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SAPAToday

Advancing the free paper industry by providing resources for success and venues for sharing ideas. THE MONTHLY NEWSLETTER FOR THE FREE PAPER INDUSTRY Board of Directors The leadership of SAPA is in good hands. The board of directors, director, and assistant are listed with contact information. Page 3

The Power of “Tomorrow I’ll” John Foust uses his story telling abilities and some great books to explain a new way to look at life. Page 3

Conference Schedule Plan today to join us at the fabulous Wynfrey Hotel in Birmingham, AL on July 15 & 16, 2011. Page 8

MARCH 2011

Graphics Series Ellen Hanrahan shows us how Vector Clip Art can be used in new and imaginative ways. Page 5

The Art of Putting Things Off Landy Chase of Charlotte, NC shows us that procrastination can be a good thing! Page 6

USPS Update Changes at the Postal Service will effect us all. Learn what those changes may be so you and your staff will be prepared. Page 9

Southeastern Publishers

Advertising Association

How To Sell Bigger Chunks of Business by Bob Berting, “Mr. Community Paper” In these difficult financial times, publications must find more creative ways to sell bigger chunks of business. Instead of struggling to sell just small mom and pop operations, the answer is to sell large merchant groups either as an area promotion or as a subject promotion. These area merchant groups are looking for someone who can work with them to not only develop their image but greatly improve their sales volume every month not just at heavy promotional times a year like Mother’s Day, Back to School, and Christmas. Let’s talk about a procedure that is applicable to area promotions which could be a shopping center, small town, or business community.

THE FIRST STEP IS TO DIAGRAM EACH TARGET AREA AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE The diagram will show the key merchants and as many of the other merchants as possible. Code each merchant in the diagram as follows: RA— Regular Advertiser, FA-Friendly Advocate, OObjections, and I-Interested. Understand how the coding works: O-Objections are for merchants who still have objections to your publication. These people have to be converted to I-Interested. Once a merchant is interested, the next step is to convert them to an FA (Friendly Advocate) who, though not a regular advertiser, believes in your publication and will go to bat for you. The FA will hopefully be converted to

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an RA (Regular Advertiser). Under this plan, the ideal situation is to convert most of the merchants to an FA or RA . Now get a 3-ring binder and set up a sheet for each target area that is assigned to each salesperson. Discuss the status of each target area at weekly sales meetings. BUILD RAPPORT AND FACT FIND THE TARGET AREA MERCHANTS The next step is to build rapport with the merchants in each target area. Whoever is assigned to a target area should try to shop in the area frequently, attend their promotional events, and above all, get to know the merchants. Next, fact

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How To Sell Bigger Chunks of Business find—ask questions. Build a file of data for each merchant. At this point you need to approach a designated chairperson, president, or key leading merchant and ask to meet with a committee or group of key merchants. It is important that you stress the reason for the meeting is to make a presentation regarding a marketing plan with your publication which would include a yearly (12x) advertising schedule and various other promotional services which will be explained at the meeting. The ideal procedure is to have a breakfast meeting at least 2 hours before the majority of stores are open. An invitation is sent to the merchants, their home offices, and their regional or district managers. Registrations are needed for the food count. PREPARATION FOR THE MEETING The publication staff must prepare for the meeting by planning as follows: Know the mix of the merchants in advance of the meeting. Talk to the friendly advocates and regular advertisers who will help get others to the meeting. Customize your talk. Know the surrounding competitive market environment. Have members of your staff: layout artist, sales management, and if possible the publisher, share in the presentation. Have a TEAM presentation. Use ample visuals including a Power Point presentation and a dummy layout with a sample heading, suggested ad sizes, and spot color examples. Show ad costs based on a 12x rate which is a 13x time rate) for new promotion advertisers. Regular advertisers could run in the promotions at their regular rate. THE MEETING AGENDA The team leader opens the meeting by explaining what the publication wants to accomplish with this group of merchants. The promotions are all in-paper promotions and no tabloids. Here is a suggested agenda: 1. A 12x schedule is presented which shows a promotional theme for each month. These themes can be a mixture of traditional events

