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Welcome! to Issue 40 of

‘The Deux-Sèvres Monthly’ magazine.

Issue 40?    Wow!  How  time  flies... You’ll   be   sure  to   find   something  to   keep   you   entertained  this  month.  In  this  busy  issue  there   are   many  summer   fairs,   markets,   open   days   and  sales  listed  -­‐  you’ll  be  glad  to  stop  and  rest   afterwards! Featured   this   month   is   the   bustly   town   of   Bressuire  which,  coincidentally,  is  the  home  of   the  ‘Grand   Prix   Automobile  Historique’  at   the  end   of   the  month.     We’ve   found   in   the   past   that   the   best   day   to   watch   the   demonstrations  is  on   the   Sunday,  which  leaves   Saturday  the  28th   free  to   visit  other  local  events.     I’m  looking  forward  to  it  and  seeing   some  of  you  there! As  this  year  sees  the  100th  anniversary  of   the  start   of  WW1,  we’d   love  to  include  any  stories  or  information  about   this  historic  event.     If  you  have  anything  of  interest,  please  contact  me  and  I’ll  do  my   best  to  publish  it. Have  a  great  month  and  see  you  next  time.

à plus, Sarah.

Tel: 05 49 70 26 21 Email: info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr website: www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

Emergency Numbers: 15 SAMU, Medical 17 Gendarmes, Police 18 Pompiers, Fire

112 European emergency 113 Drugs and alcohol

CONTENTS

What’s On.......................................................................................... 4 Getting  Out  &  About......................................................................... 6 Le  Coin  Français.................................................................................10 A-­‐Z  of  the  Communes  in  the  Deux-­‐Sèvres....................................... 11 Hobbies............................................................................................ 12 Clubs  &  Associations........................................................................ 14 Health,  Beauty  &  Fitness.................................................................. 16 Our  Furry  Friends...............................................................................18 Home  &  Garden.............................................................................. 20 French  Life....................................................................................... 22 Take  a  Break..................................................................................... 23 Spotlight  On..................................................................................... 24 Communications............................................................................. 28 Food  &  Drink................................................................................... 30 Motoring.......................................................................................... 33 Building  &  Renovation..................................................................... 35 Business  &  Finance.......................................................................... 40 Property........................................................................................... 45

THIS MONTH’S  ADVERTISERS   79  Renovations.................................................................................................... 36 A  La  Bonne  Vie  (Restaurant)............................................................................... 31 Abattage  Service  (Slaughter  House).................................................................... 31 Abord  Immo  (Estate  Agent)................................................................................ 26 Ace  Pneus  (Tyre  Supplier  &  Fitter)...................................................................... 32 Aerodrome  de  Couhé-­‐Vérac............................................................................... 48 Affordable  UK  Designs  (Kitchens  &  UPVC  Double  Glazing)................................. 2 AKE  Petits  Travaux  (Builder)................................................................................ 38 Alain  Miot  (Sawmill)............................................................................................ 38 Alan  Pearce  (Plumbing  &  Heating)..................................................................... 35 Andrew  Longman  (Plumber).............................................................................. 35 ARB  French  Property........................................................................................... 47 Arbrecadabra.com  (Tree  surgery)........................................................................ 20 Atelier  JM  Toledo  (Rug  Repairs  &  Cleaning)........................................................ 21 BH  Assurances  /  Allianz....................................................................................... 20 Bill  McEvoy  (Plumber  /  Heating  Engineer)........................................................ 35 Blevins  Franks  Financial  Management................................................................ 41 British  Mobile  Mechanic  (John  Purchase)........................................................... 34

...continued.

C’est un  carton!  (Workshops).............................................................................. Café  des  Belles  Fleurs.......................................................................................... Camping  Les  Prairies  du  Lac................................................................................ Caniclôture  (Hidden  Fencing  for  Dogs)............................................................... Carlill-­‐Strover  Building......................................................................................... Chez  Tante  Mabel  (Dolls  House  items,  Cakes,  Gift  Ideas)................................... Chris  Bassett  Construction.................................................................................. Chris  Parsons  (Heating/Electrical/Plumbing)...................................................... Chris  the  Handyman............................................................................................ Christies  (English  Book  Shop  and  Tea  Room)...................................................... Christophe  Thomas  (Fresh  Fish  &  Seafood)........................................................ Christophe  Valteau  (Rabbit  meat)....................................................................... CJ  Electricité......................................................................................................... Cleaning  Services  by  Karen.................................................................................. Clean  Sweep  Chimney  Services........................................................................... Currencies  Direct  (Money  Transfers)................................................................... Cut  46  (Hair  Salon).............................................................................................. DB  Electricité....................................................................................................... D.W  Cooper  (Carpenter,  Roofer,  Mason)............................................................. David  Cropper  (Stump  Grinding  &  Jungle  Busting)............................................ David  Watkins  (Chimney  Sweep)........................................................................ D.J  Maintenance  (Handyman)............................................................................ Domaine  de  l’Enchantoir  (Vineyard)................................................................... Double  Glazing  Installation  -­‐  Haynes  Carpentry.................................................. Down  to  Earth  Pool  Design  (Swimming  Pool  Design  &  Construction)................ Duncan  White  -­‐  Agent  Commerciale.................................................................. EcoPower  (Solar  Thermal  Trading  Company)...................................................... Electricien  Anglais  en  France.............................................................................. Emilie  Baudrez  (French  Classes  and  Translation)................................................ Famous  Furniture  in  France................................................................................. Franglais  Deliveries............................................................................................. GAN  Assurances.................................................................................................. George  Rayner  Computers.................................................................................. Give  the  Dog  a  Comb  (Dog  Grooming)................................................................ Hallmark  Electronique  (Electricians  &  Sat.  Engineers)........................................ Harris  Homes  &  Gardens..................................................................................... Heather’s  Pet  Care  Services................................................................................. Holistic  Therapy  -­‐  Soul  to  Sole............................................................................. Homes  in  France.................................................................................................. I  C  O  Electricté..................................................................................................... Insink  Plumbing................................................................................................... Jean-­‐Pierre  Sireau  (Parthenaise  Beef)................................................................ John  Pate  (Renovations)..................................................................................... Jon  the  Carpetman.............................................................................................. Julia  Hunt  -­‐  Agent  Commercial............................................................................ Keith  Banks  (Swimming  Pool  Maintenance)....................................................... L’Eco-­‐Pain  Bio  (Organic  breads  &  brioches)........................................................ La  Deuxieme  Chance  (Annie  Sloan  chalk  paint  supplier).................................... Le  Pub  des  Halles................................................................................................. Lawrence  Associates  (Renovations  etc).............................................................. Leggett  Immobilier.............................................................................................. Le  Petit  Cadeau................................................................................................... Le  Tour  de  Finance.............................................................................................. Mad  Hatter’s  Kitchen........................................................................................... Man  &  Van........................................................................................................... Man  For  Hire........................................................................................................ Michael  William  Hairdressing............................................................................. ML  Computers..................................................................................................... Motor  Parts  Charente.......................................................................................... Musée  de  Tumulus  de  Bougon............................................................................ Mutuelle  de  Poitiers  Assurances......................................................................... Nathan  Foster  Building  Services.......................................................................... Needa  Hand  Services........................................................................................... Pamela  Irving  (Massage  &  Reflexology).............................................................. Pascale  Matéo  (French  Tuition)........................................................................... Philip  Irving  (Mini  Digger  hire)............................................................................. Plan-­‐170  (Professional  Scale  Drawings).............................................................. Point  P  (Builder’s  Merchants).............................................................................. Poissonnerie  l’Ocean  (Fresh  Fish)....................................................................... Poissonnerie  Renoux  (Fresh  Fish)........................................................................ Polar  Express  (Frozen  Foods).............................................................................. Premier  Autos  (Mechanic).................................................................................. Première  Classe  Removals  &  Deliveries.............................................................. Restaurant  des  Canards....................................................................................... Rob  Berry  Plastering  Services.............................................................................. Robert  Walker  Plomberie  (Plumbing  &  Heating  Engineer)................................. Ross  Hendry  (Interface  Consulting  &  Engineering)............................................. Sarl  Down  to  Earth  (Fosse  Installations  &  Groundworks)................................... Satellite  TV........................................................................................................... SCP  Notaires........................................................................................................ Siddalls  (Financial  Advisors)................................................................................. Silverwood  Books................................................................................................ Simon  The  Tiler.................................................................................................... Spectrum  IFA  Group  (Amanda  Johnson)............................................................. Simply  Homes  and  Gardens................................................................................ Steve  Enderby...................................................................................................... Sue  Burgess  (French  Courses  &  Translation)....................................................... The  Craft  Cabin  (Handmade  cards  and  card-­‐making  items)............................... The  English  Mechanic  &  Son  -­‐  Tony  Eyre............................................................ The  Market.......................................................................................................... Trisha  Mobile  Hairdresser.................................................................................... Val  Assist  (Translation  Services)........................................................................... Venus  Rose  Yoga.................................................................................................. Yoga  Vendée....................................................................................................

26 31 8 18 38 20 37 39 36 6 27 27 39 20 37 42 15 39 36 21 37 36 30 36 45 46 39 39 9 20 34 45 29 18 39 21 18 17 47 39 35 27 36 20 46 45 27 20 31 38 46 8 43 30 34 20 15 29 33 8 45 38 36 17 9 37 37 38 27 27 31 34 34 30 35 35 28 37 29 47 44 12 37 42 21 35 9 8 34 6 15 9 16 15

© Sarah  Berry   2014.     All   rights  reserved.    Material   may   not   be   reproduced  without  permission.    While   care   is   taken  to  ensure  that  articles  and  features  are  accurate,  Sarah   Berry   accepts  no  liability   for   reader  dissatisfaction.     The   opinions  expressed   and  experiences   shared  are   given  by  individual   authors  and  do  not  necessarily  represent  the   views  or  opinions  of  the  publisher.    Please  ensure  you  verify  that  the  company  you  are  dealing  with  is  a  registered  trading  company  in  France  and/or  elsewhere. <<The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly>>  est  édité  par  Sarah  Berry,  La  Bartière,  79130,   Secondigny.  Tél:  05  49  70  26  21.    Directeur  de  la  publication  et  rédacteur  en  chef:  Sarah  Berry.  Crédits  photos:  Sarah  Berry,   Clkr,  Shutterstock,   GraphicStock  et  morgeufile.com.  Impression:  Raynaud  Imprimeurs,  zone  industrielle,  BP13,  79160,  Coulonges-­‐sur-­‐l’Autize.    Dépôt  légal:  juin  2014  -­‐  Tirage:  5000  exemplaires.    Siret:  515  249  738  00011  ISSN:  2115-­‐4848

The Deux-Sèvres Monthly | 3


06

What’s On... June 2014

1st June  -­‐  Open  Garden,  Plant  &  Garage  Sale  +  Vide  Grenier 10am  -­‐   5pm   at   5  rue   du   Gardou,  79330   Geay.     Situated   on   the   D938T  -­‐  look  out  for  the  balloons!    Contact:  05  49  96  22  92. 3rd  June  -­‐  Quiz  Night  at  Le  Pub  des  Halles See  advert  on  P.31  for  contact  details. 5th  June  -­‐  Patchwork  Expo  &  Dotty  Rose  Fabric  Sale At   Maison  pour   Tous  in  L’Absie.    2pm  -­‐   4pm.    Browse,  buy  fabric/ haberdashery  or  join  the  association.    Contact  Jenny  09  87  87  84  87. 8th  June  -­‐  House  Clearance  near  St  Aubin  le  Cloud 10am  -­‐  3pm.    See  advert  on  P.5. 11th  June  -­‐  A  Filling  Station  talk  by  Rev  Richard  Fothergrill “What  is  genuine  Christian  Renewal?”  7.30pm.    See  advert  on  P.5. 13th  June  -­‐  Live  Music  Night   ‘The   Attic   Band’  play  at  Café  des  Belles   Fleurs,  Fenioux   at  8.30pm.     See  ad  on  P.31. 14th  June  -­‐  Expo  of  Lacemaking  with  Bobbins At   Exoudun,   10am   -­‐   6pm.   Free   entry.   Exhibition,   trade   stands   &   refreshments.   14th  &  15th  June  -­‐  Artists’  Studio  Tour Organised   by  Art’Musements.    A   tour   of   local  artist’s   studios.  For   more  info  see  P.6. 15th  June  -­‐  Aidez  Association’s  Summer  Market At  la  salle  des  fêtes,  St  Germain-­‐de-­‐Longue-­‐Chaume.  11am  -­‐  5pm. 17th  June  -­‐  Le  Tour  de  Finance An   ideal  opportunity  to  ask  questions  about  finance  and  healthcare   in  France.    At  Chateau  de  St  Loup  from  10am.    Please  see  advert  on   P.43  for  further  info. 18th  June  -­‐  Quiz  Night At  Restaurant  des  Canards,  Chef  Boutonne.    See  ad  on  P.30. 20th  &  21st  June  -­‐  Guiness  Book  of  Records  Attempt Fundraising  event,  see  P.7  for  further  details. 21st  June  -­‐  Fête  de  la  Musique International  music  event.    Search  locally  for  events  in  your  area. 21st  June  -­‐  The  Mad  Hatter’s  Ball At   The   Mad   Hatter’s   Kitchen,   Caunay.     Evening   dress,  4   course   menu  and  live  music.    See  advert  on  P.30. 21st  &  22nd  June  -­‐  Moving  Vehicles  Festival Heritage   cars,  motorcycles,  trucks,  tractors,  military   vehicles,   fire   engines  at  La  Mothe  Saint  Heray.  www.lefanalrouge79.jimdo.com. 22nd  June  -­‐  Rose  du  matin Walk  and  picnic  through  the  vines  of  Puy  Notre  Dame.    See  ad  on   P.30  for  details. 22nd  June  -­‐  Free  Concert  by  Les  Chanterelles The  Amity  Singers  join  the  Coulon  based  choir.  At  Coulon  church,    7pm. 25th  June  -­‐  Book  &  Coffee  Morning At  45  rue  du  Bois  Baudron,  79100  Mauzé  Thouarsais  from  10am. 28th  June  -­‐  Summer  Fair At  The  Market,  Luché  sur  Brioux.    See  ad  on  P.6. 28th  June  -­‐  NALA’s  Summer  Fair At  Chateau  de  Puybelliard,  10am  -­‐  7pm.    See  advert  on  P.7  for  details. 28th  June  -­‐  Open  House  at  Abattage  Service See  how  poultry  is  prepared   to   cook  +   other   trade  stands.   From   10am.    See  advert  on  P.31  for  details. 28th  &  29th  June  -­‐  Grand  Prix  Automobile  Historique,  Bressuire See  website:  www.automobile-­‐club79.com  for  info.

What’s Coming Up... 5th July  -­‐  First  Aid  Course  in  English At  SDIS79  HQ  in  Chauray.    See  P.17  for  further  info. 5th  July  -­‐  Live  Music  Night With  rock  group,  ‘Coffees   and  Cigarettes’  at  Café  des  Belles  Fleurs,   Fenioux. 5th  &  6th  July  -­‐  24  hours  VTT  (Mountain  bike  race) at   Lake   Lambon,   Prailles.   See   www.arp79.com   for   more   information. 20th  July  -­‐  50th  Anniversary  Air  Show At  Couhé-­‐Vérac  airground  -­‐  see  back  page  for  details.

4 | The Deux-Sèvres Monthly

The National Holidays, Religious and Feast Days 2014 Sunday 8th  June  .................   Pentacost  (Pentecôte) Monday  9th  June  ..............   Pentacost  (Lundi  de  Pentecôte) Sunday  15th  June  ...............   Fathers’  Day  (Fête  des  Pères) Saturday  21st  June  .............   World  Music  Day  (Fête  de  la  Musique) Monday  14th  July  ..............  National  Day  (Fête  Nationale) Friday  15th  August  ............   Assumption  of  Mary  (Assomption) Sunday  5th  October  ............  Grandfathers’  Day  (Fête  des  Grand-­‐pères) Saturday  1st  November  .....  All  Saint’s  Day  (Toussaint) Monday  11th  November  ...   Armistice  Day  (Armistice) Thursday  25th  December  ...  Christmas  Day  (Noêl) Dates in blue are celebration days, not public holidays

The Chaplaincy  of  Christ  the  Good  Shepherd,  Poitou-­‐Charentes,   hold  English  speaking  monthly  services. • 1st  Sunday  at  10.30am:  The  Little  Stone  Church  in   Chef-­‐Boutonne.    Followed  by  tea  &  coffee. • 2nd  Sunday  at  11.00am:  the  home  of  Ann  White,  Jassay • 4th   Sunday   at   10.30am:   the   Presbytery   Rooms,   rue   de   la   Citadelle,  Parthenay  (opposite   St   Croix   Church).   Followed   by   tea  &  coffee,  and  a  'bring  and  share'  lunch.     A   warm   welcome   awaits   everyone   for   a   time   of   worship   and   fellowship.   For   further   information   about   location   of   churches   and   what   else  is  happening  near   you,   please  take  a  look  at  our   website  www.church-­‐in-­‐france.com  or  contact  us  by  email:   office.goodshepherd@orange.fr.

