Issuu on Google+

VISIT

US

AT

W W W. S A P A T O D AY . C O M

SAPAToday

Advancing the free paper industry by providing resources for success and venues for sharing ideas. THE MONTHLY NEWSLETTER FOR THE FREE PAPER INDUSTRY Board of Directors The leadership of SAPA is in good hands. The board of directors, director, and assistant are listed with contact information. Page 3

Selling Advertising in a Shiny Object World John Foust knows that getting and keeping attention in todays intense world is tough. But here’s how to do just that. Page 3

Conference Schedule It’s not too early to start planning for a fabulous conference in Washington, DC. 6 associations join together for the biggest and best of everything. Page 8

JUNE 2013

Graphics Series Ellen Hanrahan shows how the industry is changing. You probably already noticed that. However, Ellen explains some pretty interesting ideas. Page 5

3 Small Business Investments Dr. Joey Faucette gives us three great ideas that we can share with our readers and advertisers on keeping small businesses at home. Page 4

USPS News Saturday delivery is safe for the time being. But there is plenty to work on with the United States Postal Service. We hope to have them at the conference in Washington, DC. Read on to find out why. Page 6

Southeastern Publishers

Advertising Association

Create Instant Recognition Ads

CREATE INSTANT RECOGNITION FOR YOUR ADVERTISING By Bob Berting, Berting Communications

Today there are sequels to movies and many times a 2nd or 3rd sequel is nowhere near the creative attraction of the original movie. We see automobile styles that are almost look-alikes. We see shopping malls that look alike. Too many retailer newspaper ads look alike. Maybe it’s a lack of creativity, or maybe it’s a lack of courage to be different and the concern of being too different.

THE OPTICAL WEIGHT OF THE AD A good rule of creative advertising is to be “instantly recognizable” either by a distinctive layout style, use of type faces, unique style of art, use of a particular color or some other element that is different from the competition. Another important factor is to understand the optical weight of the ad, which is the upper left quadrant of the ad. Creativity can start in that quadrant namely with a newly designed logo, the start of a provocative head-

Southeastern Advertising Publishers Association (931) 223-5708

ing, a dominant eye-catching graphic and possibly spot color. FOCUS GROUPS What’s really interesting is how focus groups look at high profile retailer advertisers and how they perceive one store versus another. A series of full page ads might be presented with the logos covered. The members of the group would be asked to identify which ads belonged to which stores. Surprisingly few made the right iden-

(888)450-8329 fax

continued on page 2 1


VISIT

US

continued from page 1 tification as to store identity. ENCOURAGE YOUR ADVERTISERS TO IDENTIFY THEMSELVES MORE CREATIVELY As part of your consultative process, you must provide guidance on how to accomplish that process. Awaken their creativity. Challenge them to be different. Here are a few suggestions:

AT

W W W. S A P A T O D AY . C O M

Bob Berting is a professional speaker, newspaper sales trainer, and publisher marketing consultant who has conducted over 1500 live seminars, tele-seminars, and webinars for newspaper sales staffs, their customers, print media associations

and trade associations in the US and Canada. Contact Bob at 800-536-5408 or bob@bobberting.com. He is located at 6330 Woburn Drive, Indianapolis, In 46250.

Localize their business: use the name of the city or shopping community in the signature section of their ad or an illustration of an immediately recognizable landmark place nearby. Use testimonials and pictures of actual customers praising their business merchandise, or service (you need a signed release to do this). Use the business salespeople in the ads—talking to customers or individually talking to the reader. Use humor, particularly a humorous slogan. Also a campaign can be developed using clever and provocative headlines. Readers will gravitate to that type of advertising because they are intrigued by this approach and want to see what will happen in the next ad Sometimes getting attention can be as simple as creating a large dominant headline with a lot of white space and very little copy. Never underestimate the power of being unique and different. Your publication can stand out in the marketplace by constantly taking the creative initiative.

Organizational Software

Tools you need to be more efficient.

Lead Developer & Founder

407-656-2777

chris@MaxProPublishing.com www.MaxProPublishing.com Software Developed by:

Little Fish Big Ocean, Inc.

