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G RE A R an PO L A ct RT DE T io n ED ON O V rd 0 er N EL DE No O .J BA A PM SI -1 T 20 G M 12 A E /2 IZ BO N N & 76 (4 AW O T P )/2 01 RO L 212 JE /D S

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SANCTION ORDER NO. J-12012/276(4)/20112-12/DSN(NER) Dtd - 01.10.2012

PERIOD OF WORKSHOP FEBRUARY 2013 TO JULY 2013

CONTENTS

VENUE MUALLANGTHU

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NCDPD / IDP 12 - 13 / AIZAWL / BAMBOO


ncdpd / report on integrated design & technical development project / bamboo / aizawl

CONTENTS

- Acknowledgment.............................................................................04 - Preface............................................................................................05 - Background................................................................................06-09 - Aims & Objective of the activity...................................................10-11 - Need & Concept..............................................................................12 - Implementing Agency.................................................................13-15 - Approach & Methodology................................................................17 - About Indian Handicrafts............................................................18-25 - Overview of Indian Handicrafts..................................................26-27 - Exports of Indian Handicrafts.....................................................28-30 - Workshop Report............................................................................31 - Survey Report............................................................................32-69 > Aizawl - An Overview > About Aizawl - History - Demographics - Economy > About Crafts > Bamboo - Origin, Species & Use > Production > Tools & Implement > Market Potential / Trade - Designers Profile........................................................................70-71 - Participant’s List.........................................................................73-77 - Trend & Forecast 13-14...........................................................78-101 - Designs Provided..................................................................1103-114 - Prototypes Developed............................................................115-123 - List of Prototypes Developed & Photo Offer..........................124-128 - Prototypes Submitted to DC(H).............................................129-135 - Visuals of Workshop..............................................................136-147 - Performance cum Achievement Report.................................148-149

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

The successful completion of this product development programme would be incomplete without the mention of the people who made it possible. Many individuals exerted their direct and indirect influence upon the completion of the project.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

With a deep sense of gratitude and indebtedness, We sincerely thank Development Commissioner (Handicrafts) for giving us this opportunity to work for the “ Integrated Design & Technical Development Project at AIZAWL ''. We sincerely thank

Miss. Yumnam Jagyash (Handicrafts Promotion

Officer), M&SEC, O/o CD(H), Aizawl for giving us her valuable time and advice throughout the execution of this project. This program wouldn't be successful without the help of K. Zodinmawia, Mizo Heritage for providing us a beautiful venue and supporting us in the execution of project. We would also like to thank all the craft persons who took participation in this project for their constant co-operation, understanding and also being so flexible.

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ncdpd / report on integrated design & technical development project / bamboo / aizawl

PREFACE

India is one of the important suppliers of handicrafts to the world market. The Indian handicrafts industry is highly labor intensive cottage based industry and decentralized, being spread all over the country in rural and urban areas. Numerous artisans are engaged in crafts work on part-time basis. The industry provides employment to over six million artisans (including those in carpet trade), which include a large number of women and people belonging to the weaker sections of the society. With an idea of getting a complete insight into one such sphere, I have been fortunate to interact with the bamboo crafts in detail. This made us sensitive towards the efforts that must have been put into sustaining the exquisite craft. This document, therefore is our endeavor to make all aware of the existing state of this craft, and to whatever extent it succeeds in doing so, We would consider it a pleasant accomplishment. Development of new designs is a necessary factor for the survival of trend-based industries in today's global markets. Designs in many cases, acts as the distinguishing factor to position products at the right place in the international market As we continue to create new products and new needs for the people, we also need to further explore the blending of technology, art and craft.

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BACKGROUND

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ncdpd / report on integrated design & technical development project / bamboo / aizawl

BACKGROUND The Indian Handicrafts through the ages fascinated the world by its creativity, aesthetics and exquisite craftsmanship. As a highly decentralized activity, handicrafts of India present rich cultural heritage and shining example of using local resources, skills and initiatives. India's handicrafts are almost inexhaustible with infinite varieties which have been refined during course of changing history. The cross currents inspire the creative impulse of our craftsmen. Further crafts are results of years of unconscious experiment and evolution; skills inherited and passed over generations from forefathers to sons and grandsons. India has a long tradition of craftsmanship and it manifests in our culture, tradition & lifestyle. Handicrafts sector has played a significant and important role in our country's economy not only in providing employment to vast segment of crafts persons in rural & semi urban areas but also in terms of generating substantial foreign exchange for the country besides preserving our cultural heritage. Today the rural and urban crafts continue to make a hefty contribution to the economy of the country as they did in the past. In many cases this has been in hidden contribution since these did not necessarily get reflected in the visible part of our economy. For Centuries the rural Artisans have been fulfilling the needs of local farmers and other rural inhabitants in the form of locally made products and services. With the advent of machine produced goods, many of our traditional artisans have had to face intense competition from growing industrial sector. However, the inventiveness of the Indian craftsman and the various efforts for the development that has been invested over the years in human resource development and in product innovation and promotion has strengthened their ability to face this completion with a great degree of success. The handicrafts traditions that have been continued undisturbed over the centuries have to face the realities of rapid change brought about by the inexorable forces of communication and globalization.

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BACKGROUND

The significance of export sector in the growth of the economy needs hardly any emphasis. Although exports registered an impressive growth rate during the post reform period in India, our share in the world exports is still less than 2%. There is, therefore, an urgent need to raise the share of India's exports to at least 2% of world imports in the next 5 years thereby ensuring that the contribution of exports sector to the growth of the economy is further enhanced. The Indian Handicrafts sector is not only playing significant role in the country's economy but also providing employment to vast segment of people in rural and semi urban areas. Besides preserving cultural heritage it is also generating valuable foreign exchange as the manufacturing is mainly with the indigenous raw material. The Handicrafts of India through the ages fascinated the world by its creativity, aesthetics and exquisite craftsmanship. India's handicrafts are almost inexhaustible with infinite variety which has been refined during course of changing history. The cross currents inspire the creative impulse of our craftsmen. The Indian Handicrafts sector was given considerable importance in the developmental plans since early 1950.The motivating force was the resurgence of interest in the country's cultural heritage and its traditions after independence. Further, more policy makers felt it was necessary to support the handicraft sector as a means of strengthening the economy that too in the semi urban and the rural areas.

The handicrafts sector has over the years contributed significantly to the employment and foreign exchequer of the country. However, despite the large production base the market at international level is still unexplored.

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ncdpd / report on integrated design & technical development project / bamboo / aizawl

The biggest constraint which the sector facing is Design & Product Development, appropriate technology for quality and mass production, marketing of their products, especially in this era of globalization of information technology which has major influence. Few of the major constraints/impediments being faced by the Indian handicraft sector are placed below:

Ÿ Product diversification as per consumer market. Ÿ Innovative Product lines. Ÿ National / International Marketing. Ÿ Product development & Mass production. Ÿ Quality & technological up-gradation. Ÿ Merchandising Services. Ÿ Mechanization in Manufacturing Process. Ÿ Sustained Marketing Tie ups. Ÿ Development of Infrastructure Facilities at the Craft Clusters viz. CFCs,

Design Center, Resource Centre, Permanent Marketing Outlets etc. Ÿ Focused Capacity / Skill Development. Ÿ Constant flow of new designs as per Market Trends / Buyers requirement.

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AIMS & OBJECTIVES

AIMS & OBJECTIVES It is said that 80% of all life cycle costs of the product are fixed at the product planning and the design stages. Design is thus an important element of product development. On the other hand, the design greatly depends on the designer's abilities, and so-called standardization is insufficient, It is therefore necessary to clarify what the requirements are at the design stage in order to development a product strategically and efficiently. The methodology for strategic product development is a systematic activity from planning to conceptualization stages of product development that analyzes the nature of the project, identifies effective design tools and activities and guides the deployment of these tools in the subsequent development stages. The Proposal comprised to train the artisans / craftsperson / Entrepreneurs of New design for the exports and the latest technologies used in the product development for the exports. The basic objectives of the proposal for implementation of this Proposal for Design and Technology Development under the Design and Technology Up-gradation scheme is to provide integrated Design & Technology development for the product development for exports. The basic objectives are briefly narrated as follows: 타 To launch integrated design & technology up gradation programme

for the handicrafts and to provide export opportunities on long term basis to the potential craftsperson/Artisans/ Entrepreneurs. 타 Creation of international network of design and product development

expertise. 타 Broadening base of the export baskets of by New design viz-a-vis

increasing employment opportunities thereby improving livelihood.

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ncdpd / report on integrated design & technical development project / bamboo / aizawl

Ÿ To Conserve and encourage the use of natural, sustainable material in

creation of arts and crafts. Ÿ To develop capacity of the self-help groups / artisans / Craftsperson

/Entrepreneurs in Design Development, Product Development and awareness and use of the latest technologies for the product development for the exports. Ÿ Adoption of new product designs in line with more marketable styles

and colors while drawing on women's existing skills and knowledge of traditional styles. Ÿ To strengthen national links with nongovernment organizations (NGOs) and market networks, including market links with Cooperatives as an alternative sales outlet. Ÿ To identify regional/provincial craft styles for documentation and study

visits.

A team of designer and technical experts shall visit the cluster of the train potential workshop participants. Artisans will be asked to prepare products for sale and display for export and, where receptive, to also prepare products in new designs, shapes, and colors. In addition, consulted with designers and fashion experts will impart knowledge on how to remodel traditional cross-stitch designs and colors to modern day market requirement.

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NEED & CONCEPT

“Innovation” and “creativity” in improving product “usability” have become the buzzwords in the global handicraft markets. Those who could assess the taste and requirement of clients and develop products accordingly have achieved successes. Markets consider for unique selling point” in terms of quality, attractiveness, and originality.

