Page 1

Schuler Scholar   Program    Waukegan High  School 

The Schuler Quarterly

Features   Words From The Staff  Seniors  Spring Break ‘10  Alumni Connections  Academic Dishonesty  “The Cove”  Summer Plans  Reading lists  Save the Dates     

Volume 1, Issue 4 

Cover art by Gabby Escovar  Waukegan High School, Class of 2010  Amherst College, Class of 2014 


Thanks for a great year! From, the Staff

Schuler Quarterly

May 2010


Graduation, then... Tammy Aird...Cornell College  Michael Bennett...DePauw College  Shemira Castellanos...Beloit College  Anna Connelly...Lafayette College  Lakenda Crawford...University of Richmond  Jennifer Doctolero...Williams College  Neal Ellis ...Williams College  Gabby Escovar...Amherst College  Catalina Esparza...Denison University  Jackie Flores...Scripps College  Ariadna Garcia...Pitzer College  Robbie George III...Lafayette College  Irvin Gomez...Dartmouth College  Maria Hernandez...Brown University  Sarah Inglby...Skidmore College  Mario Jimenez...Pitzer College  Jasmine Jones...University of Richmond  TJ Kanvik...Cornell College  Alecia Kubicki...Depauw University  Rudy Lagunas...Columbia University  Noemi Larrondo...Pitzer College  Alejandra Mesa...Stanford University  Carol Meuth...Harvard University  Heidi Meuth...DePauw College  Danny Motta...Carleton College  Kathleen O’Connor...Cornell College  Henry Palancar...George Washington University  Stephanie Ramirez...Pomona College  Jose Rodriguez...Amhert College  Monica Rodriguez...Wellesley College  Edgar Sandvoval...Darthmouth College  Reynold Yu...University of Pennsylvania    Schuler Quarterly

omg.

May 2010


SPRING BREAK ‘10!!! Party in the USA Edition

Photos (clockwise from top left):   Yesenia Ramirez, Lynneise Jones, and Mr. Jones enjoying food in Boston’s Fulton Market (Photographer: Alex Byrd); Chapel  at Trinity College in Connecticut (Photographer: Maureen Barradas); the northern New England group coming to the end of  our tour of Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts (Photographer: Thi Ly) 

Schuler Quarterly

Vol. 1, Issue 4


For the Schuler staff and juniors, spring break 2010 was spent visiting outstanding, gorgeous colleges  and universities in northern the New England and aMid‐Atlantic regions. Although Scholars collectively  saw over 20 schools (wow!), here is some information on three top‐notch, not‐as‐well‐known colleges  that Scholars visited: 

Bucknell University 

Middlebury College  Home of the Panthers  The Northern New England group visited Middle‐ bury, a small town in central Vermont sur‐ rounded by the gorgeous Green Mountains and  the Adirondacks. The naturally rural atmosphere  is conducive to a presence of athletic and out‐ doorsy students. There is a high participation  rate in Intramural sports and students spend  much of their time pursuing environmental  causes. In fact, Middlebury’s environmental stud‐ ies program is world‐renowned.  Middlebury is well known for its Language and  International Relations programs. Not only do  many of the 2,500 students spend time abroad,  but during the summer, Middlebury transforms  the campus into a new‐world, where students  take Summer Language Courses (10 offered) and  speak, write and (hopefully!) think exclusively in  that language for the summer. 

Home of the Bisons  Juniors on the Pennsylvania trip visited this  university, located in Lewisburg, PA. Those  of you who aspire to study among the trees  might like this school, which boasts great  views of nature all around campus.  While Lewisburg is a small town in central  Pennsylvania, students maintain that the  town is still well‐equipped for college stu‐ dents and their needs, regardless of the rural  setting. About 3,500 students attend Buck‐ nell, including a small number in graduate  programs.    Bucknell is a Division I school filled with  school spirit and enthusiasm. Students say  that they truly feel part of a small campus  community, constantly involved in extra‐ curricular activities on campus. 