"The Nation's Fun, Family Newspaper!" www.kidsvillenews.com/cumberland P.O. Box 53790 Fayetteville, NC 28305 Cell: 910-391-3859 ph: 910.222.6200 fax: 910.222.6199 bbowman@kidsvillenews.com

Bill Bowman

Southeastern Advertising Publishers Association (931) 223-5708

President

(888)450-8329 fax

2


VISIT

SAPA

Leadership

President Tony Onellion Bargains Plus Slidell, LA 985-649-9515

US

Vice President Caroline Quattlebaum Southeast Sun Enterprise, AL 334-393-2969

Southeastern Publishers

Advertising Association

AT

W W W. S A P A T O D AY . C O M

Treasurer Will Thomas Exchange, Inc. Fayetteville, TN 931-433-9737

Secretary Amy Hollingshead Atlanta Thrifty Nickel Marrietta, GA 770-971-8333

Board Member Bill Derby Johnson City News & Neighbor Johnson City, TN 423-979-1300

Board Member Mike Marlow Rutherford Weekly Forest City, NC 828-248-1408

Past President Russell Quattlebaum Southeast Sun Enterprise, AL 334-393-2969

Past President Greg Ledford Shelby Shopper & Info Shelby, NC 704-484-1047

Executive Director Douglas Fry SAPA Headquarters Columbia, TN 931-223-5708

Administrative Assistant Vickie Belden SAPA Headquarters Columbia, TN 931-223-5708

Selling Ads In A Shiny Object World the newest technical gadget, even if their older version works just fine. But By John Foust Raleigh, NC in reality, Bright Shiny Objects can reMeet Erica, a veteran of many years fer to anything new and different. of sales presentations. “There’s a lot of “One of the lessons I’ve learned over talk these days about people who are the years,” she said, “is that some drawn to Bright Shiny Objects,” she people are restless. For whatever reatold me. “In most cases, that’s a refer- son – desire for novelty, competition ence to consumers rushing to purchase with peer groups, or plain old boreSoutheastern Advertising Publishers Association (931) 223-5708

dom – they are always on the lookout for new things. In the business world, they are constantly trying new procedures, new initiatives, new vendors – even new employees. If the new thing works, fine. If not, there’s always another new thing around the corner.” Erica explained that she looks for evidence of the Bright Shiny Object syndrome. For example, is an advertiser always considering new themes or media plans? Are marketing proposals requested frequently? Has he or she ever tried to shorten a long-term ad contract? Does the account seem to have a continued on page 4

(888)450-8329 fax

3


VISIT

US

AT

W W W. S A P A T O D AY . C O M

new ad agency – and a tweaked brand Erica said. “There’s a lot of truth in the identity – every year? old saying, ‘knowledge is power.’ The “These are signs of someone who likes only thing I can learn by talking is that Bright Shiny Objects,” she said. “So I I might be talking too much.”