NEED & CONCEPT

Capacity Building for up gradation of Quality In Terms of Design & Technology/ Product Development The Project Participants will have one to one meeting with the Designer, Consultant and Merchandiser following:Ÿ New Design Development. Ÿ Design Innovation and Product Diversification. Ÿ Design Trend. Ÿ Fashion / Color Forecast in Product Development. Ÿ Visual Merchandising.

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IMPLEMENTING AGENCY National centre for Design and Product Development will be the implementing agency for the project. The NCDPD's Project Implementation unit has wide experience and expertise for the implementation and execution of similar type of Design & Technical Development Project in other states of the Country.

BASIC OBJECTIVES OF NCDPD NCDPD was set up with the commitment to help Indian exporters & artisans to develop their core competencies in the areas of: Ÿ Design & Product development. Ÿ Promotion and Capacity Development. Following are the basic objectives of NCDPD: Ÿ To build and create design oriented excellence in the handicraft sector domestic and international markets and its global competitiveness: Ÿ To Cater the needs of changing taste & Design concepts of international buyers Ÿ To provide regular design inputs to handicrafts exporting community Ÿ

Ÿ

Ÿ Ÿ Ÿ Ÿ Ÿ

Ÿ

about trends & forecast periodically. Conceptualization, planning, execution & management of Trade Fairs & Conferences. Project management of individual, horizontal and vertical Trade Fair & Exhibition. Management of Projects on turnkey basis. To handle site operations for conduct of the Event. Setting up of Theme Pavilions during the exhibition. Organization and mobilization of participation from India & overseas. To update the sector about the changing global scenario with reference to technical advancement. To support product development and upgrade quality.

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MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF NCDPD Ÿ Market Driven Design Services with the help of International/national Ÿ Ÿ

IMPLEMENTING AGENCY

Ÿ Ÿ Ÿ Ÿ Ÿ

designers. Technology support for quality / mass production. Pool of Branded National / International Designers. Quality control and merchandising services. Sustainable Supply Chain Management System. Design Training to the Artisans / Manufacturers / Exporters. Skill Development Programmes. Implementation of schemes and projects of Development Commissioner (Handicrafts) for setting up of Design centres, Design Workshops, Awareness Programmes / Seminars etc.

SERVICES OFFERED BY NCDPD Ÿ Design & Product Development Services. Ÿ Exhibition Design, Showroom/ Store Development & Visual Ÿ Ÿ Ÿ Ÿ

Ÿ Ÿ Ÿ Ÿ Ÿ

Merchandising. Graphic Design. Product & Technology Development / Manufacturing Excellence. Design , Market and Technical Trends. Design Training , Mentoring , Apprenticeship and Career Opportunities. End to End Design Services to Industrial Groups. Package Design. Vendor Compliance. Image Building and Branding. Other Specialized Design services viz. Setting up of Design Studio's, SIDCS, Design Promotion, Design Research, Industry Linkage, Tie-ups, Net working, Design Library, Design Workshops and Resource Centre

etc.

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ncdpd / report on integrated design & technical development project / bamboo / aizawl

ROLE PLAY BY NCDPD FOR DEVELOPMENT OF INDIAN HANDICRAFTS SECTOR

STRONG PLATFORM FOR Ÿ Development & supply of market driven New / Innovative Design / Ÿ

Ÿ Ÿ

Ÿ

Ÿ Ÿ

Product lines. Transforming designs into products with the help designers / merchandisers Quality and Technological up-gradation. Technical assistance for mechanization in basic operations for mass Production. Infrastructure support by setting up of Design Centres / Design Banks at production centres / clusters. Creation of sustainable supply chain management. Social / Environmental compliance & other customized support services.

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APPROACH & METHODOLOGY

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ncdpd / report on integrated design & technical development project / bamboo / aizawl

APPROACH & METHODOLOGY The Project covers the following activities:-

Ÿ Study of clusters to understand the skill present, product ranges, raw Ÿ Ÿ

Ÿ Ÿ Ÿ

material & tools used etc. Study of market to assess the product demand. Development of new prototypes/diversified product range to suit International/domestic market requirements. Test market for new products. Standardization of product based on the feedback & test marketing Documentation.

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ABOUT INDIAN HANDICRAFTS

INDIAN About

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Handicrafts

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ncdpd / report on integrated design & technical development project / bamboo / aizawl

ABOUT INDIAN HANDICRAFTS India is one of the important suppliers of handicrafts to the world market. The Indian handicrafts industry is highly labour intensive cottage based industry and decentralized, being spread all over the country in rural and urban areas. Numerous artisans are engaged in crafts work on part-time basis. The industry provides employment to over six million artisans (including those in carpet trade), which include a large number of women and people belonging to the weaker sections of the society. In addition to the high potential for employment, the sector is economically important from the point of low capital investment, high ratio of value addition, and high potential for export and foreign exchange earnings for the country. The export earnings from Indian handicrafts industry for the period 1998-99 amounted to US$ 1.2 billion. Although exports of handicrafts appear to be sizeable, India's share in world imports is miniscule. It is a sector that is still not completely explored from the point of view of hidden potential areas. India, a country with 26 states and 18 languages and more than 1500 dialects offers an enormous range of handicrafts from each of the states.

Major centres in Uttar Pradesh are

Moradabad also known as the "Peetalnagari" (City of Brass), Saharanpur for its wooden articles, Ferozabad for Glass. The North Western state of Rajasthan has to offer the famous Jaipuri quilts, Bagru and Sanganer printed textiles and wooden and wrought iron furniture from Jodhpur.

The coastal state of

Gujarat comes with embroidered articles from Kutch. Narsapur in Andhra Pradesh is famous for its Lace and Lace goods. But this is only a small part of the total product range. India offers much more.

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ABOUT INDIAN HANDICRAFTS

Handicrafts are classified into two categories: 1. 2.

Articles of everyday use Decorative items

The craftsmen use different media to express their originality. The diversity of the handicrafts is expressed on textiles, metals – precious and semi-precious, wood, precious and semi-precious stones, ceramic and glass. Textile based handicrafts: Hand printed textiles including block and screen printing, batik, kalamkari (hand printing by pen) and bandhani (tie and die) are used in products ranging from bed-covers to sheets, dress material to upholstery and tapestry. The famous embroidered articles of silk and cotton, often embellished with mirrors, shells, beads, and metallic pieces are also found in India. Embroidery is done too on leather, felt and velvet etc. This segment of the industry accounts for almost half a million strong employment in addition to a large number of designers, block makers, weavers and packers involved in the trade. Clay, Metal and Jewellery: Brass, copper, bronze, bell metal are used for a variety of wares and in a variety of finishes. Scintillating ornaments are available in a wide range of patterns, styles and compositions. Made from precious metals, base metals, precious and semi-precious stones; these ornaments have traditional as well as modern styles.

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ncdpd / report on integrated design & technical development project / bamboo / aizawl

Woodwork: Wooden articles in India range from the ornately carved to the absolutely simple. One can find toys, furniture, decorative articles, etc. bearing the art and individuality of the craftsman. India is known particularly for its lacquered wood articles. Stone Craft: The intricately carved stoneware made of marble, alabaster or soapstone, etc., inlaid with semiprecious stones carry on the heritage of Indian stone crafts. Glass and Ceramic: Glass and ceramic products are a fast upcoming segment in the handicrafts from India. The age-old production process of mouth-blowing the glass instills a nostalgic feeling. The varied shapes of ceramic and glass in a number of colours, would appeal to Western aesthetics while retaining the Indian touch.

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Craft concentration Areas:

ABOUT INDIAN HANDICRAFTS

A wide range of handicrafts are produced all over Indian artmetalware / EPNS ware, wood carvings and other wooden artwares, imitation jewellery, handprinted textiles, shawls as artwares, embroidered goods, lace and lace goods, toys, dolls, crafts made of leather, lacquerware, marble crafts etc. Although it is difficult to limit a specific place for the particular craft, the following places are listed for their particular crafts.

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Artmetalware

:

Moradabad, Sambhal, Aligarh, Jodhpur, Jaipur, Delhi, Rewari, Thanjavur, Madras, Mandap, Beedar, Kerala & Jagadhari, Jaselmer

Wooden Artwares

:

Saharanpur, Nagina, Hoshiarpor, Srinagar, Amritsar, Jaipur, Jodhpur, Jagdalpur, Bangalore, Mysore, Chennapatna, Madras, Kerala & Behrampur (WB)

Handprinted Textiles & Scarves

:

Amroha, Jodhpur, Jaipur, Farrukhabad, Sagru & Sanganer

Embroidered goods

:

Kutch (Gujarat), Jaisaimer, Baroda, Lucknow, Jodhpur, Agra, Amritsar, Kullu, Dharmshala / Chamba & Srinagar

Marble & Soft Stone Crafts

:

Agra, Madras, Baster, Jodhpur

Papier Mache Crafts Terracotta

:

Kashmir, Jaipur

:

Agra, Madras, Baster, Jodhpur

Zari & Zari Goods

:

Rajasthan, Madras, Baster

Imitation Jewellery:

:

Delhi, Moradabad, Sambhal, Jaipur, Kohima (Tribal)

Artistic Leather Goods

:

lndore, Kolhapur, Shanti Niketan (WB)

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ncdpd / report on integrated design & technical development project / bamboo / aizawl

Selected crafts pockets for achieving export goal: Although each crafts pockets has its particular problems, a few selected craft pockets are identified based on their past performance for immediate remedial attention to stimulate a quantum in exports of handicrafts in the coming years.

Moradabad(UP)

:

For Artmetalwares and imitation jewellery

Saharanpur (UP)

:

For

Wooden

handicrafts

&

Wrought

iron

Iron and Sea

Shell

handicrafts Jodhpur (Raj.)

:

For

Wooden,

Wrought

handicrafts Narsapur (A.P.)