Wheaton College  Home of the Lyons*  Some of the juniors were lucky enough to visit this school located in Norton, MA. Norton is a rural  town about half‐way between Boston, MA and Providence, RI. Many students say they go into these  bigger cities for the weekend to experience a different vibe.  Social Sciences, Psychology, International Relations and Economics are among the most popular ma‐ jors. The environment is collaborative and supportive, as students are encouraged to explore a wide‐ variety of interests through Wheaton’s Foundations and Connections curriculum requirements.  *Editor’s note – “Lyons” is not a typo! The mascot is named after the school’s founding principal, Mary Lyon. 

Schuler Quarterly

May 2010


College Corner: Alumni Connections A note from College Counselor extraordinaire, Rob Andrews: 

Choosing the right college requires a lot of research and it is never too early to learn about the different  intellectual communities out there. There are many ways to investigate a college. You can read guide‐ books (the Fiske Guide is my favorite), visit individual college websites or places like princetonreview.com,  or you can actually visit the campus.  One of the best ways to learn about a school is from a current stu‐ dent. Most schools have ways to connect with students, but the benefit of being in the Schuler Scholar  Program is that Schuler College Scholars really want to reach out and talk with you about their college  experience.  While some Schuler Scholars will become trailblazers—the first Schuler Scholar to attend a  particular campus—others will join current Scholars who are already at a school.  We asked some Schuler  Scholars who graduated in 2009 to respond to a series of questions regarding their first year at college.  Here is what they had to say: 

Davinna Gonzalez  DePauw University  DePauw University is a small liberal arts college located in Greencastle Indiana  (depauw.edu). DePauw is known for strong school spirit, amazing academics,  and a sporty, preppy, happy student body that wants to go out to the game.   

What do you like most about being a college student?  What I enjoy most about being a college student is the freedom and inde‐ pendence that comes with it. If you don't manage your freedom and inde‐ pendence well; however, it will quickly become your downfall.    Why did you choose your college?  I chose to attend DePauw University because of all the schools to which I  was accepted it was the one with the best academic standards and the  one that gave me the best financial aid. DePauw is amazing at helping its  students with need‐based aid.         

Schuler Quarterly

Vol. 1, Issue 4


College Corner: Alumni Connections What's campus like?  Depauw's campus is beautiful! It's an amazing place to visit during the Summer and Fall. Everything here is small and  tight‐knit. The professors, staff members and students are all extremely friendly.    What classes are you taking? What do you like about them? What is the workload like?  I am required to take four courses every semester. Each semester, I must also fulfill a graduation requirement. I am cur‐ rently a double major in International Race Relations and Spanish with a minor in Sociology. My major may change to  Conflict Studies if I cannot pursue International Race Relations here, but my courses reflect these areas. This semester,  the four courses I am taking are: English: Theory and Play of Fiction, Sociology: Contemporary Society, Spanish, History  of Southern Africa.  Here at DePauw you will encounter a heavy, but manageable work load. Success at DePauw requires a lot of reading,  which coincides with exceptional time management skills. So far, I have loved all of my courses related to the areas of  History, Sociology, Anthropology and Foreign Languages. The class sizes are small and the professors, as well as the ad‐ visers, take the necessary time to get to know you and help you shape your future.    What are you doing with your free time, when you aren't studying?  When I have free time, I sleep! Finding sleep at college is difficult, especially with your course load and extracurricular  activities.    What is the biggest surprise from college?  My biggest surprise about college is how focused on my education I am able to be. Regardless of my limitations, I made  it to where I deserve to be. My biggest concern about college was always how affordable it would be and coming to De‐ Pauw has proven to me that money should be the least of my worries and my education should come first.    Describe some of the differences between DePauw and Waukegan.  Depauw is an extremely positive environment that promotes the success of all its students. DePauw is a small campus  and Greencastle, IN is a small town. Despite its size, you will soon find that the professors and people of Greencastle  have huge personalities and an extreme passion for their work. Here you'll find corn, corn, more corn, chubby squirrels,  larger than life insects, cows and elk! You’ll also see tiny corner stores, a few grocery stores and countless churches.  Greencastle is cozy. I can’t remember the last time I saw a cow in Waukegan. :)  