The Filling  Station  ~  Poitou-­‐Charentes

The Filling   Station   is   a   network   of   local   Christians   of   all   denominations   who   meet   together   regularly   for   spiritual   renewal   and  evangelism  purposes.    ALL  WELCOME. Please  see  our   bilingual   website   for  details  of   meetings  and  spring   programmes  www.thefillingstationfrance.com  or  contact   05  49  87  89  16  or  email:  michael.willis@sfr.fr

ALL SAINTS,  VENDEE - Puy  de  Serre We  hold  two  services  each  month,  on  the  2nd  and  4th  Sundays at  the  church  of  St  Marthe,  Puy  de  Serre,  at  11am.   After  each  service,  tea  and   coffee  is  served  in  the  parish   room   and  everyone  is  invited  to  a   `bring  and  share`   lunch.  For   details   of   all   our   activities,   our   Services   in   the   west   of   the   Vendée,   copies   of   recent   newsletters   and   more   information,   please   check  our  website:  www.allsaintsvendee.fr

The Rendez-­‐Vous  Christian  Fellowship  

A warm  welcome  awaits  you  at   our   meetings  in   the  Vendée  on   the  1st  &  3rd  Sunday  in   the  month  at   11am.    We  meet   at  The   Barn,   off   the   D960B   between   Pouzauges   and   Chantonnay.     Meetings   last   about   an   hour   and   are   followed   by   a   time   of   fellowship   with  refreshments.  To   find   out   more   please  contact   Chris   Taylor  09  60  49  78  50  or  Des   Vine  05  49  74  18   27  or  visit:   www.therendezvous.fr


06

Paperback Jan Books  in  English

Open 6.30-9pm

Reel Fish & Chips

                       

1st June:     Café  des  Belles  Fleurs,  Fenioux  79160  2pm  -­‐  4pm 4th  June:     Cafe  Cour  de  Miracle,  Vouvant  85120.    2.30pm-­‐  4.30pm 5th  June:     Brasserie  Vue  du  Chateau,  Bressuire  79300.  11am  -­‐  1pm 5th  June:     Bar  le  Palais,  St  Aubin  79450.  2pm  -­‐  5pm   6th  June:     Bar  de  la  Paix,  Thouars  79100.  11.30am  -­‐  2pm 6th  June:     Tipsy  Bar,  Coulonges  79160.  4pm  -­‐  6pm 11th  June:  Le  Don  Jon  Bar,  Moncontour  86330.  4pm  -­‐  6pm 12th  June:Pause!  Cafe,  L’Absie  79240.    2pm-­‐  5pm 13th  June:  Jan’s  home,  La  Ferriére-­‐en-­‐Parthenay  79390.    11am-­‐  4pm 14th  June:  Café  Le  Chauray,  St  Maixent  l’Ecole  79400.    10am  -­‐  1pm 15th  June:  Salle  de  Fêtes,  St  Germain  de  Longue  Chaume  10am-­‐5pm 25th  June:  Jan’s  home,  La  Ferriére-­‐en-­‐Parthenay  79390.    11am-­‐  5pm 26th  June:  Le  Relais  des  2  Moulins,  Clessé  79350.    4pm-­‐  6pm   For  more  info  contact  Jan  on: 06  08  30  73  29  or  email:  paperbackjan@gmail.com

Top Hat Quiz & Curry

From 7pm

2nd June: Limalonges 5th June: Chef Boutonne 9th June: Theil Rabier 11th June: Aigre 12th June: Champniers Tel: 05 45 71 70 91 ~ more info at www.tophatquizzes.com Local Markets

• • Tuesdays: • • • • Wednesdays: • Thursdays: • • • Fridays: • • Saturdays: • • • • Sundays: • • • •

Benet 85490 Lencloître (1st Monday in month) 86140 Lezay 79120 Coulonges-sur-l’Autize 79160 Thouars 79100 Bressuire 79300 Parthenay 79200 Sauzé-Vaussais 79190 Niort 79000 La Mothe Saint-Héray 79800 Thouars 79100 Melle 79500 Bressuire 79300 Chef-Boutonne 79110 Airvault 79600 Niort 79000 Coulon 79510 Saint-Maixent-l’École 79400 Neuville-de-Poitou 86170 Coulon 79510 Photo: Lisa Roberts

Mondays:

Sun 1st     Etusson  Village  Fete   Weds  4th  &  18th     Etusson  Canteen     Thurs  5th     St  Martin  de  Sanzay  

12H30 -­‐  14H00 18H30  -­‐  21H00 18H30  -­‐  21H00

Reduced dates  this  month  as  REEL  FISH  AND  CHIPS  are  charity         fundraising  -­‐  by  trekking  Mount  Everest  up  to  5500m.                                           Sponsorship   and   donations   accepted  at   our   venues  for   Cancer   Research  and  The  Heart  Foundation.                                                                                                         Tel:  06  04  14  23  94  ~  www.reelfishandchips.net

Fish 4 Chip

Open 6 - 8pm

Mondays: Bar Tilleuls, Champniers (near Civray) Tuesdays: Sauzé-Vaussais (Main square) Wednesdays: Chef Boutonne (near Chateau) Thursdays: Sauzé-Vaussais - Evening. (Main square) Fridays: Mansle (Car park of Simply Supermarket) Tel: 06 37 53 56 20 ~ www.mobilefishandchipsfrance.com

La Vendée Chippy

Open 6 - 8.30pm

Wednesdays: Bar ‘Auberge le St Vincent’, St Vincent Sterlanges Thursdays: Bar ‘La Rando’, Mervent. Fridays: Bar ‘Au Bon Coin’, Thoursais Bouildroux + 7th June: Bar Le Lys @ La Chapelle aux Lys

For more  info  please  visit  website:  www.lavendeechippy.com

Mr T’s Friterie

Open 6.30-9pm

(incl. Bank Holidays) With regular venues at:

17770        H      ilaire                      d    e        V      illefranche             • Aulnay    17470    (from  6pm)  •    St   • St  Jean  d’Angély  17400 • Matha 17160

• Gourville 16170

See www.frying2nite.com  for  details  or  call  06  02  22  44  74

The Deux-Sèvres Monthly | 5


Getting Out & About... SUMMER MARKET SUNDAY 15th JUNE Organised by Aidez Association

Salles des Fêtes St Germain-de-LongueChaume (79200) Open from 11am - 5pm Good variety of 30+ stalls Money raised will benefit local French Charities. Free Entry

FREE Music For ALL!

Imagine an   evening   of   outdoor   entertainment   on   a   warm   summer   solstice.     Entry  is  free,  the  musicians   perform  for   free   and  anyone  can  play  any  music  without   paying  performing  rights   fees.   Debutant   musicians   and   singers   can   perform   alongside   seasoned   professionals.     All   around   is   the  spirit   of   festival   and   encouragement,  while  everyone  joins  in  the    massive  celebration   of  music  that  occurs  all  over  France  on  the  same  day  and  in  over   100  other  countries. This  isn’t  one  of  John  Lennon’s  dreams  or  some  pagan  ritual  -­‐  This   is  ‘La  Fête  de  la  Musique’. On   21st   June   every   year   events   spring   up   in   streets,   parks,   bourgs,  hospitals  and  a  plethora  of  venues  with  all  musical   styles.   Initiated   nationally  by   Jack   Lang,   the   Ministère   de   Culture,   in   1982,  within  three  years  it  grew  into   a  European  event   and  then   went   global.     Now  you  can  find  a  ‘Fiesta’,  ‘Festa’  or   ‘Music   Day’   from   Montevideo   to   New   York,   Nairobi,   Madrid,   Glasgow,   Istanbul  and  across  to  Sydney,  to  name  a  few. But  the  size  of  the  town  may  not  reflect  the   size  of  the  fête.    In   Paris,  along   with   the   spectacular   shows   one   can   ‘sérénade   sur   pavé’,   while   in   the   Haute-­‐Vienne   village   of   Maisonnais-­‐sur-­‐ Tardoire   (87440)   the   bourg   opens   at   6pm   for   a   free   variety   concert   with  more   than   twelve  acts   over   three   hours,  with   the   usual   buvette,   food   and   even   local   ice-­‐cream   for   a   warm   summer’s  evening.

Studio Tour between the rivers l’Autize and l’Egray On the   weekend   of   14th/15th   June,   fourteen   artists   (painters,   photographers   and   sculptors)   from   over   seven   communes   will   open  their  studios,  and  some  of  them  their  gardens,  to  the  public   between  2pm  and  7pm  each  day. A  leaflet   of   the   tour   containing  the  addresses  of  the   artists  and   photos  of  some  of  their  works  will  be  available  in   shops  and  public   places.    And  from  31st  May  there  will  be  an  exhibition   of  a  work  by   each  of   the  artists  at   the  ‘Bar  à  Thym’,  La  Véquière  (on   the  D745   between   Champdeniers   and   Béceleuf,   for   those   of   you   without   GPS!)    Tel:  06  85  12  90  05. And,  if   you  would  like  to  meet  the   artists  in  a  festive  atmosphere,   on  Saturday  14th  June  starting   at  7.30pm   there  will   be  an   apero-­‐ concert  with  a  free  glass  of  rosé  and  a  meal  for  10€  at  the  ‘Café  du   Centre’,  Béceluf.     Reservations  would  be  appreciated  for  the  meal   (contact  Bruno  Guilbaud  on  06  03  22  32  52). mu t'' Ar

sements

The tour   is   organized   by   the   associauon   Art’Musements.   Contact  Nathalie  Delbois:  05  49  05  32  61.      

So wherever   you   are,  go   along   to   support   your   artistes   and   join   in   with   all  that  enthusiasm  in  this   wonderful   worldwide   celebration  of  music.

Bon fête! More  info  on  www.fetedelamusique.culture.fr  and  local  culture/ tourism  web  sites. 6 | The Deux-Sèvres Monthly

Above: Alain Simonnet’s studio in Coulonges-sur-l’Autize.


CONCERT'A'COULON Le'Chœur'de'Femmes'Chanterelles

invite la chorale Amity Singers de Jersey ILES%ANGLO%NORMANDES

Grand Programme de Musiques variées du XVIème au XXème siècle Musique sacrée Jazz Gospel et Chansons Folkloriques

Eglise de Coulon Dimanche 22 juin à 19 h Entrée'libre

2nd Sunday  Club,  5th  Season!

Le record du Goëland

We are   now  in  our   5th  season   with   the  2nd  Sunday  Club   which   started  in   May  2010.    Last   year   was  a   challenging   one   with   the   decision   taken   to   have   a   committee   created   and   a   fee   for   membership,  along  with  the  purchase   of  insurance  to  cover   any   eventuality  on  our  club  runs.

On June   20th-­‐21st,  L’Association   des  Randonneurs  du   Val  d’Argent   (REVA)   will  attempt  to  beat   the  Guinness   Book  of  Record’s  record   for   the   longest   distance   travelled   on   horseback  or   carriage   in   a   relay  over  24  hours.    

Last year  was  also  a  challenging  year  for  my  husband,  Ian,  and  I  as   he  was  diagnosed  with  primary  liver  cancer  and  has  been  under treatment  for   it  ever   since.      We  sold  our  old  Triumphs  and  went   for  more  modern  bikes  for  their  reliability. Our  committee  consists  of  :-­‐ President • Caroline  Self       Secretary • Penny  Homewood       Treasurer • Ian  Self       Web  Master • Dave  West     Our   members   now   total   a ro u n d   4 0   p e o p l e   w i t h   approximately   25   bikes.     The   membership   fee   is   10€   per   rider  and  per  passenger  and  5€   for  associate  members. This   season   we   plan   to   start   from  different   starting  points  to  vary   the   routes   we  ride,  which   will  be  published  on  the  club's  website  www.2ndsundayclub.fr. One  of   the   charities   that   we  are   supporting  is  ADAPEI,  which   is   based  just   outside  La  Caillere  St   Hilaire  and  we   were  pleased  to   meet   with   them   on   Easter   Saturday   to   present   them   with   a   donation. We  always  welcome  new  members  and  if  you   are  interested  please   contact   Penny  Homewood   on  pennyhomewood@hotmail.com  or   Caroline  Self  on  caroline.self@sfr.fr

Happy and safe biking everyone.

L’Association le   Goëland  Amities  Pays  de   la   Loire,  who   will   profit   from  this  event,  represents  people  touched  by  a  rare  genetic  illness   called   Fragile   X   Syndrome   (the   second   cause   of   intellectual   deficiency  after  Trisomy  21).    The  association  endeavours  to  inform   the   public   of   the   syndrome,  is   involved   in   the   development   of   research  and  helps  sufferers.      They  created   a  farm  in   Roussay  to   provide  a  range  of  activities,  which   has  welcomed  38  adults  since   2008.    A  second  specialised  centre  for  life-­‐skills  is  planned  in   the   Loire  region.   Edgar   is   the   ambassador   for   the  ride  (see   photo  right).    He  is  14  years  old,  has  a  lovely   smile,  big  brown  eyes   and  is  a  nephew  of   one  of   the   REVA  volunteers.     For   several   years  his  parents   didn’t   have   any   answers   to   the   questions   raised   by   their   son’s   different  behaviour.    But,  after  learning  that   another   family   member   had   just   been   diagnosed   with   Fragile   X,   Edgar   was   screened  and  found  to  be  a  sufferer  too.   Edgar  loves  horse  riding  and  his  favourite  horse  is  Fauvette  and   they  will  be  participating  in  the  final  stage  of  the  relay. Leaving  Friday,  June   20th  at  6.30pm  from   Longeville,  Conches-­‐sur-­‐ Mer   and  arriving  Saturday  June  21st   at   Le  Pin  near   Cerizay.    The   randonnée  is  free   and  the  pace  of  the  relay  will  be  controlled  and   calm  with  both  horses  and   riders  in   mind   and   will   be   on   public   paths  and  off  paved  roads.    Many  associations  have  helped  and  bio   degradable  balloons  can   be  purchased   for  two  euros   and  will   be   released  at  the  end  of  the  event  (prizes  for  the  winner). For  more  information  please  email:  laroutedugoeland@orange.fr

The Deux-Sèvres Monthly | 7


Combined Services Support Group (CSSG) by Terri  Laverick We   had   a  most   enjoyable  day   at   Le   Ferriere-­‐en-­‐Parthenay  last   month   selling  tea,   coffee  and   cakes  and   we   also  had  a   Tombola   stall   and  a  brocante  space.      Apart  from  a  short   howling  gale  and   a  spurt   of  torrential  rain,  a  great  day  was  had  by  all.    Many  thanks   to  those   of  you  who  supported   us  by  donating  cakes  and  goods,   and  then  went  on  to  spend  your  money  with  us  for  a  good  cause. We  will  be  holding  a  Summer  Garden  Party  at  La  Bourrichere,  St   Pardoux  on  27th  July.     If  you  would  like  to  have  a  trade  stand  at   this   event,  please   contact   John   Blair   at   johnblair@btopenworld.com.     The   cost   of  a  stand  is   10€.      Reel  Fish  and  Chips  will  be  there  and   cakes   have  been  requested  from  our   regular  cake  makers  to   enjoy   with  your  tea  or  coffee.     Keynotes  Choir  have  agreed   to  sing  for   us   and   3+1   will   be  there   to   entertain   you.     Please  come   along  and   enjoy  the  day.    

So, where  shall  we  be  this  summer? Here’s  a  list  of  events  so  far...

1st June:  Plant  and  Garage  Sale  in  Geay,  with  our  tombola 15th  June:  Aidez  Summer  Market,  St  Germain  with  tombola 28th  June:  Race  Night,  Fenioux  with  a   chicken  and  chips  supper   (This  is  a    ticket  only  event,  please  email:  cssgroup@outlook.com). 27th  July:  La  Bourrichere,  Summer  Garden  Party. The   next   breakfast   meeting  of   the   Combined   Services   Support   Group  (CSSG)   will   be   on   14th   June,  at   Cafe  des  Belles  Fleurs  in   Fenioux.    If  you   would  like  breakfast   prior  to  the   meeting,  please   contact  Pauline   Tonks  at  cssgroup@outlook.com  and   she   will   be   pleased   to   make   your   reservation.   Breakfast   is   at   10am,   the   meeting  is  at  11am.   We  are  always  looking  for   more  friends  to  join  our  busy  group,  so   come   along   to   any   of   the   above   and   be   assured   of   a   warm   welcome. Contact  CSSG  by  email:  cssgroup@outlook.com

Contact ‘The DSM’ magazine... Call Sarah on 05 49 70 26 21 or email: info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

8 | The Deux-Sèvres Monthly


Saint John’s Day Bonfires by Sue  Burgess The   summer   festival   of   Saint   Jean   (fête   de   la   saint   Jean)   is   traditionally   accompanied   by   large   bonfires   (feux/feux   de   joie).     The  festival   celebrates  St   John  the  Baptist   and  is  held  on  the   24th   June. The  festival  is  close  to  the  summer  solstice  (le  solstice  d'été)    which   has   always  been   celebrated  and,  as   with   many  other   festivals,  la   fête  de  la  Saint  Jean  has  its  origin  in  Pre-­‐Christian  festivities. Le  Bûcher  de  la  Saint-­‐Jean  (St  John's  log)  used  to  be  celebrated  in   Paris.    The  bonfire  was  traditionally  lit   by  the  King  of  France  himself   on   the   Place  de   Grève  -­‐   now   known   as   Place   de  l'Hôtel-­‐de-­‐Ville.     The   tradition  lasted  until  1648   and  Louis   XIV  was  the  last   king  to   officiate.   In   most   of   the  parishes  of   France   the   Fête   de   la  Saint-­‐Jean   was   traditional.     There  were  games  (jeux)  and   rites  of  passage  (rites  de   passage)   which   were   also   the   moment   to   welcome   youngsters   who  had   reached   their   teens   as   members   of   the  singles  club  (la   bachellerie)  of  the  village.     The  King  and  Queen  of  the  Youth  (le  roi   et   la   reine   de   la   Jeunesse)   were   elected.     There   was   always   an   evening  party  (une  veillée)  with  lots  of  singing  and  dancing  around   a   large   bonfire   made   of   logs   (bûches)   which   the  youngsters   had   gone  round  the  houses  begging  for  (mendier)  a  few  days  earlier.   In   the  Poitou   Charentes   and   the   Limousin   when   the  flames   died   down  (baisser),  the  boys  in   particular  used  to  jump  over  the  fire  to   show  what  they  were  capable  of.    This  tradition  was  carried  on  until   very  recently  in  some  of   the  villages  around  Niort  (and   may  still  be   carried  out  today).

Vocabulary /  vocabulaire  : un  feu  de  joie...................................... bonfire allumer................................................ to  light une  bûche........................................... log une  allume-­‐feu................................... a  fire-­‐lighter les  braises........................................... embers les  centres........................................... ashes la  flamme............................................ flame la  fumée.............................................. smoke des  chamallows  grillés....................... toasted  marshmallows sauter.................................................. to  jump il  n’y  a  pas  de  fumée  sans  feu............ there’s  no  smoke  without  fire il  n’y  a  pas  le  feu................................. it’s  not  urgent un  feu  de  cheminée............................ a  chimney  fire un  feu  de  forêt................................... wildfire éteindre  le  feu.................................... to  put  out  the  fire une  allumette..................................... a  match un  briquet.......................................... a  cigarette  lighter

The Deux-Sèvres Monthly | 9


Le Coin Français Qui est pour le tennis?

« Cream Tea »

Ce mois-­‐ci   verra   le   début   de   Wimbledon,   l'un   des   quatre   événements  «Grand  Chelem»  dans  le  calendrier  du  tennis  et  le  seul   événement  à  être  joué  sur  gazon.

C'est devenu   la  tradition   en   Angleterre   pour   profiter   d'un   «cream   tea»   ou   des   fraises   et   de   la   crème   tout   en   regardant   les   Championnats  de  tennis  de  Wimbledon.....