:

For Lace and Lace goods

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ABOUT INDIAN HANDICRAFTS

Opportunities Ÿ Rising appreciation for handicrafts by consumers in the developed countries. Ÿ Widespread novelty seeking. Ÿ Large discretionary income at disposal of consumer from developed countries. Ÿ Growth in search made by retail chains in major importing countries for suitable products and reliable suppliers. Opportune for agencies to promote marketing activities. Ÿ Use of e-commerce in direct marketing.

Strengths Ÿ Abundant and cheap labour hence can compete on price Ÿ Low capital investment and high ratio of value addition Ÿ Aesthetic and functional qualities Ÿ Wrapped in mist of antiquity Ÿ Hand made and hence has few competitors Ÿ Variety of products which are unique Ÿ Exporters willing to handle small orders Ÿ Increasing emphasis on product development and design

upgradation

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NCDPD / IDP 12 - 13 / AIZAWL / BAMBOO


ncdpd / report on integrated design & technical development project / bamboo / aizawl

Threats Decline in India's share due to: Ÿ Better quality products produced by competitors from

Europe, South Africa, South Asia, etc. Ÿ Better terms of trade by competing countries. Ÿ Consistent quality and increasing focus on R&D by competing countries. Ÿ Better packaging. Ÿ Stricter international standards.

Weaknesses Ÿ Inconsistent quality. Ÿ Inadequate market study and marketing strategy. Ÿ Lack of adequate infrastructure and communication

facilities . Ÿ Capacity to handle limited orders. Ÿ Untimely delivery schedule. Ÿ Unawareness of international standards by many players in the market.

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OVERVIEW OF INDIAN HANDICRAFTS

OVERVIEW OF INDIAN HANDICRAFTS The Indian handicrafts sector is playing a significant role in the Country’s economy by providing employment to a vast segment of people in rural and semi-urban areas. Besides preserving the cultural heritage of India it is also one of the largest employment providing sector in the country as well as also generating valuable foreign exchange. The rural segment accounts for 78.2% units and 76.5% handicraft artisans/ manufacturers while the urban segment accounts for the rest. Broadly speaking, a total of 850 lines of products are now being produced and exported from India. Exports play an important role in the development of Indian crafts sector. The trend of exports and the details regarding the production have been provided in the table below.

In last two decades many SE Asian countries laid emphasis on technological up-gradation of the production techniques, production, quality, customer oriented design and product development, packaging, marketing channels and provided sustainable supply chain management and turned into sourcing hub for the developed countries. Countries like China, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Hong Kong, Vietnam, Cambodia etc. have major impact on their GDP and economical development due to the professional support provided by their respective Governments.

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ncdpd / report on integrated design & technical development project / bamboo / aizawl

The Small Scale and Cottage Sector helps to solve social and economic problems of the artisans, by providing employment to over 60 lakhs artisans which include a large number of women and people belonging to weaker sections of the society. In addition to the high potential for employment, the sector is economically important from the point of low capital investment, high ratio of value addition, and high potential for export and foreign exchange earnings for the country. The industry is highly labour intensive and decentralized, being spread all over the country in rural and urban areas. Many artisans are engaged in certain crafts work on part-time basis. India is one of the important suppliers of handicrafts to the world market. Although exports of Handicrafts appear to be sizable, India's share in world imports is very small. Despite the existence of production base and a large number of craftsmen. India has not been able to en-cash existing opportunities. In the changing world scenario, craft products exported to various countries form a part of life style products in international market. The impact is due to the changing consumer taste and trends. In view of this it is high time for India Handicraft Industry to go into the details of changing designs, patterns, product development, and requisite change in production facilities for a variety of materials, production techniques, and related expertise to achieve a leadership position in the fast growing competitiveness with other countries.

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EXPORT OF INDIAN HANDICRAFTS

EXPORT OF INDIAN HANDICRAFTS

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EXPORT OF INDIAN HANDICRAFTS

EXPORT OF INDIAN HANDICRAFTS

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ncdpd / report on integrated design & technical development project / bamboo / aizawl

WORKSHOP REPORT

Integrated Design and Technical Development Workshop in bamboo craft was organized at Muallungthu, Aizawl from February 2013 to July 2013. Designer Satyendra Kumar conducted the 6 months long workshop. 40 prototypes were developed at the workshop in 2 sets. While one set of prototypes was brought back to NCDPD, another set was deposited at the Development Commissioner (Handicrafts) Office at:The Assistant Director Maktg. & Service Extn. Centre Office of DC (Handicrafts) C/o Mizoram H,loom & H,crafts Dev. Corpn. Ltd., (ZOHANDCO), Chaltang, Aizwal-796012 (Mizoram) The workshop was conducted at the premises of Muallungthu Centenary, Aizawl and Artisans own working place where 50 artisans participated in the workshop. Designs were explained to the artisans by the designer and the required skills taught to them for making the prototypes. The artisans attended the workshop for all 105 days and worked day and night to complete the prototypes. All problems faced by the artisans were resolved by the designer. Inspection of the workshop was conducted by Ms.Yumnam Jagyashwori Devi, HPO, O/o DC(H), Aizawl. The workshop was concluded through a conclusion ceremony where cheques were distributed to all the artisans who participated in the workshop. The workshop was successful in developing new designs in the craft and also helping the artisans develop new design skills in their craft.

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SURVEY REPORT Ÿ Aizawl - An Overview Ÿ About Aizawl

- History - Demographics - Economy About Crafts Bamboo - Origin, Species & Use Production Tools & Implement Market Potential / Trade

AIZAWL - AN OVERVIEW

Ÿ Ÿ Ÿ Ÿ Ÿ

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ncdpd / report on integrated design & technical development project / bamboo / aizawl

SURVEY REPORT

AIZAWL - AN OVERVIEW

Aizawl, the scenic capital of Mizoram, with its surrounding area and the rest of the state have been developed to meet the influx of domestic and foreign tourists. The largest city in the states, but still very remote. Aizawl is located at 3715 feet from the sea level, and is a religious and cultural centers of the Mizos. Aizawl lies just north of Tropic of cancer. Population : 260, 000 Weather: Summer : Max : 30o C Min: 20oC Winter: Max : 21o C Min 11o C Rainfall: 3,000 m Altitude: 1132 metres/ 3715 Ft Best time to visit: October - March Wear: Cottons during summer and woolen during winter Health issues: Mineral water should be consumed and food should be eaten from licenses outlet Language (s) Official : English, Mizo BY AIR: Nearest airport is Aizawl. Aizawl is connected to Kolkata, ( 1 hr 45 min ) and Imphal ( 30 min ). Indian Airlines ( Alliance Air ) flights Kolkata - Aizawl Kolkata ( daily service ) and Kolkata - Aizawl - Imphal - Aizawl - Kolkata ( monday, wednesday, friday ), Guwahati - Aizawl (Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday). BY RAIL: Nearest railhead is Silchar which is in Assam ( 184 km away) From Guwahati, travel to Silchar by Barak Valley Express, Cachar Express or the Tripura Passenger. The journey takes about 19 hrs.

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BY ROAD: NH - 54 connects Aizawl with the rest of the country through Silchar. Buses and taxis are available from Silchar to Aizawl ( 6-8 hrs ). Night services are also available. Aizawl is also accessible by road from

AIZAWL - AN OVERVIEW

Shillong and Guwahati. Local Transport: Taxis are the chief mode of transport in the city and rates negotiable. Buses ply on route within the state.

Place to visit Bara Bazar: This is the main shopping center with stalls selling garments and other commodities. The main bazaar is where the people are best seen in their traditional costumes selling produce from farms and homesteads including river crabs with little wicker baskets. Luangmual Handicarfts Centre: 7 Kms away takes half an hour to reach by car. The 'Khumbeu' ceremonial bamboo hat is made there using waterproof 'hnahthial' leaves Mizoram State Museum: This museum is situated at Mc Donald Hill in the town center. Open Monday - Friday from 9:00 A.M to 5 PM. Saturday 9 AM to 1 PM. Though small, it has an interesting collection of historical relics, ancient costumes and traditional implements.

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ncdpd / report on integrated design & technical development project / bamboo / aizawl

SURVEY REPORT

AIZAWL - AN OVERVIEW

Durtlang Hills: These beautiful, craggy hills offer a good view of Aizawl. Mini Zoo: Home to species of animals and birds found only in the hills of Mizoram. Berawtlang Tourist Complex: This is a recreational center situated 7 kms away from Aizawl City center. There are facilities of Restaurant as well as Tourist Cottages.

Place of attraction nearby to Aizawl:

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ABOUT AIZAWL

Aizawl is the capital of the state of Mizoram in India. With a resident population 291,822. It is the largest city within the state. It is also the center of all important government offices, state assembly house and civil secretariat. The population

ABOUT AIZAWL

of Aizawl strongly reflects the different communities of the ethnic Mizo people.

HISTORY In 1871-72, the disorderly conduct of Khalkom, a Mizo chief compelled the British to establish an outpost that later became the Aizawl village. In 1890, Officer Dally of the Assam Police and his 400 men arrived at Aizawl to support Colonel Skinner's troops during a British military operation against the Mizo tribals. On Dally's recommendation, Aizawl was selected as the site of a fortified post that Colonel Skinner had been ordered to construct. The troops constructed stockades and buildings at the site. In 1892-95 Aizawl became accessible from Silchar by fair weather road under the supervision of Major Loch. The Indian Air Force carried out air strikes on the town during the March 1966 Mizo National Front uprising, following which the MNF withdrew to Lunglei. Until 1966, Aizawl was a large village but the regrouping of Mizo villages after the uprising made it become a larger town and then a city. Aizawl has become the center of Road network in Mizoram connecting the North and South, East and West. More than 25% of the Mizoram population reside in Aizawl.

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DEMOGRAPHICS As of 2001 India census, Aizawl had a population of 228,280. Males constitute 50.80% of the population and females made up the remaining 49.20%. Mizos from various tribes make up the majority of the population. Christianity is the dominant religion in the city. Other religions include Islam, Buddhism and Hinduism Presbyterians make up the majority of the population. However, there are also significant numbers of the Salvation Army, Baptists, Seventh Day Adventists, United Pentecostal Church and Roman Catholics in the city. There are also some cultural based Christian sects. Hinduism and Islam are also represented in very small numbers in the city population.

