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Sarah Lagpacan city & regional planning portfolio


About Me

SARAH LAGPACAN

Having lived in several different cities over the course of my life thus far, I have had the opportunity to see how different planning decisions impact people’s everyday lives. I am especially fascinated by transportation and its role in providing access to opportunity, and I am driven by the motivation to make sure transportation networks work for the people who use them - both now and into the future. Through stakeholder engagement and clear written and visual communication, I work collaboratively to turn diverse ideas and aspirations into strategic plans of action.

EDUCATION

Bachelor of Science in City and Regional Planning Minor in Economics

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission Provided planning resources to local government Homeport Prepared affordable housing projects for implementation Indiana Department of Transportation Aligned planning projects with statewide goals


PLANS

Table of Contents

Waterways & Greenways Vision..........................................................................................................................................................................6 Stormwater Management Proposal...................................................................................................................................................................10 Public Participation Plan.......................................................................................................................................................................................12

STUDIES

Global Forces Analysis..........................................................................................................................................................................................16 Campus Area Bus Service Analysis....................................................................................................................................................................18 Autonomous Vehicle Studio................................................................................................................................................................................22

EXPERIENCES

Study Abroad..........................................................................................................................................................................................................28 Community Conflict Resolution........................................................................................................................................................................30


Plans


Waterways & Greenways Vision

creating recreational, ecological, and community connections

THE PLACE

Source: Google Maps

Belize City is an urban peninsula located on the eastern coast of the Central American country of Belize. It is home to mangroves, mahogany, toucans, and a multicultural history. Haulover Creek is a major river which bisects Belize City from west to east, separating affluent communities in the north of the city from disadvantaged communities in the south. Informal settlements expanding to the city’s west pose problems by encroaching on previously undisturbed ecosystems and placing pressure on the city to expand public infrastructure.

THE PROJECT Tasked by Belize City planners to envision a new network of waterways and greenways, our studio team of both undergraduate and graduate students analyzed existing conditions, conducted a gap analysis for the city’s parks, proposed locations for new green spaces and trails, created a community survey to inform the vision’s implementation, and redesigned a specific park as a pilot project to guide the improvement of other parks. We presented our work to Belize City stakeholders and summarized our findings in a report which was presented at the 2017 Caribbean Urban Forum.

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PLANS | Waterways & Greenways Vision Housing in the Port Loyola Neighborhood - South Side of Belize City

Photo credit: Rolf Schmidt

Garbage Around Canals

Photo credit: Rolf Schmidt

INITIAL NETWORK

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PLANS | Waterways & Greenways Vision

ENVISIONED NETWORK

INITIAL PARK ACCESSIBILITY 8

ENVISIONED PARK ACCESSIBILITY


PLANS | Waterways & Greenways Vision The newly envisioned waterways and greenways network locates a park within 0.3 kilometers of all residents’ homes, incorporates inclusive design, maximizes connectivity between neighborhoods and key locations, fosters the use of public spaces, preserves key environmental elements, and honors the city’s history and culture.

KEY CONTRIBUTIONS Outcome identification Formulated criteria for the vision to follow Site planning Decided where to propose new pocket parks and connections between existing and proposed greenspaces

ENVISIONED NETWORK SNAPSHOT

Map development Used ArcGIS and Adobe Illustrator to create all maps used in the report and presentation

Port Loyola

Community engagement Developed a Park Questionnaire and processed its approval through the International Research Board

ENVISIONED PARK

Jane Usher Park in Port Loyola Source: Matt Hughes

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Stormwater Management Proposal

formulating a strategy for green infrastructure implementation

THE PLACE

The Ohio State University Athletics Campus is located northwest of main campus and just west of the Olentangy River. It is home to sports facilities, spaces for concerts and other large events, and an abundance of parking lots.

THE PROJECT Our interdisciplinary group of students collaborated to address three specific issues at the site: flooding, which contributes to dangerous driving conditions; water quality, which is diminished by pollutants and trash that are carried into waterways; and runoff velocity, which contributes to watershed erosion and pollution.