Schuler Quarterly

May 2010


Alumni Connection

Terry Dejaresco          Carleton College  Located in Northfield, Minnesota, Carleton College’s small population of 1,800,  stellar faculty, and top‐notch academics help make it a highly selective liberal arts  college (carleton.edu). Even though it is just 45‐minutes from Minneapolis/St. Paul,  most students stay on campus to cultivate a strong sense of community.  To learn  more, ask your Scholar Coaches, Raymonda and Sarah, who graduated from this  school last June. 

What do you like most about being a college student?  I have the ultimate freedom to make my own decisions and be responsible  for myself, which makes me feel like I'm my own person. As stressful as  this may seem to a lot of people, it's a big part of growing up. I'm sur‐ rounded by what I need, apart from my family, which my friends and I  seem to create in any case. It's all about experience.           Why did you choose your college?  I chose this college mainly because of its academic reputation. I visited the campus during my sophomore year and  liked it, and I did research on the classes they provided. I ultimately made my choice based on financial need. I  barely looked at the social life, which I read was positive anyway.           What's campus like?  Once I got on this campus, I was surprised. There are so many things available to every student, from gaining volun‐ teer experience in a school or clinic to participating in an unparalleled dance group or music group. There are even  more things that the website or countless tours or chats with college reps could even tell you! There are so many  quirky aspects about Carleton that people just have to experience it to really understand it. I'm in love with this  college.           What classes are you taking? What do you like about them? What is the workload like?  This term I'm currently taking Spanish 102, a Linguistics course called Syntax Theory, and English Lit 1. In Spanish, I  have the most delightful professor, Linda Burdell. I absolutely love her enthusiasm and energy when teaching her  students. She is really intent on helping us not only learn Spanish, but understand it. She takes great pains in helping  us. I had no real interest in Linguistics, but I thought I'd take it for fun. It has been very interesting to see how Lin‐ guistics relies mainly upon group discussion.        

Schuler Page 8 Quarterly

Vol. May 1, Issue 2010 4


As a class, we are developing our own theory on the English language. English Lit. is a fun class because of our professor. She abso‐ lutely adores literature and is not afraid to show it. She even surfs the web from time to time and makes references to LOLcats and  the vernacular of today's youth. Most, if not all of the professors are really cool people to be around. Office hours can also be really  fun and helpful. There, students can get a huge amount of help, whether with a paper, a problem set, or crummy data from a lab. The work‐ load is manageable; you will never receive any amount that you cannot do within a reasonable amount of time. 