ECONOMY The Economy of Aizawl is basically sustained by Government services as it is capital of Mizoram. The Major Banks are also located within Aizawl. A 3-star category hotel, Hotel Regency, has recently been inaugurated at Zarkawt, a central location within the city. It provides a much-needed hospitality service for tourists and business visitors to Aizawl.

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ABOUT CRAFTS

Mizoram, one of the North eastern states of India, consists of a lot of form of arts and crafts which is considered to be one of their crucial activities. The art and crafts also occupies a very important sector of the industrial market of the state. The primary section of arts and crafts in the

ABOUT CRAFTS

state is textiles, bamboo and cane works as well as basketry.

Textiles The Mizo women are very much involved in weaving, and they are experts in it. A vast range of textile products are being produced in Mizoram. Out of them all some of the textile products of Mizoram which are famous, not only in India but also internationally, are puanspuon dum, puon pie, thangou puon, puon laisen, jawl puon, thangsuo puon, hmarm and zakuolaisen.

TOYS The bamboo pop-gun is an interesting toy made for children by local craftsmen. A length of small diameter bamboo is used as the barrel. When the splint is pulled back in the slot and released, it can propel a small pellet placed inside the tube. An indigenous trigger mechanism is provided to regulate the release of the pellet. These devices seem to have evolved from the countless bird and animal traps that are used locally. Most of these traps uses the elastic property of bamboo splints in order to spring the trap when the prey touches the trigger.

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There are a number of craftsman and skilled artisans among the Mizos. Weaving is an internal part of the Mizo culture and the women learn how to weave at an early age. Puans in numerous designs are produced by them on traditional lion looms. These are somewhat like lungis, usually about 45 to 48 in width and about 36 in length, worn by the women, and are their native dress. Puans are noted for their beautiful design and intricate embroidery which is invariably worked out along with the weave. Mizos have a wealth of motifs. The patterns of traditional puans are now being adopted with many fresh combinations. Mizo women also turn out shawl and their shoulder bags, which are quite attractive, and not too expensive considering their quality. The Hmars weave many designs and some of the important ones are thangsuo puon meaning famous cloth, puon laisen meaning cloth with middle in red colour, hmarm - the loin cloth worn by women and zakuolaisen - the blouse piece used mainly by the unmarried girls. Paiteis do not weave many indigenous designs in their cloth but whatever little designs are woven seems to be indigenous and seems they attach distinctive value to those. The important cloth of the Paiteis include thangou puon, puon dum, jawl puon and puon pie.

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ABOUT CRAFTS BAMBOO AND CANE CULTURE OF MIZORAM Mizoram is the land of a number of craftsmen and skilled artisans excelling in various crafts. Bamboo and Cane related crafts are a major source of income to the state as well as the people. The Mizo’s dexterity in wicker-work and basketry is well known. Bamboo and Cane have their multifarious uses in turning out various commercial crafts and items of furniture. Even their houses are generally built with bamboo walls and floors and thatched roofs. While women excel at weaving, men are expert at cane and bamboo work. They make fine cane hats and uncommonly beautiful baskets. The traditional Mizo hat is

ABOUT CRAFTS

known for its workmanship. It looks as if the hat is woven out of fine bamboo as fine as cotton yarn. Besides their typical hat or caps, domestic baskets are all made from plaited bamboo and these are reinforced by stout cane, which is very hard and durable. By smoking, the cane would be coloured a shiny mahogany to give some colour and patterns to the work. A typical Mizo basket is broad at the rim and tapers at the bottom. There are baskets for carrying firewood, water, paddy, rice and vegetables. Baskets made of cane and bamboo together with leaves and grasses, for storing ornaments, clothes and other valuables are also made. Other items made are chairs, sofas, tables, bamboo screens and cages, umbrella-handles, knitting needles and hats. All types of traditional baskets and decorative articles are products in the Handicrafts Centres situated in three districts- Aizawl, Lunglei and Chimptuipui (Sailha). The Handicraft Centres at Luangmual, Aizawl produces typical Mizo Cane Hats. Traditional ornaments too use bamboo in it. On celebrations, Mizo women use a headgear of a bamboo band with parrot feathers stuck in it, the ends of which are decorated with beetles. Other bamboo products include fish and animal traps, rain bamboo hat seen with the formation of a flat thin layer on its top, japis,

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cones, circular boxes and other materials serving as reservoirs and containers of goods, crops and other things. Therefore, a variety of them is catered to the village craftsmen on regular or irregular basis. They serve mainly as body panniers for placing head-loads, carrying baskets, cages, fish nets, etc. They take different shapes and vary from slim or even flat (like rice winnowing fans) to broad, elongate sizes and the traditional size with regard to proportion from rim to base is retained. Panniers or cones accommodate the bigger loads whereas the other baskets of course do not support heavy weight. Mizos both men and women are inveterate smokers. They love their locally made pipes. The women’s pipe is like a small hukkah, small enough to be easily held in the hand and carried about. The men’s pipe is of western type. These are made out of bamboo and weed. Provided with selected, seasoned bamboo and given proper training in carving pipes for export, the Mizo craftsmen could possibly introduce a new range with sufficient prospects. So far as the bamboo in the Mizo Hills are concerned, it is available in large quantities but at present it has not been utilized to the maxim. However, it seems that the constituted authorities have envisaged the feasibility of introducing in Mizoram better vocational trades in spinning and weaving, cane hats and cane baskets, bamboo chairs, tables, teapots, racks, safes, etc as well as bamboo screen cages and umbrella handles.

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ABOUT CRAFTS

MIZO HOUSE The houses built by the Lushai tribe of Mizoram, predominantly uses bamboo and wood in their construction. Most of the houses are built on the slopes and are invariably supported by wooden posts of

ABOUT CRAFTS

varied lengths, so that the house is balanced horizontally with the level of the road. Cross beams are fastened against these posts and over the beams long solid bamboos are laid. Bamboo matting is then laid over the bamboo frame, which forms the floor of the house. The walls of the house are also made up of bamboo matting fastened to the outer posts. The roof consists of solid as well as split bamboo frames covered with thick thatch and some other kind of leaves. Cane is generally used for keeping the joints together and in some cases, iron nails are also used. In case where the floor of the house is much above the ground, a ladder made entirely of a piece of log is placed across the intervening space between the floor of the house and the ground. The doors and windows are usually of bamboo matting and these are fastened against the wall. It may be noted that in some cases the floor, doors and windows are made of wooden planks, while in others split bamboos are used instead. The interior of the house is a single rectangular structure. It is partitioned into a number of rooms according to the convenience by screens made of bamboo matting or with a cloth fixed to bamboo or wooden frame. In houses where both married and unmarried persons live together, separate sleeping apartments are made by partition as described above. The hearth is always at one corner of the house usually near the front floor.

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It is made of clay and stones and is raised about 2-3 ft above the floor supported by raised poles. Above the fire place is hung a bamboo frame which is kept suspended to keep various things used in cooking as dried chillies, dry fish, salt, etc.

Bamboo and Cane Mizoram is expert in making crafts out of bamboo. People are skilled in making bamboo and cane products in Mizoram. This also plays a major role in developing the economy of the state. The major works of bamboo and cane are animal and fish trapscone, hats, wide range of local jewellery and japis. Bamboo and cane industry is a very significant domain of mizo men. In their flawless bamboo works can be seen both unique and decorative piece which shows pride in its beauty.

Basketry Basketry among the tribes is a delicate work. They are experts in making etches and notches from the soft fibres of cane. Baskets with lids and without lids, smoothly surfaced, strongly floored, gently fenced from mouth to base and modelled into oval, square, flat structures,

Bamboo basket (has jute straps), Aizawl, Mizoram

revealing a considerable skill in sliting, folding and inserting are seen. They serve various purposes such as cages, containers, baskets of different articles, etc.

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ABOUT CRAFTS Models of Baskets (local names) i) ii) iii) iv) v) vi) vii) viii)

ABOUT CRAFTS

ix) x) xi) xii) xiii) xiv) xv)

Dawrawn. Empai, Emping, Tlamen. Paikawng: It is a basket made from split bamboo strips. Hnam. Nghawngkawl. Thlangra. Koh or Fawng. Paih-Per. (Dawrawn, Hnam, Nghawngkawl, Paih-Per are best examples of Panniers). Thul or Thulte: They are used for storing valuables at home and outside. Herhsawp: It is a bamboo stool. Arbawm: It is usually netted and is a poultry basket. Thuttleng orThutthleng: It is a bamboo chair; it is four legged. Bontong: It is an ornamented basket for storing coloured yarn. Bawmrang: It has a hollow circular rim and it is u-shaped. Aiawt: This is a fish or crab trap. In most cases, a variety of jungle cane is used. The fine cane serves the purpose of etching, notching and more making a suitable coherence in the parts of the bamboo structure.

BASKETS A. Open Weave Carrying Basket: (i) Paikawng: The paikawng is an open-weave carrying basket made and used by the Lushai tribe of Mizoram. Women generally use the basket as a rough work basket for carrying firewood, bamboo water tubes, etc. The basket, made entirely of bamboo outer splits, is carried over the back with a strap resting on the head. The local names of the bamboo species normally used are rawnal, rawthing or phulrua.the basket has an extremely strong construction which is very resistant to vertical loads. This is due to the construction pattern as well as the fact that fairly thick strips of bamboo are used.