Les premiers  championnats  de  Wimbledon   ont  été  joués   en  1877   après  le  désir  de  jouer   au   tennis  compétitivement,  conduisant  à  la   création   de   clubs   de   tennis.   Les   championnats   nationaux   américains  simples   dames  ont   eu   lieu   en  1887  et   la  Coupe  Davis,   une   compétition   annuelle   entre   les   équipes   nationales,   date   de   1900  .

Un thé  à  la   crème  comprend   une   tasse   de   thé   avec   du   lait   et   un   scone   de   fruit,   coupé   en   deux,   beurré  et   recouvert   de   confiture   de   fraise,   surmonté   de   crème   chantilly   (ou   de   crème   fraîche   épaisse).  La  recette  est  ci-­‐dessous   -­‐   alors  pourquoi   ne   pas  l'essayer   pour  vous  ?

Le tennis  a   une   longue  histoire  dérivée  du  jeu   français  «le   jeu   de   paume»,  mais  sa  considération   comme   sport   moderne   peut   être   datée  de  deux  origines  distinctes. La   première,   en   1859,   quand   un   avocat   basé   à   Birmingham,   le   major   Thomas  Henry  Gem  et  son  ami  Batista  Pereira,  jouèrent  à  un   jeu   sur   une   pelouse   à   Edgbaston   qu'ils   nommèrent   "pelote",   d'après   un   jeu   de   balle   espagnol.   En   1872,   les   deux   hommes   s'installèrent  à  Leamington  Spa,  et  avec  deux  médecins   de   l'hôpital   Warneford  jouèrent   à  la   pelote  sur   la  pelouse  derrière   l'hôtel   “le   Manor   House  Hotel”.  Pereira  rejoignit   le  Dr  Frederick  Haynes  et   le   Dr  A.  Wellesley  Tomkins  pour   fonder   le  premier   club  de  tennis  sur   gazon   dans   le   monde,   et   jouèrent   à   ce   jeu   sur   les   pelouses   à   proximité.   Ils   formèrent   de   Leamington   Tennis   Club   en   1874   et   créèrent   les  règles  originales  du  jeu.  L'un   des  premiers  tournois  de   tennis   semble  avoir   eu  lieu  dans  le  parc  du  Maquis  Hall   en   Juillet   1884. La  deuxième   origine  remonte  à  Décembre   1873,  le  major   Walter   Clopton  Wingfield   conçut  un   jeu   similaire   pour  l'amusement  de  ses   invités   lors   d'une   réception   mondaine   (garden   party)   sur   sa   propriété   de   Nantclwyd   au   Pays   de   Galles.   Il   fonda   le   jeu   sur   l'ancien   sport   de   tennis  en   salle  ou  vrai   tennis  (real  tennis/"royal   tennis"),  qui  fut  inventé  en  France  au  12ème  siècle  et   joué  par  des   aristocrates  jusqu'à  l'époque  de  la  Révolution  française. Voyant   le  potentiel  commercial   du   jeu,  Mjr   Wingfield   tenta  de   le   breveter   en   1874,  mais   n'y  parvint   jamais.  Le  tennis  se  répandit   rapidement   parmi   les   classes   aisées   en   Grande-­‐Bretagne   et   aux   Etats-­‐Unis  et   depuis  de  nombreuses  années  fut   principalement   un   sport  du  monde  anglo-­‐saxon. L'Open   d'Australie,   l'Open   français,   Wimbledon  et   l'US   Open   sont  devenus   et   sont   restés   des   événements   les   plus   prestigieux   du   tennis.   Ensemble,   ces   quatre   événements  sont  appelés  le   Grand   Chelem  et  gagner  un   tel   tournoi,   en   remportant   View from Court 12 at Wimbledon ces   quatre   titres   en   une   année  civile,  est  la  plus  haute  ambition  de   la  plupart  des  joueurs   de   tennis.

L’Open d’Australie:      13  -­‐  26  janvier  2014 L’Open  français:      25  mai  -­‐  8    juin  2014 Wimbledon:    23  juin  -­‐  6  juillet L’US  Open:          25  août  -­‐  8    septembre  2014 Photo: Carine06, WikiCommons

10 | The Deux-Sèvres Monthly

Pour en  faire  6-­‐8: •   50g  de  beurre •   225g  de  farine •   3  cuillères  à  café  de  levure •   1/2  cuillère  à  café  de  sel •   30g  de  sucre  en  poudre •   50g  de  raisins  secs/fruits  secs •   150ml  de  lait •   1  oeuf  battu  avec  un  peu  de  lait Préparation: 1. Préchauffer  le  four  à  400F/205°C/Gaz  :  th.  6-­‐7 2. Graisser  généreusement  une   plaque  de  cuisson  avec  du   beurre   puis  saupoudrer  de  farine. 3. Tamiser   la  farine  dans   un   grand   saladier,  ajouter   le  beurre  en   cubes,  la  levure  et  le  sel. 4. Frotter  rapidement  le  beurre  dans   la  farine  du  bout   des  doigts   jusqu'à  ce  que  le  mélange  ressemble  à  une  fine  chapelure. 5. Ajouter  le  sucre  et  les  fruits  secs,  bien  mélanger. 6. Faire   un   puits   au   centre   et   à   l'aide   d'un   couteau,   ajouter   suffisamment  de  lait  pour  faire  une  pâte  molle  et  flexible. 7. Si  la  pâte  est  trop  collante  saupoudrer  avec  un  peu  de  farine. 8. Renverser   la   pâte   sur   une   planche   farinée   et   la   pétrir   très   légèrement   jusqu'à   ce   qu'elle   soit   lisse   puis   étaler-­‐la   légèrement  pour  obtenir  2cm/¾"  d'épaisseur. 9. Découper  des  ronds  de  7,5  cm/2"  de  diamètre  ou  des   triangles   à  l'aide  d'un  couteau  pointu. 10. Les   déposer   sur   la   plaque   du   four   et   badigeonner   avec   le   mélange   d'oeufs   et   de  lait   battu.   Cuire  dans   le  haut   du   four   chaud  pendant  15  minutes  ou  jusqu'à  coloration   dorée  et  bien   levés. Laisser   refroidir   sur   une   grille   avant   de   manger   et   servir   avec   du   beurre,  ou  une  montagne  de  confiture  et  de  crème. C'est  délicieux!

ARTICLES.... Nous sommes toujours à la recherche de nouveaux articles à publier pour les éditions futures. Avez-vous une expérience à partager? Quoi qu'il en soit, que ce soit long ou court, nous aimerions vous lire. Vous pouvez appeler Sarah au 05 49 70 26 21 pour proposer des idées ou les envoyer par courriel à: info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr


A-Z of the Communes in the Deux-Sèvres... by Sue  Burgess

LA FERRIÈRE-EN-PARTHENAY La Ferriere-­‐en-­‐Parthenay  is  a  commune  on  the   edge  of   the  Deux-­‐   Sèvres  bordering  the  Vienne.   The  inhabitants  of  la  Ferriere-­‐en-­‐Parthenay  are  the  Ferrariens  and   the  Ferrariennes.  The  main   road  from  Poitiers  to  Nantes,  the  N149   crosses  the  commune,  as  does  the  river  Vendelogne. La  Ferrière  gets  its  name  from  the  richness  of  its  soil  in   iron.    From   the  earliest  times,  itinerant  founders  worked  on   the  iron  and  later   the  iron  was  used  to  supply  the  forge  at  La  Peyratte. The  existence  of   a  Roman  camp  probably  gave  its  name  to  the  farm   of  le   Châtelier.    In  the  forest  of  Magot,  where  there   is  a  tumulus,  a   flint  axe  has  been  discovered.   The  church  of  La  Ferrière  was  given  between  1037  and  1039  to  the   abbey  of   Cormery,  by  a  certain   Simon   of  Parthenay  Larchevêque.   He   got  important  privileges   for   the  creation  and   expansion   of   the   market  town  around   the   church.  The  church  that  we  can  see  today   was  rebuilt  in  the  1830s.   At   the   edge   of   the   Forest   of   le   Roux,   the   hamlet   of   la   Verrerie   reminds  us  of  the   glassmakers  of   La  Ferrière  who  in  1466  obtained   from  the  Abbess  Sainte  Croix  of  Poitiers  permission  to  cut  the  ferns   used  for   their   ovens   on   her  lands  at  Vasles.   There  were  two  open   quarries   for   iron   which   were  exploited   for   a   long  time.    A  stone   quarry  occupied   a   few   workers   and   the   tile   and   brick  works   at   Magot   supplied  the  local  masons.     Two   lime   kilns  were  working  in   La  Ferrière  in  1860.    

Above: Historical image of La Place du Champ de Foire

La Forge   à   fer   (the   Iron   Forge)   at   La   Peyratte   owes   a   lot   to   La   Ferrière.     La  Ferrière  supplied  the  iron  and   the   wood  for   burning   which   was   cut   from   the   local   woods.   These   famous   woods   welcomed  hunters  like  Louis  XI  in   the  spring  1470  and   François  I  in   1543. Today  the  châteaux  and  manor  houses  are  private  residences. A  VOIR  /  MUST  SEE • The   Church   -­‐   dedicated   to   Saint   Vincent,  the   patron   saint   of   wine-­‐growers.    The  three  bells  are  called  Vincent   Léonce,  Maire   and  Rémy.     A  legacy  from  Monsieur   Bertrand   Arthur   allowed  a   clock  to  be  installed  in  August  1917.   • The  Town  Hall,  which  was  built  in  1875  as  the  boys'  school.   • The   Wash-­‐houses.    Lavausseau   wash-­‐house  was   built   in   1858.   Access  is  by  a  small  sloping  pathway.    It  was  renovated  in  1997. • La  Cacault  wash-­‐house  is  closer  to  the  centre  and  easier  to  get  to.     It  was  built  in  1909.    Its  roof  was  restored  in  1999. • La   Salle   des   Fêtes.     The   old   salle   des   Fêtes   nicknamed   «La   Baraque»   (the   shed)  was   built   by  the   Germans   during  the   war   and   used  as  a  canteen.    After  they  left  dances,  films  and  wedding   breakfasts   rhythmed   its  life  until   1970.     The  present   salle   des   Fêtes  was  inaugurated  in  October  1969.  It   is  currently  undergoing   complete  renovation  and  refurbishment.

More A-Z of the Communes of Deux-Sèvres next month...

Above: the church at La Ferrière-en-Parthenay.

Photos copyright: www.laferriere79.fr

The Deux-Sèvres Monthly | 11


Hobbies... More from   local   writer   Alison   Morton...     Please   see   back   issues   of   ‘The   DSM’   if   you   would  like  to  see  previous  articles. Doing  your  Research You’ll   be  writing  your   story  and  you'll   discover   you   need   to   find   out   whether   DNA   testing   existed   in   the   1980s   or   when   the   Romans   swapped  from  segmented  armour  to  chain  mail.     Or   did  they?     And  when   did  people  start  using   zips  in  clothes?   Research  comes  in  many  shapes  and  sizes,  from  seeking  out  a  forensic   pathologist  and   requesting  an  interview,  to  spending  hours  searching   through   history   books,   contemporaneous   accounts   and   academic   articles   on  the  internet   and   in   the   library.     Fiction  writers  are  often   distracted,  going  for  the  shiny  bits,  poking  at  one  idea  before  dropping   it  and  moving  on  to  the  next  glittering  thing.    Sometimes  they  become   experts  in  their  chosen  subject  almost  to  academic  level.     However,  if   you’re  fascinated   by  your  research   area,  it's   likely   that   your   passion   will  come  through  onto  the  page  for  the  reader  to  enjoy. The  most  difficult  thing  about  research  is  knowing  when  to  stop,  to  let   it   go,   so   that   you   can   get   on   with  your   story.     Known   as   ‘research   thrall’  among  writers,  it’s  a  bit  like  Golum  and  the  Ring.     So,  set  a  time   limit   for  each  session  as  well  as  for  the  whole  book  writing  project.     I   try  to  limit  it  to  roughly  a  third  of  my  writing  time.   With  their  ability  to  check  facts  at  a  few   clicks  of  the  mouse,  readers   expect  you  to  be  accurate.     But  although  detail  is  important,  90-­‐95%   of  what   you  have  dug  up  shouldn’t  end  up  in  your   book.    You  don’t   want  to  be  one  of  those  writers  who  feels  compelled  to  jam  in  every   last  detail   about   what  kind  of  buttons   that   regiment   wore  on   their   jackets,  how   the   corn  was  ground   to   go   into  the  bread   the  heroine   was  eating,  unless,  of  course,  it’s  vital  to  the  story.    It  doesn’t  matter   that  you  took  10  hours,  10  days  or  10  years  to  learn  all  this  stuff,  the   reader   doesn’t   want   an  ‘info   dump’  in  the   middle   of   an   absorbing   story. Drip-­‐drip  is  the   best   way,  leaving  little  flashes  of  colour,  hints  about   atmosphere  and   setting,  whispers   of  sounds  woven   into  the  action.   Most  readers  understand  a   castle  on  a   hill.    Have  your  heroine  dirty   her  skirt  when   crossing  the   muddy  yard,  tread  carefully  avoiding  the   horse-­‐droppings,  smell  the   harsh  lye  soap  from  the  laundry  women’s   tubs,  step   back  when  the  lord   rides  through  the   stone  gateway.   Bet   you  can  see  that  castle  courtyard… If  there   are  strange  words  or   technical   terms,  use  them  carefully  and   explain  without  explaining.    “She  turned  her  back  to  me  and  took  her   time   running  her   fingers   over   the   pommel   and   down   the  creamy   wire-­‐inlaid  grip  of  a  ceremonial  pugio  dagger  in  the  open  glass  display   cabinet.    The  grooved,  waisted  blade  was  flat  and  wide  with  razor-­‐thin   edges.    It  was  twenty  centimetres  of  meanness.”  (PERFIDITAS).

WW1 CENTENARY QUILT This is  a  community  project  based  in  the  UK,  to  commemorate,  in   fabric   and   thread,   those   who   served   with   the   Commonwealth   Forces  during  the  First  World  War.   If   you   would   like   to   take   part   by   embroidering  a  square  with  details  of   a  family  member   or  of  someone  who   died   in   the   war,   please   visit:   www.spanglefish.com/ firstworldwarcentenaryquilt.   In   return   for   a  small  donation,  you  will   be   sent   the   fabric,   thread   and   instructions.     High   standards   of   embroidery  are  not  necessary,  as  you  can  see  by  my  example!   Profits  are  to  be  divided  and   donated  to  HelpforHeroes  and  Q4IS   (Quilts  for  Injured  Servicemen)  

By adding   ‘ceremonial’   and   ‘dagger’   to   pugio   the   reader   then   understands  the  Latin  word.  The  detail  gives  us  an  idea  of   the  almost   ritualistic  significance  of  the  weapon  and  the  character’s  reaction  to  it   shows  there  is  danger  and  a  distinct  threat.   So   whether   you’re   writing  historic   fiction,   a   space   adventure   or   a   coming  of   age   in   the   Australian   outback,  your   story  needs   to   have   strong  elements  of  both  good  research  and  good  writing. Happy  writing! Alison  Morton  writes  alternate  history  thrillers,  blogs  about   wriNng  and  Romans  at  hPp://alison-­‐morton.com/blog/  

12 | The Deux-Sèvres Monthly

www.normandie-tourisme.fr


Our full  programme  can  be  seen  on   the  website  but   I  will  keep  you   up-­‐to-­‐date  month  by  month  through  this  article.

The Art  Scene It’s   always  difficult   writing   this   article   because   I  am   often   writing   before  things  have  happened  and  anticipating  the  audience  reaction.     This   was  the   case   with   our   play   in   April,   ‘Entertaining  Angels’.     I   expected   the  play  to   be   a  success  but  your   comments  and  emails   exceeded  my  wildest  expectations!  Thank  you  for   your  appreciation   and   we   are   so   glad   you   really   enjoyed   the   play.     Some   of   your   comments   can   be   seen   on   our   website   as   will   be   news   on   the   autumn  production. Keynotes  have  a  very  busy  year  ahead.      The  next   performance   will   be   in   support   of   the   Aidez   Association   Summer   Market   which   will   be   held   on   the   15th   June   at   St   Germain-­‐de-­‐Longue-­‐ Chaume.    Lin  Adams   and  her   team  always  put  on  a   good   “do”   so   come  along  and  hear  us   sing  at  about  2pm  and   perhaps  join   in,  I’m   sure  you’ll  know  most  of  the  songs.

Lost But Never Forgotten...

by George Slack

My father,  Mr   G.W.D  Slack  fought   in   the   Normandy   invasion.     Like   many   others   who  served  for  our   country  in   the   Second   World   War   he   seldom   spoke   of   his   experiences.  However   there   is  one   story   he  would  recount  to  me  as  a  child…. He   had   been   given   a   heavy  army  pedal   bike   which   he   carried   onto   a   boat,   then   carried   it   onto   a   loading   craft   and   on   arrival   at   Sword   beach,   Normandy,   he   then  carried  it   ashore.    After   crossing  the   beach,  under  fire  from  the  enemy,  he  was  

When you  were  only  twenty, They  took  you  there  for  free, In  an  old  and  battered  L.C.I., Across  the  stormy  sea, ies, They  packed  you  up  with  good A  mortar  and  a  bike, and  sent  you  out  all  innocent, to  face  a  bit  of  strife. , They  dropped  you  in  the  water with  quite  a  resounding  splash, h, and  you  waded  onto  Sword  beac . ack b   oing g o   n For  there  was    there, They  sent  you  across  the  sand , between  two  tapes  of  white  dunes, and  you  dropped  into  the  sand t. righ f f   o k   ttac with  a  mild  a

of you, There  were  Warwicks  to  the  left   s, .L.I. .O.S K he   t   ight r To  the   e  was   and  you  wondered  if  ahead  ther a  very  quick  demise. Or  might  perhaps  good  fortune calm, have  arranged  things  nice  and   steed, y   rust t   so  you  could  mount  your . and  cycle  into  Caen Alas,  the  best  laid  plans  of  man, so  often  go  awry, way', 'The  road  is  mined,  there  is  no   the  stalwart  sappers  cry. 'Detour  across  the  marshes', so  your  valient  leaders  tell, and  so  to  your  unridden  bike, you  had  to  say  farewell.