like Mother’s Day, Back to School, Christmas, etc., and events which are customized to the target area like Sidewalk Sale, Anniversary Sale, Harvest Of Values, etc. The dates for each promotion are shown which are based on research of the merchants, when their best sale dates are, and copy deadlines. This schedule, once approved, will be sent to each merchant, their home offices, and their district managers. This will be done at NO CHARGE. 2. A sample announcement flyer is presented. This flyer will be sent prior to each promotion to participating merchants. The flyers not only remind people of the promotion date, but the copy deadline and extra point of sale services which will be summarized later. This flyer will be done at NO CHARGE 3. Tearsheets for each promotion will be brought to the participating merchants to post on their windows. Their ads can be circled in red. Also extra papers can be brought to go on their front counters. This service is at NO CHARGE. 4. Other point of sale support: Window banners AT COST, Shelf Talkers at AT COST, Coupon Boxes—delivered with tearsheets and shelf talkers AT COST. THE MERCHANTS ARE IMPRESSED WITH THE PLAN At this point most merchants will be impressed with the plan. However the question may be asked, “How can your publication do all these things at no charge or at cost?” The answer is, “Only if your group or association will run this promotion schedule as a collective group and at least 50% of your merchants sign a 12x contract.” Your regular advertisers can be counted in the 50%. The percentage of required participation can vary. A strip center of 20 merchants may be 50% while a business community or small town of 50 merchants may be 60%. THE CLOSING PROCEDURE STARTS

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WITH A DUMMY LAYOUT The layout will be configured to the size of the promotional page spread and will have a heading for the first promotion on the yearly schedule, and ad sizes showing the 12x cost of each ad size. Regular advertisers will have their ad selection at their rate. In some cases a regular advertiser will run a separate ad in the promotion besides their ROP ad in the publication—or at least run a more dominant ad in the promotion. The closing procedure now is to get commitments for ad spots and have 12x agreements ready to sign. If your presentation is effective, most of the merchants present will sign a 12x contract. FOLLOW UP TO THE MEETING Although there may be a good turn out for the breakfast meeting, there are always merchants who are absent or home offices to be contacted. These contacts should be seen as soon as possible and shown the dummy layout where many of the spots were sold at the meeting. The services at no charge and at cost are to be explained as well as the 12x rate. In many cases, if the group is organized, there will have been a notice telling absent merchants what was done at the meeting. After all the merchants have been seen, the percentage of participation is reviewed. If it is close, you may want to proceed. If it is off quite a bit, the leadership of the group may need to help you solidify the commitments. At this point, it is a judgment call for the publication. It is my experience selling 20 shopping centers, small towns, and business communities, that the breakfast meeting will determine the success of the promotion. SUMMARY Once a target area merchant group is sold, it becomes a domino effect. The more groups that are sold, the easier it will be to sell new groups. Although the procedures outlined in this article require a lot of effort and hard work, the results can generate huge increases in advertising revenue. Bob Berting (Mr. Community Paper) is a professional speaker, newspaper sales trainer, e-book author, and publisher marketing consultant. Bob’s website is www.bobberting.com. He can be reached at 800536-5408 or bob@bobberting.com.

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SAPA Leadership

President Russell Quattlebaum Southeast Sun Enterprise, AL 334-393-2969

US

Vice President Tony Onellion Bargains Plus Slidell, LA 985-649-9515

Integrity is the most valuable and respected quality of leadership. Always keep your word. Brian Tracy

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Treasurer Alan Lingerfelt The Piedmont Shopper Danville, VA 434-822-1800

Secretary Caroline Quattlebaum Southeast Sun Enterprise, AL 334-393-2969

Board Member Will Thomas Exchange, Inc. Fayetteville, TN 931-433-9737

Board Member Bill Derby Johnson City News & Neighbor Johnson City, TN 423-979-1300

Past President Greg Ledford Shelby Shopper & Info Shelby, NC 704-484-1047

Past President Gary Benton Peddler ADvantage Paris, TN 731-644-9595

Executive Director Douglas Fry SAPA Headquarters Columbia, TN 931-490-0400

Administrative Assistant Vickie Belden SAPA Headquarters Columbia, TN 931-490-0400

The Power of “Tomorrow I’ll” By John Foust, Raleigh, NC Recently I was browsing through a used bookstore and ran across a gem of a children’s book entitled “Me and My Flying Machine” by Marianna and Mercer Mayer.

airplane races. Sadly, when he – along with his dog – pulled the flying machine out of the barn the next day, it fell apart.

