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Corinne Jones Playground Fall 2011


Corinne Jones Playground

A design build project for a neighborhood park in Charleston that supplements the City’s playground renovation.

Fall 2011 Location: Charleston, SC Program: Shading and Seating Structure Considerations: Context, Community needs, Sunlight/Shading, Budget Team: Barrett Armstron, Nicholas Barrett, Richard Chalupa, Sara Cheikelard, Julie Knorr, Joseph Martin, Tyler McLemore, Keith Richey, Alex Wetzel, Lindsay Yarborough Professor: David Pastre


Site Plan

N

Master Planning This shading and seating structure is located in Corinne Jones Playground in the Wagener Terrace neighborhood of Charleston, South Carolina. This studio was composed of a team of 10 graduate and undergraduate students in architecture and landscape architecture. Phase 1- the northern wall- was built during the semester, with plans for the southern part, Phase 2, to be completed by the City at a later date. Working with the City of Charleston, Charleston Parks Conservancy, and local Neighborhood Association made the project possible.


Key Components: 8� deep foundation Concrete wall segments Wooden trusses & Benches Steel louvers Concrete pavers

Before

After

Materials 1160 linear feet of rebar

640 square feet of melamine

24 cubic yards of concrete

443 board feet of Meranti

1020 pound of steel angle

1160 linear feet of rebar

20 sheets of melamine

24 cubic yards of concrete

443 board feet of Meranti

1020 pounds of steel angle

27 da


Plan The segmented concrete wall curves around the existing sidewalk, providing seating overlooking the playground and tennis courts. Ten wooden trusses are inserted between key blocks to create the shading and benches. The steel 2” x 2” louvers are tabbed and twisted 90˚ prior to being attached to the beam structure to create a unique twisted shading pattern above the poured concrete blocks and benches.


9" 1'-316

A

7'-4"

7" 3" 2'-2 4

7 8" 1 22"

1 2'-9 4"

94° 1 1'-104"

30°

13 " 4

9" 1'-316

4'-0 3" 8

7"

71 2"

A

1 22"

95°

2'-2 3 4"

2'-8 3 " 8

7 8"

94° 1 1'-104"

30° 4'-0 3" 8

1 3'-118" 2" 2"

B

7'-4" 21" 2

71 2"

1 8"

7" 8

1 3'-118" 2" 2"

A

7" 8

B

B

7"

7" 8

C

C

1 8"

7" 8

3" 84

3" 3'-98

13" 4

Truss Construction D

7'-8 3 " 16

1 7'-8 2"

3" 1" 6'-10 2

7

5 1"" 82

1 1'-6 2 "

A

1 4"

10"

B 1'-5"

C

41" 16

60°

7" 11 1'-916"

7" 8

41" 16

E D

83 4"

1" 4

C

3'-93 8"

13" 4

7" 7'-816

1" 52

41 16

60°

96° 31 2"

D

7'-8 3 " 16

1 7'-8 2"

66°

1" 6'-10 2

13 716 "

3"

1 2 " 4

96°

5 1" 2

1 1'-6 2 "

1 4"

10"

5 1'-8 8 "

E 1'-5"

E

3 " 4

45 8" 13 " 8

D

2'-1 5 " 16 150°

41" 16

11 2"

96°

1" 4

3 1" 2

150° 3" 4

7" 1'-316

5" 2'-316

66° 11" 3 2 1'-5 4"

311" 16 7"

1" 52


Structure

The wooden trusses are made of Meranti, a tropical hardwood that is dense and durable. They slide into keyways created in the concrete formwork.

The beams of the trusses are attached to the columns with a lap joint- the 2 x 6s are notched out to receive the beam. They are joined with epoxy and countersunk screws.

The benches are connected to the columns with the same technique as the upper beams, and have a half-lap joint at the tips. Steel angle supports the bench slats.

The steel louvers are galvanized 2 x 2 angle that was twisted and tabbed to lap over the wood. They are screwed into pre-drilled holes on top of the beams.


Wall Details The 4’ wide blocks and trusses continually change across the entire curving wall. The first block is 9” tall, and each successive blocks grows 3”, until the tallest block is 39” tall. Then they begin to decrease by 3” in the remaining blocks. The front face of the blocks starts out projecting forward at the top and cantilevering out. Each block 5’ then loses 1” in depth at the top while the bottom kicks out 1” so that the blocks have a scissoring effect when next to each other and the benches are on blocks that lean back. At the tallest block, they start the reverse. The back face of the blocks remains perpendicular to the ground.


Design Details

Truss Details The trusses also change in relation to the blocks. They grow 3� taller at each block, and the beams are also 3� longer. The angle of each truss is dependent on the lower block it is adjacent to, and is the same angle as the front face of that block. The tallest block doesn’t have a truss in its section because the truss is dependent on the lower blocks to its sides.


Construction Timeline

Week 1

Week 2


Week 3

Week 4

Corinne Jones Playground  

Design build in Charleston, SC. Graduate work-Fall 2011

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