Issuu on Google+

Paulo

COELHO The Alchemist


Paulo Coelho is one

of the world’s best-selling authors. In a little over twenty-five years, the stories told by this Brazilian writer have spread throughout every continent and become part of many cultures and of all our imaginations. Paulo is more than just an internationally successful author, he’s a writer who is loved and respected everywhere.

What few people know, however, is that Paulo’s life story, the main source of inspiration for his books, is even stranger than fiction. As he himself wrote in his first book, The Pilgrimage (1987), what he experienced in real life would seem highly improbable if turned into fiction.

© Marvin Zilm

From childhood on, Paulo’s journey has been a story of dogged determination. Up until he was 40, Paulo lived life intensely, overcoming obstacles and plunging into all the dilemmas and conflicts facing a young man in the 1970s, torn between God and the Devil. He


3

flirted with death, escaped madness, dallied with drugs, withstood torture, knew the pain and pleasure of love, found success in music and continued to pursue his one objective, to become, as he said when still an adolescent: ‘an established writer, who is read and respected throughout the world’. Over the years, Paulo’s strength and determination have been tested to the limit, but he has never lost sight of his goal. While his personal experience is unique, his stubborn, unceasing search for the meaning of life is universal. In looking for his own place in the world, he found answers for the problems afflicting us all and succeeded in putting into words the courage required to discover what now seems so obvious: all that matters is the present moment, all that matters is love. Paulo experimented with magic and alchemy, studied philosophy and religions of all kinds and creeds, read voraciously, lost and recovered his faith. Paulo set out on his spiritual search wanting to be different and to feel special; what he realized, though, is that ‘the extraordinary lies in the path of ordinary people’. He says that we all carry within ourselves the necessary strength to find our own destiny, to fight the ‘Good Fight’ and fulfill our ‘Personal Legend’. Paulo is certainly fulfilling his ‘Personal Legend’, and the story of his life is proof of this. As a screenwriter and film producer, I am lucky enough to be able to choose what work I do, and I only embark on a project when I fall in love with the story. Some screenwriters whom I greatly admire have told me that I’m mad to make fiction out of real-life stories, when the real difficulty, they say, is precisely that: setting the boundary between real life and fiction. The secret, for me, lies in respecting both things – fiction and reality. Paulo is a complex, controversial, polemical figure, who has lived every moment of his life as intensely as he could. His fantastical stories may seem unlikely, but his plots are truly universal: an example of perseverance triumphing over adversity. A real gift for any writer. The whole process of research for the film has taken seven intensive years of work. At first, Paulo is everything you would expect: strong, mysterious, unique, enigmatic. Gradually, though, he reveals himself to be a very cultivated, intelligent man, provocative and funny. And I discovered also that, deep inside him, there is still that suspicious, rebellious child, a man as in love with his wife as if he were an adolescent, a man who experiences the same conflicts and dramas as everyone else. And I realised that Paulo’s real story is even better than the stories he has invented and which have met with such success worldwide. I discovered, above all, that the secret of Paulo’s success lies in the transparency, courage and generosity with which, in both fiction and reality, he shares his story with his readers. In joy and sadness, in sickness and in health.

«Deep inside him, there is still

that suspicious, rebellious child, a man as in love with his wife as if he was an adolescent, a man who experiences the same conflicts and dramas as everyone else. And I realised that Paulo’s real story is even better than the stories he has invented and which have met with such success worldwide.» 444

In the film world, we say that a character isn’t what he says, but what he does. And I usually add that this applies to life as well: we really only get to know people through their actions, not their words. After spending these past seven years reading and researching, after many interviews and conversations, I can say that Paulo is one of those rare, delightful examples of someone whose words are completely at one with his actions. I feel sure that when he says in a song lyric ‘try again’ or writes in a book ‘keep on searching and you’ll find what you’re looking for’, he knows what he’s talking about. Não Pare na Pista [Keep On Driving] is a film about a man who draws strength from the difficulties he encounters, who walks his own path, and who, above all, won’t give up on his dream. A wonderful, deeply moving story that serves as an example to us all.