The last two pages feature an It’s the story of a little boy who illustration of the little boy walking discovered some boxes, pieces of away from the broken pile of wood wood, nails and a hammer in an and mismatched wheels, along with old barn – and decided to build an the caption, “Tomorrow I’ll build a airplane. He worked all day on the rowboat.” airplane, then dreamed that night Those are powerful words: “Tomorrow about all the adventures he could I’ll build a rowboat.” What the little have. He could deliver mail, take boy is saying – and what young hikers to mountain tops, perform readers of the book are sure to grasp – dangerous aerobatic stunts, and win continued on page 4

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is that there is no need to dwell on the mistakes of the past. Tomorrow is right around the corner. And tomorrow will bring new opportunities.

by a dozen publishers, 27 different publishers rejected Dr. Seuss’s first book, and Margaret Mitchell’s “Gone with the Wind” was rejected 38 times “Tomorrow I’ll” holds an important before being published. lesson of optimism. Especially in When the Beatles were starting out, these challenging economic times, a record executive said, “We don’t sales people need to forget yesterday’s like their sound, and guitar music is disappointments and move on to on the way out.” Oprah Winfrey was something with more promise. fired from her first television job, Here are three simple points to keep because she was “unfit for TV.”

well, don’t you think? 3. Take action. Don’t let “tomorrow I’ll” become a delay tactic. Make it a specific commitment. The hero of our story started planning his rowboat as soon as the ill-fated flying machine fell apart. It is significant that he said “tomorrow I’ll” instead of “someday I’ll.”

Bronco busters sometimes call it “getting back on the horse.” They in mind: Don’t let rejection get you down. It don’t give failure a chance to get a foothold. 1. Take heart from others. If your happens to the best of them. last sales presentation got a chilly 2. Keep learning. Today’s failure can Yes, there’s real power in “tomorrow reception, you’re in good company. take you one step closer to tomorrow’s I’ll.” Because tomorrow is where the Thomas Edison made over a thousand success – as long as you learn from future is. unsuccessful attempts at inventing the it. Benjamin Franklin set aside some (c) Copyright 2011 by John Foust. All light bulb. In fact, he later said that he time each day to analyze his activities rights reserved. E-mail John Foust for had failed his way to success. and interactions – all for the purpose information about his training videos for You may have heard that J.K. Rowling’s of doing better the next time. His self- ad departments: jfoust@mindspring.com first Harry Potter book was rejected improvement strategy worked pretty

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GRAPHICS CAN HELP CALL ATTENTION TO INFORMATION IN OUR ADS, OR EVEN TO THE AD ITSELF. BACK IN THE DAY WE CALLED IT …

A commonly used vector program is Adobe Illustrator.

Clip Art

We really had to “clip” or cut out the art from a huge art book that contained various sizes of line art and photos—mostly line art in black and white, because who was using color? These books had to be 24x36 inches… I did say huge, right? So not so easy to move around, but we could cut the size that was closest to our need and “paste” it into the design before we sent it to the typesetter. Some of you have no idea of what I am talking about, but trust me, you haven’t missed much… it’s better now!

I love vector art

The use of a photograph has its limitations—mostly a matter of size. In the small ads I did, using the photo as an attention-getter was not an option due to lack of appropriate spacing. So an illustration became more adaptable to my uses. When I look for an illustration, it has to 1) appeal to me; 2) be able to be “deconstructed;” and 3) be generic enough to be used in or as a frame for a variety of ads, from helpwanted to home fix-up. Flowers or floral designs fall into that category for me.

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Another deconstruction The floral design above and to the left offers versatility. We were putting together one of our spring home sections and had an odd 1x5 space to fill. The above artwork would work nicely. As it turned out, this was an ideal place to take apart this artwork, reverse it and add info regarding our upcoming fair section. Black and white can be striking if used properly. Newsprint is a hard paper to work with because of “dot gain” (ink has a tendency to spread on this paper), so keep gradients to a minimum—actually you are better off if you avoid them for the most part. Since there wasn’t a lot of copy, it was easy to reverse because I could use text at a large point size and still have it readable. I used only part of the flower, otherwise the floral element would have been too small and less of an attention-getter. I also eliminated some of the vertical stripes in the background. In a one-column ad the use of a lot of contrasting vertical stripes can appear to “segment” or “chop up” the ad. We have used this ‘template’ for other small one-column promos.

