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Strategies •

Walking is the favored mode of transportation on the main campus. All other modes should in general yield to pedestrians, subject to traffic controls such as crosswalks, curbs, signals and signs, lane markings, and other indicators of right-of-way.

The primary transportation modes—walking, bicycling, private motor vehicles, university and service vehicles, buses, and potentially light rail—should be managed as distinct but intersecting and overlapping circulation systems. Each has its own pattern of connectivity and degree of access to buildings.

Transportation demand management is an integral component of the university’s mobility strategy. In keeping with a general commitment to sustainability and to the quality of the campus, the university’s administrative departments should continue to support and promote alternatives to commuting by single-occupant vehicles. The transportation system should be managed in coordination with the goals and management principles of the University’s Sustainability Committee.

Traffic operations analysis should be integrated with campus design. Streets, footpaths, plazas, trails, and passageways through buildings must be orchestrated to create a direct and functional system of pedestrian access. Every aspect of campus design should be considered from the point of view of people in motion and should guide them with clear indications of right-of-way and the potential for paths to cross.

05/09/2013

University of Texas at Austin Campus Master Plan  

University of Texas at Austin Campus Master Plan, Fall 2012

University of Texas at Austin Campus Master Plan  

University of Texas at Austin Campus Master Plan, Fall 2012

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