What are you doing with your free time, when you aren't studying?  Often times I hang out with my friends here. Sometimes we go see a movie playing in a classroom, jam in a practice room at  the Concert Hall or Music Hall, play video games when we get the chance, and even participate in intramural (IM) sporting  events. Sometimes we venture from campus to walk around town and have a good time. On my dorm floor, I organize music  video performances ‐ one of them was even entered in a film festival competition! Also, I'm currently trying to muster the  help of Waukegan High School alumni to give back to the school and assist where needed.           What is the biggest surprise from college?  I never expected college, especially one with such high standards as Carleton, to be as fun as it is! I knew that it is strong aca‐ demically, but I never heard much of anything during my tours or online about what the social life would be like here. The  social life here is fantastic and I don't end up spending all my hours in a day studying! I actually get outside, sometimes walk  around the arboretum behind my dorm, exercise, dance, sing…you name it. The sky's the limit as to what one can do here on  campus and it's just a matter of taking the time to discover it.           Describe some of the differences between Carleton and Waukegan.  There's a significant difference in the way people live their lives here. At Carleton, most, if not all, of the students work to‐ gether to create a sustainable living environment. We compete to conserve energy through campus‐wide initiatives like  "Green Wars,” have countless support groups and clubs that anyone can join, and, in general, we show our support for our  fellow colleagues and professors. In Waukegan, there's obviously a bigger population, so interpersonal connections can be  more difficult to cultivate.    If you could offer advice to Schuler Scholars in preparing for college, what would you say?  College is not as intimidating as one would think. If you're worried about not being academically prepared, there are plenty of  people that would be more than happy to assist you. That's their job, after all. Also, don't feel limited to just doing school‐ work. Remember that you have a social life, and can just as well maintain it while rocking that awesome GPA. Also, don't feel  intimidated to join a club or a sport. There are plenty at practically any school. Like I've said, it's only a matter of discovering  your passions. Also, your priorities and perceptions will most likely change. If you have plans for the future, there may be a  particular department that you take great interest in, and it may end up becoming your major. Don't be afraid of this. Just  know that there are so many fantastic things for you out there. You just need to find them. And one last thing: be who you  are, not who you think you should be.     Tell us an interesting story that illustrates your time at college so far.   Last fall, my floor mates and I made some music videos. Our first music video was inspired by NBC’s "The Office," a show most  people on my floor adore. We spent a lot of time organizing, buying silly costumes, and getting approval from our RAs to pull  these videos off. It is stress‐relieving to watch these videos with my floor mates. My RAs still watch them. We also made a  second music video this term. It's been so fun collaborating on these projects and sharing them with the rest of campus.  

Schuler Quarterly

May 2010


Alumni Connection (continued) Gabby Castellanos  Brandeis University  Brandeis University located in Waltham, Massachusetts (brandeis.edu). Rachel Nimmons,  our Scholar Coach, went there too. It was founded in 1948 by luminaries of the time, in‐ cluding Albert Einstein. The reason for its inception was to combat the blatant anti‐ Semitism that occurred in college admissions during the first part of the twentieth century.  Brandeis was founded so anyone regardless of race, religion or national origin would have  access to high‐quality education.  Social activists feel at home on campus. It is also well  known for its science departments.  

What do you like most about being a college student?  College allows one to work at his or her own pace because even though you get  way more homework than you do in high school, you have more time to do it. I  feel truly independent. Nobody is breathing down my neck, telling me to do my  homework. I have to be responsible for myself and what I need to get done.         Why did you choose Brandeis?   I chose Brandeis because they gave me a chance. I was anxiously waiting for my  acceptance letter from Duke University because I thought it was the place where  I wanted to be. Brandeis was my second choice, but I was very hopeful for Duke.  When I was rejected from Duke, I felt like I had to settle for Brandeis. As I began to explore Brandeis and got to spend  three days on campus, I had an epiphany: Brandeis was not only the place where I really wanted to be: it is where I belong.  Brandeis is awesome and I love it!     What's campus like?  Campus is like home. The people make one feel welcome. The food variety is phenomenal; no matter what you have, it is  definitely tasty. There is a castle on Campus. It provides a very foreign feeling—and there is a perfect view of all of Boston!  The size of the campus is more than manageable by foot and it is so gorgeous that it isn’t a pain to walk around and just  admire the architecture.       What classes are you taking? What do you like about them? What is the workload like?  Peninsular Spanish Literature; Global Economy; Don Quixote; American Government; and American Frontier.  For most classes, what I like about them is I actually chose them. The ability to control what is fed into my mind is awe‐ some. I had always wanted to be able to pick subject matter that interested me and now I get that opportunity. The pro‐ fessors are also always just an e‐mail away. Each professor is really supportive and provides helpful information on any‐ thing any student has an issue with within a reasonable amount of time. 