The art  group  will  be  continuing  during  the  summer  months  both   at   our   normal  venue  in  Secondigny  and   introducing  a   number  of  Plein   Air   sessions.     Our   latest   programme   for   June  and   July,   which   will   cover  a  wide  range  of  topics,  can  be  seen  on  our  website. As   I   mentioned   last   month,   the   Reaction   Theatre   Alternative   Calendar  Girls  calendar  appeal  has  now  closed  and  thanks  to  your   enormous  support,  we  reached  our  target  and  10,000€.    We  will   be   sharing   the   funds   equally   between   Leukemia   and   Lymphona   Research   in  the  UK   and   the   French  Cancer  research  organisation   ’Fondation  de  France’.        Arrangements  are  being  made  to  present   the  cheques  to  the  two  charities,  so   watch   the   local   press  for   some   smiling  faces. If  you  would  like  to  join  any  or   all  of  our   sections,   membership  is   a   mere  12€  per  year,  possibly  the  bargain  of  the  century. Information  on  Reaction   Theatre  membership,  Reaction  Theatre  and   Keynotes  performances  past  and  future  and  The  Art  Scene  meetings   can   be   seen   on   www.reactiontheatre.fr   or   contact   me   for   more   information.

still carrying  his  pedal  bike  which,  of  course,  was  very  heavy  by  this   time.    He  made  his   way  to  the  road  and  was  about  to  ride  away,   when  he  was  told  to  get   rid  of  his  heavy  load  (the  pedal  bike)  and   walk,  as  there  are  mines  everywhere.   My  father  often   told   me  this  story.  So  it  came  as   no   surprise   that   when   he   passed  away   in   October   2013   he   had  left  me  his  medals   and   this  poem.  I  think   this   poem   tells   a   lot   a b o u t   a   m a n ’ s   thoughts   after   the   Second  World  War.   Lest  we  forget.

And thence  through  many  a  cornfield, at  a  crouching  crawl  you  roam, While  lying  neath  a  hawthorn  hedge, soon  seemed  like  home  from  home, Then  like  the  good  old  Duke  of  York, and  his  ten  thousand  men, they  marched  you  up  Lebisey, and  they  marched  you  down  again.

When you  were  three  and  sixty, you  went  back  there  once  more, by  luxurious  Sealink  ferry, a  return  ticket  well  assured, the  sea  was  like  a  millpond, so  there  was  no  mal-­‐de-­‐mer, and  the  only  horror  waiting, were  the  toilets  at  Honfleur.

Nigh Norfolk  House  you  tarried, while  the  Generals  studied  form, doing  reccies  to  the  Chateau, still  through  fields  of  waving  corn, until  at  crack  of  dawn  one  morning, with  support  from  many  a  gun, you  went  back  up  to  Lebisey, and  got  Gerry  on  the  run.

You walked  the  length  of  Sword beach, on  a  bright  and  sunlit  day, oh  so  different  from  the  last  time, three  and  forty  years  away, you  saw  many  well  known  places, for  your  memory  had  it  right, but  you  had  just  one  sad  failure, you  didn't  find  your  bike.

The Deux-Sèvres Monthly | 13


Clubs & Associations... ARE YOU A MODEL RAILWAY ENTHUSIAST?

Le Tallud Boules en bois

Capella Group

GARDENING CLUB

If so,  join  a  group  of  like-­‐minded  friendly  modellers  who  meet  on  a   monthly  basis  to  visit  member’s  layouts  and  swap  information.  If  you   are  interested  please  contact  Gerry  Riley  for  more  information  on  05   49  63  34  01.

are offering   sessions   every   Wednesday   (16h-­‐18h)   from   April   to   September   at   the   parc   de   loisirs,   Le   Tallud.     Everyone   welcome.   Details  from   Rosemary  Williamson   via  email:  rw.williamson@orange.fr

If you  enjoy  singing  and  would  be  interested  in  starting  a  close-­‐ harmony  group  near  Chef-­‐Boutonne,  please  get  in  touch!  Email  me,   Christine  for  further  information:  chezloubigne@aol.com

We meet  every  third  Tuesday  of  the  month,  14.30  with  free  tea/ coffee  &  biscuits  at  Le  Bon  Vertoef,  28  Grand  Rue,  79110  TILLOU.     (nr  Chef-­‐  Boutonne).    Everyone  welcome  for  garden  talk!     For  further  information  Mike  Curtis    05  46  33  66  17  (eves)

Hypnotherapy Slimming Group (Near Bressuire) Slimming group  including  Hypnotherapy,  Metabolic,   lymphatic  and  dietary  ideas  to  let  go  of  that  weight   once  and  for  all  !      Call  Pamela  Irving  Dip  MHCAH  on   05  49  65  55  25  or  e  mail  irving.philip@wanadoo.fr

Fitness Class with James A fun  &  lively  Aerobic/fitness  class  run  on  a  voluntary  basis.  Tuesday   evenings  7-­‐8pm  at  Salle  De  Fete  in  La  Chappelle  St  EIenne.  All  ages,   naIonality  &  gender  welcome.  15€  membership  for  the  year  which   covers  insurances  &  room.  For  further  details  please  email  James:     jdharris247@gmail.com

The Harmonics Singing Group

Based in  the   Salle   d’Annexe   in   Civray.     We   meet  each   Wednesday   2pm-­‐4pm.   No   experience   necessary,   just   a   willingness   and   commitment   to   learn.     We   sing   all   sorts   of   music   in   several   languages.  Contact:  Dave  Lee:  05  49  87  53  93  /  dave.lee@cegetel.net

CLE helps  you  unlock  the  secrets  to  a  happy  and  comfortable   lifestyle  in  France.  We  provide  information  and  organise   workshops,  visits  and  charity  events,  enabling  members  to   make  new  friends  in  the  ex-­‐patriot  and  French  communities. www.cle-­‐france.com.    Tel:  05  49  87  19  85

Alone in France?

Book Club  Thouars.     Do  you  enjoy  reading  a  cracking  story?  And  talking  to   others  about   it?    Do  you  live  in  north  79,  south  49  or  north  86?    Come  along  to   our  book  club.   Contact  Alison  Morton  at  info@bookclubthouars.fr  for  details.

Rubber Bridge

ALL GIRLS TOGETHER Calling girls  18-­‐80  for  fun,  laughter  &  support.    We  meet  alternate   Wednesdays  at  Fontenille,  2-­‐5pm.  Ring  Viv  for  further   information:  05  49  27  51  98.    All  Welcome. 9/4:  Jewellery  Sale  &  23/4  Coffee,  chat  &  Restaurant  Review.

We are  a  group  of  people  living  alone  in  the  l'Absie  area  who  meet  on   the   1st   and   3rd   Tuesdays   at   11am   for   coffee   at   the   Pause!   café   in   l’Absie.    Our  lunches  are  at  different  venues  each  month.      A  warm   welcome  awaits  you.    More  details  from  Frank  05  49  69  80  47.

Any Bridge  players  interested  in  making  up  an   informal  occasional  4?    Email  David  Rowe:   djfrowe@hotmail.com  or  phone  05  49  63  26  57.

Can you help local French children? BOOK Group...

meeting 2nd Thursday of the month from 3pm at Christies Tea Room & Bookshop, Gençay, 86160. Take a look at the Book Group page on the website: www.chezchristies.com for more information.

FRANGLAIS at Thouars

We are  a  French-­‐English  speaking  group  who  meet  at  Centre-­‐Socio-­‐ Culturel,  Anne  Desrays,  Thouars  on  Wednesdays  7.30pm  –  9.30pm.   We  welcome  English  speakers  who  want  to  improve  their  French.   Come  along  or  contact  jcbed@orange.fr  for  more  information.

We meet  twice  a  month  -­‐  one  for  workshops  and   the  other  for  informal  chats  and  a  light-­‐hearted   competition  entry.  If  you  would  like  to  join  us,   visit  our  website www.ttlphotographygroup.com

14 | The Deux-Sèvres Monthly

Jeff Wos   is   a   teacher   in   le   Collège   Notre-­‐Dame   de   Bressuire.    He   helps  to  organise  trips  to  England  for  their   pupils,  but  there  are  an  unlucky  few  who  won’t   be  going,   and  Jeff  is  looking  for  your  help.     He  needs  a   few   friendly  English   people  for  an   afternoon   tea   (2   hours),   talk   and   fun   with   small   groups   of   11-­‐12   year  old  pupils,  between  16th  -­‐  20th  June.     If   you   are   English,   living   near   Bressuire   and   interested   then   please   contact   Jeff   on   05   49   74   46   20   or   jf.wos@laposte.net


Health, Beauty & Fitness... Nails by Nicola With the  summer  on  its  way,  we  are  often   busy  with  visiting  guests,   holidays,  children  or  just  making  the  most  of  the  glorious  weather.   We  don't  always  have  time  to  make  sure  our  nails  are   looking  and   feeling  great,  but  summer  is  the  perfect  time  to  show  off  our  nails   and  experiment  with  new  bright  colours  or  traditional  classics. If   you   are  finding  that  time   flies  by,  why  not  take   advantage   of   a   time   saving,   ultra   convenient   and   super   easy   solution   to   maintaining  a  flawless   look  to   your  nails............Wonderlack,  a  semi   permanent  nail  polish  solution. Delivering   a   flawless,   shiny   finish   in   a   wide   choice   of   c o l o u r s ,   t h i s   s e m i   permanent   nail   polish   can   last   up   to   three   weeks.     Even   for   hard   working   hands  this   fabulous  solution   gives  the  ultimate  answer   to   chipped   or   peeling   nail   polish  problems. A   semi   permanent   nail   polish  can   be   applied  after  any  luxury  manicure  and  pedicure.     The   application   is   simple   and   similar   to   that   of   a   normal   nail   polish   except   finished   with   the   Wonderlack   varnish   using   a   UV   curing   lamp.     It’s   simple,  effective   and   mess  free,  plus   it   has   the   added   advantage   of   zero   drying  time   so   there  is   no   need  to   be   waiting   around   in   the   salon   for   your   nails   to   dry   and   it   avoids   finding   smudged  nails  later  on. This  semi  permanent  nail  polish  is  a  worry-­‐free  solution  and  lasts  so   much  longer   -­‐  it’s  an  ideal  solution  for   holidays,  trips  back  to  the  UK   etc.....no   need   to   worry   whilst   you’re   away   for   that   special   occasion.     This   is  also   a   great   solution   for   those  who  have   hard   working   hands   and   feet....no   need   to   hide   your   nails   away   just   because  you  enjoy  time  outdoors  or   in   the  garden  and   no   feet  to   hide  in  your  fabulous  summer  shoe  collection. I  have  many  happy  clients  who  have  taken  advantage  of  this  service   and   I  can   highly  recommend  a  semi  permanent  nail  polish  solution.   With  the  professional  advice  and  aftercare  I  can  offer  you  this  is  the   ultimate  in  stress-­‐free  nail  care. So  why  not  take  advantage   of  this  wonderful  service  and  put  your   nail   care  worries  to   the   bottom   of   your   list   this   summer?     Take   advantage  of   this  excellent   offer   -­‐   book  a  luxurious  manicure  with   Nails  by  Nicola  and  receive  a  Wonderlack  manicure  for  free!  

The Deux-Sèvres Monthly | 15


Abbey teaching at Venus Rose Yoga Sanctuary situated at the foot of The Melusine Tour in Vouvant.

“Beauty is not in the face; beauty is a light in the heart.” Yoga and  the  Art  of  Creating  The  Life  You  Want... There  are  energy  centres  within   your  body,  we  call   them  'Chakras',   and   they   are   a  key  aspect   of   Yoga.   In   fact,  they  are   absolutely   foundational.  You  have  7  main  Chakras  that  run  up  your   body  from   base  to  crown,  each   one  corresponding  to  a  colour  of  the  rainbow.   Without  doubt,  regular  Chakra  meditation  will  transform  and  uplift   your  life  in  ways  that  you  never  dreamt  possible. So   here's   a   brief   overview   of   your   first   chakra,   the   base   chakra,   muladhara... This  chakra  is  located  at  the  base  of  the  spine  and   is  connected  to   the  earth.  It   governs  our   most   basic   survival   needs  and   sense   of   belonging.     When   it   is   blocked   we   are   anxious,   lethargic   and   insecure. When   balanced  we  are   confident,   full   of  energy   and  able   to  get   new  projects  'off  the  ground'  easily...

Kahil Gibran

Chakra Meditation Muladhara   Shodhana   (meaning  'to   make   pure'   in  Sanskrit) Sit  quietly  and  comfortably...

Yoga

SECRETS

Close your  eyes... Feel  the  presence  of  the  earth  beneath  you... Cover  yourself  in  a  fountain  of  golden  light... Bring  your   awareness  to   your   root   chakra,  muladhara   at   the   base  of  your  spine... Inhale... Exhale... Softly  and  smoothly  through  the  nose... Visualize   this   chakra   filled   with   red   light...

Regular Group   and   Private   Classes   are   held   at   The   Yoga   Sanctuary   from   Monday   to   Saturday.     Morning   Class:   11.30am-­‐1.00pm  and  Afternoon  Class:  2.00pm-­‐3.30pm. Limited  places  available  so  please  call  and  book. Call  Venus  Rose  Yoga:  06  35  15  60  60 Email:  amaradeva@thevenusyogaexperience.com Website:  www.  thevenusyogaexperience.com

Open your  eyes... Om  Shanti... Namaste For   daily  inspiration   follow  me   on  my  new   blog:  ‘Beauty  Is  The   Way’:   Forthewayisbeautiful@blogspot.fr   and   make   it   part   of   your  new  beauty  regime!    Siret  No.  798-­‐232-­‐781  00012

FREE INTRODUCTORY SESSION at THE YOGA SANCTUARY Centre de Yoga et de Meditation

BEGINNERS WELCOME With Our Compliments Call Now on 06 35 15 60 60 16 | The Deux-Sèvres Monthly


Cancer Support Deux-Sèvres (CSDS)

by Denise Langford. Vice president.

Cancer Support  Deux-­‐Sèvres  has  enjoyed  a  good  and  long-­‐standing   relationship   with   Niort   Hospital’s  Palliative   and   Oncology  units  in   assisting  patients   suffering  from  Cancer.    They  identified   a   growing   need  for  support  and   assistance  with  translation  for  these  patients   during  their  consultations. In   response,   they  invited   us   to   enter   into   a   formal   arrangement   whereby  members  of  the  Cancer  Support  Deux-­‐Sèvres  team  could   accompany   their   patients   as  translators   during   hospital   visits.     A   contract   to   this   effect   was   drawn   up   by  the  hospital   which   was   formally  signed  by  all  parties  in  April  this  year.     We  have  previously   entered   a   contract   with   Parthenay   hospital   and   are   working   towards  the  same  south  of  Niort. At   the   same   time   we   made   a   donation   of   5000€   to   be   shared   between   the   EMSP   (Equipe   Mobile   Soins   Palliatifs)   Oncology,   Pneumonology  and  Gastroenterology  departments.     This  donation   will  enable   them  to   buy  aids   and  equipment  not  covered  by  their   normal  budget. We  would   like  to   express  our  sincere  appreciation  to  everyone  who   has  donated  to  our  association  in  order  to  make  this  possible...  

A big  Thank  You  to  all.

We have  made  donations   to   several  hospitals   in  the  past   and  are   planning   to   make   donations   to   Cancer   researchers   in   the   Deux-­‐ Sèvres.     We  are   an  active  group   supporting  Cancer  sufferers  during   their   illness,  treatment   and  rehabilitation   and   are   always   looking   for  volunteers,  especially  fluent  french  speakers. If  you  feel   that  you  would  like  to  help  cancer  sufferers  in  your  area   and  are  interested  in  joining  us  or  would  like  more  information  you   can  contact  our  President,  June  Searchfield. Cancer   Support   Deux-­‐Sèvres   is   affiliated   to   Cancer   Support   France(CSF).    Donations  can  be  made  directly  to  CSDS. Cancer Support Deux-Sèvres

Aims to improve the lives of people affected by Cancer in the Deux-Sèvres. Contact June Searchfield on 05 49 64 59 96

Refresh Your First Aid

The First   Aid  course,  which   should   have  been   carried   out   in   February,   is   now  scheduled   for   the  5th  July  at  Service  HQ  Chauray  near  Niort. This  course  (which   will   be  mainly  in  English)   is   one   of   two   levels   certified   by   the   French   authorities   (i.e.  for   those  with  a  responsibility   to   carry   out   First  aid   at   a   work  place  and   this   one  for   the  general  public.)  A  certificate  will  be   given  which  is  recognised  throughout  France.     The   day  will  include  how  to  use   a  defibrillator   and  practical  hands-­‐on  instruction.   The  emergency  ambulance  service  is  controlled  by  the  Department   and   most   of   the   personnel   are   volunteers.   The   target   time   for   attendance   is   20   minutes!   I   can   assure   you   that   they   really  do   appreciate  the  fact  that   when  they   arrive  and  attend   to   a  patient  

Don’t Forget... our copy deadline is the 15th of the month!

they find   that   there   is   someone  who  has  prepared   the  scene  and  can  give  good   answers  to  any  queries  they   h a v e ,   i t   g i v e s   t h e m   confidence   in   what   they   need  to  do. Registration   can   be   done   through  Service  HQ  or  me,  John  Hoyland.    The  cost  is   40€,  with   a   deposit   via   cheque  of   20€   payable   to   SDIS79   at   the  time  the   of   booking.    (This  sum  is  set  by  the  authorities  and  is  in   line  with  other   organisations.)    Full   details   of   the   day  and   directions  will  be  sent   out  to  those  attending  in  due  course.   To  register   please  contact  Anne   Cestor  (who   speaks   good  English)   at   SDIS79  on  05  49  08  18   49  or   email:  a.cestor@sdis79  or   me   at     john.hoyland@wanadoo.fr. Those  previously  registered  will  be  included.  