The original artwork appears in the top left side of this column. As you can see, I did a lot more “tweaking” with this art and you can see the result above right with final use in the ad above (shown at 83%). The original art would not work effectively in this ad although the art itself was totally suitable for this springtime ad. By simply removing the background, flipping the art and repositioning the pieces made for an eye-catching frame for the ad. I also made the artwork more transparent to soften it and let the words remain dominant.

And even more

The beauty of vector art is that it can be used in a number of places— backgrounds, help-wanted, birthdays, retail stores, etc., and you have so many parts to choose from. Vector artwork can be used in any drawing or illustration program to create the parts that will best fit in your ads and sizing is not an issue because vector art does not degrade —that’s a whole ‘nother topic on file formats! These files were from iStockphoto, but can be found in Metro Newspaper Service, PhotoSpin— or any art service that handles vector artwork, or create your own! Once I have created the “parts” from the original, I use them quite a bit. They fit in small spaces and work nicely at large sizes too. The ability to fill a variety of needs fits well into my arsenal of tools.

Happy St. Patrick’s Day and may Spring start soon! I welcome your input and suggestions. I entered the publishing business after nine years as a high school art teacher and taught software programs at the technical school level. I also write another graphics column for The Independent Publisher. Reach me at: hanrahan.ln@att.net Ellen Hanrahan ©2011

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The Art of Putting Things Off by Landy Chase All of us are taught from an early age that procrastination is a bad habit, that postponing tasks until the last minute is a work-management style that is best avoided. I strongly disagree with this assumption. Actually, my experience has been that procrastination, if used properly, is a superb productivity skill. Allow me to explain. If you are like most people, there is simply not enough time in the typical week to complete everything that resides on one’s to-do list. Given that we have more things to do than we have time to complete them, the ability to properly prioritize work becomes the key element in being productive. Let’s face it: every request that is made of our time is, to the person requesting it, a red-hot emergency. Whether it actually is or not is subject to interpretation. We ourselves must make that decision; we must separate that which is important from that which is not, and do the important things first.

be done now, what can be done later, and allocate your time usage accordingly.

Unfortunately, this may mean that some things don’t get done on time. How does one go about determining what must be done now, and what can wait? A priority is defined as a task that has significant negative consequences if it is not completed on time. When looking over your task list, you can immediately see that some of the items will have more severe consequences for non-completion than others do. If a task on your to-do list has little to no consequences for lack of completion – in other words, if there is no significant downside to putting it off – it does not meet the definition of a priority, and should therefore be procrastinated upon in favor of completing another item for which there are greater negative consequences.

Using this logic, task management becomes an exercise in ranking priorities. In practice, your to-do list should be always sorted from top to bottom in order of the consequences associated with failure to complete each task. Have a report due to a key client on Friday? This task would be found near the top of the to-do list, because failure to complete the report on time would result in significant negative consequences: an unhappy client, and potentially a lost account. Have an appointment to look at a new copier on Friday, while the existing one is in good working order? This would be found at the bottom of the list, as the negative consequences for failure to have that meeting would be minimal – you can look at the new copier at a later time without a problem. In that case, it would be prudent to delay (read: procrastinate) the copier appointment so that the scheduled report gets to the client in a timely fashion. Get the idea?

No matter how efficient you are at task This means, of course, that you must management, you will continue to inlearn to use the skill of procrastination evitably find that there will be some wisely. You must know what needs to continued on page 7

