” panel by the end of class. Prerequisite: Beginning Stained Glass or instructor approval. All materials provided. $135.

TRADITIONAL MOSAIC TECHNIQUE: WEEKEND WORKSHOP Friday, April 04, (6 - 9pm) & Saturday, April 05, (10am - 6pm) & Sunday, April 06, (10am - 4pm) Instructor: Carolyn O'Hearn Learn the traditional method for working with vitreous tile and explore the use of line as you complete a 12" square panel suitable for a wall hanging or use as a table top. Tools will also be available to work during your own time, with a refundable deposit. No experience required. All materials provided. $155.

Please See Page 6 For Studio Rental Information

WATER STREET GLASSWORKS • WINTER & SPRING 2014 • Ph: 269-925-5555 • www.waterstreetglassworks.org • Page 13 12


light metals/jewelry (AGES 12 & UP)

BEGINNING COPPER ENAMELing: Three-week course Thursdays, march 10 - 24, (6 - 8:30pm) - Or Saturdays, April 30, may 07 & 14 (6 - 8:30) Instructor: Jackie Baker This class will introduce the basic techniques of fusing glass powder to copper—called enameling. Learn how to apply glass powder using a variety of decorative techniques including stenciling, drawing, and stamping. Pieces will be fired and can be completed as decorative objects or jewelry. No experience required. All materials provided. $135.

*New!* DAPPED & DOMED EARRINGS

Saturday, February 22, (1 - 3pm) Instructor: Tina Walter Learn new metalworking skills to create delightful Dapped and domed and earrings using hammers, heat and COPPER! Bring your own beads for embellishment or purchase some at WSG if you like! No experience required. All materials provided. $60.

WIRE-WRAPPED BRACELET (put your beads to use) Tuesday, May 06, (6:30 - 8:30pm) Instructor: Angela Caldwell Put your hand made beads to use (or choose from a selection provided) by incorporating them into a wire-wrapped, linked bracelet.You may have time to make a pair of earrings to match! Copper or bronze wire provided. No experience required. All materials provided. $60.

COLD CONNECTIONS Saturday, May 31, (1 - 4pm) instructor: Angela Caldwell Love the industrial sheek look of layered and combined metals or rivets and tubing? Cold connections are the way to put it all together. Learn the basics of tube and nail rivets to create interesting earrings, pendants or components for bracelets. Learn to cut, drill, saw, file and hold all your pieces together with various types of rivets. Once you learn these techniques, you won’t be able to stop! This class is for beginners or returning students. No experience required. All materials provided. $75.

*New!* BIRD'S NEST PENDANT

Saturday, April 19, (1 - 3:30pm) Instructor: Angela Caldwell This sweet nest pendant is easy to make, adorable to wear and makes a wonderful Mother's Day or spring birthday gift: Using craft wire and beads, you’ll make this pendant in short order. Maybe you'll have time to make two! No experience required. All materials provided. $65.

*New!* jewlery basics for BEADS

Saturday, April 12, (1 - 4pm) Instructor: Gina Edwards Learn how to combine beads you made (or purchased) into fabulous jewelry using the following basic techniques: stringing, crimping, attaching clasps, using headpins, etc. All other materials (spacer/accent beads, jewelry wire and findings) will be provided. Bead assortments will be available for purchase if necessary. No experience required. Bring your own beads. Beads will also be available for sale. All other materials provided. $75.

Page 15 14 • WATER STREET GLASSWORKS • WINTER & SPRING 2014 • Ph: 269-925-5555 • www.waterstreetglassworks.org


metals

(AGES 15 & UP)

CREATIVE WELDING 1: FOUR-WEEK COURSE Mondays, January 20 & 27, February 03 & 10, (6 - 9pm) - OR Mondays, March 31, April 07, 14 & 21, (6 - 9pm) Instructor: Josh Andres This introduction to artistic welding and metal working includes safety in the studio and how to handle the tools in order to cut, bend, hammer, torch and weld steel to create metal artwork. No experience required. All materials provided. $225.

CREATIVE WELDING 2: FOUR-WEEK COURSE Mondays, February 24, March 03, 10, 17, (6 - 9pm) Instructor: Josh Andres This is a continuation of Creative Welding 1. Students will develop intro skills in artistic welding and metalworking. Learn safety in the studio and how to handle the tools in order to cut, bend, hammer, torch and weld steel to create metal artwork. At the conclusion of Creative Welding 2, students may apply to rent studio time. Prerequisite: Creative Welding 1. All materials provided. $225.

CREATIVE WELDING 1: two-week course Saturdays, April 19 & 26, (10am- 4pm) Instructor: Josh Andres This introduction to artistic welding and metal working includes safety in the studio and how to handle the tools in order to cut, bend, hammer, torch and weld steel to create metal artwork. No experience required. All materials provided. $225.

*New!* BLACKSMITHING: WEEKEND WORKSHOP

Saturday & Sunday, May 03 & 04, (10am - 6pm) Instructor: Dan Mackessy This course will cover the basics of the art of blacksmithing. Learn fire tending, hand forging, decorative twists, and use of special tools. We will begin with simple projects such as nails, “S” hooks, coat hooks, and letter openers. More complex projects are possible as you progress. No experience required. All materials provided. $295.

TORCH-WORKED METAL: WEEKEND WORKSHOP Saturday & Sunday, April 12 & 13, (9am - 4pm) Visiting artist: John VanAmerongen Explore the use of an oxy-acetylene torch as an alternative to blacksmithing. Square and round bar stock (1/4” to 1⁄2”) will be used to fabricate a project of your choice that falls within the scope and timeframe of the class. This technique lends itself to vine-like forms. Racks, shelves, hooks, hangers, garden art, and sculpture are all possibilities. John will help you realize your individual piece. No experience required. All materials provided. $260.

WELDING: TEXTURE ON METAL Saturday, March 08, (noon - 4pm) Instructor: Josh Andres Enchance your metalworking skills as you use welders, plasma cutters, torches, hammers and grinders to apply different textures and finishes to your pieces. Learn ways to enhance and personalize your unique and one-of-a kind work. Prerequisite: Creative Welding 2 or equivalent experience. All materials provided. $85.

WELDING: GARDEN TRELLIS WORKSHOP Saturday, May 17, (10am - 4pm) Instructor: Josh Andres Create a beautiful, functional work of art in the form of a trellis for your garden or yard this spring, using re-bar and found objects. You will cut, bend, weld and fabricate metal. Prerequisite: Creative Welding or equivalent experience. All materials provided. $150.

WATER STREET GLASSWORKS • WINTER & SPRING 2014 • Ph: 269-925-5555 • www.waterstreetglassworks.org • Page 15 14


NON PROFIT U.S. POSTAGE

PAID 140 Water Street PO Box 161 Benton Harbor, MI 49023

Registration for Winter & Spring begins: Thursday, January 2 10am Register by phone: 269-925-5555 or in person at the WSG office. WSG OFFICE HOURS: Tuesay - Friday, (10am - 5pm) Saturday, (12 - 4pm) Sign up to receive Your class schedules via email on our website

www.waterstreetglassworks.org FOLLOW US ON:

Page 16 • WATER STREET GLASSWORKS • WINTER & SPRING 2014 • Ph: 269-925-5555 • www.waterstreetglassworks.org

Benton Harbor MI Permit No. 161


Adobe project portfolio