The Deux-Sèvres Monthly | 17


Our Furry Friends... Association Galia

Did you   know   that   homeless   animals   outnumber   homeless   people   5   to   1?  Or   that  only  1  in  10  dogs  will   spend  its  whole   life  in  one  home?    It’s  not  surprising  to   see   an   unwanted   dog/cat   roaming  the  streets   in  even   the  smallest  of  towns.     There  are   around   17   dogs   to   every   100   people   in   France,   one   of   the   highest   ratios   in   the   world.     Around   40   per   cent   of   French  people   list   their   dogs   as  the  most   important   thing   in   their   lives   (even   more   important   than   their   lovers)   and   the  French  spend   some  €3   billion   on   them   annually;   there’s  at   least   one  ‘poodle-­‐parlour’  (salon   de   toilettage)  in   every   town.   On   the  other   hand,   many  dogs  are  kept   outdoors   and   some  are   almost   permanently   penned   or   chained.   This   is   a   heartbreaking   reality  we  live  with,  but  sometimes  people  find  a  way  to  help  those   dogs   and   cats   in   need,  such   as   Association   Galia   in   Fontenay   le   Comte. Founded   in  2008,  Association  Galia  successfully  re-­‐home  about  250   dogs   each   year   and,  sadly,   the   abandonment   of   dogs   is   on   the   increase.     We  are   often  in  danger   of  going  over   the   limits  of  our   licence  and  have  to  rush  to  find   foster   families,  this  is  due   to   the   fact  that  we  operate  a  NO  Kill  policy  at  our  refuge.     When   we   receive  a  pooch   at   the   refuge   the   first   thing  we   do   is   check  for  the  microchip,  you  would  be  amazed  at  how  many  do  not   have  them  despite  it  has  been  law  here  that  all   dogs  born  after  6th   January  1999  must   be   given  an  official   identifying  number.     This   rule  is  designed  to  make  it  easier   to   find  the  owners  of  stray  dogs   and  to  reduce  the  incidence  of  ‘dog  trafficking’.   Around   100,000  dogs   are   abandoned  by  their  owners  every  year,   many  at  the  start  of   the  long  summer  holiday  or  after   the  hunting   season  is   over,  and  stray  dogs  are  regularly  rounded  up  and  taken   to  the  local  pound  (fourrière)  to  be  destroyed. The   refuge  in   Fontenay  le  Comte  does   not   have  enough  kennels,   nor   enough   volunteers  to   help   with   the  day   to  day  cleaning  and   dog  walking.    Sadly,  some  of  our  pooches  only  get  to  go  for  walkies   at   the   weekend,  our   regular   daily  helpers  try  so   very  hard  to  give   each  dog  some  1  to  1  time  so  that  they  feel  that  someone  cares  for   them  and  they  are  so  grateful.  If  you  could   see  the  happy  smiley   face  and  the  furious  tail  wagging  when   you  have  given   them  a  kind   word  or  rubbed  their  tummy,  your  heart  would  be  captured.     How  you  can  help...... • Become  a  volunteer   • Become  a  foster  home • Join  the  association • Make  a  donation  or  sponsor  a  dog • Promote  and  advertise  the  refuge As  well  as  your  help,  we  also  always  need    blankets  and  towels. For  more  information,  contact  us... Refuge  de  l'association  Galia Chemin  des  perchées  (ancienne  déchetterie),   85200  Fontenay  Le  Comte Tel  :  02  51  52  06  19  or  06  28  18  13  72 Email:  association.galia@orange.fr www.association-­galia.forumactif.com

18 | The Deux-Sèvres Monthly

Tina Hatcher

Adoption Appeal...

If you're  looking  for  a  cuddly  cat  to   adopt  Jessy,  a  one  year  old  male,   might  fit  the  bill.   More  details  about  Jessy  and  other   cats  looking  for  homes  can  be   found  at   www.nosamislesanimaux.com Nos Amis Les Animaux 85480 (NALA 85480). Tel: 07  70  31  54  59

Email: nala85480@hotmail.com www.nosamislesanimaux.com


HOOF (Horse Orientated Open Forum)

HOOF is  open  to  anyone  with  an  equine  interest.     You  do  not  need  to  own  a  horse!    We  meet  about  once  a  month   for  talks,  visits  etc.    Interested? Contact Jo Rowe on: 05 49 64 30 59

FIDEL..

Equine Rescue France

FIDEL is   a  calm  sweet   natured   boy  who  is  very   affectionate  and   loves  his  cuddles. Amazingly,  given   his   awful   previous   existence,   he  is   completely   non-­‐aggressive   and   just   adores   being   in   human   company.   However,  we  feel   he  would  be  more  comfortable  in  a  family  with   children  over   5  years  old,   as   the  younger   ones  tend  to   frighten   him  with  their  noise  and  activity. He's   good  with  other  dogs  but  we  haven't  had  an   opportunity  to   assess  him  with  cats  or  other  animals. FIDEL   is   house-­‐trained,  non-­‐destructive  and   walks  nicely  on   his   lead   without   pulling  -­‐   as   yet   he   has   not   been   assessed   off   his   lead,  so  a  safe  and   secure  garden  would  be  needed  as  he  loves  to   play.     He   travels   well   in   the   car   but,   although   normally   non-­‐ barking,  he  DOES  bark  in  the  car  -­‐  it's  the  only  time  he  does!!   FIDEL  has  been  microchipped,  neutered,   vaccinated  (not   rabies)   and  treated  for   worms,  fleas  and  ticks.  An  adoption  fee   of  120€   will  be  asked  for   towards  his   veterinary  costs  to  date   and  Orfée   will  conduct  a  home  visit  prior  to  adoption. If   you   would   like   more   information   about   FIDEL   please   contact   MARY:   05   49   50   69   41,   email:   orfeeinenglish2@gmail.com   or   CAROLINE:  05  45  96  02  79,  email:  orfeeinenglish3@gmail.com

We are always looking for new members and we are in need of donations so we may continue to help equines in France. Please support the ERF. Please contact Equine Rescue France via their website: www.equinerescuefrance.org

MAYDAY MES AMIS If you   know  of   an  animal  in  need   in  the  l'Absie  area   or   if  you   would  like  more  information   about   Mayday  Mes  Amis  please   email:  jill.zub@sky.com

Refuge SPA  de  SAINTES route  des  GAUTHIERS,   17100  SAINTES Tel:  05  46  93  47  65  ~  www.spa.de.saintes.free.fr/

Phoenix Association   rescue  and   re-­‐home   animals   in   need.  Please  visit  our  website:   www.phoenixasso.com  for  more  details.

APPEAL

Nipper..... FREDA  is  one  of  many  Phoenix  kittens  looking  for  homes....... Freda   was   born   to   a   feral   cat,  who   decided   to   bring  her   kittens   to   live   on   someone's   doorstep!   Luckily,   the   mother  chose  well,  and   t h e   k i n d   p e r s o n   contacted   Phoenix   for   advice.   We've  managed  to  take   Freda  and   her   siblings   in,  but   we   know   that   this   will   be  one  of   the   first   litters   of   many,  as   by  July  and   August,   we'll   be   receiving  several   calls  a  day  about   abandoned   kittens.   You  can  help   Freda   and   the  cat  population   by  ensuring  that  your   own  cats  are  sterilised.    If  you're  feeding  any  feral  cats,  it's  then   your  responsibility  to  ensure  they  too  are  sterilised.  

Hello! I   am  a  young  lady  of   nearly  five  years  old.   My   owner   recently   died   and   I  am  looking  for   a  new   home  with   owners  that  can   give  me  lots  of  affection. I   am   very   friendly,   was   brought   up   with   a   kitten   and  am  good  with  children.     I   enjoy   running   around   in   the  garden  and  playing  ball.   Nipper   is   not   neutered/vaccinated/chipped   and   is   currently   being   fostered   near   Chef   Boutonne.   For   more   information   please  contact  Sue  Wardle  on  05  49  07  26  05. For   further   information   on   other   cat   and   dogs   for   adoption,   please  go  to  www.hopeassoc.org

Please visit   our  website  on  www.phoenixasso.com  for   details  of   all  of  our  cats  and  dogs  waiting  for  homes.  

The Deux-Sèvres Monthly | 19


Home & Garden...

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Spotlight On... The Marais Poitevin Deadline: 15th  June.

20 | The Deux-Sèvres Monthly


THE AMATEUR GARDENER by Vanda Lawrence

It's June   again  and  isn't  it  lovely  to  have  that  extra  couple  of   hours   in  the  evening  to  work  in   the   garden?    Much  needed,  I  might   add  -­‐   there  is  always  something  to  do! The   potatoes  are  coming  up  nicely  but  it   will  be  necessary  to  spray   with  Bordelaise  (Bordeaux)   Mixture.     This   leaves  a  blue  film  over   the  leaves  and  prevents  mildew.    It  is  also  effective  on  strawberries   and  tomatoes. Outdoor   tomatoes   need   staking  when   you   plant  them  to   support   the   weight  of  all   those  lovely  tomatoes  soon   to  be  hanging  there.     At   the  same  time  it's   a  good   idea  to   insert  a   4"  flower   pot   in   the   ground  beside  each   plant,  with  the  top   at   soil   level,  so  that  when   you  feed   and  water   the  plants  all   goodness  goes  straight  down  to   the  roots  where  it  is  needed. Begin   harvesting   strawberries   as   they  ripen   and,   if   you   wish   to   increase  your  stock  plants,  encourage  runners  to   root  by  anchoring   with  a  stone  or  piece  of  bent  wire.    Remove  runners  if  you  prefer  to   grow  isolated  plants,  because  it's  too   easy  for  the   strawberry   bed   to  become  overcrowded. For   convenience   I  plant  my  cherry   tomatoes  amongst  the  annuals   in   the  flower   bed  nearest   the   back  door,  but   how   about   a  tub   of   strawberry  plants   there   too   -­‐   readily  available   for   picking   as   the   fruit   ripens?     Try   interplanting   these   with   'frilly'   leafed   lettuce   plants   -­‐  they  look  good   and  are   handy  for   pulling  the  odd  leaf  or   two   for   a   garnish   rather   than   lifting   a   whole   lettuce   from   the   potager. Window  boxes,  planters  and  hanging  baskets  should  all  be   planted   up   by  now,   so   it   won't   be   long  before  we  are   awash  with  their   colour.     Likewise,  summer   bedding   plants   will   be   in-­‐situ   and   shrubs   will   begin   flowering  in  the  warmer   weather  so  the  bees   and  butterflies  will  be  happy. My   roses   are   flowering   but   I   need   to   spray   against  blackspot  and  rust.    Also  aphids,  of  course;   greenfly   and   blackfly   are   a   real   pest   but   apparently   interplanting   roses   with   Alliums,   Catnip,   Parsley  or  Thyme  will  help  deter  the  little  blighters. Another   nuisance   in   the   garden   is   Bindweed   (Convolvulus   arvensis).  Pretty   white  trumpet  flowers  I  grant   you,  but   they   smother  and  choke  hedges  and  shrubs  in  the  garden,  and  will   quickly  climb   up   and   cover   walls   and   fences.     Dig  it   out   as   soon   as  you  see  it!    The  roots  can  go  down  several   feet,  so   be  as   thorough   as  possible.     Even   a  tiny   piece  of  root   left   behind  will   continue   to   grow   and   spread.     Glyphosate   weedkiller   will   work   down  and  kill  the  roots,  so   if  this  weed  has  already  started  to  grow   around  other  plants,  untwine  it,  lay  it  on  the  ground   and   spray   it.     (Do  not  spray  this   weed   killer   on   a  windy  day  because   overspray   will  damage  nearby  plants).    Alternatively,  I  have  heard  you   can  cut   the   bottom   off   a   plastic   lemonade   bottle,   push   the   untwined   bindweed   growth   into   the   bottle   then   push   this   firmly   into   the   ground.     Now  open  the  top  of  the  bottle  and  spray  the  glyphosate   inside  -­‐  Voila!    Sounds  like  a  good  idea,  doesn't  it? Lastly,  the  pond.     Our  fish  are  up  looking  for  their  food  each  evening   and   the  water  lilies   are  coming   along.    If  you  have  a  water   lily  or   other   pond   plant   in   need   of   division,   now   is  the   time   to   do   it   -­‐   another  little  job  to  fit  in  during  these  longer  evenings.     Happy  gardening.    See  you  next  month. The Deux-Sèvres Monthly | 21


French Life... The young  can  be  weaned   from  four  weeks  but  we  prefer  to  leave   them  until   they  are   8   -­‐   10   weeks  old   before  taking  them   away   from  mum.    Where  possible  it’s  best   to  split  them   into   male  and   female  just  in  case  of  interbreeding.   In  the  commercial   world  the  doe  is  put   to   the  buck  once   the  kits   are  three  weeks  old.  This  means  they  could  have  six  litters  a   year   but   we  prefer   to   limit   the   numbers   to   two   or   three   to   give   her   time  to  recover.

Life on the Farm...

by Peter  &  Jenny  Sebborn.

Hi everyone.   This   month   we   thought   we   would   have   a   change   from   the   normal   hatches,  matches   and  dispatches  and   look  at   a   particular   animal   instead.  We   have   decided  to  throw  a   bit   more   light  on  the  humble  rabbit  or  lapin. If  you’re  thinking  of  breeding  your   own,  here  is  little  information   to  help  you  on  your  way... Whether   it’s  for  meat,  a  pet  or   for  show,  remember  that  they  are   prolific  breeders,    the  phrase  “breeding  like  rabbits”  can   be  very   true   if   you   are   not   careful!   Firstly,   choose   your   breed.   Good   breeding  stock  is  the  key  to  producing  good   youngsters.  It   can  be   worth   going   to   a  breeder   rather   than   buying  from   the   markets.   Some  of  the  most  popular  meat  breeds   and  those  that  we  favour   are  New   Zealand  White  (which  usually  reach  a  fully  grown  weight   of  4.5  -­‐  6kg  live  weight),  Flemish  Giants  (5  -­‐  9kg)  and   Californian  (4   -­‐  6kg).  Cross   breeds  as   with   many  animals,  can  produce   a  better   product.

Like all  animals,  rabbits  can  suffer  with  a  variety  of  ailments  which   include   Myxomatosis   (common   in   wild   rabbits)   and   Coccidiosis   (which   you  can  vaccinate  against   if  you  wish).     It’s  best  to  separate   domestic   from   wild   animals   to   lessen   spread   of   disease.   Remember,   if   medication   is   given   there   may   be   a   withdrawal   period  before  you  are  able  to  eat  the  meat. Timescale  from  birth  to  table  will  depend  on  the  size  of  rabbit  you   want.  For   the  breeds  we  keep   it   about   16  weeks.   Most   poultry   abattoirs  are  also  set  up  to  kill  and  prepare  your  meat   (for  about   3€).  Of   course  you   can  do   this   at   home  if   you   feel   proficient   in   doing  so.    Expect  to  lose  about  50%  of  the  weight  in  preparation. Rabbit   is  a   great  low  fat,  low   cholesterol   meat  but   if  roasted  can   be  a  little   dry  so  it   is  best  suited  for  stews,  casseroles,  paella,  pies   and  puddings,  or  if  you  do  fancy  roasting  it,  then  cover  it   in  bacon   or   something  similar   to   keep  it   moist.  As  well   as  a  great   tasting   meat   you  can  also  make  rillets,  and   use  the  offal   to  make  paté.  If   you  have  the  time  perhaps  cure  the  skin  and  make  glue  (but  it’s   a   very  long  process).

Once you   have   selected   and   purchased   your   rabbits,   arrange   suitable   shelter,   food   and   drinkers   and   the   rest   is   left   to   the   rabbits.     Your   rabbits  will  need  hay,  pellets   (about  125  –  175g  per   day),  and   perhaps  some   dry   bread   and   water,   introducing  fresh   fruit  and   veg  gradually  when  a  little  older  (no  lettuce   though  as  it   will  give  them  an  upset  stomach). So   where  to  start..  always  put   the  Doe  to  the  buck  rather  than  the   buck  to   the  doe.    This  can  be  done  from  about  8  months  of  age.  If   you  put   the  buck  in   the  doe’s  hutch  she  will   fight   to   defend   her   territory   -­‐   sometimes   fatally.   Rabbits   differ   from   a   lot   of   other   animals   in   that   they  do   not   come   on   heat   and   then   mate.  The   rabbit   comes  on  heat  as   a  response  to   mating.     If   the   doe  isn’t   ready  she  won’t  let   him  mate,  if  she  is   ready  he’ll   have  done  the   business  before   you  even   have  the  hutch  door   shut!    There  is  no   romance  in   the  rabbit   world  -­‐  no   flowers,   chocolates  or   meals  in   fancy   restaurants!     They   can   be   left   together   for   a   while   but   ensure  you  remove  the  doe  before  she  kindles  (gives  birth).   Gestation   is   approximately   31   days   from   conception.   She   will   usually  make  a  nest  with  straw  and  her  belly  fur  a  few  days  before   (although   we   have   experienced   nest   building  two  weeks  before,   so   there   are   no   set   rules).   You   may   not   realise   until   you   see   movement  in  the  nest  that  she  has  actually  given  birth  to  the  kits   which  are   naked   and   should  not   be   disturbed.    If   the   doe   feels   threatened  she  could  eat  the  young  so   do  not  touch!    The  kits  will   grow  fur  and  open  their  eyes  after  about  10  days.    Whilst   the   doe   is  feeding  her  young  she  will  need  an  increased  amount  of  food.   Litter  sizes  vary  and  can  be  as  little  as  1,  but  normally  range  from   6  -­‐   12.    It’s  not  uncommon  for   a  doe   to  have  a  litter  of  17  and  as   this  may  prove  difficult  for  her  to  feed  them  all,  she  may  select  the   healthiest   kits   and   sadly  push   the  weaker   or   ill   ones  out   of   the   nest. 22 | The Deux-Sèvres Monthly

Above: Californian Rabbits

So whether  you   decide  to   give  it   a   go   for  yourself  or  pick  one  up   next  time  you  are  in  the  supermarket   or  farmers  market,  there  is  a   huge  choice  of  recipes  to  choose  from.  Hope  you  enjoy! Peter  &  Jenny  Sebborn.  Breeders  of  pigs,  lambs  and  poultry.   La  Gauteliere,  79220,  Pamplie.    Tel:  05  49  28  38  57.