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The Art of Putting Things Off tasks remaining on your to-do list that were not completed at the end of the week. The only issue of relevance here is whether or not those uncompleted tasks are “felonies” or “misdemeanors.” If you have some unfinished business on Friday afternoon which all fall under the description of “misdemeanors,” congratulate yourself for having managed your time efficiently. Take a slap on the wrist if need be. You can always get to those items when time allows. The only thing that matters is that you arrive at the weekend felonyfree. In closing, it is worth noting here that there is one set of tasks on your to-do list that must always be assigned immediate priority whenever they appear, because they have the most impact on your career advancement. I am referring, of course, to things that your boss asks you to do. Next to loyalty, dependability is the most valued trait of a subordinate. This means that when your boss asks you to do some-

thing, it always gets done, on time, without any further follow-up. Every single time. If you desire to advance your career, I cannot stress enough the importance of developing a reputation for dependability with your immediate supervisor. Don’t make the mistake that so many sales people make when it comes to promotions – the assumption that having good sales numbers entitles one to a job promotion. That, unfortunately, is not how the real world works. Instead, having good sales numbers entitles you to consideration for promotion – and then the issue of dependability will usually make or break your promotion opportunity. Is that playing politics? Absolutely. So what? We don’t dictate the way that the game is played. Play the game properly and your career will benefit as a result.

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fessional selling and sales management skills. For more information, visit his website at www. landychase.com or call (877)550-2655.

Southeastern Publishers

Advertising Association

Coming Soon!

Based in Charlotte, North Carolina, Landy Chase, MBA, CSP is an expert who specializes in speaking to corporations and associations on advanced pro-

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Conference Schedules S A PA A n n u a l C o n f e r e n c e : Birmingham, AL July 15 & 16, 2011: SAPA always has the best conferences in the industry. Next year’s conference at the Wynfrey Hotel in Birmingham, Alabama will be no exception. Great speakers, enjoyable time to mingle with your publishing friends, and opportunities

AFCP/CPF Annual Conference: St. Petersburg Beach, FL May 5-7, 2011. AFCP and the Community to network make this conference Papers of Florida team up to present another “must-attend” event. The another HUGE joint conference Wynfrey Hotel adjoins a huge May 5-7, 2011 at the beautiful shopping experience so you might Tradewinds Resort on St. Pete want to plan an extra day or two. Beach. If you can’t make the SAPA Now, more than ever, you’ll benefit Conference in Birmingham on July from attending this upcoming 15 & 16, 2011 this would be a close conference. Call Douglas Fry at second. 1-800-334-0649 for more info.

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USPS Update by Donna Hanbery WHAT IS A FREE COMMUNITY PAPER? When Pennysaver.usa.com publisher, Pete Gorman, met Paul Vogel, the USPS president and chief marketing/sales officer, the first question of the meeting was “What is a Pennysaver?” The free paper industry could not have a better spokesperson than Pete Gorman to tell the Pennysaver story. Paul Vogel is the USPS official charged with helping the Postal Service grow its languishing business. Vogel has expressed a commitment and interest to nurture saturation mail as a high margin, profitable, Postal Service product. In the past two months, the Postal Service has shown a sincere effort to grow its saturation program mail business by maintaining stable rates up to the 3.3 oz. break point and by expanding the rules on simplified addressing to include city routes. Pete thanked Paul Vogel, and his team, for listening to what our industry has been saying. He explained that the Harte-Hanks shopper division had over 10M in circulation in Florida and California and had branded the name Pennysaver in California. He stated that many other independently owned and operated free papers, also using the name Pennysaver, have been published since the 1930s ranging from small to large circulations throughout the United States. Pete lost no time explaining how HarteHanks Pennysaver promoted print and the mail to the small business advertiser as the best way to market and grow their business. Pete said, “We’re hyper local. We are the sales force for Main Street.

We combine the mailed Pennysaver with the internet. Sixty percent of our advertisers are using us to create a web presence for them. It works very well.” Donna Hanbery, Executive Director of SMC, accompanied Pete at the meeting. Paul Vogel’s team included Tom Foti, David Mastervich, and Jo Ann Miller. Foti and Mastervich have been active over the past two years overseeing the 2009, and current 2011, saturation volume incentive programs. They have been engaged in listening to, and learning from, free papers and SMC members about the program mail business and marketplace. Donna gave a little background about the free paper industry and shared information developed by the Free Paper Associations and PaperChain about the power of papers to small business. She said: “In the 70s, the Postal Service was the main source of distribution for free papers. When postal rates escalated, you lost market share. The steps you have taken to hold down rates and simplify addressing could renew interest with papers returning to the Postal Service for distribution.” Pete praised the Postal Service for the positive steps it had taken to grow saturation mail business. “First and foremost, I want to applaud what you are doing.” He explained that weekly programs, like free papers had a very close, connected relationship with the Postal Service to enter and deliver mail. But, he stressed, it was essential to work together and maintain good communications. “Our businesses all need certainty. Lack of predictability, or inconsistency, is a killer.”