big news. I’ve found it helpful to use a map to show the growth areas. A picture is worth a thousand words, and geographic changes are easy to illusbuild my presentations around new- She is consistently looking for new in- trate.” ness. Of course, I mention my paper’s formation about her advertisers. What 3. New products. According to Erica, stability in being around for a long are their thoughts on their current this is where you can score big points. time, but I put a lot of emphasis on the marketing? What are they considering A new product – whether it’s a special new things we have to offer.” for the future? What information can section, a snazzy addition to your web site, or a social media feature – is an That’s a solid sales strategy. Let’s take a she provide that might be of help? closer look: 2. New audience. “Our number one authentic Bright Shiny Object. 1. New information. “Like any good product is readership,” Erica said. 4. Improvements in existing products. sales person, I ask a lot of questions, “When we expand our coverage, that’s Does your paper have a new printing process? (That can mean better color and faster turnaround.) Do you have access to new market research? (Better targeting.) Have creative capabilities been improved? (Additional design staff, recent creative awards, etc.) Has your paper opened a new office or revamped the old office? Are there new week, most of the business fuel that ad discounts? (Save money, get more by Dr. Joey Faucette of the Positive Media powers the U.S. economic engine is bang for the buck.) Network local, small businesses like my grandNews reports of the D.C. celebrations father’s. These owners are the people “It’s all about getting in step with adthis week around small businesses we sit beside at the school’s PTO meet- vertisers,” Erica said. “I believe my paprompted me to remember my grand- ing, sing “Amazing Grace” with on per can be just as bright and shiny as father. He was a small business owner Sundays in an adjacent pew, and will any other media vehicle.” who farmed and ran a country store. stand in line with come the November (c) Copyright 2013 by John Foust. All rights reserved. He managed risks such as drought- elections. producing weather, commodity price So while the Small Business Adminis- John Foust has conducted training changes of milk and tobacco affected tration captures most of the national programs for thousands of newspaper by global markets, and Labor Day news this week touting small business- advertising professionals. Many ad deweekend hold-up’s. While technology es via sound bytes, what do you say we partments are using his training videos start-up’s longing to be the next Face- make some news of our own? to save time and get quick results from book to IPO are all over the news these in-house training. E-mail for informadays, my grandfather was the typical What if we actually do something tion: jfoust@mindspring.com small business owner of his genera- profitable that creates a Work Positive difference for our friends slogging tion… through the daily mud of running a …and of today as well. While Mark business? Southeastern Advertising Zuckerberg had the time of his life last continued on page 9 Publishers Association

3 Business Investments

David C. Zeh Print Sales Consultant 402 Mayfield Drive • P.O. Box 966 Monroe, GA 30655 toll free: 800.354.0235 local: 770.267.2596 fax: 770.267.9463 Partners in Printing Since 1900

mobile: 770.722.0076 email: dzeh@waltonpress.com

Here’s how it works… An online radio station that’s fully customized for your local community. We do all the heavy lifting so there’s no management headaches. You sell audio ads with display ads. We take care of the rest!

www.waltonpress.com

Southeastern Advertising Publishers Association (931) 223-5708

(888)450-8329 fax

4


VISIT

US

AT

W W W. S A P A T O D AY . C O M

SPRING Changes PLANTS SPRING FLOWERS

I ENTERED THE FREE PAPER INDUSTRY DURING A TIME OF TRANSITION. THE “OLD” WAY OF COMPOSITION WAS ENTERING A DIGITAL STAGE. AND ONCE AGAIN WE FIND OUR INDUSTRY GOING THROUGH…

I usually try to run different articles for IFPA and SAPAToday for reasons that I have previously stated. However, current changes in our industry—from software changes, storage changes, viewer’s changes, etc. have prompted me to address the current situation and my experiences. This article ran last month in The Independent Publisher. This month I will address these issues with you. And note there are some minor differences… Here’s what I mean. Wisconsin Community Papers went to an online judging system this year, and while I was not a judge per se, I reviewed the judges’ picks (in certain categories) to make sure that rules and policies were followed, as well as to make sure that there were no egregious errors. Online judging can be a little tricky, especially for print advertising. Since I have been a part of this process this was not difficult… or tricky. The tricky part comes in looking at advertising printed on paper and comparing them to the screen version. “It always looks better on the screen,” because the colors are more vibrant, but good design is good design no matter how you view it. The categories however, may have to be looked at. For instance, we have a category, Best Cover Page of a Special Section, with two divisions. Division #1 is Newsprint Cover, and Division #2 is Coated Stock Cover. In reality, there are definite visual differences, —on the screen they look the same. But this is an easy fix. There are other areas to look at as well, but for a “first time” I think it went well. Now we need to sit down as a group and evaluate the procedures and results… and I will keep you posted. If anyone else has gone through this process, we could certainly use and appreciate your comments and concerns. E-mail address is listed below.

Online Ads

There is one category though that I think needs to be addressed. It’s Best Online Ad and while I was reviewing it, it occurred to me that we have to rethink this category. Most of the ads were just a reproduction of the printed ad, but there was one that had “click-through” capabilities. By that I mean it was interactive! If you are preparing an online ad, engage the viewer. Give them the opportunity to go to the advertiser’s website or click to see other specials at the store. In other words, use interactive techniques to benefit the advertiser. You also have to make sure that the viewer can easily return to your publication.