Carolina Kotscho Screenwriter of Não Pare na Pista [Keep On Driving]


film 4

Não Pare na Pista

Não Pare na Pista [Keep On Driving] is the title of a rock song written by Paulo Coelho and musician Raul Seixas back in the seventies, when they revolutionized the Brazilian music scene. But now it is also the title of a feature film inspired by the author’s life story. ‘Paulo Coelho is the most widely-read living author, but people don’t know much about his life. And his work and philosophy both draw on his life experiences,’ said producer Iôna de Macedo while filming on the Camino de Santiago de Compostela, the medieval pilgrimage route followed by Paulo Coelho more than 25 years ago that changed his life. That turning-point has now become the setting for a film about a boy who never gave up on his dream to become a writer.

Directed by Daniel Augusto and filmed on location in Brazil and Spain, the cast includes Ravel and Júlio Andrade (young and mature Paulo Coelho respectively), Paz Vega (Luiza), Lucci Ferreira (Raul Seixas) and Fabiana Gugli (Christina Oiticica). Because Paulo Coelho doesn’t want to interfere in this project inspired by his life, he has had only one meeting with Júlio Andrade – due to the insistence of the producers – in Geneva. ‘I am whatever people think I am,’ Coelho told him. A clear and simple statement that defines the author’s philosophy and helped the actor prepare for the role he was about to play. The movie is expected to include some spectacular make-up special effects provided by Academy Award-winning artists Montse Ribé, David Martí and Stephen Murphy as well as some remarkable sets from Pedro Almodóvar’s regular production designer, Antxón Gómez. It is hoped that Goya-award-winning composer, Lucio Godoy, will write the film score, which will take its inspiration from the songs of Raul Seixas and Paulo Coelho. The film is co-produced by Dama Filmes in Brazil and Babel Films in Spain, and was written by screenwriter-producer Carolina Kotscho. Não Pare na Pista will be in Brazilian cinemas in the first quarter of 2014. The working title for international release is expected to be The Pilgrim.


m

5


6

Facts & Figures

Coe 150 million copies

sold worldwide, published in 80 languages in more than 224 territories

827 versions

Writer with the highest number of social media followers

of Paulo Coelho’s works

26 books

published: 14 novels; 7 short story collections; 3 adaptations; 1 anthology; 1 tweetbook

Stationery line now available in countries: 10 diaries; 2 quotation books; 1 journal

39

115 international prizes and awards

Newspaper columns syndicated in media in 66 countries

192

65 theatre

adaptations of his works


7

elho Speaker at the World Economic Forum in Davos since 1998

Paulo Coelho Institute founded in 1996; it supports underprivileged Brazilian children

450

Member of the Brazilian Academy of Letters since 2002

Board Member of the Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship since 2000

Second most influential celebrity on Twitter in 2010 according to Forbes

United Nations Messenger of Peace since 2007

2004 Guinness World

Record for the most translations (53) of a single title (The Alchemist) signed in one sitting (45 min.)

Member of the Amnesty International Global Leadership Council since 2013

2009 Guinness

World Record for the most translated author for the same book (The Alchemist)


It’s always

© Romero Britto

very hard for me to talk about Paulo Coelho and about The Alchemist, the novel that made him a living classic. A publisher is the books s/he has published, the authors s/he has proposed, the successes and failures achieved (although time, of course, will be the final judge of that). Paulo Coelho and, in particular, The Alchemist, have been a part of my publishing life since 1994. And given that one only lives once – at least until someone proves otherwise – and given that I have always, and still do, put my all into my work, I can say that Paulo Coelho and The Alchemist are woven into the very fabric of my personal life. In a way, they are me.