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The paikawng has a square base of diagonal 230 mm from where it gradually transforms into a circle of diameter 390 mm at the rim. The height of the basket is 390 mm. To the craftsmen making this basket, the height is assumed to the one hand-measure known as tawngkhat in Lushai. The main elements are those that form the base, sides and rim of the basket. The basket is carried by means of a braided head-strap. (ii) Emsin: The emsin is very similar in construction to the paikwang. In fact, it is an ornamental version of the work basket. Lushai women use this basket for marketing or carrying belongings to the fields. It is used for light work. Young girls take pride in taking this basket on evening walks to the bazaar. It is carried over the back with a strap resting on the head. The emsin has a square base whose diagonal measures 225 mm, the rim diameter is 370 mm and its height is 370 mm. The main elements are about onethird the width and thickness of the paikawng but more elements are used. The rest of the structure is similar to that of the paikawang except at the rim.

B. Closed Weave Basket: (i) Paiem: The paiem is a closed-weave carrying basket used by the Lushais of Mizoram to carry grain and other field produce. In Lushai, the word em means “basket” and pai means “without holes”. This basket is also called empai. The Lushai women also use this basket for marketing. It is made from bamboo outer splits from a species locally known as rawnal. Split cane is used in the rim-strengthening element; the weft elements of the side weave near the base; in bindings at the rim; and for strengthening the corners of the basket. The cane species used is locally known as mitperh. The basket has a square base whose diagonal measures 200 mm and the cross-section of the basket goes through a gradual transition till it reaches a perfectly circular rim of diameter 410 mm. Its height is about 430 mm. All elements made from cane are smoked to a rich red-brown colour before they are used in the basket.

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ABOUT CRAFTS

ABOUT CRAFTS

(ii) Tlamen: The tlamen is a Lushai product, larger than the paiem, which is carried by men to bring in produce from the fields. The basket has a square base and a circular rim. The diagonal of the base square is 210 mm and the sides flare outwards sharply to a rim diameter of 520 mm. The height of the basket is 520 mm. (iii) Dawrawn: The dawrawn is anther closed-weave carrying basket used by the Lushais, both for storage as well as to bring in field produce. This basket is made in two sizes, the men's size and the women's size. It is a tall, narrow basket with a square base and circular rim. The diagonal of the base square measures 190 mm; the rim diameter is 420 mm and its height 740 mm. The structure and method of construction is similar to that of the paiem, except that slightly coarser strips are used for the warp and weft elements.

C. Small Storage Baskets Fawng: The fawng is a shallow, square-based basket with a self-strengthened square rim and is used by the Lushai tribe of Mizoram. The diagonal of both base square and rim square measures 400 mm and the height of the basket is160 mm. The basket is woven in the diagonal-weaving method with two mutually perpendicular sets of elements interlacing in either a 2-up-2-down twill structure or a 3-up-3-down twill structure. The corners of the base square are in some cases strengthened by split-cane binding. Smaller baskets of a similar construction are made by the Lushai to store yarn for making the loin-loop warp. These are called fawng-te-laivel. "Fawng" refers to the square-based basket described above, while te means “small”, and “laivel” refers to the “concentric square pattern” generated by the twill-weave structure used in the basket.

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D. Storage Containers Thul: The Mizos use a basket called Thul. These baskets, though shaped like their carrying baskets, have a double-walled structure and legs located at the corners of their square base. A lid shaped either like a semi-spherical dome or like a cane covers the mouth of the basket. Native Furniture Stool from Mizoram: The Mizo stool is a short cylinder made of two rings of cane held apart by a series of vertical bamboo splints located around the circumference of the rings. These splints have both ends shaped to form tenons, which are firmly driven into corresponding holes provided in both rings. The seat surface is made of raw hide stretched over the upper rings and simultaneously held in place by the bamboo verticals. The cane rings are held in shape by overlapping the free ends by an inclined cut, which is then bound by leather thongs. The local name of the cane and bamboo are mitperh and phulrua respectively. The most fascinating feature of this stool is the manner in which the rings are formed. The Mizo craftsmen have found a unique way of bending cane. As freshly harvested cane is fairly flexible, a length of cane is wounded around a cylindrical post of selected diameter into a tight helix and left to cure in the sun. The cane is left in the sun for three or four days before being removed from the mould and cut to form rings of the required size. Whole culm containers Tuium: The tuium is made from a bamboo with a diameter of about 100 mm to 140 mm and internodes length of 450 to 600 mm. Two internodes are used to make a water tube 900 to 1200 mm long, with one nodal wall forming the base. The nodal wall between the internodes is pierced to connect the lumen. Half the circumference of the top open edge of the tube is cut at an angle to facilitate pouring. The outer skin of the bamboo is removed and the nodes are scrapped off to reduce the weight of the tube, to prevent it from cracking and to keep the water cool by evaporation through the internodal walls.

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ABOUT CRAFTS Winnowing Trays Thlangra: The thlangra is a winnowing tray used by the Lushai tribe of Mizoram. The triangular thlangra requires manufacturing skills that only a few craftsmen possess. The rawthing bamboo is used because of the resistance of thin strips of this bamboo to impact loads. The equal sides of the isosceles thlangra are held in the hand when it is being used.

ABOUT CRAFTS

Fish Baskets - There are baskets that are used to store fishes. These are either carried by the fishing folks in their hands or tied to a belt around their waist. Paikur: The Mizo paikur is a bottle-shaped structure with a conical spiked valve at the mouth. This again only allows the fish to enter the bottle. The fish can be collected by removing the spiked cone when required.

Rain Shield and Head Gear Lukhum The lukhum is the traditional hat commonly worn by Lushai men. Its shape is like a peaked cap and retains its shape even when not in use. It is formed in two layers, each made from strips of bamboo woven in an openhexagonal weave. The inside layer is generally coarser than the outside layer and is woven first, spinning at the top. This hat is made extremely delicately, with a high quality of craftsmanship. The recent trend however is to make the hats a little coarser, with paper or plastic replacing the palm leaves between the layers.

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Smoking Pipes (1) Vaibel The Lushai tribe of Mizoram makes a bamboo pipe called vaibel. The species of bamboo used is locally called tursing. It is a solid bamboo upto 50 mm in diameter and it is very strong, as it does not break when dropped. A part of the culm including a node is used to shape the bowl. The hollow of the bowl is bored in the centre passing through the node in a small hole. The bamboo stem passes through the shaped branch segment to enter the hollow created below the node. The hole at the bottom is sealed with a piece of dried gourd. Locally grown tobacco is used and only men use this pipe. Whereas, the Lushai women use a pipe called tuibur. (2) Tuibur The tuibur is made in an interesting combination of bamboo and clay. It consists if five parts connected to respective elements in housed joints wedged tightly together. The joint between the water container and the central element is covered and strengthened by a fine braided band made from a palm fibre. The central element is solid and is shaped from a part of a rhizome.

Weapons Sairawkher: The sairawkher is a bow made by the Lushai tribe of Mizoram and used to hunt birds and small animals. Unlike the usual bow, this one fires clay pellets instead of arrows. It consists of a strong beam made from a wide splint of bamboo, which is held bent in tension by a bow-string made from a fine bamboo split. The beam is made from rawthing bamboo while the bow string is from sairil bamboo. The bow requires some skill to operate, as it has to be twisted slightly to one side to permit the pellet to sail past without striking the beam.

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BAMBOO - ORIGIN, SPECIES & USES

BAMBOO - ORIGIN, SPECIES & USES

Origin of Bamboo The plant known as bamboo to the entire world has been around and used for centuries. Records dating back more than seven thousand years talk about products made of bamboo such as arrows, paper, building materials, and books. Because of its origins, the current way it is used, and the economic sustainability of the plant, bamboo is an excellent resource. Origins While bamboo grows everywhere in the world except those places with extremely cold climates, it is thought to have originated in China, where the first use of bamboo to make every day items was recorded. This tall, hearty grass (yep, bamboo is technically grass) was used for as many products as they could manage, as it was a quickly renewable resource. The species of bamboo that we know today evolved from prehistoric grasses between thirty and forty million years ago, long after the extinction of the dinosaurs. It then became the major food source for herbivorous animals, eventually becoming a food source for the modern human being as well.

Current Use Major bamboo research didn't begin until 1920, when the history of the plant was studied. It has shown that there are native species of bamboo almost everywhere, including the United States. It is now used widely in landscaping, but bamboo grows in two styles, clumping and running, which make it a widespread plant that can easily take over a garden if not cared for properly. While bamboo was used frequently in the eastern hemisphere for housing for centuries, it is now only becoming popular in the western part of the world. More and more architects are seeing the beauty and intelligence in using bamboo for structures and other building material, and are becoming famous from the use of it in buildings.

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Economic Sustainability Bamboo has been used through history not only because of the strength of the material, but also through the renewable prospects. Through history, wood has become more and more scarce, simply because to produce a full grown tree can take up to sixty years, and then another sixty years time for a replacement. Species of bamboo equal to the height and width of a tree take as little as sixty days to mature completely. Bamboo is also easy to grow, because of the root systems. Running bamboo species are especially easy to grow, as they produce several shoots at a time, and will take over as much room as they possibly can. Bamboo is also difficult to get rid of, unless it is completely plowed under. The unknown building material and resource of the future, bamboo has had a long and rich history. It will be used for years to come in everything from housing to bed sheets, and even more as more information is learned about this amazing plant.

Species of Bamboo There are many different opinions on how many species of bamboo that there are. Some experts say there are approximately 1000 species of bamboo, while others say there are more than 1600 species on the planet growing naturally. Of course, all these species of bamboo are both decorative and useful when they are used in the homes and businesses in countries around the world.

Regions of growth Of the many kinds of species of bamboo out there, 64% of the varieties of bamboo growing naturally do so within the Southeast Asia regions. 33% of the species grow naturally in Latin America, and the last 7%, give or take a few species, grow in the Africa and Oceana regions of the world.