If you can’t wait, you can always e-mail to find out a little more about live text and images!

An Image in Live Text

I’m thinking that most of us have had the opportunity to place an image within the confines of a text box. Convert the text to outlines and then place the image into the text—it’s a graphic frame after all. But what if the font is wrong for the image, or there’s a misspelling or you need to change the text…well, you just start over. There is an easier, more efficient way using live text! It’s pretty cool… and I learned it in the April/May edition of InDesign Magazine!

This is really a great use of the RGB Transparency Blend Space. I made the simple change from “Flowers” to “Plants” just by changing the text—no boxes, no outlines! And unfortunately, I don’t have enough space to explain effectively what needs to be done. So call it a “teaser, or “cliff hanger,“ but next month I will give more details and samples so you will be able to use this technique in your advertising!

The above image did NOT show up well in the IFPA article so this also gives me a chance to get a “do over.” I think somewhere along the line my RGB Transparency changed to CMYK with not so good results… very washed out! Remember that you always should learn from your mistakes!

The Industry is Changing

As designers we are in the midst of change and challenge. Most of the advertising content that we do for our publications can also live beyond print—online, tablets, whatever. More information, different work flows, timeconsuming learning curves are now part of our job requirements. The good news—design is design, and software programs are making it easier to bridge the gap between print and digital. The bad news—how do you make it happen? In an attempt to keep my skills up-to-date and prepare for the web experience, I took a Dreamweaver course. Ach! I was in a whole ‘nother world. Hey, thank goodness I didn’t take it for credit, but I do have a better understanding of how CSS coding works and at least I know how to fix it… minor fixes… very minor fixes…very, very minor fixes. Anyway, I picked up a book “Digital Publishing with Adobe InDesign CS6,” Moving Documents from Print to Digital by Sandee Cohen and Diane Burns. Sandy Cohen has contributed many easy to understand articles to InDesign Magazine so I trust the information. This book seems to present a simpler way to this whole print to digital (online) conundrum. So I will also

Southeastern Advertising Publishers Association (931) 223-5708

share my journey with you… although I’m only in Chapter 1: Introduction. Stay tuned!

InDesign Magazine

This digital magazine is a really valuable tool for any InDesign user. April/May edition articles include: InDesign to HTML; Filling Out Preprinted Forms; InStep: Filling Live text with Images; InType: How to Be a Better Designer. I love books and magazines, so when I see a good thing I get excited! The 6-issue-per-year PDF subscription is $59. Or get two years for just $69 (only $10 more!) and receive 12 issues of the magazine plus all back issues (for both subscriptions) for free! PLUS they have a special discount price! Get $20 off a one-year subscription (code: friend) or get $15 off a two-year subscription (code: friend2) (This is for a 1-user license). Discounts at www.indesignmag.com/purchase.php The first issue was July/August 2004 and they were working in InDesign CS. So you would be able to find information no matter what version of InDesign you are using. OK, enough commercial space! I welcome your input and suggestions. I taught art, entered the free paper publishing business in the 80s and now write articles for The Independent Publisher, Community Papers of Michigan…and still learning. Ellen Hanrahan ©2013 E-mail: hanrahan.ln@att.net

(888)450-8329 fax

5


VISIT

US

AT

W W W. S A P A T O D AY . C O M

Saturday Delivery Safe

FOR NOW SATURDAY DELIVERY SAFE – FOR NOW by Donna Hanbery

In February 2013, the Postal Service announced that it was adopting a new modified delivery schedule with 6-day package and 5-day mail delivery effective August 2013. After outcries from Congress, and the passage of a continuing resolution by the Congress that continued the mandate for 6-day service, the Postal Service pulled the plan in an announcement released in mid-April. In a statement issued from the US Postal Board of Governors, The Board referenced the restrictive language in the continuing resolution and the action of Congress to prohibit the new delivery schedule. The Board stated: “Although disappointed with this congressional action, the Board will follow the law and has directed the Postal Service to delay implementation of its new delivery schedule un-