9

«The Alchemist is not just a

To recall the 25 years since the first publication of The Alchemist is, therefore, to recall the beginnings of my life as a publisher, which means that personal and professional memories are very much intertwined, both the friendship that I feel for Paulo Coelho and Mônica Antunes and my awareness of their importance in literary and publishing terms. As I say, it was 1994 and I hadn’t long been working at Bompiani. Taking a chance on Paulo Coelho was not an easy decision for a publishing house whose strong point had traditionally been American and French fiction. The Alchemist was published in Brazil in 1988 and while it had been a great success, it wasn’t yet the best-seller it went on to become. Mônica Antunes first suggested it to me, through a person who left us only recently and whom I have great pleasure in recalling – Gigi Giannuzzi, founder of Trolley Books. Mônica – I can remember it as if it were yesterday – was convinced of the value of that book, not as an agent promoting a particular novel, but as an individual inviting someone else to read a book that had changed her life. Mônica was and is a reserved and elegant person, but always very firm in her convictions. She suggested Paulo’s book to me in 1994: it was the English version, published by the guys from HarperSanFrancisco (a special HarperCollins imprint). I read the book and thought it could fit in very well with our list, which for many years had included the legendary fairy tale The Little Prince by Saint-Exupéry (The Alchemist shares a similarly delicate narrative and thematic tone). So I built a kind of bridge between Saint-Exupéry’s work and Santiago the shepherd boy’s journey to find himself. It was worth trying. The book came out in the autumn of 1995 and, with the blind passion that occasionally grips me, I convinced the sales network to launch it with a print-run, which, on looking back, seems totally unrealistic: 50,000 copies. That is something for which Paulo has always been grateful to me. And, slowly but surely, the book began to sell very well and very widely. But there’s another important point which may seem to have nothing to do with The Alchemist. Many authors

novel from the past, it’s a novel that keeps coming back, that is always there, consciously, side by side with the author’s other novels. And side by side with us.» 444

write one book, a universal book, but find it hard to follow up with another equally forceful, expressive work, as if, after that initial achievement, they had lost their way, their thread, their inspiration. Well, this is not the case with Paulo Coelho, who has not only continued to write novels that have met with worldwide success, he has also continued to experiment with different subject areas and even different genres. This brings us back to The Alchemist (and this, for me, is the crucial point), because The Alchemist is a narrative representation of the search for knowledge. The Alchemist renews the great myths that described man’s desire to know the truth, above all about himself. And this thirst for knowledge is to be found not only in the novel, it is also, and above all, to be found in the author, Paulo, who, as man and as writer, has revealed that desire in novel after novel, year after year. And so The Alchemist is not just a novel from the past, it’s a novel that keeps coming back, that is always there, consciously, side by side with the author’s other novels. And side by side with us.

Elisabetta Sgarbi Publisher at Bompiani, Italy


10

The Alchemist «When you want something, the whole universe conspires to help you to achieve it.» The Alchemist

1980

1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

«While I was writing The Alchemist,

1993

1994

1995

I was trying to understand why we are here. Instead of writing a philosophical treatise, I decided to talk to the child inside my soul. To my surprise, millions of other people around the world responded to that inner child. With this book I wanted to share with my readers the questions that make life a great adventure precisely because they have no answer.» 444

1996


11

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

I remember receiving a letter from the American publisher, Harper Collins, which said: ‘reading The Alchemist was like getting up at dawn and seeing the sun rise while the rest of the world still slept.’ I went outside, looked up at the sky and thought to myself: ‘So, the book is going to be translated!’ At the time, I was struggling to establish myself as a writer and to follow my path despite all the voices telling me it was impossible. And little by little, my dream was becoming reality. Ten, a hundred, a thousand, a million copies sold. One day, a Brazilian journalist phoned to say that President Clinton had been photographed reading the book. Some time later I opened the magazine Vanity Fair and there was Julia Roberts declaring that she adored the book. Walking alone down a street in Miami, I heard a girl telling her mother: ‘You must read The Alchemist!’ The book has been translated into 80 languages, has sold more than 65 million copies, and people are beginning to ask: What’s the secret behind such a huge success? The only honest response is: I don’t know. All I know is that, like Santiago the shepherd, everyone needs to be aware of their Personal Legend.