Flower Beds

Impermeable Curbs Bioretention Cells

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In response to these issues, our team created a targeted implementation strategy for stormwater infrastructure on Athletics Campus consisting of a system of bioretention cells installed in place of existing flower beds, grated curbs installed in place of existing impermeable curbs, permeable sidewalks installed in place of impermeable paths, and signage installed for community education about the infrastructure and its purpose. Our implementation strategy, in combination with proposals for the other sections of Ohio State’s campus, was submitted to the Environmental Protection Agency’s 2015 Campus Rainworks Challenge.

Impermeable Paths Grated Curbs

Permeable Sidewalks


PLANS | Stormwater Management Proposal

KEY CONTRIBUTIONS Research Established a foundational understanding of stormwater infrastructure to base site recommendations upon Writing Developed and edited written material for the final report Graphics Created a poster to visually communicate our team’s proposal which was voted best in class

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Public Participation Plan

involving stakeholders in corridor design

Business on Goodale Boulevard

THE PLACE Goodale Boulevard is a main corridor which runs through Grandview Heights, Ohio -- a neighborhood just outside of Columbus. This corridor, home to parks, businesses, and industrial uses, is undergoing a major redesign which will have a significant impact on these land uses and their stakeholders.

Source: LoopNet

ENVISIONING A GRAND VIEW FOR GOODALE Public Participation Timeline

Engagement

Visioning

Proposal

1. Digfest * 2. Grandview Hop* 3. Tour of Grandview

June 17, 2017 August 26, 2017 September 2017

4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

October 2017 November 2017 January 2018 February 2018 April 2018

Visioning Meeting Taste of Goodale Visioning Session #1 Visioning Session #2 Visioning Session #3

9. Chocolate Walk* May 2018 10. Strategy Session #1 June 2018 11. Strategy Session #2 July 2018 *already existing community events

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THE PROJECT Our team was tasked with creating resources to inform how Grandview Heights will proceed with public participation regarding Goodale Boulevard’s redesign. To begin, we conducted stakeholder analyses for two different businesses along Goodale Boulevard to better understand their priorities and interests, as well as their hopes for the participation process. Our team also formulated a public participation plan that outlines a consistent and accessible outreach process which engages a diverse array of stakeholders and interests and fosters a positive outlook on public participation among residents and stakeholders. The plan has two consensus-based outcomes that can be used by decision makers for policy enactment: a proposal for Goodale Boulevard and a list of strategies for turning the proposal into a reality.


PLANS | Public Participation Plan

KEY CONTRIBUTIONS Goal setting Identified the goals for our team’s public participation plan

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION WEBSITE MOCK-UP (above) To be used throughout the public participation process

Stakeholder engagement Co-conducted both of our team’s interviews Writing Developed and edited written material for the final report

PUBLIC SURVEY MOCK-UP

(left) To be used at communitywide events in the Engagement Phase

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Studies


Global Forces Analysis

preparing local communities for globalization

Hocking County

OHIO

Source: Google Maps

THE PLACE Hocking County is a rural area in Central Ohio located approximately one hour southeast of Columbus by car. Hocking Hills is a region within the county well known for its state parks, rock formations, and outdoor activities.

THE PROJECT As part of a larger study of the Mid-Ohio region’s adaptiveness to globalization, our interdisciplinary group of three students analyzed Hocking County’s real estate sector with regards to four different global forces: trade and investment, automation, migration, and climate change. Starting with a Strength-Opportunity-WeaknessThreat (SWOT) analysis for each global force, our group identified an overarching key challenge for the sector and a collaboration strategy for working with other planning sectors to address that key challenge, creating accompanying infographics to illustrate these concepts. Finally, our group provided key lessons from relevant case studies as well as a set of recommendations to advise decision makers.

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STUDIES | Global Forces Analysis Source: The Kubala Washatko Architects, Inc.

Vertical Farm

KEY CONTRIBUTIONS Leadership Capitalized on our group’s diverse skills and interests to develop a more robust analysis Writing Developed and edited written material for the final report Graphics Created infographics to visually communicate our group’s analysis

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Campus Area Bus Service Analysis

utilizing GIS to understand networks

THE SUBJECT Source: The Ohio State University

The Ohio State University’s Campus Area Bus Service (CABS) is a free transit service provided by the university’s Transportation and Traffic Management Department. As a provider of 11 different bus routes, CABS serves tens of thousands of students, staff, and faculty each day of the school year.