til legislation is passed that provides the Postal Service with the authority to implement financially appropriate and responsible delivery schedule.” The Board made it clear that it still thought 5-day was needed – “someday” - sooner rather than later. The Board’s announcement continued: “The Board continues to support the transition to a new national delivery schedule. Such a transition will generate approximately $2 billion in annual cost savings and is a necessary part of a larger 5-year business plan to restore the Postal Service to long term financial stability.” The Board’s announcement – and the commentary and testimony that followed – showed that the Postal Service felt this restriction could force it to pursue other, perhaps extreme, measures. The Board announced that it was directing Management to seek reopening of negotiations with the

postal unions and to evaluate “further options to increase revenue, including an exigent rate increase to raise revenues across current postal categories and products not currently covering their costs.” The Board made it clear that everything was on the table. Meanwhile, Congress has done nothing to advance a comprehensive bill that would address or correct the Postal Service’s financial woes and the many government mandates that have created the Postal Service’s financial crises. For mailers that value Saturday delivery service, or fear that a reduction in days of delivery will have an adverse ripple effect on other delivery days, the news was greeted as a welcome reprieve. Meanwhile, a number of SMC members and free paper publishers are working to explore the feasibility of switching from a Saturday in-home date to deliveries on Thursday and continued on page 7

Integrated Management Software designed by publishers for publishers Display & Classified Ad Sales & Billing Circulation z Direct Mail z Payroll z Accounting

M ERRIMAC S OFTWARE A SSOCIATES INC . TAMWORTH, NH 603 323 8811

W W W. M E R R S O F T . C O M

Introducing

PHOTOS

UNLIMITED 450,000 stock photos you’ll love!

Unlimited Users, Unlimited Downloads, Unlimited Creativity. Questions? Need help? We’re here! 800.245.9278 or create@creativeoutlet.com

Southeastern Advertising Publishers Association (931) 223-5708

(888)450-8329 fax

6


V I S I T U S A T W W W. S A P A T O D AY . C O M

USPS News Friday. Several publishers have raised questions and concerns about the Postal Service’s ability to transition papers that currently have a Saturday inhome date to a pre-weekend delivery timeframe. This is particularly true in areas where some postal stations may already be delivering another saturation mail program with a Thursday or Friday delivery window. In meetings with Postal Service officials, Donna Hanbery has expressed the worries of publishers and the importance of papers serving advertisers and retailers with a weekend sales break of having a mail program that can get into the home on Saturday or “pre-weekend.” This issue has been discussed with Maura Robinson, Vice President of Consumer and Industry Affairs. Recently it was raised at a meeting with the Postmaster General, his executives and other trade association leaders. Postmaster General Donahoe urged papers with a weekend delivery date to start working with the Postal Service, and their printers and advertisers, now to look at moving deadlines, copy deadlines, and mail entry dates back to allow for a Thursday or Friday in-home date. Although Friday is a very busy day for the Postal Service to receive flats for processing for delivery on Saturday or the following week, Friday is not a heavy delivery day for the Postal Service. Postmaster Gen-

continued from page 6

eral Pat Donahoe stated the Postal Service and its officials should work with publishers that currently have Saturday in-home dates to try and advance the delivery of their papers. The Saturday discussions are far from over; but at least, for now, advertisers and consumers valuing Saturday mail delivery will still enjoy 6-day service. POSTAL PRESENCE AT AFCP CONFERENCE For the first time ever, the United States Postal Service appeared as not only a sponsor, but the principal sponsor, of the Association of Free Community Papers (AFCP) Annual Meeting and Conference. The Postal Service sent two representatives to meet and greet customers throughout the trade show, and in a mailer’s breakout section, along with Donna Hanbery, Executive Director of the Saturation Mailer’s Coalition. The conference began with remarks by Pat Reynolds, a 26-year postal veteran with experience in major accounts and sales strategy. Pat was warm and enthusiastic. He told the full assembly that today’s Postal Service “is not your father’s post office.” He told publishers that the Postal Service was striving to be more proactive, not just reactive. Describing himself as a proponent of out-of-the-box thinking, Pat encouraged publishers to come and speak to him about challenges, ideas, and ways