Photo: Ervinpospisil, WikiCommons


Take a Break... DSM Easy  Crossword Across: 8.   The  part  of  a  golf  course    bordering     the  fairway  (5) 9.   A  musical  entertainment  given  by  a     single  performer  (7) 10.   The   arch   of   hair   on   the   lower     forehead  (7) 11.   Pleasurable  social  event  (5) 12.   To  appropriate  fraudulently  (8) 13.   Plastic  construction   toy  with   many     parts  (4) 15.  Make  healthy  again  (4) 17.   A  carefully  thought-­‐out  strategy    (4,4) 21.   Give  supporting  evidence  (5) 22.   Summer  sport  (7) 24.    Very  hot  red  peppers  (7) 25.   River  mouth  (5)

Down: 1. Soft  creamy  white  cheese  (4) 2.   Surpassingly  good  (6) 3.   Spicy  Spanish  pork  sausage  (7) 4.   Gardening  tool  (6) 5.   Range  (5) 6.   Die  of  food  deprivation  (6) 7.   Understate  the  importance  or  quality     of  (4,4) 12.   Recover  through  digging  (8) 14.   Amounts  of  time  (7) 16.   Ballroom  dance  (6) 18.   Device   used   to   stop   a   ship   from     moving  (6) 19.   With  considerable  certainty  (6) 20.   Storage  box  with  a  lid  (5) 23.   Made  of  transport  (4)

DSM Toughie  Crossword Across: 7.   Keeping   busy,   bringing   energy   to     penultimate   part   of   Shakespeare     play?  (6) 8.   Girl  almost  related  to  a  star?  (6) 10.   Study   of  who   is  responsible   mixing     in  with  a  small  part  of  the  action  (7) 11.   Faith  added  after  writer  gives  small     change  (5) 12.   The   first   man   to   take   the   mickey     out    of  a  lady?  (4) 13.   Six   gangsters,   for   example,   found     in  containers  (5) 17.   It  looks  like   a   small  piece   of   land  is     no  longer  for  rent  (5) 18.   Sheltered  spot  for  an  old-­‐fashioned     sort  of  chap?  (4) 22.   Note   in   oral   medley   to   compose     slow  piece  (5) 23.   Cart  her  off!    It’s  in  the  contract!  (7) 24.   Putting   together   Boer   War   scene     without  any  iron  (6) 25.   Buys  a  round  of  batches  of  umber?     (6)

Down: 1. Can  past  changes  make   a  full  strength     brand?  (7) 2.   The  right  thing  to  do  is  halt  ice     formations  (7) 3. A   day   to   remember   in   hospital     department.    What  a  happening!  (5) 4.   Fence   cross   about   pressures   to   use     end  of  brush  (7) 5.   Taking  a   coat   off   what   you  might  call     a  miserly  person  is  very  hard  (5) 6.   Paradise  without  ecstasy  is  still  a   good     place  to  be  (5) 9.   Feeling   of   sorrow   for   confusing   nice     teen  under  pressure  (9) 14.   As   to   underesumaung   the   locauon     for  shock.....  (7) 15.   ......predict  the  finish  to  be   after  what  is     left  (7) 16.   Set   read   turns   out   to   be   the   most     loved  (7) 19.   Note  weak  assembled  at  sign  of  fire  (4) 20.   Stopper  may  cause  fissure,  so  they  say?  (5) 21.   Unknown   among   villains   going   to     raves  (5)

Quiz-tastic!

With thanks  to  M.Morris

Monthly quiz  by  Roland  ScoT.....how  many  can  you  get?

1) Who  wrote  the  novel  “Rob  Roy”? 2)  How  many  children   in   the  Von   Trapp  family  in   “The  Sound   of       Music”?

8) Of   the   Three   Tenors,   two   are   natives   of   the   same   country,     which? 9)  Matt  Groening  is  responsible  for  which  cartoon  family?

3) In  the  “Peanuts”  cartoon,  what  is  Snoopy’s  brother  called?

10) Which  is  the  nearest  seaside  resort  to  London?

4) According  to  legend  what  did  St  Patrick  expel  from  Ireland?

11) Who  was  lead  singer  of  the  group  Kiss?

5) In  terms  of  swimming  speed,  what  is  the  slowest  fish?

12) Which  solder   of  the  Peninsular  Wars  was  played  on  T.V.  by  Sean        Bean?   Find  the  answers  on  our  website:  www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

6) Which  vegetable  is  used  to  make  Eggs  Florentine? 7)  In  Blair’s  first  government,  Tony  Banks  was  minister  for  what?

Copyright  RJS  2014. The Deux-Sèvres Monthly | 23


Spotlight On...

BRESSUIRE

Top: The Highland Games. Photos Copyright AJEF Highland Games France

by Mick Austin

The 9th  Grand  Prix  Automobile  Historique,  however,  held  over   the   weekend  of  28/29th  June,  is  one  event  definitely  not  to  be   missed   this  year.     The  Circuit   Alain   Métayer,   around  Place   St-­‐Jacques,  will   throb  to  the  evocative  sounds  of  classic  racing  cars  and  sports  cars   from  the   1930s  to  the   1950s.     Feast   your   eyes  on  famous  names   like  Bugatti,  AC  Cobra,  Triumph,  Jaguar,  Lotus,  Panhard  and  Peugeot   –  and  entry  to  the  event  is  free! The   grand   prix   -­‐  sponsored   this   year  by  your   very  own  ‘ The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’  -­‐  is  not  a   race   but   a   series   of   demonstrations   with   speeds   restricted   to   70kph,   which   gives   you   plenty   of   opportunity   to   get   up   close   and   personal   with  both  cars  and   drivers.     On  the   Saturday   there   will   also   be   a   special   celebration   to   mark   80   years   of   the   Citroën   Traction  Avant.     You  know,  the   one  that  looks   a  bit  like  a  WW2  German  staff  car!

But there’s  more  to  Bressuire  than  kilts  and  cars  and  it’s  easy  to  get   around   on   your   own,   all   year   round,   with   the   help   of   green   direction   markers   on   the  ground   and   a   brochure   from  the   local   tourist  office. The  first   must-­‐see  site  is   the  Eglise  Notre  Dame,  with  parts  dating   back   to   the  12th  Century.    The  rounded  vaulting  of  the  nave  is  in   the  Plantagenet  style  of  the  Angers  area  while  the  choir  was  rebuilt   in  the  16th  Century,   creating  a  huge  sanctuary  lit   by  stained  glass   windows  and  later  decorated  with  frescos  in  the  19th  Century.    The   56-­‐metre  high   Renaissance   bell   tower   rises  high   above   the   town   and  the  surrounding  countryside.

24 | The Deux-Sèvres Monthly

Photos: Grand Prix: Sarah Berry, Through The Lens Photography Group, Eglise Notre Dame & Couléé Verte: WikiCommons

Fancy hitching  up   your   kilt   for   a  weekend   of   everything  Scottish?   Hammer-­‐throwing,   caber-­‐tossing,   bagpipes,   marching   bands,   dancing  and  French  and  Celtic  food?    Sorry,  but  the  Games  are  held   every  two  years  and  the  next  one  is  not  due  until  June  2015!  Make   a  note  of  it   in  your  diary,  though,  because  Bressuire  will  then  have   the  honour  of  hosting  the  Highland  Games  World  Championships.

Pascaloue,

If you’ve  come  across   the  town  of  Bressuire  before,  chances  are   you’ll   have   heard   about   two   of   its   most   famous   events   -­‐   the   Highland  Games  and  the  Grand  Prix  Historique.

The Grand Prix Automobile Historique

Eglise Notre Dame

Coulée Verte


The Château of Bressuire

Then it’s   the   Château   de   Bressuire,   built   on   a   rocky   promontory   and   dominating   the   town   and   the   Dolo   river   valley.  One   of   the   main   military  sites  of   the  Poitou   province   in   the  Middle   Ages,   its   history  is  linked  to  that  of  the  Beaumont  family.  The  castle  was  built   in  stages,  with  a  first  perimeter  wall  dating  from   the  11th  Century   and   a  second   –  including  38  towers  –  from  the  13th   Century.  The   ruins   of  the   main   L-­‐shaped   building,   built   in   the  15th  Century,  still   have  its  staircase  and  chimneys  in  an   inner  area.  Set  slightly  back   stands  a   19th  Century   Troubadour-­‐style  castle  in  which  temporary   art  exhibitions  are  held  every  year. Set  within  the   castle  are  the  jardins  thématique,  which  are  free  to   visit  all  year   round.  Check  out  the  former  glasshouse  overrun  with   honeysuckle  and  then  follow  the  mineral  path  through  time  with   a   romantic  pergola,  Baroque  sundial,  Renaissance  square  and  finally   into   Hortus   Conclusus,   an   enclosed   medieval   garden   where   flowers,  fruits   and  medicinal  and  aromatic  plants  grow   side  by  side   in  raised  beds.

Continue following  the   green  markers   and  you   come   to   le   Verger   des   Sculpteurs   (the   Sculpture’s   Orchard),   a   park   where   contemporary   sculptures   stand   next   to   some   50   apple   trees   of   different   species.   Every   two   years   the   Bressuire   International   Symposium  of  Sculpture  allows  both  French  and   foreign  artists  to   use  the  site   to   create  works  in  wood,  stone,  metal   etc.  The   next   symposium  is  due  in  2015.  (www.vergersculpteurs.fr) Your   mini   tour   ends   with   a   visit   to   La   Chapelle   St   Cyprien.   The   chapel  was  given  to   the  Saint-­‐Cyprien  Abbey  in  Poitiers  in   1028  and   its   main  features  include  frescos  and  a  crypt  supported  by  a  single   central  pillar.

Things to See

Crèche Animée.    Abbot   Rochard  was  self-­‐educated  and  fascinated   by  electricity  and  mechanics.    He  spent  more  than  30  years  building   a   model   Palestinian   village   that   shows   daily   life   at   the   time   of   Christ.     There’s   a   30-­‐minute   automated   show   in   the   manger   created   by   volunteers   who   restore   and   maintain   all   the   120   characters  in  this  lifelike  show.    Details  from  the  tourist  office  or   call   05  49  72  80  95. Gare   de   fret.     Situated   in   a   former   warehouse  in   the   old  freight   station  is  an   8.5m  x  2.5m  model  depicting  the  railway  system  in  the   1950s.     A   must   for   adults   and  children.     Details  from   the   tourist   office.

Did you know? Bressuire is  the   birthplace  of  famous  glassblower  and  window  restorer   Max   Ingrand   (1908-­‐1969).     He  was  Artistic  Director   for   FontanaArte  in   the  early  1950s  and  came  up  with  design  classics  like  the  Fontana  table   lamp. He  produced   many  stained  glass  panels  for   religious   buildings,  hotels   and  public  places  and  was  awarded  the  French  Legion  of  Honour.

Photo: www.patrimoine-histoire.fr

The fabulous stained glass panels at Saint-Pierre Church , Yvetot, produced by Max Ingrand.

The Deux-Sèvres Monthly | 25

Photo Chateau de Bressuire, WikiCommons: Twingoman

Next stop  is  the  Art  and  History  Museum,  located  in   what  was  once   the  town’s  grain  granary.  As  well   as  the   old   buildings,  documents   and  works  of  local  artists,  on  the  first  floor  you’ll  find  18th  and   19th     Century   French   earthenware   galleries   and   ceramics   from   the   Middle   Ages.  On  the  ground   floor,  in  the  Galerie  des  Arcades,  the   Les  Amis   des  Arts   association   regularly  features  exhibits  of   works   by   contemporary   artists,   sculptors,   painters,   ceramicists   and   calligraphers.  


BRESSUIRE

FACT FILE... Airvault: 35  mins Argenton-­‐les-­‐Vallées:  20  mins Cerizay:  8  mins La  Forêt-­‐sur-­‐Sèvre:  20  mins Mauléon:  25  mins Parthenay:  35  mins Thouars:  35  mins The orchard sculptures, photo: www.coeurdubocage.fr

Leisure Amenities

A pleasant  walk  for   the  family  is  the  Coulée  Verte  at  the  foot   of  the  Bressuire   château.     You’re  bound  to   come  across  legendary  goblins   in   the  Vallon   des   Douves,  some  beavers  too  fat  to   scarper   at  your  approach   and  some  strange   sculptures  among  the  apple  trees.    Call  in  at  the  tourist  office  for  details  on  the   20-­‐plus  walking  tours  available. If   you   find   life   easier   on   two   wheels,  why  not   rent   a   bike   at   Vélo   Cité   in   Bressuire   and   discover   the   Pays   du   Bocage   Bressuirais   via   cycle   tracks   or   mountain  bike  tours.    Details  from  the  tourist  office. If   it’s  raining  try   the   12-­‐lane   indoor   bowling   at  the  Bocapole   or   swimming   at   the  Centre  Aquatique  Coeur  d’O  with  its  seven  pools  and  a  spa  centre   offering   hot  tubs,  steam  room  and  sauna.

Bressuire is  in  the  dept.  of  Deux-­‐Sèvres    in  the  region  of  Poitou-­‐Charentes  Population:  18764  in  2011 Airports:   Poitiers  (82  minutes),  La   Rochelle  (117  minute s),   Nantes  (88  minutes)  &  Tours  (137  minutes)

Nearby places  to  visit:

• Old historical  towns  of  Parthenay  (32km)  and  Thouars  (30km) • Niort,  capital  of  the  department  (73km) • Saumur  (63km)

Contacts

• Tourist office:  6  place  de  l’Hôtel  de  Ville,  79300  Bressuire.   Tel:  05  49  65  10  27.   Website:  www.tourisme-­‐bocage.com  and  www.ville-­‐bressuire.fr • Musée  de  Bressuire.   Tel:  05  49  74  32  24.  Website:  www.musee@ville-­‐bressuire.fr • Bocapole  bowling.  Tel:  05  49  80  30  55 • Grand  Prix  Historique.  Website:  www.automobile-­‐club79.com • Le  Centre  Aquatique  Coeur  d’O,  Boulevard  de  la  République.   Tel:  05  49  80  71  90.

Fishing Lakes Cycle Routes Picnic Locations Bars & Restaurants

Cashpoint Fuel Stations Campsite Supermarkets

Mick Austin   is   a   freelance   journalist   based   in   the   Pays-­‐de-­‐la-­‐Loire.   He   has   had   his   work   published   in   several   expat   magazines   and   newspapers   and   has   also   written   the   Mayenne   Tourist   Board’s   only   English-­‐language   brochure.   He   also   runs   a   gîte   business   at   www.gitefortwo.com

LOCAL ADS*LOCAL ADS*LOCAL ADS*LOCAL ADS* LOCAL ADS*LOCAL ADS*LOCAL ADS*LOCAL ADS* LOCAL ADS*LOCAL

26 | The Deux-Sèvres Monthly


BRESSUIRE MARKET

by Jessica Morris

Every Saturday  morning  for  the   past  three   years  I  have  been   working   on  a  fishmonger’s  stall  in  the   traditional  Bressuire  market.  I  have  lived   in   France   with   my   parents   for   13   of   my   19   years,   currently   being   educated  in  Nantes. As  I   am   studying  advertising   and  marketing,  I  recently  did   a   six  week   work   experience   placement   with   ‘The   Deux-­‐Sèvres   Monthly’   magazine,   promoting   local   businesses.   The   market   traders   at   Bressuire   have   been   very   supportive   and   believe   in   a   very   strong   community  spirit.   I  now   feel  very  much   a  part  of  that  community  and   I’m  keen  to  spread  the  word. Starting  their  working  day  in  the   very  early  hours,  the  market  traders   bring  fresh  produce   from   local  farms  and  collect   freshly   caught  fish   and  seafood  from   ports  in  the  West  and  the  North.  They  then  prepare   their   stalls   (some   arriving   as   early   as   7am),   ready   for   their   first   customers. Other  stalls  sell   freshly  baked  bread,  organic  products,  Spanish  tapas,   meat,   dairy   products   and   even  English   cupcakes.   You   can   also   buy   local  wines  and  on  a   Tuesday  morning,  the  regular  wine  tasters  have   a   little   terrace   where   you   can  relax   and   appreciate   the   merchandise   and  there  is  also  a  traditional  French  restaurant  across  the  road. My  job  on  the  fish  stall   involves  giving   information  and   suggestions,   weighing,   preparing   and   selling   the   fish   and   seafood  to  our   French   and   English   customers.   It   can   be   difficult   early   on   cold   winter   mornings,   but   there  is  such  a  friendly   and  busy   atmosphere   that  we   soon  warm  up!    Even  though  my  studies  have  taken  me  further  afield   now,   I  hope   to  be  able  to  keep   my  part  time   job  and   continue   to  be   part  of  the  local  community.

The Deux-Sèvres Monthly | 27


Communications... Organising Your PC. Tidying Your Files and Folders by Ross  Hendry

All of  the  information  on  your  PC  is  stored  in  files  and  these  files  have   a  name   and   an  extension.  This  extension   is  separated   from  the  file   name  with  a  dot  (Full  Stop)  and  is  normally  three  characters  long.  It  is   always  the  last  full   stop  and  the  characters  that   follow  it  that  are  the   file  name  extension. Microsoft  Windows  uses  this  file  name  extension  to  determine  what   program  to  open  the  file   with   when  you  double-­‐click  on  it.  Here  are   some  examples  of   file  name  extensions  that   you  may  know:  .jpg  for   jpeg  -­‐   this   is  an   image   file  (normally  a  picture  or  photo),  .txt   for  text   file,  .doc  for  document   file,  .mp3  for  an  MP3  encoded  music   file;  .avi   for  "audio-­‐visual  interleaved"  or  a  video  or  movie  file. Regardless  of  the  file  type,  you  may  organise  them  into  folders  just  as   you  would  organise  files,  pictures  or  documents  into  folders  in  a  filing   drawer.    It  is  normal  to  keep  your  Documents  in  the  folder  called  'My   Documents',   your   Pictures   in   the   folder   called   'My   Pictures'   etc.     Inside  each   of   these   folders  you  may  also  have  other  folders  to  help   arrange  your  documents  or  photographs. So,   in   the   'My   Documents'   folder   you   may   have   the   subfolders:   Family,  Household   Letters,  Insurance   Letters,   Bank  Letters,  Recipes   and/or   Holidays,   each   of   these   folders   may   also   have   folders   to   further  help  arrange  the  information,  so  Household  Letters  may  have   Electricity,  Water,  Telephone  and  Rates  &  Taxes.    By  creating  a  set  of   folders   you   may   organise   your   documents,   pictures,   music   and   videos  however  you   wish,  making  retrieval  of  your   information  quick   and  easy. Most   of  us  are  in  too  much  of  a  hurry  to  meticulously  file  every  item   when   we   create   it,   so   our   'My   Document'   folder   can   become   cluttered.    Using  Windows  or  File  Explorer  it  is  quite  easy  to  tidy  up   our  files  into  folders  so   that  we  can   find  them  quickly  each  time  we   need  to  refer  to  or  edit  them. To   do   this,  organise   the  desktop   display  of  your   PC  for   this  task  by   opening   two   Windows/File   Explorer   Windows   and   dragging   and   dropping   the   files   from   one   window,   the   source,  to   another,   the   destination  window  -­‐  displaying  the  folder  the  file  should  be  filed  in.