THE STUDY Research Question As an independent GIS research study, I investigated the following question: To what extent do class densities and housing densities align with current bus stops and bus connectivity? Methodology To determine class densities, I summed up the classroom capacities of each building on campus. To determine housing population densities, I found the occupancy of each on-campus dormitory and calculated the population living in off-campus student housing units in terms of each census block. I then identified the service area of each CABS bus stop using the road network. Finally, I overlayed class and housing densities with bus stop service areas to analyze connectivity and service appropriateness.

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STUDIES | Campus Area Bus Service Analysis

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STUDIES | Campus Area Bus Service Analysis

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STUDIES | Campus Area Bus Service Analysis

Recommendations In order to identify how CABS might be restructured to better accommodate housing and class densities, I generated a route that would serve the highest class and housing densities. Future Analysis To inform further investigation of CABS’ route appropriateness, I identified the following guiding questions: • How well do individual bus routes cater to the demographics of their specific areas of campus? How could these connections be improved? • What other densities can be considered (libraries, gyms, other amenities, time of day)? • Would sidewalk data or public surveys change the results of the analysis?

KEY SKILLS DEVELOPED Research Used research methods to investigate a question GIS Utilized ArcGIS to develop maps and conduct spatial analysis Graphics Utilized Adobe InDesign to create a booklet visualizing my research findings

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Autonomous Vehicle Studio

incorporating cutting-edge research into planning

Underutilized Roadway on Broad Street

THE PLACE Downtown Columbus, Ohio is home to 8,300 residents and employment for 84,367 workers. Single-occupancy vehicles commuting into Columbus are extremely common, with 87 cars per 100 workers driving into downtown each work day.

Photo credit: Alexander Wooledge

THE PROJECT Our studio of City & Regional Planning students created a report and presentation identifying the potential implications of autonomous vehicle technology for Downtown Columbus in terms of parking, development, public infrastructure, and policy.

Underutilized Parking

Photo credit: Alexander Wooledge

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Parking To determine how much parking will be needed in Downtown Columbus with the adoption of autonomous vehicles in the future, our studio conducted stakeholder interviews, reviewed autonomous vehicle literature, and stayed current on emerging stories to understand predicted adoption rates for autonomous vehicles. These adoption rates were used to develop parking projections for Downtown Columbus under different scenarios.


STUDIES | Autonomous Vehicle Studio

TRAFFIC ANALYSIS ZONE (TAZ) SCORING CRITERIA Score

Historical Value

Site Plan Orientation

Condition

Mass/Height

Specialty Use

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Indispensable “cultural treasures”

Pedestrian-oriented design that encourages use

Newly constructed or renovated, almost no wear and tear*

Tall, highly utilized, taking up multiple blocks

Highly specialized and highly demanded

2

More indispensable than disposable

More pedestrianoriented than caroriented

Newer and less worn down

Taller and wider

More specialized and more highly demanded

3

Right in between

Right in between

Right in between

Mid-rise, taking up about one block

Common/mixed use

4

More disposable than indispensable

More car-oriented than pedestrian-oriented

Older and more worn down

Shorter and narrower

Less specialized or less highly demanded

5

Disposable

Car-oriented, parking dominated, suburban character

Old, abandoned, obvious dilapidation

One to two stories, only taking up part of a block

Highly specialized use that is becoming obsolete

*also includes blocks that are currently under construction/renovation

Development To predict how autonomous vehicle adoption will impact development, each studio member conducted a field survey of Downtown Columbus’ built environment. Splitting Downtown up by Traffic Analysis Zone, we scored each zone in terms of its susceptibility to change based on five different factors: historical value, site plan orientation, condition, mass/height, and specialty use. Pooling all of our individual data together, we determined which areas of Downtown Columbus are most prime for redevelopment given parking requirement reductions by autonomous vehicles, and we developed a projection of the future density of development in Downtown Columbus made possible by autonomous vehicle technology.