Southeastern Advertising Publishers Association (931) 223-5708

the Postal Service could be a better partner to publishers. Pat also introduced his colleague, Steven Booker, from postal headquarters. He promised that the two of them would listen, engage with customers, and take publishers’ concerns back to headquarters. The reaction to Pat Reynolds’ remarks was positive. Many publishers and conference participants applauded the Postal Service for coming to the conference and taking a major role as the principal conference sponsor. In true AFCP fashion, there were several social and networking events throughout the conference that encouraged participants to visit all of the vendors’ booths. The Postal Service booth, with a prominent location on the conference floor, had a steady stream of publishers stopping by to ask questions, discuss concerns, and learn more about the mail and what the Postal Service was willing to try and pursue in today’s regulatory and competitive environment. On the second day of the conference, a mailer’s breakout session was held as an open round table and forum for publisher and postal service dialogue. Donna Hanbery served as moderator to make sure that every publisher with a question or concern got a chance to be heard. It was a lively session, with a lot of interest and dialogue. Even before the session began, Pat and Steven impressed the group with their grasp of

(888)450-8329 fax

continued on page 8

7


VISIT

US

AT

W W W. S A P A T O D AY . C O M

Conference Schedules SA PA A n n u a l C o n f e r e n c e : Washington D.C.: SAPA, IFPA, CPF, CPNE, MACPA, CPOWV, and a whole bunch of other letters will be joining together at the Ritz-Carlton in Pentagon City on September 19 - 21, 2013. This will be one of the largest assemblies of free community papers to ever come together. Plan now on

joining your friends from across the Eastern United States in what will be an unforgettable conference. Top-notch speakers, exciting activities, friendships, and time to network will be some of the things you will remember most about the conference. Call Douglas Fry at 931.223.5708 for more information.

The challenge of leadership is to be strong, but not rude. Be kind, but not weak. Be bold, but not a bully. Be thoughtful, but not lazy. Be humble, but not timid. Be proud, but not arrogant. Have humor, but without folly. NEWSPAPER PRINTING COMPANY

Jim Rohn

Doug Schwenk A c c o u n t E xe c u t i ve NEWSPAPER PRINTING COMPANY

5 2 1 0 S O U T H LO I S AV E N U E / TA M PA , F LO R I DA 3 3 6 1 1 (813) 902-1196 / CELL (561) 239-2495 P ro d u c t i o n : ( 8 1 3 ) 8 3 9 - 0 0 3 5 / FA X : ( 8 1 3 ) 8 3 9 - 7 2 9 5 E M A I L : d o u g s @ N P C p r i n t i n g. c o m w w w. N P C p r i n t i n g. c o m

USPS News publishers’ concerns. Pat said he and Steven were putting together a list of topics to present to headquarters. He made it plain that he had already heard – loud and clear – that the audience was concerned about postal rates and costing. He said, “I understand that some of you are not postal customers. I want to help figure out ways we can get more of your business.” Pat summarized the issues he was hearing as issues relating to costing and consistency, worries about Saturday delivery and getting papers in the home on time, and having someone at the Postal Service who would understand and learn about the free paper business. Pat said he know they were squeezed by advertisers and raising costs and that leaving the mail or going out of business was a real concern. Pat and Steven both encouraged the group that they were enthusiastic

NEWSPAPER PRINTING COMPANY

continued from page 7

about the opportunities for the USPS and the free paper industry and wanted to explore solutions. One idea they suggested was the potential for forming a committee where representatives of the industry, and a USPS Business Alliance Manager, could get creative in developing a pricing strategy that would attract more business.

stay in the mail if prices were lower or there was some protection against increases.