Here is  how:  

1. Open   Windows   Explorer   -­‐   How?   -­‐   use   the   icon   on   the   taskbar  this  will  open  the  first  Windows/File  Explorer  screen. 2.  Resize  the  screen  until  it  takes  up  half  of  the  PC  screen:

28 | The Deux-Sèvres Monthly

a) How?  if  the  top  right  hand  corner  of  the  window  looks  like  this   (see  left)  use  the  centre  icon   to   reduce   the  size  of   the   window  from  full  screen.   b)  Then,  placing  your  mouse  pointer   on  the  right  hand     vertical     edge  of  the  window,  you  will  notice  the  pointer  changes.   c)   At  this  point   hold  down  the  left   mouse  button,  whilst   sliding     the  mouse  to   the   left   to   reduce  the   width  of   the   window,   to     that   of   half  of   the   screen.  Then   release  the  left   mouse  button     when  it  is  the  correct  size.   d)  If   the  top  right   hand   corner   looks   like  this  then     you  should    follow  steps  2.b  through  2.c  above. 3.  Now  open  the  second  Windows/File  Explorer  Window;     a)   How?  Right   click  the  Windows/File  Explorer  Window  on   the     taskbar   and   select   either   'Windows   Explorer'   for   Windows     XP/  Vista/7   and   'File   Explorer'   for   Windows   8/8.1.   This   should     open   another   Explorer   Window   slightly   offset   from   the   first     one. 4.  Slide  the  newly  opened  Window  to  the  right  hand  side  of  the  screen   a)   How?  Move   the   mouse  pointer   to   the  title  bar   of  the  new     Window   and   left   click   and   hold   the   left   mouse   button   down     whilst  sliding  the  Windows  Explorer  Window  into  position  to   the     right  hand  side  of  the  screen. 5.  You  should  now  have  two  Explorer  windows  open,  one  on  the  left   that  will  contain   the  files  you  wish  to   organise,  known  as   the  source   window,  and   one   on   the   right   known   as   the   destination   window   where  you  will   move  or  copy  the  files  to.     In  the  left  hand  window   click  to  open  the  folder  containing  the  files  you  wish  to  Organise/File   or  Tidy. 6.  In  the  right  hand  window  open  the   folder  you  would  like  to  move   the  files  to. 7.  In   the  left  hand  window  choose  the  files  you  want   to   move  by  left   clicking   on   them   whilst   holding   down   the   'Ctrl'   button   on   your   keyboard. 8.  Now  drag  the  selected  files  from  the  left  hand  window  to  the  right   hand  window.    Do  this  by  holding  down  the  left  button  on  one  of  the   highlighted   files   and   dragging  it   into   the   right   hand   window.  This   should  take  the  other  highlighted  files  at  the  same  time,  giving  you   a   count   of  the  number   of   files  to   be   moved   by  the  mouse   pointer.     Once  you  are   in  the   correct   position,  simply  release  the  left  mouse   button  to  move  the  files. Using  the  technique   described  above  you  are   able  to  visually  sort   your   data   into   manageable   units   called   folders,   and   further   sub-­‐ divide  these  folders  to  create  a  neat  nested  filing  system  for  each  of   your  file  types. Ross   Hendry   is   the   proprietor   of  Interface   Consulting  and  Engineering,   who   has   over   42   years   experience   in   Communications,   Computer   Technology  and  Direct  Marketing.  (See  advert  below).


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The Deux-Sèvres Monthly | 29


Food & Drink... French Village Diaries Love is   in   the   air   chez   nous  as   my   husband  and   I  have  just  celebrated   16  years   of   wedded   bliss.    We  got   engaged   in   Ireland,  married   on   the   banks   of   the   River   Thames   and   now,   three   houses,   one   son,   two   cats,   one   dog  and   many   feathered   friends   later,   have   spent   the   majority   of   our   married   life   in   a   small  village  in  France.  

by Jacqueline Brown.

We celebrated,  not  on  the  actual   day  -­‐   our   lifestyle   means  he  is  often  away  for  work  and  that  has  to  take  priority  over   birthdays  and  anniversaries  -­‐  with  the  purchase  of  a  freezer!   If  you  include  the  not-­‐so-­‐small  freezer  section  of  the  fridge/freezer   in   the  kitchen   this   is  now  four   freezers   he’s   treated   me   to   since   finding  ourselves  the  owners  of  an  orchard  in   France  and  yes,  they   are  all  still  in  use.    I  know  a  freezer   is  an  unusual   gift,  and  wouldn’t   be   ideal   for   many  ladies,   but   I   was   over   the   moon.     I  regularly   remind  him  how  lucky  he  is  to  have  such  a  low  maintenance  wife  -­‐  I   don’t  need  regular   dates  at  cocktail   bars,  expensive  restaurants  or   even  gifts  of   shoes,  clothes  or  handbags,  but  another   freezer  to  fill   with   our   home-­‐grown   and   homemade   produce   wins   my   heart   every  time.     I  also  know  without  a  doubt  how   lucky  I  am  to  have   him   -­‐   for   an   office   man   in   the   IT   world   he   regularly   sorts   out   anything   mechanical   from  lawnmowers  to   oil-­‐fired   boilers   to   car   engines  and  obviously  keeps  our  IT  gadgets  ticking  over  nicely  too. This  time  of  year   is  the  perfect   time   to   sort  out  and  use  up  those   bits  lurking  at   the   bottom  of  the  freezer   to  ensure   plenty  of  space   for  this  year’s  pickings.    We  have  pretty  much  eaten  all  the  potager   soups  I  made  last  summer  and  we  are  down  to  just  one  or  two  pots   of   frozen   tomato   purée   that   has   been   delicious   added   to   casseroles,  pasta  dishes  and  used  as  pizza   topping  all  winter.     With   extra  freezer   space  I’m  hoping  to   be   able   to   make  and  keep  more   this  summer.    However,  my  poorly  looking  seedlings  really  seem  to   be  suffering  from  a  lack  of  sunshine  at   the   moment,   just   like  we   are.     We  also   seem  to  have  been  invaded   by  snails  and  I’ve  been   warned  to  expect  lots  of  pests  and  beasties,  due  to  the  mild   winter   and  lack  of  serious  frosts  and  snow.     Be  warned  snails,  I’m  prepared   to  fight! In  one  freezer  I  did  find  some  old  bags   of   frozen   plum   halves   (that   will   make   a   great   tangy   jam)   plus   some  pots  of  apple  and  quince   purée  from  last   autumn  that   I  wasn’t  too  sure  what  to  do   w i t h .     I   d e c i d e d   to   experiment   with  purée  jam;   defrosted   them,   added   an   equal  amount   of   sugar   and   boiled  rapidly  for  about   five   minutes.     It   didn’t   make   a   huge   quantity   of   jam,  but   it   was   delicious   on   a   fresh   baguette   for  breakfast  so  I  don’t   expect   it   will  last   too   long.     Waste   not  want  not! For  recipes  please  email  me  at  frenchvillagediaries@gmail.com   or  visit  www.frenchvillagediaries.com  

30 | The Deux-Sèvres Monthly


With Wimbledon   just  around  the   corner,   I  thought   I’d  look  out   the   scone  recipe  for  a  Cream  Tea!    Delicious! Makes  6-­‐8: • 30g    caster  sugar •   50g  butter • 50g  sultanas  or  dried  fruit •   225g  all-­‐purpose  flour • 150  ml    milk •   3  tsp  baking  powder • 1  egg  beaten  with  a  little  milk •   1/2  tsp  salt   Preparation: 1. Heat  the  oven  to  400F/205C/Gas  6 2. Generously  grease   a  baking   sheet   with   butter  then  sprinkle   with   flour. 3. Sieve   the   flour   into   a   roomy  baking  bowl,  add  the   cubed  butter,   the  baking  powder  and  salt.   4. Quickly  rub   the  butter   into  the   flour   using  your  fingertips  until  the   mixture  resembles  fine  breadcrumbs.

5. Add the  sugar  and  the  dried  fruits,  mix  well. 6. Make  a   well  in  the   center  and  using  a  dinner  knife,   stir  in  enough   milk  to  make  a  soft,  pliable  dough. 7. If  the  dough  is  too  sticky  sprinkle  with  a  little  flour. 8. Turn  the   mixture  on  to  a  floured  board  and  knead  very  lightly  until   just  smooth  then  lightly  roll  out  to  2cm  /  3/4"  thick. 9. Cut  rounds  with  a  7.5cm  /2"  cutter   or   cut   into   triangles  with   a   sharp   knife. 10. Place  on  the  baking   tray  and  brush   with   the   beaten   egg   and   milk   mixture.   Bake   near   the   top  of   the   hot   oven   for   15   minutes   or   until   golden  brown  and  well  risen. Cool   on  a  wire  rack  before   eating  and  serve  with  butter,  or   lashings  of   jam  and  cream.   The Deux-Sèvres Monthly | 31


Pape and His Rolling Stones

by John Sherwin

The red  wines  of  Chateauneuf-­‐du-­‐Pape

…It was  a  wet   Wednesday   night   and   business   in   the   surreal   demi-­‐monde   of   the   mobile   fish-­‐and-­‐ chip   van   was  quiet.    Billy  served   up   my  sausage   and  chips,  and  our   minds,   as  one,  turned   to  the   ma‰er  of  wine.     Billy,  out  of  leŠ-­‐field,  menuoned   Chateauneuf-­‐du-­‐Pape.   I   said   I’d   think   about   it,                            and  I  have.

When Pope   Clement   5   relocated   the   papacy  to   Avignon   in   the   southern  Rhone  in   1308  he   found  that  the   local  wines  were,  shall   we   say,   not   that   good.     When   John   22   took   over,   being   a   trencherman   who  liked   a  drop,  he  was  sore  irked.    But  his  vinous   advisors   noted   that   the   terroir   around   and   about   should   be   conducive   to   making   excellent   wine.     Two   factors   in   particular   stood  out:  the  types  of  soil  and  the  mistral  wind. The  mistral,  which  whistles  down  the  Rhone  valley  at   up  to   80kph   for  an  average  of  170  days  a  year,  acts  as  a  natural  ‘cleansing’  agent   –   there   are   no   dank   conditions   here   where   various   rots   and   mildews  might  affect  the  vine.   When   people   talk   of   the   soil   of   CdP   they   normally   refer   to   the   large,  smooth  stones,  similar   in  size  to   those   used   by  the  Scots  in   the  ‘sport’  of  curling,  which  aeons  ago  were  rolled  down  the  Rhone   from  the  Alps.    The  usual   riff   is  that   they  store  (as  well  as  reflect)   lots  of   Provençal  sun  during  the  day  and   release  it   at   night,  giving   the  grateful  plants  a  double  dose.     (If  you  ever   walk  a  few  steps  in   these  vineyards,   you  will  understand  that  vine   growing   here   is  not   only  not   for   the  faint   of  heart,  it   is  definitely  not   for   the   weak  of   ankle.)     While  this  is   perfectly  true,  many  vineyards  around  CdP  do   not  have  these  monster   pebbles,  but  sand,  fine  stones  and  gravel.   No   matter,   all   good   for   the   vine.     So,   while   building   his   ‘new   castle’  (‘chateauneuf’),   John   22   encouraged   the   development   of   vineyards  in  the  area. CdP  was   the  first  French  wine  area  to  be  ‘appellation  controlée’,  in   1936,  with  its  13  named  grape  varieties,  and  boy  do  they  never   let   you  forget   it.     The  13  include  white  varieties   (white  production   is   only  about  5%  of  total)   and  some  real   oddballs.     In  practice,  the   reds   rely  heavily  on   Grenache  (80%   of   plantings)   with   Mouvèdre,   Syrah   and   Cinsault   making   guest   appearances.   This   constant   reference   to   the   13   varieties   together   with   the   hefty   bottles   embossed   with   papal   insignia   count   as   ‘savvy’   in   the   woefully   inadequate  world  of  French  wine  marketing. What  of  the  wine  itself?  Not  all  is  great,  by  any  means.     Some  can   be  weakly  flavoured,  or  too  hot  and  strong  –  unskilled  winemaking.   The   best,   however,   can   be   drunk   young   or   cellared   for   twenty   years,  due  to   tannins  which   although  silky  and  enveloping  in  their   youth  have  enough  backbone  to  stand  the  test  of  time. Good   producers:   Chateau   de   Beaucastel,   Domaine   Gourt   de   Mautens,  Domaine   de  Marcoux,   Clos   des   Papes,   Château   Rayas,   Tardieu-­‐Laurent,  Domaine  du  Vieux  Télégraphe. But   yet   another   conundrum:  is  it   to   be  Sauternes  or   Barsac   with   that  deep-­‐fried  Mars  bar  ?  I’ll  get  back  to  you…

John Sherwin, French Wine Tours. Tel: 02 51 66 13 05 ~ E: john@french-wine-tours.com ~ www.french-wine-tours.com

32 | The Deux-Sèvres Monthly


Motoring... Eighty Years of Traction by Helen  Tait-­‐Wright Well,  2014  seems  to  be  a  year   for  big  automotive  birthdays,   and  this   month  I  am  looking  at  a  real  old  timer,  the  Citroën  Traction  Avant.  

Even if  you   didn’t   know   what   it  was   called,   the   Traction   is   instantly   recognizable,  mainly  due  to  being   immortalised  by  Maigret,  and  at  the   grand   old   age   of   80,   their   robust   construction   means   they   are   still   going  strong. The   Traction   is   deeply   entrenched   in   modern   French   history,   and   indeed  in  the  history  of  car  production  and  design. “Avant”,  as  you  will   know,   living  in  France,  refers  to  the   fact   that  the   Traction  is  front  wheel  drive.  In  modern   terms  this  is  not   particularly   noteworthy,  but  when  the   Traction  Avant  launched  in  April  1934  it  was   a   radical   innovation   at   a   time   when   almost   all   cars   used  rear-­‐wheel   drive.   Although  the  idea  itself  was  nothing  new,   even  in  the  1930s,   Citroën   claims   the   Traction   Avant   set   the   standard   for   handling   and   road   holding  in  a  front-­‐wheel  drive  vehicle.    It  was  also  the  first  time  such  a   layout   had  been  paired  in  a   production  car  with  a  monocoque   body.   The   all-­‐steel  frame  was  central  in  reducing  weight  and  giving  the  Avant   a  low  centre  of  gravity. The   Traction   was   just   as   innovative   under   the   skin.     In   addition   to   unibody   construction,  the  Traction  boasted  a  totally  flat  floor  thanks  to   a   front-­‐wheel   drive   layout   consisting   of   a   four-­‐cylinder   engine   mounted  backwards  between   the  front  wheels  and  the  firewall,  and  a   manual   transmission  installed  at   the   front  of  the   car.    The   low-­‐slung   arrangement  also  eliminated  the   need  for  running  boards  to  step  into   or   out   of   the   vehicle.   These   features   made   them   ideal   for   use   as   limousines  and  taxi   cabs,   and  they  were   popular   among   drivers  and   passengers  alike.

ACE Service!

Fully trained  and   insured,  the  original  tyre-­‐fitting  business,  Ace   Pneus,  has  been  running   successfully  now  for   5  years.    Due  to   demand   the   business   expanded   into   fitting   towbars   and   batteries   last   year   and   to   repairing   alloy   wheels   and   refurbishing  headlights  the  year  before.       Offering  a  friendly  and  honest  service,  David  Ace  is   available  to   discuss  your  needs  and  help  out  with  any  enquiry.     During   opening   hours   he   will   pick   your   car   up   from   ‘The   Market’,  Luché  sur  Brioux  (see  advert,  page  6),  where  you  can   relax  in   comfort  whilst  your   car  is  being  repaired  -­‐  special  menu   prices  for  Ace  Pneus  clients.

In spite   of   the   Traction’s   expensive   development   process   which   contributed   to   Citroën   filing   for   bankruptcy   in   1933   and   being   purchased  by  Michelin,  the   car  was  first  presented  to  the  public  at  the   1934  edition  of  the  Paris  Motor  Show. The   Traction  proved  a   popular   model   for  Citroën,   with  over   759,000   models  built   during   over   twenty  years   of  production,   despite   dealers   unanimously  telling  Citroën  that  they  thought  buyers  would  be   put  off   by  the  aerodynamic  body.   The  name   Traction  Avant  is  widely  used  to  describe  any  model  of  the   lineup,  which  over  the  years  includes  many  different  engine  and  body   style   variants,   but   the   car   was   initially   launched  as  the   Citroën   7CV,   denoting  the  puissance  fiscale  of  the  original  engine.

Photo: http://3.bp.blogspot.com

During the   war   years   the   production   of   the   Traction   continued   alongside   trucks  being   built   for   the   French   army,   and  the   cars  were   widely  used  by  the  French  and  German  armies  across  Europe  but   also   as  far  as  Russia,  Libya   and   Tunisia.    Later  on,  the  Traction  was  used  by   members  of  the  French  Resistance,  who   reportedly  didn’t  hesitate   to   borrow   privately-­‐owned   cars   when   their   own   Traction   either   broke   down  or  was  wrecked. Production  eventually  stopped  in  1957,  and  it  is  amusing  to  note   that   until   1953,   the   only   colour   available   was   black.     Today   a   Citroën   Traction  Avant   is  still  a   usable   daily  drive,  but  not  without  quirks.  Rust   is  a  major  enemy,  and  servicing  and  maintenance  require  stamina  due   to  inaccessibility.   Pre-­‐war  Tractions  are  rare  these   days,   and  prices  for  restored  coupes   and  convertibles  can  range  as  high  as  £110,000,  but   postwar  cars  still   change  hands  more  reasonably,  anywhere  from  £10,000-­‐£20,000.

The Traction  is  being  celebrated   on  28th   June  as  part  of  the  Grand   Prix   Historique   de   Bressuire,   so   come   along   and   see   them   en   masse  for  yourself! Contact  Helen  at:  helen@stodel.org. The Deux-Sèvres Monthly | 33


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Business & Finance... FRENCH PENSIONS If you  work  or   have  worked  in  France,  you  are  entitled  to  a  French   pension.    This   is  actually  one  of  the  things  you  pay   contributions   for!    Many  people  confuse  contributions  and  income  tax.    Although   they  both  hurt,  they  are  not  the  same.     Contributions  are  what  you   pay  towards  healthcare,  unemployment,  pensions,  etc  and  you   pay   that   to  either   RSI,  MSA,  URSSAF,   etc  and  it  is  a  percentage  of  your   turnover   (if  you  are  auto-­‐entrepreneur)  or  a  big  amount  each   year   if  you  are  micro,  SARL,  etc.   So   how  does  it   work  and   more  importantly  how  much   could  you   get?     This  article  will   only  give   you   a   broad  view,  so   for   more  in   depth  details,  please  contact  me.

The Great  Principle  of  Pensions The   system  itself   is   a   bit   of   a  shambles   because  it  is  the  workers   who  pay  for   the   pensioners!   That   was   OK  in   the   1960’s  as   there   were  four   workers  for  one  pensioner  but  now  the  ratio   is  2:1  and   forecasted   to   be   1.2:1   by   2030.     This   is   why   successive   French   governments  are  doing  reforms  all  the  time  (average  one  per  year).     The  main   principle  in  France  is  that   provided  you   have  worked   for   42  years  you  can  retire  from  62  years  old  (both  men  and  women).     However,   in   order   to   have   worked   one   year,   you   need   to   accumulate  four  quarters  (4  x  3  months)  so  the  French  government   count   the   number   of   quarters,  not   the   number   of   years.   As   an   auto-­‐entrepreneur,  you  need  to  earn   a  minimum  amount  per   year   to  at  least  register  one  quarter.