Schuler Quarterly

May 2010


After class, one always feels like he or she learned something. High school classes are very vague, but in col‐ lege, each professor puts the subject material in a way that allows the student to feel passionate about the  class. The workload is enormous but the professors’ passion is the best weapon against the work. When a pas‐ sion so big is inspired, the workload is actually enjoyable.    When you aren't studying, what are you doing with your free time?  When you are taking five classes, there is not much free time. However, I am the treasurer of AHORA!, which is  the Latino club on campus. I am a Teacher Assistant for the Spanish Conversation and Grammar class, and I am  also founding the Brandeis Chapter for a non‐profit organization that helps children in Honduras. Brandeis has  tons of extracurricular activities and clubs for everyone. There is even a game room with everything to enter‐ tain yourself. Brandeis has over four hundred clubs, three gyms, coffee shops, and awesome people. I’m never  bored at Brandeis. I actually need more time to be able to do everything I would like.          What is the biggest surprise from college?  Once you experience college, you will definitely face many surprises.. For example, coasting won't work in col‐ lege. Assignments must be on time, tests actually studied for, and criticism taken into account in order to im‐ prove. You have to try to succeed here, unlike in high school where most of what you learned was review with  some extra added on. You will also learn to manage your money better.      Describe some of the differences between Brandeis and Waukegan.  Comparing Brandeis to Waukegan is like trying to find the contrast between black and white. Brandeis defi‐ nitely has a better environment to learn because everyone is so engaged with their work. Doing homework is  normal. My classes are full of very intelligent people and discussions are extremely interesting.     If you could offer advice to Schuler Scholars who are preparing for college, what would you say?  Know that you are about to chose not only the school you will attend, but also the place where you will spend  the four next years of your life. So, make sure the college you are choosing is right for YOU.  Also, do not take  five classes the first semester; college is hard and you will be going through MANY changes, so take it easy.     Tell us an interesting story that illustrates your time at college so far.  College has absolutely brought the real Gabby to light again. While at WHS, I was super self‐conscious because  of my accent and it affected many aspects of my high school experience.  Now, I am very active and well‐known  on campus, I am a triple major, and so far, I am very proud of my academic achievements.  Last Monday I had  four essays due, two of which were 6 pages long. The other two where 3 and 4 pages; it was a tough week‐ end. So far, I have gotten 2 of them back and I got an A in both of them. Even though college is hard and it may  drive you crazy sometimes, it is the place where you find your true self.     

Schuler Quarterly

May 2010


Current Events: The Cove Since February, seniors participated in a new program dealing with current events. With different themes at each session,  seniors read articles, listened to podcasts, and viewed documentaries. The 2009 Academy Award‐winning documentary, The  Cove fell under the theme “Animal Rights,” though the documentary also connects to political and environmental justice, eco‐ nomic responsibility, and health hazards. Danny Motta (Carleton College, class of 2014) wrote a reflection on the film.  *If you haven’t seen it, the Schuler office has a copy of The Cove for you to borrow! Watch it during your lunch 

periods with friends!  

A Shrug To The World By Daniel Motta

“Bodies strewn across a dead end street... we eat and drink while tomorrow they die." ‐ U2  “As I'm gettin' older y'all people gets colder‐‐ most of us only care about money makin'‐‐   selfishness got us followin' our wrong direction.” ‐ Black Eyed Peas    These are both phrases taken from the lyrics of songs that express injustice. They are timeless words that connect  brutality to the faces of the innocent. In this case, the innocent are the dolphins.     It was not long ago when the Schuler Scholar Program showed a documentary that left most of us with moistened  eyes, shocked from agitated emotions, and yearning for justice of an exposed cause. The Cove was its name. It  depicted the killing and barbaric treatment of dolphins and whales in the coastal city of Taiji, Japan.     This Oscar Award‐winning film projects a cause that one man instigated after he witnessed a dolphin so tortured  that it committed suicide in front of him. From this, Ric O’Barry vowed to spend his life to end the unnecessary  suffering of these creatures. He did this by documenting the Taiji officials’ treatment of dolphins during a covert  night‐mission. After gathering plenty of statistics and hours of recorded images and sounds of the slaughter of  these fellow mammals, he and his team were able to show the people of Japan and the rest of the world what  goes on in this cove. 