Pat Reynolds said the Postal Service W S P A P E Rto P R exploring I N T I N G C O M P A N ways Y wasN Eopen to look at its pricing so as to retain and increase this business. With more than 50% of all audited free papers delivered outside the mail, Pat stated he could see the Postal Service opportunity. He Several publishers in the session exsaid he would stress the opportunities pressed questions about postal rules to headquarters. and the need to get papers in the home on time. They echoed concerns that There were a number of questions the daily newspapers would “own the about Postal Service processes and opweekends” if Saturday delivery was erations. Steven Booker helped parstopped and the Postal Service could ticipants understand the rules that apnot help papers get in the homes be- ply to how the Postal Service handles mail and that often other advertisers fore the weekend. – that seemed to be getting better deCarol Toomey, AFCP President and livery – had standing appointments a mail publisher, stressed that postwhere their pieces were brought into al rates and increases were always a the Postal Service and were delivered concern. Carol said many publishers would like to try the mail or would continued on page 10

Southeastern Advertising Publishers Association (931) 223-5708

(888)450-8329 fax

8


VISIT

US

AT

W W W. S A P A T O D AY . C O M

3 Business Investments

continued from page 4

Here are 3 small business investments nity. you can make this week that pay imINVEST IN LOCAL HOME mediate dividends: PRODUCTS INVEST IN LOCAL FOOD When I renovated an apartment for PRODUCTS renting, I could have installed pre-fab One of the better government initia- cabinets made in a factory somewhere tives comes from the USDA’s support far away. But I remembered my grandof locally grown food products. This father doing business with a local direct-to-market approach is an an- craftsman who built everything from cient-future strategy as my grandfather knotty pine cabinets to pole barns. sold garden-grown tomatoes in his This small business owner, like my country store. Also, he sold his milk to grandfather, employed local citizens a regional cooperative that produced from the community, did good work, dairy products like ice cream and and that’s why he was the go-to guy. milk. Of course, their products tasted Installing new cabinets? Find a local better to me because I knew the cows craftsman. He can probably build furpersonally… niture, also. Discover work by local arWho grows blueberries in your neck of the woods? Or, raises grass-fed, antibiotic-free beef? Or, free-range chickens and eggs? Or, honey? In addition to a host of benefits like freshness, you receive the satisfaction of knowing that as you invest in these local food products, you support small business owners in your local commu-

play in my hometown. The hot dogs are just as good as I support Wayne who runs the concessions that my daughter’s friend, Jennifer, serves as one of her summer jobs. As you invest in local entertainment, you give a big-thumbs up to small business owners. So while the SBA captures the Washington headlines this week, let’s you and I invest in small businesses in these 3 ways that pay immediate dividends to the benefit of our friends and neighbors.

Dr. Joey Faucette is the #1 Amazon bestselling author of Work Positive in a Negative World (Entrepreneur Press), Work Positive coach, & speaker who helps business professionals increase sales with greater productivity so they leave the oftisans whether it’s paintings or pottery fice earlier to do what they love with those to decorate your home. Oftentimes, they love. Discover more at www.Listenthey accept commissioned work. toLife.org. Besides excellence in craftsmanship, you develop a relationship with the small business owner as you invest in unique, local home products. Hand out business cards when your friends compliment your décor. INVEST IN LOCAL ENTERTAINMENT That local band playing for the Relay for Life fundraiser in your community all have day jobs. They play to support the community, laced with dreams of the big-stage. Buy a CD from them. Maroon 5 or Carrie Underwood won’t miss it.

JB Multimedia, Inc. P.O. Box 704 N. Bellmore, NY 11710 888.592.3212 phone/fax www.jbmultimedia.net

M a k i n g p u b l i c a t i o n s i n t e r a c t i v e.

Justin Gerena, President, Director of Sales p: 888.592.3212 x710 e: justin@jbmultimedia.net

Those kids in the Summer Theater have rehearsed for weeks to perform. Sure, you can drive to an off-Broadway production of Wicked. Invest in the future stardom of a potential Tonyaward winner from your hometown. I love watching my nephew, Dan Uggla, start at second base for the Braves when I travel to Atlanta. But I also love watching the Rookie League Braves

Southeastern Advertising Publishers Association (931) 223-5708

GET YOUR CUSTOMER’S ATTENTION! Bring your message to life by advertising in over 4 million homes each week. Call us today to speak to one of our advertising professionals about making a splash!