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SMC and Harte-Hanks Pennysaver have been proponents of a simplified-butcertified idea that would allow program mailers to do simplified addressing on city routes. Now that the Postal Service has expanded the concept to all saturation flat mail, some of our members have operational concerns. Pete volunteered to have his staff, with decades of experience in managing multi-state mail programs, develop best practices with the Postal Service for handling do-not-deliver requests. Harte-Hanks had previously assisted the Postal Service in testing DAL automation and has always been willing to work with the USPS to develop operation practices that produce the lowest combined costs and meet advertiser and consumer needs. On the rate side, Pete explained that free papers that mail were saddled with very high fixed costs and prices. He commented: “In the 70s we used to say that the Pennysaver relied upon three Ps – people, paper and postage. Postage used to be our third highest expense. Now it’s No. 1.” The Pennysaver, like many other SMC members, was forced to trim circulation in marginal areas during down economic times. Now advertisers are urging mailers to expand their circulation footprint, but adding new markets and geography is a major commitment. Vogel asked if the Pennysaver was able to take advantage of any of the recent Postal Service incentives. Pete commented that the incentives were a step in the right direction, but the incentives were too short-term. For a mailer to open a new market, it is a multi year commitment. It may take years before a mailer sees a return on its investment. When there is uncertainty about rates, like last year’s threat of a 5% exigency increase, this

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USPS Update can be a “deal breaker” to opening new territory. Vogel asked for ideas that would be welcome to Harte-Hanks, as well as other SMC members, to grow saturation mail. Donna and Pete threw out a number of ideas and suggestions, including the following: The Postal Service should reward frequency, or loyalty, like every other business. Advertisers get a rate break when they commit to advertising every week. The Postal Service should consider a lower rate for program mailers with a stated frequency in a market. This is simply a recognition that a partner who makes a commitment to be with you week in and week out, month in and month out, and not just during the holidays or before other prime times, is a different and more valued customer. The Postal Service has excess capacity. There may be parts of the country that have no shared mail programs, or no free papers, that are in the mail. If the Postal Service has a market with excess capacity, the Postal Service could offer a lower, “open-the-market” rate to any program mailer that was willing to come in and contract for doing a mail program for a fixed period of time, such as one or more years. The Postal Service has recently filed an NSA with Discover Financial. The NSA will give Discover a hedge against future postal rate increases in return for Discover’s commitment to maintaining, and increasing, its postal rate spending. If the Postal Service could give its loyal customers, or new market customers, a hedge against rate increases, this would stimulate an interest in opening new markets,

commitment to retain volume and revenue with the Postal Service.

continued from page 9 expanding frequency and circulation.

The meeting ended with a promise for the Postal Service and the Pennysaver to work together to explore best processes for the new rule changes on citysimplified. There was also an invitation and encouragement for program mailers to pursue more specific suggestions, and revenue growth proposals, with the Postal Service in the future.

Pete challenged the Postal Service to consider investing part of its ad budget in free papers, a wonderful advertising vehicle to target and capture thousands of small businesses. Pete praised the Postal Service’s flat rate box television campaign. This same campaign in RATE ADJUSTMENTS APPROVED print could reach lots of potential small On February 16, 2011, the Postal business users by doing an insert in the Regulatory Commission (PRC) issued Pennysaver. a Decision and Order approving the request of the United States Postal A lower pound rate, or combined rate Service (USPS) for a rate adjustment for heavier pieces, would help. Mailed under the price cap authority. Although free papers, and other SMC members, the PRC opinion expressed concern that would like to attract more advertisers some individual postal products were not and heavier inserts into their programs. sufficiently covering their costs, such as The current pound rate, and the lower standard mail flats, certain catalogs, and prices offered by newspapers and private periodicals, the Commission found the carrier papers and products, make it overall adjustment was in compliance hard to bring some advertisers into the with the Postal Reform law. The PRC mail. Any incentives and programs stated “The Commission recognizes the Postal Service could develop to that the Postal Service is granted broad give program mailers an opportunity discretion under the PAEA to set its to expand their programs’ weight, or rates.” contiguous geography, would benefit both the Postal Service and program For saturation mailers of letters and mailers. flats, the rates program mailers will Paul Vogel and his team talked about their openness to building business with new products and contract rates. They acknowledged, however, that a contract that benefited one mailer might be challenged by another mailer as unfair or discriminatory. It appears, however, that the Postal Service has been considering the benefits of a loyalty program or some steps to recognize that more frequent, and committed program mailers, may be a customer or product group that deserves consideration in the form of better rates, or more certainty about future rates, in return for the