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BAMBOO - ORIGIN, SPECIES & USES

BAMBOO - ORIGIN, SPECIES & USES In America, there are only three species of bamboo that grow naturally. These three species once covered nearly five million acres of land in America, until settlers began to tear down this “Cane Break� for farming lands. Any other species of bamboo that grow in North America are generally those that have been transplanted from other places. Temperature zones Different species of bamboo grow in different temperature zones, depending on what kinds of needs the particular species has. Most bamboo grows in areas of temperate, sub-tropical, or tropical temperatures, with those growing in the temperate zones the hardiest of the species. For gardeners, the temperature zones that bamboo grows best in are zones 4 through 10. The heartier species of bamboo should be grown in zones 4 through seven, while sub-tropic species can be grown in zones 9 and 10. Tropical species should only be grown in places considered zone 10, and anything grown indoors should be a heartier variety. Clumpers and runners There are two distinct sections of bamboo that describe how they grow in nature. These two sections, clumpers and runners, are determined by what kinds of roots or rhizomes they have, as well as how fast they spread. Clumpers grow in dense clumps and slowly expand from the place of origin. Runners spread quickly from where they began and tend to take over anywhere that they exist. While there is some proof to show that there are tendencies for these two sections of bamboo to grow in certain areas, there are always exceptions to the rules. But clumpers tend to grow in tropical areas, while runners are known for growing in the temperate zones where they are planted or found naturally. While there are an indeterminable number of species of this woody grass in the world, there are certainly enough to keep people interested in making objects and other useful items out of bamboo. In the future, it might be possible to find even more species as the usefulness of the ones already discovered continues to grow.

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General Uses For Bamboo Bamboo has been used for eons for many applications, from a food source to a building material. But with the age of modern materials, many people don't understand the scope of uses for bamboo. The shoots can be picked early for eating, and the wood of older canes can be treated and used as anything from decoration to instruments. Thankfully, many manufacturers have seen all the products that can be made from this highly renewable resource and have begun to utilize bamboo in some fascinating ways. Decorations From picture frames to room dividing screens, bamboo can make some elegant and exotic decorations for the home. Depending on the manufacturer, bamboo decorations can be the rough finish of natural bamboo that reminds people of tropical getaways, or the sleek, lacquered finish that creates a modern elegance that many people remember. Bamboo can also be colored so that it can fit into any dĂŠcor. Building materials More and more furniture, flooring, and even homes are being built with bamboo. Whether people like the look of the bamboo, or the way it holds up, it is becoming a more popular building material that many people are recognizing. The smooth floors hold up well in kitchens and other rooms, and the furniture, bound attractively with rattan or leather, gives any room a modern look. Fabrics and clothing A fabulous trend right now is bamboo fibers being used in fabrics and clothing. Bedding made of bamboo fibers is as soft as or softer than most cotton beddings, and drapes with the look of silk without the expense. It is becoming a mainstream trend to have bamboo fabric products or clothing, populating many major chain retail stores.

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BAMBOO - ORIGIN, SPECIES & USES

BAMBOO - ORIGIN, SPECIES & USES Cooking Cooking with bamboo is nothing new in Asian culture. Bamboo shoots are a common food in that part of the world, and have also migrated into cooking utensils. Bamboo cutting boards are notoriously good for not dulling blades on knives as quickly, while bamboo utensils like wooden spoons are excellent for not scratching the bottoms of expensive non-stick cookware. Agriculture Bamboo started out as a natural plant in most places, but has become a large part of agriculture. From being the main crop of a farm to be harvested for other uses, or as the channel linings for irrigation systems, bamboo fits naturally into agriculture. Of course, bamboo is also grown as a food source, and as a garden plant as well, the woody grass being an excellent addition to any garden. Weapons While this is rarely seen any more, bamboo was once used to make many different types of weapons. From blow guns to archery bows and arrows, bamboo made light but strong weapons for many centuries. Though they aren't used as frequently any more, even gunpowder guns have been made with the hollow tubes. Instruments Hollow tubes make excellent instruments, whether it is a flute or a drum, and bamboo is one of the best bases for instruments. The light, durable quality of the bamboo is coupled with its musical potential, and creates some of the most beautiful sounds that music has ever heard. Of course, these aren't all the uses for bamboo. There are many other types of products that can be made of bamboo, and all are coming back into their own as bamboo continues to grow more popular in the main stream economy.

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Bamboo Products It seems like hundreds of products can be made from bamboo. From household items to the entire house, bamboo products are nothing new to society. Ancient civilizations were using bamboo for building long before they were using other materials and this trend has faded slightly over the centuries, but is now making a comeback in parts of the world, becoming a popular resource. Numerous Products Bamboo has been made into numerous products over the years. From raw products like bamboo charcoal or edible bamboo shoots, to finished pieces like furniture and instruments, there are many kinds of bamboo products out there. Whether they are made of raw or treated bamboo, they all seem to be used with more frequency now that we are re-discovering the versatility of the products. Some bamboo products include: Ÿ Charcoal Ÿ Clothing Ÿ Alcohol Ÿ Fabrics Ÿ Bed sheets Ÿ Flooring Ÿ Blinds Ÿ Garden plants Ÿ Paint brushes Ÿ Matting Ÿ Bicycles Ÿ Instruments Ÿ Cutting boards

Unusual Products There are also some very unusual products made from bamboo out in the world. Most people would never think these products could be made with bamboo, but they hold up just as well as metallic counterparts. These products include: Ÿ Sugar (as in sugar cane) Ÿ Record player needles Ÿ Deodorizers Ÿ Roofing Ÿ Beer Ÿ Umbrellas Ÿ Beehives Ÿ Wedding favors

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BAMBOO - ORIGIN, SPECIES & USES

BAMBOO - ORIGIN, SPECIES & USES This is only a tiny representation of what kinds of products can be made with bamboo. There are hundreds of others, all waiting to be accepted into mainstream society as great products to replace those out there made of less renewable resources. Bamboo Fabric One of the most innovative parts of the bamboo industry has got to be the bamboo fabric that is being produced. Anti-bacterial, wicking, and biodegradable, bamboo fibers are becoming more and more popular when it comes to making fabric. From bedding to clothing, industries are making more products with bamboo fabric, extolling the virtues of using the alternative source to cotton. Aesthetic Qualities The most noticeable qualities of bamboo fabric are the aesthetic qualities that are gathered from the first touch or sight of bamboo. These qualities include: 타 Texture - Bamboo fabric feels softer than the most refined cotton. 타 Color - Bamboo fabric tests as well as every other material for color fastness when washing and wear over time. 타 Appearance - The fabrics made of bamboo appear to look like other materials which are more expensive, such as silk. Anti-bacterial One of the many reasons that bamboo fabric is becoming more popular is because of the anti-bacterial properties that it has. When growing, bamboo requires very little to no pesticides, an attribute which scientists have discovered is from an anti-bacterial bio-agent called bamboo kun. Bamboo kun is bound closely in the bamboo cells, thus why it lasts so long in bamboo fabric. It makes the fabric resistant to bacteria, and scientists have done tests to show that a large portion of bacteria that naturally incubates on bamboo fabric doesn't survive because of the bamboo kun property. This makes products made from bamboo fabric, such as bed sheets and bath towels, good for people with allergies. With the fabric unable to host the bacteria and allergens that cause people with allergies to react, these people are able to find a healthy alternative to other fabrics.

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Breathable and Absorbent Another attractive property of bamboo fabric is how breathable and absorbent it is. Many people who have worn clothing made of this fabric have stated how they are kept cooler, because the breathable fabric doesn't cling to skin. The absorbent fabric also wicks away moisture, keeping the skin cool and dry. These insulating characteristics also make bamboo fabric warm in colder months. It is also because bamboo fabric is breathable that it is good at remaining odorless, even when attacked by odor-causing bacteria. Economical and Ecological Bamboo fabric is one of the most economical and ecological products in the world today. Because of how it grows, there is only a fraction of the time and resources spent on producing bamboo for fabric as there is for cotton. Bamboo does not require the large amounts of water and pesticides that cotton does to be produced, nor does it require the attentive care of cotton. Bamboo fabric is also quite ecologically friendly. 100% biodegradable, the fibers used to make bamboo fabric don't need to be sprayed with chemical additives of any sort. There is also less water wasted for irrigation for bamboo, and there is very little surface runoff from chemicals that could be sprayed on the plants to keep them healthy, as these chemicals aren't needed. Economical, ecological, aesthetically pleasing, comfortable, and long-lasting, bamboo fabric is obviously going to be the way of the future. With soft fabric that is easy to produce, and has health benefits like being anti-bacterial as well as insulating, bamboo fabric will become the favorite textile of many in years to come.

Bamboo Architecture Once thought of as the building material of the poor, bamboo is now being used more prominently in all types of architecture. From houses to business buildings, there are more and more places that are being built with bamboo as a main material or at least an accenting material of the architecture.