How Is  It  Calculated? There   are   two   pensions:   The   basic   old   age   pension   and   the   complementary  pension.       Both  are  government   pensions  and  are   an  obligation  to  contribute  towards!

Basic Pension It   depends  on  what  job  you  do,  so   you   could  contribute  to   either   RSI.,   MSA.,   CNAVPL,   etc   (each   type   of   job   has   its   own   pension   scheme)  but  how  much  you   will  get  is  calculated  the  same  way  and   based  on  three  criteria: 1. The  average  of  your  best  25  years  of  salary 2. A  percentage   between  0  -­‐   50  depending  on  how  long  you  have   worked   during   your   life   (at   67   years   old,   it   is   automatically   50%).    Note   that  the  years  you  have  worked   outside  of  France   count  as  long  as  you  can  prove  them  (salary  slip  for  example). 3. The  number  of  quarters  you  have  worked  in  this  particular  job   type  divided  by  the  reference  of  number   of  quarters  (42  years   so  168  quarters).  E.g.  You  could  have  worked  as   an  Artisan  for   ten  years   and  as   a   gardener   five  years,   so  ten  years   with   RSI   and   five  years  with   MSA  so  you   would  get  two  different  basic   pensions  (one  from  RSI  and  one  from  MSA). This  is  the  formula:  (average  wage  X   50  %*)  X  (Number  of  quarter’s   worked/  168  semester) *if  you  have  worked  42  years  during  your  life. E.g.  My  best   25  years  average  wage  was  15000   euro  and  I  worked   in  France  and  the  UK  (need  to  be  able   to  prove  it)  for  a  total   of   42   years   (so   I  am   entitled   to   50%)  and   I  have  worked   as   an   Artisan   (RSI)  for   28  years  (112  quarters)  so  my  basic  pension  from  RSI  will   be  (15000  x  50%)  x  (112/168)  =  4999  euro   per   year.    This  amount  is   to  be  added   to  other   basic   pensions   (maybe  also  from  UK)  and  the   complementary   pension.  In   any  case,   the   maximum  amount   you   can  get  from  your  basic  pension  is  50%  of  your  average  earning.

40 | The Deux-Sèvres Monthly

Complementary pension This   one   is   a   bit   easier   to   understand.     When   you   pay   your   contributions,  you  buy  some  points.     The  more  you  earn,  the  more   you  contribute  and  the  more  points  you  have. The  value  of  the   point  for  RSI  is  1.1777  euro  for  2014  so  when  you   retire  you  multiply   the   number   of  points  you   accumulated   by  the   value  of  the  point.    The  value  of  the  point  changes  each  year  and  is   reduced  if  you  have  not  worked   enough  years.    Note  that  the  value   of  the  point  when  you  buy  it  is   17.309  euro!    Yes,  it  is  not   a  joke,  it   is  worth  10  times  less  when  you  get  it  back!     Obviously,   different   jobs,   different   complementary  pensions   and   different  value  of  points...  It  would  be  too  easy  otherwise!

Private savings

You must  have   gathered  by  now  that   the  best   way  to  get   a  good   pension   is  to  do  it  yourself!     So  what  type  of  pension  schemes  are   available  for  you  in  France?

Assurance vie:   Yes,  I  know,  I  keep   going   on   about  this  wonderful   saving  account   but  this  is  because  it  is  brilliant,  not  just  because  I  get  a  commission   for   it.   This   is   the   most   popular   one   for   pensions   because   it   is   flexible   (you   can  stop   and   start  your   regular   payment   into   it,  the   money  stays   available,  etc.)   and   offers   tax   advantages   once   you   retire.     Basically,  you  save  regularly  when  you   work  and  when  you   want   to   retire,   you   can   either   take   it   out   as   a   lump   sum   or   as   regular  revenue  or  both.     And  if  you  had  the  policy  for  more  than  8   years,  this  revenue  will  be  tax  free  up  to  a  certain  limit  per  year.

PERP: This is   only   good  in  order   to  reduce   your   income  tax   during  your   working  life   as  the  government   gives   you   a   rebate   depending  on   what  tax  scale  you  pay.     If  you  are  taxed  at  5.5%  and  you  put  1000€   per  year  into  a  PERP,  your   tax  is  reduced   by  5.5%   of   1000  so   55€.     So  it’s  only  good  if  you  are  taxed   at  30%  or  40%.    It   is  not   flexible  as   it   is  transformed   automatically  as   an  annuity  when   you   retire  and   you  can’t  access  it  before  you  retire.

Contrat MADELIN Same  as  PERP  but  for  self-­‐employed  and  even  less  flexible. Conclusion:   The   pension   system   in   France   can   be   quite   complicated   to   understand  and  you   deserve  a  medal  if  you  have  understood  it  all   from  my   explanation   above.     The  problem   is   that   it’s   never  the   same   whether   you   are   a   farmer,   an   artisan,   a   trader   or   an   employee.    If  you  really   want  to  know  roughly  how  much  you   will   get,  you  can  contact  me  as  we  have  a  software  which  can  calculate   it   for   you.     However,   because   the   government   are  changing   the   rules  all   the  time  (and  never  in  our  favour!)  you  will   be  better  off   opening  a  saving  account  then  hope  for  the  best!     Don’t  hesitate  to  contact   me  to  see  which  saving  scheme  would   be   more  appropriate  for  you.

BH Assurances, 22 rue Jean Jaures, 16700 Ruffec Contact Isabelle Want: Tel: 05 45 31 01 61 /Mob: 06 17 30 39 11 Email: isabelle.want@bh-assurances.fr


Be Careful Who You Trust With Your Money

by Brad Warden, Partner, Blevins Franks

Many people take financial advice to protect their assets from tax and inflation and to provide financial security. What many do not realise, however, is that their choice of adviser is probably the most important financial decision they need to make. For security and peace of mind, choose an advisory firm which abides by national and international regulations, with advisers who are professionally qualified to a high degree. They should also be experienced at advising expatriates in your area. While France has its own regulation system, the UK’s Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) – formerly known as the Financial Services Authority (FSA) – is considered one of the most rigorous regulators in Europe. Using a firm authorised and regulated by the FCA gives you reassurance that it can be trusted to advise you in a wholly appropriate way, and that the investments they recommend are also well regulated. The Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union enables regulated entities within one EU country to conduct business in another EU country. This is done through a ‘passport’ obtained under the EU’s Insurance Mediation Directive. Using a UK incorporated company, fully authorised and regulated by the FCA, with a passport to provide advice in France, is ideal for

British expatriates who need financial planning involving both countries. A UK based adviser is unlikely to be familiar enough with the tax rules in France and financial planning needs of expatriates here, so his recommendations may not be suitable for you. You need an adviser who lives locally and has in-depth and up-to-date knowledge of French and UK tax and estate planning concerns, and how the two tax regimes interact. Qualifications and high professional standards are also very important. The FCA requires all advisers it regulates to have obtained the Diploma for Financial Advisers. This involves considerable professional study and various examinations. In summary, three key things to look out for when choosing an adviser are regulation, qualifications, and personal, local experience. You should accept nothing less for your and your family’s financial security! Blevins Franks Financial Management Limited (BFFM) is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the UK, reference number 179731. Where advice is provided outside the UK, via the Insurance Mediation Directive from Malta, the regulatory system differs in some respects from that of the UK. Blevins Franks Tax Limited provides taxation advice; its advisers are fully qualified tax specialists. This article has been approved and issued by BFFM.

The Deux-Sèvres Monthly | 41


What is ‘Le Tour de Finance’

Ask Amanda.

by Sue Cook

“Who is  “Ask  Amanda”?”

As Le  Tour   de  Finance   in   this  area   approaches   you   may  wonder   why   you   should   attend.   Well,   I   thought   I   would   give   you   an   overview  to  answer  some  of  your  questions. Le   Tour   de   Finance   came   about   as   a   number   of   professionals   realised  that   there  was  a  need  for  the  ex-­‐pat  community  living  in   France  and  other  countries  to  have  their  questions  answered.   Our   mission  is   to   bring   information   and   ease  to   those  who  have   chosen   to   make   France  their   home.  We   want   to   be   the  chosen   forum  for   all  those  with  financial   concerns  and  questions  who  are   living   in   these   countries.   If   you   have   questions   about   residency   rules,   healthcare   changes,   how   best   to   invest   your   hard-­‐earned   money   then   there   will   be   professionals   at   the   event   who   can   answer  them.

Le Tour  de  Finance  will  be  presented  in  your  local  area,  because  we   believe   that   information   about   foreign   exchange   transfers,   pensions,  taxation   and  healthcare   should   be   available  where  you   live   so  you   know   you   are  talking   to   people  who   understand  your   needs  and  concerns. After   the   presentations   you   will   have   the   opportunity   to   meet   other  people  in   your  area  over  a  free  buffet  lunch  and  also   talk  one   to  one  with  the  professionals.

So come  along  to  Saint   Loup-­‐sur-­‐Thouet   on  17th  June  and   see   for  yourself.

As it   has   been   over   two   years   since   I   introduced   myself   to   ‘The   Deux-­‐Sèvres   Monthly’   magazine   readers,   I   thought   a   reminder  of  who  I  am  would  be  helpful. Along  with  drawing  on   the  resources   of   The  Spectrum   IFA  Group,   one   of   Europe’s   leading   independent   intermediaries,   I   have   25   years  of  experience  in  financial  services.   For   over   15   years   I   have   specialised   in   personal   financial   planning.   Whilst   in   the   UK   I   worked   for   several   UK   high   street   b a n ks   a s   a   f i n a n c i a l   advisor,   attaining   the   following   Certificate   for   Financial   Advisers   (CeFA-­‐)   qualifications:   C.E.F.A   I,   C.E.F.A  II,  C.E.F.A  III  &  CEMAP. After  a  permanent   move  to  France  in  2006,  I  have  been  addressing   the   unique   financial  planning   needs  of   expatriates  and   those  with   cross-­‐border   interests.     I  have  a  detailed  knowledge  of  the  French   rules   and   regulations   for   tax   efficient   investments,   pension   organisation,  inheritance  planning  and  French  mortgages. In   making   recommendations   we   have   access   to   some   of   the   world’s   most   respected   international   banking,   investment   management   and   insurance   institutions,   bringing   customers   a   widespread  range  of  services. There   are   no   consulting   fees   for   providing   you   with   advice   or   ongoing  service.     Our   Client   Charter   outlines  how   we  work  and   what   you   can   expect   from  us.  Please   do  not  hesitate  to   ask  for   a   copy  of  this. Whether  you  want  to  register  for  our  newsletter,  attend  one  of  our   upcoming  road  shows  (June  17th  &  19th)  or  speak  to  me  directly,   please  call  or   email  me  on  the  contacts  below  and  I  will  be  glad  to   help  you.  We   do  not  charge  for  reviews,  reports  or  recommendations  we   provide.

Amanda Johnson,  The  Spectrum  IFA  Group.  Tel:  05  49  98  97  46 Email:  amanda.johnson@spectrum-­‐ifa.com

www.spectrum-­‐ifa.com/amanda-­‐johnson

or “Ask Amanda” at finance@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

Thinking about placing an ad? Why not take advantage of our Special Packages for New Advertisers? Call Sarah for more details: 05 49 70 26 21

42 | The Deux-Sèvres Monthly


The Deux-Sèvres Monthly | 43


Wealth Tax  in  France

by David Hardy

Wealth Tax  (Impôt  de  Solidarité  sur  la  Fortune)  is  an  annual  tax  on   the   sale   value   of   your   assets,   based   on   their   value   on   the   1st   January  each  year.   The   taxable   threshold   for   any  household   is   €1,300,000   worth   of   assets   although   a  30%   allowance   is  given   against   the   value  of   a   principal  residence.     Mortgages  as  at  1st  January  can  be  offset  and   house  contents  can  be  valued   at  a  set   5%  of  total  assets,  or  their   real  value.  

Exemptions

Certain assets   are   currently   exempt,   however,   from   ISF   including   antiques,   collector’s   items   and   fine  art. Importantly,   ‘business   assets’   can   be   also   excluded,   however,   they  must  be  an  asset   used  for  a  registered   business  which   provides  your  main   source  of   income  and  not  simply  designed  to  hold  and  manage  your  personal   wealth. Up   to   now,   it   has   been   our   understanding   that   UK   qualifying   pension   funds   can   be   excluded   as   an   asset   for   Wealth   Tax   calculations,   since   that   fund   can   never   be   turned   into   an   asset.   However,  the  last  UK  Budget   proposed   to   relax   pension   rules  and   diversify  pension  options,  therefore   it  is  less  likely  that  exemptions   will  be  accepted  for  certain  forms  of  pension  plan.   Since  2011,  new  legislation  has  confirmed   that  any  assets  held  in   trust   must   be  part  of  a  Wealth  Tax  return  if  the  trust   has  a  French   resident  settlor  or  beneficiary.

New Residents

French law   has   now   given   all   new  residents  of   France  exemption   from  French  Wealth  Tax  on  all  assets  held   outside  France,  until  the   31st  December  of  the  fifth  year  following  your  year  of  residence.

How To  Declare

All households  owning  taxable  assets  worth   between  €1.3  million   and   €2.57   million,   make  a   Wealth  Tax  declaration   as   part   of  their   Income   Tax   return.  Those  with   taxable   assets   that   exceed   €2.57   million  must   make   a   separate   tax  return   by  15th   June   each   year   accompanied  by  a  cheque  for  the  amount  of  tax  due. Should   you   wish   further   information   on   how   to   reduce,   or   potentially  eliminate   your   Wealth  Tax  liability,  or  require  a  review   of   any  other   financial   areas   it   is  best   to  seek   sound   professional   advice  first.  

David Hardy  is  Regional  Manager  of  Siddalls  France,   Independent  Financial  Adviser,  specialised  in  tax,  inheritance,   pension  and  investment  planning  for  the  British  community  in   the  Poitou-­‐Charentes  since  1996.    Tel:  05  56  34  75  51 www.siddalls.fr

44 | The Deux-Sèvres Monthly

CONTRIBUTIONS.... We are always looking for new articles for consideration in future issues. Do you have an experience to share? Are you a tradesman with a Top Tip? or perhaps an avid reader who would like to contribute a book review? Whatever it may be, either long or short, we would love to hear from you. You can call Sarah on 05 49 70 26 21 with any ideas, or send them on an email to: info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr


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The Deux-Sèvres Monthly | 45


Where Once Weavers Spun by Joanna Leggett

According to  French  legend,  the  enchanting  town  of  Parthenay  was   created   by   a  wave   of   the   wand   of   the   fairy  Melusine   who   was   deemed  to  be  half  woman  with  a  serpent's  tail! What   is   known   is   the   tales   of   Melusine   were   worked   into   a   collection   of   “spinning  yarns”   as   told   by  ladies  while   doing  their   spinning!   And   with   its   origins   firmly   routed   in   medieval   times,   Parthenay  had   its  own   thriving  community  of   weavers  -­‐   perhaps   the  basis  for  this  long  told  tale? A  medieval  walled  town,  Parthenay  was  once  the  capital  of  the  hilly   and   wooded   area  which   occupies   the  centre  of   the   Deux-­‐Sèvres   département.     Medieval   pilgrims  walked  past  the   weavers'  homes   on   their   way   southwards   towards   Compostela.     Today   it   is   still   possible  to  reach  the  top  of   the  gatehouse,  which   provides  views   over  the  river   and  lower   part  of   the  town.    It’s  castle  was  built  in   the  13th  century  on  an  easily  defended  site  surrounded  by  the  river   Thouet  -­‐  this  was  the  time  of  the  100  years  war  after  all! It   was  only  in  the  19th  century  that  the  town  was  extended  beyond   the   medieval   citadel,   with   wide   boulevards   and   squares   constructed  following  the  line  of  the   old  town  wall  and   to  the  east   of   the   town.     It   became   known   for   the   breeding   of   cattle   and   indeed   the   Parthenais  breed   is   named   after   it.     Today  Parthenay   continues   to   be   a   thriving  and   busy  market   town   -­‐   and   it   is   the   gateway  towards  the  Loire  valley  which  lies  northwards. At   its  heart  remain   narrow   streets  lined   with   medieval   timber-­‐line   houses   with   vegetable   plots   climbing   the   slopes   which   rise   on   either   side   of  the   street.    Many  of  these  original  properties  retain   ground   floor   wooden   shutters  which   once   folded   down   to   form   market  stalls! For   sale   in   the   historic   heart   of   Parthenay  is  a  superb   14th   century   half   timbered,  pink  rendered  house   (reference   37124,   photo   left).     Currently   being   run   as   a   very   popular   B&B  business,  this  charming   home   has   five   bedrooms  and   three   bathrooms.    As   you   enter   from  the   street,  you   encounter  a   door   to   the   first   B&B  room  with   large  bedroom,   its   own   living   room   with   stone   chimney,  fitted  kitchen  and  shower  room.    On  the  first  floor  are  the   kitchen,  dining  and   living  rooms  leading  to  a  beautiful   courtyard.     There   are  two  further   B&B   rooms  and  at  the  top  of  the  house  are   two  more  bedrooms  as  well  as  a  luminous  music  lounge  and  study.     This  gorgeous   house   embodies  the  spirit  of  a  bygone   age,   with   a   steady   stream   of   clientele   (and   income),   and   is   for   sale   at     371,000€. Some  20kms  further   along   the   river  Thouet   is  St  Loup  Lamairé  with   its   stunning   château.     Situated   on   the   edge   of   its   grounds   and   currently   for   sale   is   another   charming   four   bedroom   property   (41994).    A  must  see  at  158,050€   with   its  generous  four   bedroom,   two  bathroom  accommodation,  this  home  oozes  character  set  off  by   a  walled   enclosed  courtyard,  open   barn  and   attached   annexe,   the   latter  currently  being  used  as  a  games  room  and  for  entertaining,  but   could  easily  be  converted  into  further  living  space. Joanna  Leggett  is  Marketing  Director  at  Leggett  Immobilier. You  can  view  their  full  portfolio  of  properties  for  sale  in  France  at   www.leggettfrance.com

46 | The Deux-Sèvres Monthly


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'The Deux-Sèvres Monthly' June 2014  

English language magazine for the French department of Deux-Sèvres and surrounding areas.

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