Schuler Quarterly

May 2010


Obviously, the people of Taiji were not very pleased with the manner in which the movie depicts the 400‐year‐ old tradition that drives their economy through the sale of methyl‐mercury contaminated dolphin meat and  captured young dolphins. (Kyodo News) According to some articles in The Japan Times Online, many of Taiji’s  residents are not allowing themselves to be interviewed by foreigners. Local assembly member Hisato Ryono  declared that, "This is a close‐knit group of fishermen. The more they feel squeezed, the more they will close off  to outsiders. They won't stop this hunt because of such pressure….” (Alabaster) Many of the Taiji officials also  call for an understanding of this ancient tradition and they say that, “Dolphin and whale hunting in Taiji is not an  illegal act, [it is] in compliance with the Fisheries Act and under Wakayama Prefecture's approval… We regret the  movie expresses false things that are not based on scientific evidence.” (Matsutani) Nonetheless, there were a  multitude of studies that show the level of mercury contamination in whale and dolphins as well as in those who  consume their meats. According to researchers, “…levels of mercury in hair samples of residents of Taiji, Waka‐ yama Prefecture, which is known for customarily eating small whales caught by coastal whaling, are about 10  times the average in Japan.” (Hasegawa)     Though the people of Taiji, especially the fishermen and officials, are very reluctant to any change according to  National Public Radio, the first week of the dolphin hunting season last September saw controversy in the very  streets that The Cove recorded. Much international attention was put on the small town during this time; how‐ ever, according to multiple blogs and a news article that I found, the hunt began eight days later than usual. So  what exactly has the Japanese or local government done to address this dark corner of the world?      Not much has occurred since the documentary spread the information. The movie caused the world’s cameras  to flash over Taiji, as well as a “tsunami” of complaints to different societies at national and international levels.  This led to the suspension of Taiji’s relationship to its Australian sister city of Broome, as long as the mass  slaughter of two‐thousand dolphins a year continues. (Kurokawa)    There is much to be done about the tyrannical shrouding that Japan has over its waters and the world’s species,  especially these loving creatures that have been made so famous through their pain. This is now a job that ex‐ tends itself to more than just one man or his crew. The world must seek rectitude, and we—everyone—must  work toward it.  

Schuler Quarterly

May 2010


Summer Plans! The following student(s) will...

... attend the following outstanding summer college  programs for sophomores.   Work hard and have fun!    Lindsey Bennett —> Stanford University  Irene Castillo —> Kenyon College  Danielle Cherry —> Earlham College  Quamesha Crawford —> Barnard College  Diana Cruz —> Smith College  Lally Delgado —> Barnard College  Amber Dimitroff —> Skidmore College  April Estrada —> Kenyon College  Tony Flores —> Davidson College  Miguel Garcia —>Brown University  Michelle Johnson —> Barnard College   Raeven Jones‐Kelley —> Lewis & Clark College  Roberto Lopez‐Cruz —> Brown University  Lina Luu —> Barnard College  Uriel Mandujano —> Vanderbilt University   Vianey Mora —> Washington University in St. Louis  Catherine Ramirez —> Vanderbilt University  Kevin Rivera —> Boston University  Javi Rojas —> Ithaca College  Lupe Ruiz —> Smith College  Allysin Ruttle —> American University  Cristina Sandoval —> Boston University  Ashwin Sivaramakrishnan —> Worchester    Polytechnic Institute  Hector Uriostegui —> Davidson College 

Schuler Quarterly

...travel to different places here and around the world for  sweet, interesting programs.     Joanna Garcia —>  Navaho Nation  Denise Escovar —> India  Dulce Lazcano —> South Africa  Sally Luu —> Spain  Yesenia Ramirez —> India 

...attend the following incredible summer college  program. Work hard, have fun!    David McClelland —> MIT 