LIKELIHOOD OF REDEVELOPMENT MAP 23


STUDIES | Autonomous Vehicle Studio

ROAD HIERARCHY

POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS

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STUDIES | Autonomous Vehicle Studio Public Infrastructure To identify how Downtown Columbus’ road network might change with autonomous vehicles, our studio developed a road hierarchy which categorizes different thoroughfares under four different classifications: one-way highway connectors, recreational thoroughfares, traditional thoroughfares, and secondary thoroughfares. For each classification, our studio developed a set of conditions which would make the road network more conducive to autonomous vehicles, along with redesign proposals for three specific thoroughfares. Pickup/dropoff zones, garages, and alleys were also addressed with a set of recommendations. Policy To place Downtown Columbus in the best position for the onset of autonomous vehicles, out studio developed a set of recommendations for policies that will prioritize immediately valuable implementations in the short-term, facilitate a smooth transition to autonomous vehicles in the mid-term, and capitalize on full autonomy in the long-term.

KEY CONTRIBUTIONS Studio Presentation

Stakeholder engagement Led the stakeholder engagement team in setting up and conducting interviews Data collection Conducted field surveys for 20 different Traffic Analysis Zones Writing Created an outline for the entire report to adhere to and developed written materiaL Presentation Co-presented our studio’s work to Downtown Columbus Special Improvement District staff, journalists, and other stakeholders

Photo credit: Philip Arnold

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Experiences


Study Abroad

exploring international approaches to inform planning at home

THE PLACE

As part of a City & Regional Planning study abroad program through The Ohio State University, I traveled to Taiwan with a group 15 other students to study the country’s transportation systems. We spent time in Taipei, New Taipei City, and Kaohsiung.

Transit Control Center

THE EXPERIENCE Our group attended numerous presentations and tours. The Taipei City Government hosted us at their office for a presentation about transportation and land use planning in their city. Company representatives at the Kaohsiung Rapid Transit Corporation gave us a tour of their train depot and their transit control center. Professors at Chinese Cultural University gave us a lecture on climate change and Taiwan’s response to it. Our group also explored all modes of transportation and their accompanying infrastructure: mass rapid transit, high speed rail, bus, bicycle, pedestrian, and aviation.

Riverside Bike Path

High Speed Train 28


EXPERIENCES | Study Abroad Formosa Boulevard Station Art

METRO USER EXPERIENCE Information Tables at All Stations

Bathroom Stall Availability Signage

KEY TAKEAWAYS It takes more than logistics for people to take transit. Planners can create user experiences that make public transportation preferable to driving.

Daan Park Station 29


Community Conflict Resolution

engaging community members in decision making Camp Chase Confederate Cemetery with Vandalized Statue

THE PLACE Camp Chase Confederate Cemetery is a public cemetery on the west side of Columbus, Ohio. It is located in Westgate, an affluent community nested within a larger, distressed neighborhood: the Hilltop. As the burial site of thousands of Civil War soldiers, community groups hold ceremonies at the cemetery to commemorate history and remember family members. The site is also home to a Confederate statue which was recently vandalized. Source: The Columbus Dispatch

THE PROJECT In collaboration with both City & Regional Planning and Landscape Architecture students, our group placed the contestation of Camp Chase Confederate Cemetery within its local and national context by researching the history of Camp Chase in relation to the city and its communities, interviewing community leaders to understand conflicting perspectives surrounding the cemetery, and researching nationwide stories surrounding Confederate monuments.

Brainstorming with Visiting Professor Walter Hood

Photo credit: Philip Arnold

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EXPERIENCES | Community Conflict Resolution Community Members Exploring the Gallery

THE GALLERY Under the guidance of renowned designer Walter Hood, our group created a public exhibit which created interactive illustrations of Camp Chase Confederate Cemetery and its story, the prevalence of Confederate monuments nationwide, and approaches to managing Confederate monuments in public spaces. A team of us also organized and facilitated a community discussion and negotiation simulation to foster mutual understanding and build consensus among community members. Photo credit: Kristi Cheramie

The Team in the Gallery

Negotiation Simulations

KEY CONTRIBUTIONS Research Investigated the history of Camp Chase Writing Developed written material for gallery panels and the negotiation simulation Community engagement Interviewed community leaders and facilitated the negotiation simulation Photo credit: Philip Arnold

Photo credit: Kristi Cheramie

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SARAH LAGPACAN | city & regional planning portfolio

City & Regional Planning Portfolio  

Featured work from my City & Regional Planning education at The Ohio State University

City & Regional Planning Portfolio  

Featured work from my City & Regional Planning education at The Ohio State University

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