Southeastern Advertising Publishers Association (931) 490-0400

see for the next 12 months will not significantly change. The Postal Service recommended, and the PRC approved, no change in the rates for saturation letters or flats that are brought to a USPS drop ship location. For pieces that are entered at network mail centers (NMC), or exceed 3.3 ounces, there is a slight increase in rates for pieces that exceed 3.3 ounces or that are brought to a NMC. After the decision, the USPS announced that the new rates will take effect on April 17, 2011.

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Report by Brian Gay

THE RESPONSE IS FANTASTIC The total number of ads submitted for the design an ad contest to promote PaperChain was 195. The PaperChain committee was moved by such a positive response. The top five will be announced at the AFCP conference in May at St Pete’s Beach. Best of luck to all of those that entered. At first we thought that it would be helpful for PaperChain to make enough CD’s of all the entries so each PaperChain Member could have one. However, after more discussion PaperChain is going to be sending an ad each week to the individual publications by email in hopes that the PaperChain members will run them in their publications. Without the on-going support of the members there is no way that ad agencies will hear about the free paper industry. I am a firm believer in the free paper industry and feel one of the best ways to promote our selves is through our PaperChain member papers. If we do no step up and do the promotion no one will. It is up to us to “toot” our horn every now and then.

booth we will have a computer presentation of all the ads that were submitted.

MAKE A WISH After several years working with the March of Dimes PaperChain made a change. This year Paper Chain will be working with Make A Wish to see just how we can impact the donations and bring awareness to their cause. Carlos Guzman is in charge of the committee that is working with Make A Wish. There will be ads that you can run in your paper(s) in the next few weeks. These ads can be run in any edition during the year. As a group, we did so well with the Mach of Dimes and now it is time to help another charitable organization.

IT IS YOUR MONEY Should you be attending the AFCP conference May 5th through the 7th, do yourself and your publication a favor and stop by the SRDS booth to check your PaperChain sponsored listing. This is the only way a media buyer can get in touch with you. If your listing is wrong then the media buyer will have to send the ad to your competition. After all, it is your money!

If you are able to attend the AFCP conference, please stop by the PaperChain

GET YOUR CUSTOMER’S ATTENTION! Bring your message to life by advertising in over 4 million homes each week. Call us today to speak to one of our advertising professionals about making a splash!

Your Logo and Contact Information Go Here

I used to say, “I hope things will change.” Then I learned that the only way things are going to change is when I change.

Jim Rohn

Don’t be reluctant to give of yourself generously, it’s the mark of caring and compassion and personal greatness.

Brian Tracy

There’s not a lot you can do about the national economy but there is a lot you can do about your personal economy.

Zig Ziglar

It's time for a new business venture…

Needing new Revenue for 2011?

JB Multimedia, Inc. P.O. Box 704 N. Bellmore, NY 11710 888.592.3212 phone/fax www.jbmultimedia.net

theBOOKcreators.biz CONNIE GIBBS Connie@theBOOKcreators.biz 563-451-7854 JOEL KLAASSEN Joel@theBOOKcreators.biz 620-947-1923

Southeastern Advertising Publishers Association (931) 490-0400

M a k i n g p u b l i c a t i o n s i n t e r a c t i v e.

Justin Gerena, President, Director of Sales p: 888.592.3212 x710 e: justin@jbmultimedia.net

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g n i h s i l b r Pu o F c i n c i P A s Is r e b m e M Our n I s U n L i A o , J m a h g n i 1 m 1 r 0 i 2 B , 6 1 & 5 1 y h y l W Ju t u O d n i F d An Southeastern Publishers

Southeastern Advertising Publishers Association (931) 490-0400

Advertising Association

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2011 March  

SAPAToday our association newsletter

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