...travel to New Orleans to build homes with the non‐ profit organization, Habitat for Humanity. Awesome!    Isabel Guadarrama  Gabe Hernandez  Daniela Torres  Monica White 

...travel to Stratford, Ontario (in Canada!) to enjoy  some plays at the Shakespeare Festival.    It’s going to RULE!    Jackie Flores  Miguel Garcia    Rudy Lagunas    Lynneise Jones            Payton Schlict          Raeven Jones‐Kelley 

Vol. 1, Issue 4


Not Sure What To Do This Summer?? Still looking for something to do this summer (or have time before and after the fantastic activities listed on the previ‐ ous page)? There is still time to have a productive and meaningful summer! For example, super star senior Jackie Flores  (Scripps College, class of 2014) made an ongoing internship happen for herself. Read her story, follow her lead: 

Over the summer of 2009, I interned at State Representative Eddie Washington's office. After re‐ searching online and preparing my resume with Rob, I simply called the office to see if I could help out.  I interviewed, got the job, and then my work began. As an intern, I answered phones and went to local  events to inform people about the office and how they could contact Mr. Washington. I worked in the  office on weekdays and worked local events on weekends.  I had so much fun and got to meet many  people. I learned how a political office runs and I was able to network with many important people in  Illinois. I recently attended the Women's Democratic Party luncheon and met Congresswoman Bean.  Internships allow you to gain experience in one of your fields of interest. You get to do hands‐on work  and the networking opportunities are endless. Internships open doors and look great on your resume!                  —Jackie Flores 

The talented junior Daniela Torres, who will be volunteering in New Orleans with Habitat for Humanity this summer,  initiated some fantastic volunteer opportunities for herself. Read her story, follow her lead: 

A favorite pastime of mine is meeting with the elderly at Waukegan’s Pavilion Nursing Home. Words  cannot explain the satisfaction one feels after seeing a warm smile coming from that creased face. So  many stories are held in the memories of these aged individuals, yet few know of them because they  have very little contact with the world beyond Pavilion. I remember the first time I walked in, not  knowing what to expect. Little did I know that I would fall in love with this service. During my time with  them, we play board games, color, dance, or play other recreational games. Regardless of all of those  activities, my favorite pastime is simply conversing with them. Their knowledge and way of analyzing  life is so different that it makes one think of the changes in our society. Although they make an impact  on my life, I am also able to have a positive influence on their lives by bringing excitement. This volun‐ teer service on its own was, not only a payment to society, but to my inner‐self as well.   

Schuler Quarterly

–Daniela Torres  May 2010


Summer = Fun = Reading 

Keys to success:  Read at least 1/2 hour a day.   Read the news for at least 15 minutes a day.  ...not sure what to read? Try these! 

News websites:  nytimes.com  bbc.co.uk  cnn.com  washingtonpost.com 

Reminder   Mandatory Fun: 

Fiction: Everything is Illuminated Jonathon Safron Foer  A Tree Grows in Brooklyn Betty Smith  Love in the Time of Cholera Gabriel Garcia Marquez  The House of the Spirits Isabel Allende  Catcher in the Rye JD Salinger  The Bluest Eye Toni Morrison  About a Boy Nick Hornby  Their Eyes Were Watching God Zora Neale Hurston  A Portrait of the Young Man as an Artist James Joyce  To the Lighthouse Virginia Woolf    Non‐fiction:  The Invisible Wall Harry Bernstein  The Diversity of Life Edward Wilson  Into Thin Air Jon Krakauer  The Boys of Summer Roger Kalui  The Power of Myth Joseph Campbell  The Fire Next Time James Baldwin  Silent Spring Rachel Carson  Page 16

PICNIC!    

Fri., June 25 @ 12‐3pm  Bowen Park  1800 Sheridan Rd.  Waukegan, IL   

May 2010

Schuler Quarterly  

The End of the Year Edition! :)

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you