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BAMBOO - ORIGIN, SPECIES & USES

BAMBOO - ORIGIN, SPECIES & USES Ancient Bamboo Architecture In the past, bamboo was not known as a premium building material. In most cultures that used it, from China to India, the poorest people were the ones who used bamboo as building material for their homes. While it is true that bamboo is an easily renewed, inexpensive resource, it is being cultivated to become more mainstream in places like Western Europe and all over America. Renewable Resource Unlike wood, which can take between twenty and sixty years to mature to the stage where it can be harvested, bamboo takes a very short amount of time to regenerate in comparison. Most species of bamboo that are used in architecture can be harvested after three to six years of growth. The quickest growing species of bamboo can grow up to one meter a day, and reach full growth within two months time. This makes bamboo the most efficient renewable resource, especially in today's world where wood is becoming scarcer. Structural Characteristics Bamboo is a unique building material in that it is strong in both rigidity and density. While tensile strength remains the same throughout the age of the bamboo plant, the plant fiber strength increases as it gets older. There is some controversy in determining proper testing protocols though and is still under debate. To utilize bamboo to its utmost potential, several conditions are important to consider. One factor is that bamboo grown on slopes is stronger than bamboo grown in valleys, and that bamboos that grow in poor dry soils are usually more solid than those grown in rich soils. Bamboo also shrinks diametrically, and that should be taken into consideration. There are certain limitations of the use of bamboo in construction due to the nature of the plant. The starchy interior is attractive to insects, and if not treated can rot, and fill with insects. In addition, because bamboo has a slick waterproof coating, it cannot be painted very easily, but it can be accomplished with the right types of paint. Bamboo architecture is growing in popularity. It has gone from the building material of the poor to the choice of architects and artists with rapid ambition. While the world isn't yet ready for whole cities made out of bamboo, it is certainly ready for homes made of it, and it seems to be coming in the near future. 58

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Bamboo in Interior Decorating As bamboo continues to grow in popularity as a versatile, renewable, and environmentally responsible alternative to hardwoods and synthetic materials in all sorts of applications, it is also becoming a very hot trend in interior decorating. Homeowners and interior decorators who are looking for distinctive and durable home furnishings from renewable sources are finding that bamboo is the perfect solution and manufacturers are responding by introducing new and innovative bamboo products to the market every day. People that prefer the warm tones of traditional hardwoods in their homes but would rather not add to the growing worldwide problem of deforestation are finding that they can have it both ways by purchasing tree-saving: Ÿ Bamboo Flooring Ÿ Bamboo Furniture Ÿ Bamboo Wall Coverings Ÿ Bamboo Ceiling Materials Ÿ Bamboo Cabinetry Ÿ Bamboo Decorations Ÿ And Much More

The strength of bamboo compares very favorably to many grades of steel and the hardest of hardwoods to provide environmentally conscious homeowners a 'green' choice that not only looks great but is also very durable and resistant to wear. Homeowners are also finding that these bamboo home decorating products will not warp or cup as some hardwoods do from fluctuating air humidity.

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BAMBOO - ORIGIN, SPECIES & USES

BAMBOO - ORIGIN, SPECIES & USES Perhaps the most encouraging trend of all is that we are only beginning to discover how versatile bamboo is as a replacement for hardwoods in all sorts of home building and decorating applications. As we continue to search for ways to lessen our impact on the environment, bamboo may offer us the best chance to save our remaining forests so that future generations can experience the simple joys of a walk in the woods.

TOP TEN REASONS - BAMBOO CAN SAVE THE PLANET By now, nearly everyone knows that we are depleting the natural resources of the only home that we have at a rate that is well past sustainable. To some extent, we have become inured to alarming reports and ominous warnings about our wasteful ways. Media outlets yammer away about Overpopulation, Global Warming and Deforestation and these reports either fatigue or motivate us to make necessary changes in our lives. Occasionally, a development comes along that provides some optimism about our prospects for making positive changes in our living habits. One such development is the emergence of new uses for a species of grass that has been around far longer than we have. Bamboo has been used for everything from food to bridge building for millennia but consumers and manufacturers are taking a fresh look at all that this amazing plant has to offer. Here are the top ten ways that bamboo will save the planet. 1. Renewable resource. Depending on the species, bamboo can be harvested in one to five years. Hardwoods like oak take at least forty years to mature before they can be harvested. Almost 1 million acres of forests are lost each week worldwide to deforestation. Bamboo's versatility as a substitute for hardwoods offers a chance to drastically reduce that figure and protect the forests that we have left. 2. Absorbs greenhouse gases. Bamboo absorbs carbon dioxide and releases 35% more oxygen into the atmosphere than an equivalent stand of hardwood trees.

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3. Amazing growth rate. Some species of bamboo grow more than three feet each day! No plant on the planet features a faster growth rate. When it is harvested, it will grow a new shoot from its extensive root system with no need for additional planting or cultivation. 4. Very little waste. After harvesting, virtually every part of the plant is used to make a wide variety of products. From soil-enriching mulch to beautiful furniture to chopsticks, every part of the plant can be utilized. 5. Versatility. Bamboo can replace the use of wood for nearly every application. Paper, flooring, furniture, charcoal, building materials, and much more can be made from bamboo. What's more, bamboo fibers are far stronger than wood fibers and much less likely to warp from changing atmospheric conditions. 6. No fertilizer, pesticides, or herbicides needed. Unlike most cash crops, bamboo requires no agricultural chemicals to thrive. Unlike cotton, which is one of the most intensely sprayed crops in the world and rapidly depletes the nutrients in the soil, bamboo sequesters nitrogen and cultivation does not add chemicals to the environment. 7. Soil protection. Once hardwood forests are clear-cut and the stumps are burned to provide fertilizer and space for growing crops, erosion inevitably occurs as the topsoil and nutrients are washed away by rainfall. The eroded soil then clogs rivers and streams and affects the lives of people and animals living downstream. Bamboo roots remain in place after harvesting where they prevent erosion and help retain nutrients for the next crop. 8. Economic development. In less developed countries where unemployment leads to civil unrest, bamboo production and the manufacturing of bamboo products provides job opportunities in areas that desperately need social and economic stability.

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BAMBOO - ORIGIN, SPECIES & USES

BAMBOO - ORIGIN, SPECIES & USES

9. Low in fat According to the Washington State Extension Service Brochure, bamboo shoots have been found to be low in fat and calories, which people are always concerned with when trying to eat healthy. 10. High in nutrients Bamboo shoots are also good for you because they are an excellent source of two nutrients that human bodies really need, fiber, and potassium. One serving of bamboo shoots can provide 10% of the fiber a human needs a day.

All of these reasons are great examples of why bamboo makes a person healthier. But don't just take our word for it, go out and find some bamboo sheets or a t-shirt, or have a healthy serving of bamboo shoots. You'll be feeling healthy in no time.

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PRODUCTION

Raw materials and their uses North Eastern Region has probably the maximum resources for the cane and bamboo industry in India, comparable with Canada and the Scandinavian countries-Sweden, Norway and Finland. In bamboo and reeds, North Eastern Region has the most concentrated forests in the whole of India. As many as 51 species of bamboo grow in NER and they are being used for diverse purposes, mainly for buildings, furniture and diverse contraptions. Studies are being conducted in some research centres in India as to the suitability of the bamboo being used as a reinforcement to replace mild steel bars in light concrete structures. Bamboo is also used for umbrella handles, walking sticks, tool handles, fishing rods, tent poles, cordage, ladders, yokes, baskets, toys, handfans and various domestic and agricultural implements. All these articles can be produced on a cottage and small-scale basis with small machineries.

TOOLS & IMPLEMENT In the sphere of bamboo and cane works simple and inexpensive used throughout the state. The essential tools required for bamboo craft consists of a ‘dao’ (bill-hook), a knife and a ‘jak’ (‘v’ shaped wooden frame). In manufacturing cane products also, ‘daos’ and knives are mainly used, and only the furniture making establishments use a few saws, hammers, pliers and pincers in addition to daos and knives. A few more hand tools are found to be employed in the manufacture of bamboo umbrella handles. The tools and implements used in the craft are ‘bakai kol’ (bending frame), ‘narum’ (sharp and pointed carving blade), files, saws, knives, blowpipes, tongs, oven, etc. Workshed: The manufacture of cane and bamboo products are mostly carried on outdoors and the craft does not require any housing arrangement particularly in rural areas. In the urban areas, however, it is found that cane products are manufactured in workshops and the majority of the establishments are housed in rented buildings.

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TOOLS

Andhra Katti and scissors

Different types of tools used are: • Kati (Small Knife) • Andhra Kati (Big Knife) • Katrika (Scissors) • Tepupadi/ Pallaga (Sharpening wood) • Hand planners • Hex saw machine • Hand drills • Large containers for boiling • Sewing machine • Frame loom Hand grinder

Various tools used in the process of making bamboo products

TOOLS

Tools used in processing and creating bamboo products are predominantly the one used for wood. Since there are no specific tools for bamboo therefore these machines are not accurate and create a lot of wastage. The sliver machine used to slice the bamboo is unable to cut bamboo according to the grains direction. Thus the grains are cut in between and therefore it reduces the strength. For this reason artisans prefer to use hand tools to work on bamboo.

River bed stone is used to sharpen the knifes

Buffing machine

Hex saw

Different brushes used to apply transparent varnish Wax is applied with the help of an old cotton cloth to give the product shine

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• Measuring tape • Fevibond • Sandpaper – 80, 100 and 120 • River stone • Plainer • Hand Cutter • Paint Brushes • Clear Varnish • Wax Polish

Cutting machine

Ÿ Natural Colors: Various colors are extracted from natural sources to be used in

coloring the bamboo as per the requirement. Ÿ Chemical Colors: Several colors are used t paint the curtains and other product to

enhance the beauty. Ÿ Boric and Borax Powder: These are used to treat the plant in order to prevent fungal

and borers attacks.

Colorful beads of several patterns used in making jewelry

Various tools and raw material used to make jewelry Cotton and nylon thread are used to weave the curtains or mats

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MARKET POTENTIAL / TRADE The World Bamboo Market by manu • March 29, 2010 • Uncategorized • 12 Comments

MARKET POTENTIAL / TRADE

INTRODUCTION The market for bamboo and bamboo products is growing and over the past years has been spearheaded by a rapid increase in bamboo production and/or trade coming out of China and other parts of Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe, Middle East and Latin America. Evidence exists that under the right conditions bamboo can be a leading sector for rural industrialization and large-scale poverty reduction. Technical innovations in processing, particularly standardization and product innovation have enabled bamboo products to compete in mainstream wood-product markets such as laminated flooring, composite boards and paper and pulp. Other promising bamboo products do not compete in the timber products markets, such as bamboo shoots and bamboo handicrafts, and these sub-sectors are subject to unique factors affecting growth. It is estimated that the current value of global trade in bamboo products is worth 7bn USD, and is expected to rise at 17bn USD by 2017 assuming mid-level growth. The current market size as against the projected market size by 2017 for some of the products would be as follows . In view of the global market trends in bamboo usage coupled with the fact that India has the largest recorded bamboo resources globally; the need to prioritize this sector is of great significance. In India, 13.47 million tons of bamboo is harvested annually of which 11.7 million tons is utilised industrially in paper mills, as scaffolding or fencing, for internal consumption in bamboo-growing households, handicrafts and miscellaneous items like incense-sticks, ladders, ice-cream sticks, agricultural implements, etc. But no reliable estimates of quantities are available for any of these items. Due to the abundance of the natural product, small holders harvest the bamboo from the edges of their farms and their surroundings; there is negligible large-scale commercial cultivation of bamboo in India.