Southeastern Publishers

(888)450-8329 fax

Advertising Association

9


VISIT

US

AT

USPS News

W W W. S A P A T O D AY . C O M

within the Postal Service’s delivery standards. Booker explained that the Postal Service delivery standards for standard mail gave the Postal Service up to three days to move the mail from one postal station to the next. If mail went to the DDU, it should be on the street within three days. If the mail was entered further upstream, the timing for delivery could be five or six days. Booker and Reynolds both encouraged participants to meet with local postal stations, to find out the procedures for setting up appointments, and to work to coordinate times and expectations for weekly papers.

Service should develop some loyalty program or incentive that would retain and attract free papers and program mailers.

As the session was coming to a close, Steve Harrison, publisher of the Genesee Valley Pennysaver, spoke for all. Steve thanked the Postal Service for taking a leadership role as a principal sponsor, for taking the time to send two people who were good listeners and clearly knowledgeable about Postal Service rules, rates and processes, to come and meet with existing and potential customers. Harrison said, “It really means a lot to me and to others to see the Postal Service making this effort.” Harrison explained that he was one of the publishers that were working to transition from a Saturday in-home date to a Friday in-home date. Although he had encountered some problems and resistance with some postal stations, he was appreciative that the Postal Service appeared to be working to meet his needs and that of his advertising customers.

Recognize the importance of the detached address label to publishers of papers and magazine-type coupon publications.

Appoint an industry Business Alliance Manager. A BAM is an account manager that could have an industryrelationship and serve as a liaison to different departments of the Postal Service existing and potential publishers advertising program mailers. Share the concern about loss of Saturday service. Publishers with weekend programs need certainty for Thursday or Friday delivery.

Address problems with inconsistencies and what different USPS stations and offices require. We urged the Postal Service to continue to be a principal sponsor of AFCP. Throughout the conference, I had the opportunity to introduce Pat and Steven to other Association executives. I explained that there were other state, regional – and one other national as-

sociation – that would welcome opportunities to dialogue with the Postal Service at meetings and conferences. I urged the Postal Service to make an effort to participate in the upcoming Joint Conference of IFPA, and several regional and state conferences taking place in the Postal Service’s “backyard” at the Pentagon City Ritz Carlton in Washington D.C. on September 1921, 2013. Stealing from a comment made by several participants at the AFCP meeting, Pat and Steve were certainly the right people to present the Postal Service in the best light to publishers. It is hoped that Steve and Pat are equally effective in getting the powers-that-be at Postal Service headquarters to carry this good communication, action items and suggestions forward into action items. Donna E. Hanbery, Executive Director Saturation Mailers Coalition 33 South Sixth Street, Suite 4160 Minneapolis, MN 55402 (612) 340-9350 Direct Line (612) 340-9446 Fax hanbery@hnclaw.com

At the end of the meeting, I sat down with Steven and Pat to work on our list of action items and “to dos.” The industry concerns that Pat and Steve pledged to take back to headquarters included the following: Concerns about costing, pricing, and consistency. We agreed that the Postal Southeastern Advertising Publishers Association (931) 223-5708

(888)450-8329 fax

10


VISIT

US

AT

W W W. S A P A T O D AY . C O M

Web design is BIG business

Southeastern Advertising Publishers Association (931) 223-5708

(888)450-8329 fax

11


US

AT

W W W. S A P A T O D AY . C O M

THE

EAST COAST

FREE PAPER

a

CONFERENCE

MONUMENTAL event

VISIT

Southeastern Advertising Publishers Association (931) 223-5708

SEPTEMBER

2013

CPOWV

SAPA IFPA

FCPNE

HOSTED BY

MACPA

19•20•21

RITZ-CARLTON

PENTAGON CITY (888)450-8329 fax

12


2013 June