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The annual market for value added bamboo in India is estimated at approx. 1.0bn USD in 2004 which is expected to grow up to 5.8bn USD by 2015. To achieve this there is a need for consistent supply of processed bamboo, development of industry, channeling of raw material into manufacturing system and an assurance of steady market . Trade regulations for bamboo are usually the same as those for wood both at international and regional levels. Despite bamboo’s inherent advantages for livelihood and environmental sustainability, only China, India and Vietnam, have favorable policies towards bamboo at present. Further, the customs codes that are used for the collection of trade statistics do not specifically define bamboo products within their categories and it is necessary to interpolate to derive best guess estimates. INBAR has however produced a new series of codes that will be implemented by the World Customs Organization from 2007–8, and this should enable more accurate understanding of the trade.

OVERVIEW The world bamboo market is currently worth USD 7 Billion/year, of which China has USD 5.5 Billion. The largest markets are handicraft (USD 3 Billion), bamboo shoots (USD 1.5 Billion) and traditional furniture (USD 1.1 Billion). Traditional markets cover handicrafts, blinds, bamboo shoots, chopsticks and traditional bamboo furniture, which count for 95% of the market. Emerging bamboo markets are wood substitutes such as flooring, panels and non-traditional furniture. The growth of the global market is expected to grow to USD 15-20 Billion/year in 2017. Non-traditional markets are expected to claim 45% of the total bamboo market. CURRENT SIZE OF SELECTED MARKETS The world bamboo market is currently worth USD 7 Billion/year, of which China has USD 5.5 Billion. The largest markets are handicraft (USD 3 Billion), bamboo shoots (USD 1.5 Billion), traditional furniture (USD 1.1 Billion); the remainder consists of window blinds, chopsticks, panels, charcoal etc. In 1992, France,

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MARKET POTENTIAL / TRADE Germany and the Netherlands were the major markets for bamboo, collectively accounting for 53% of the world’s total imports (NAFRI, NUoL, SNV. 2007). Traditional markets cover handicrafts, blinds, bamboo shoots, chopsticks and traditional bamboo furniture, which count for 95% of the market to date. New

MARKET POTENTIAL / TRADE

market products include modern/laminated furniture, flooring and panels cover the remainder 5% of the bamboo sector.

FUTURE MARKET SIZES Emerging bamboo markets, particularly wood substitutes, have been pioneered by Asian producers and include flooring, panels and non-traditional furniture. These represent the largest growth opportunities for bamboo. Strong world (and Chinese) demand and Chinese’s productive capacity and exports have produced a structural change in the wood industries. Increased restrictions of certified timber supply, growing environmental awareness, and competitiveness in lower-cost countries create a positive market outlook for bamboo. As there is still a high degree of uncertainty over bamboo market growth, especially in new markets, two bamboo market scenarios are presented in Figure 9 below, Figure 9: Global Bamboo Scenarios (Source: OHK, 2006) World Bamboo Market Scenario 1: Existing market – zero growth scenario (Worst case), based on current market size only assuming zero growth in global markets or bamboo penetration. It is believed that this scenario is unlikely to occur due to the current dynamic expansion of the sector. World Bamboo Market Scenario 2: Mid-level future scenario, based on the prevailing forecasts for ‘global market’ growth and the mid–level scenario for bamboo penetration growth). The growth of the global market is expected to grow to USD 15-20 Billion/year in 2017. Of this it is expected that traditional products will grow, but not as fast as the non-traditional market which will expect to claim 45% of the total bamboo market. Source: Mayank, M (2008) Techno-Economic Feasibility Study for Setting up Bamboo SMEs, NMBA, India

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Bamboo industry eyes slice of $7.5 bn world mkt ASHOK B SHARMA : NEW DELHI, APR 20, APR 21 2008, 00:14 IST

The poor man’s timber, bamboo, is no longer the orphan crop. It is gradually engaging the attention of the government, which has planned to diversify its uses to reap the benefits in the $7.5 billion global bamboo product market. India is the second richest bamboo resource country in the world, next only to China. In terms of genetic diversity, India has 136 bamboo species under 75 genera. About 89 bamboo species out of 126 recorded in India under 16 genera grow naturally in different forest areas or are cultivated. Though India has bamboo resources in about 9 million hectare, the yield is low at 3 tonne per hectare per annum as the cultivation is not intensively managed. China has gone for intensive commercial cultivation of bamboo and has increased the average yield to 25 tonne per hectare per annum. Within two decades of the initiatives, China has been able to convert their traditional bamboo-based handicrafts sector into a mechanised one. However, in India, the situation is under change with the launch of the National Bamboo Mission (NBM) a year ago. The mission has taken up the job of encouraging farmers to grow the right type of bamboos and facilitate bamboobased industries. “Our team visited China last year to study bamboo cultivation and bamboo-based industries. We invited Chinese bamboo-based industries to set up joint ventures in India,” the mission director and high commissioner of the NBM, ML Choudhary said. The NBM works in coordination with the Cane and Bamboo Technology Centre

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PARTICIPANT’S LIST / DETAIL LIST OF PARTICIPANTS OF INTEGRATED DESIGN AND TECHNICAL DEVELOPMENT PROJECT (IDP) ON BAMBOO AT AIZAWL.

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LIST OF PRODUCT DEVELOPED

LIST OF PRODUCT DEVELOPED

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LIST OF PRODUCT DEVELOPED

LIST OF PRODUCT DEVELOPED

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LIST OF PRODUCT DEVELOPED

LIST OF PRODUCT DEVELOPED

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PROTOTYPES SUBMITTED TO DC (HANDICRAFTS)

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PROTOTYPES SUBMITTED TO DC(H)

PROTOTYPES SUBMITTED TO DC (HANDICRAFTS)

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PROTOTYPES SUBMITTED TO DC(H)

PROTOTYPES SUBMITTED TO DC (HANDICRAFTS)

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PROTOTYPES SUBMITTED TO DC(H)

PROTOTYPES SUBMITTED TO DC (HANDICRAFTS)

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VISUALS OF THE WORKSHOP

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VISUALS OF THE WORKSHOP

VISUALS OF THE WORKSHOP

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VISUALS OF THE WORKSHOP

VISUALS OF THE WORKSHOP

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VISUALS OF THE WORKSHOP

VISUALS OF THE WORKSHOP

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VISUALS OF THE WORKSHOP

VISUALS OF THE WORKSHOP

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VISUALS OF THE WORKSHOP

VISUALS OF THE WORKSHOP

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PERFORMANCE CUM ACHIEVEMENT REPORT

PERFORMANCE CUM ACHIEVEMENT REPORT

PERFORMANCE CUM ACHIEVEMENT REPORT OF INTEGRATED DESIGN AND TECHNICAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME IN BAMBOO AT AIZAWL FROM February 2013 TO July 2013

National Centre for Design & Product 1 Name of the Organization

Development (NCDPD) 43, Okhla Industrial Estate-III, New Delhi-110020 Integrated Design and Technical

2 Name of the activity 3 Sanction Order No.

Development Programme In Bamboo At Aizawl J-12012/276(4)/2012-12/DSN(NER)

4 Detail of Venue

Dated 01.10.2012 Muallungthu, Aizawl

5 Date of commencement

02/02/2013

6 Date of completion

25/07/2013

7 Number of beneficiaries 50 8 Number of prototypes developed 40 in 2 sets O/o Development Commissioner (Handicrafts) sanctioned Product Development Programme for Export in Bamboo at Aizawl vide Sanction Order No. J12012/276(4)/2012-12/DSN(NER) Dated 01.10.2012. NCDPD organized the above workshop at Muallungthu, Aizawl during 02/02/2013 to 25/07/2013. During the Workshop 50 artisans were trained in Design Development, Product Development, skill development, Marketing & retailing etc. 40 new and innovative products of utility containers, clocks, jewellery, photo frames, lamp lights, etc. in 2sets were developed by the beneficiaries during the activity. As per the guide line of Sanction order one set of prototypes has been deposited with The Assistant Director Maktg. & Service Extn. Centre Office of DC (Handicrafts) C/o Mizoram H,loom & H,crafts Dev. Corpn. Ltd., (ZOHANDCO), Chaltang, Aizwal-796012 (Mizoram) and other set of prototypes will be test marketed during the IITF & IHGF.

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Process involved was as follows: 1. Cluster visit · Identifying artisans and master craftsmen · Understanding of the craft and its process (documentation of the craft in that particular region) · Products being developed in this region 2. Process of design Methodology · Research on the products being developed in fashion accessories items (existing) · Research of the trends and forecast as well as colour. 3. Design development · Developing new forms and shapes (Brain storming) · Development of new techniques to develop new products · Finalizing designs · Specification /detailing of the designs · Full sizing of the patterns involved (if any) · Total raw material involved 4. Development of the prototypes · Hand on working with crafts artisans · Finishing of all products · Costing of the products developed · Photography of the products developed · Market testing Designer Involved: Mr. Satyendra Kumar (NCDPD Designer) Experienced and qualified international and national designers specialized in hard goods conducted the program at Aizawl cluster and taught modern contemporary designs to the artisans. The products developed are new and innovative. The officials from O/o. Development Commissioner (Handicrafts) visited clusters and also addressed the participants. The prototypes were also inspected by the officials. The inspection was also made by the officials of DC (H).

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NCDPD SERVICES

NCDPD SERVICES

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Organised by :

SS 2013

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