Paulo Coelho

2013


12

Since its publication, The Alchemist has succeeded in every country where it has been published. In Brazil it has sold more copies than any other book in history. In the United States it has stayed on the New York Times paperback trade fiction best-seller list for longer than any other title. In France the novel topped the best-seller list for more than five years. In Germany the hardback edition beat all records after remaining in Der Spiegel’s best-seller list for over 306 weeks. In Australia it went straight to number one in the best-seller list in 1993. In Spanish, it became the biggest-selling book for several years throughout Latin America and Spain. In Russia it topped the best-seller list for five consecutive years. In Portugal, in 2002, it was declared to have sold more copies than any other book in the entire history of the Portuguese language, and Paulo Coelho is the country’s top-selling author. In Italy a special edition was published in 2012 commemorating the 100th edition of the book. In Norway a special edition includes texts written by students in 2012 who entered a contest entitled One Novel. Millions of Dreams. In South Africa it has been published in more than five languages. In India it has been translated into ten different languages. Around the world there have been theatre adaptations, musicals, puppets, operas and songs (such as the Japanese Acidman), all inspired by the novel.


13

June 16, 2013

THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW

Copyright 2013 © by The New York Times

Print Paperback Best Sellers This week

TRADE FICTION

WEEKS ON LIST

1

WORLD WAR Z, by Max Brooks (Three

49

Rivers.) An “oral history” of an imagined Zombie War that nearly destroys civilization

2

BEAUTIFUL RUINS, by Jess Walter (Harper Perennial.) Ruins both emotional and architectural, in Italy, Hollywood and elsewhere, figure in this sweeping novel.

9

3

FIFTY SHADES OF GREY, by E. L. James (Vintage.) An inexperienced college student falls in love with a tortured man who has particular sexual tastes; the first book in a trilogy.

64

4

THE ALCHEMIST, by Paulo Coelho

255

(HarperOne.) In this fable, a Spanish shepherd boy ventures to Egypt in search of treasure and his destiny.

The Alchemist is a key text for young readers (the novel is a favourite for high school graduation gifts) and it has become part of the imaginative world of a whole new generation. Last year, British actress Emma Watson was seen reading the book during her holidays, and McFly vocalist, Tom Fletcher, said he read the novel on a flight back home and found it ‘absolutely amazing’. So there is a new public not only reading the novel every year, but also sharing it and talking about it. Positive word-of-mouth reviews ensure that The Alchemist remains essential reading, more relevant than ever.

Instituto de Formacão de Professores de Angonia (IFP). Tete Province, Mozambique


14

Veronika Decides to Die «Be crazy! But learn how to be crazy without being the centre of attention. Be brave enough to live differently.» Veronika Decides To Die

1980

1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

‘I entered a tiled cubicle. There was a bed covered with a rubber sheet and beside the bed some sort of apparatus with a handle. “So you’re going to give me electric shock treatment,” I said to Dr Benjamim Gaspar Gomes. “Don’t worry. It’s far more traumatic watching someone being treated than actually having the treatment yourself. It doesn’t hurt at all.” I lay down and the male nurse put a kind of tube in my mouth so that my tongue wouldn’t roll back. Then, on either temple, he placed two electrodes, rather like the earpieces of a telephone. I was looking up at the peeling paint on the ceiling when I heard the handle being turned. The next moment, a curtain seemed to fall over my eyes; my vision quickly reduced down to a single point, and then everything went dark. The doctor was right; it didn’t hurt at all.’ The scene I have just described is not taken from my latest book. It comes from the diary I wrote during my second stay in a mental hospital. That was in 1966, the beginning

On 22 January 1999, Brazilian Senator Eduardo Suplicy read out passages from Veronika Decides to Die to the other senators and managed to get approval for a law which they had been trying to get through the Congress for the last ten years, a law forbidding arbitrary admissions into mental institutions. 444

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

of the blackest period of Brazil’s military dictatorship (1964-1989) and, as if by some natural reflex of the social mechanism, that external repression was gradually becoming internalised. So much so that good middle-class families found it simply unacceptable that their children or grandchildren should want to be ‘artists’. In Brazil at the time, the word ‘artist’ was synonymous with homosexual, communist, drug addict and layabout. When I was 18, I believed that my world and that of my parents could coexist peacefully. I did my best to get good marks, I worked every afternoon, but at night, I wanted to live out my dream of being an artist. Not knowing quite where to begin, I became involved in an amateur theatre group. Although I had no desire to act professionally, at least I was amongst people with whom I felt some affinity. Unfortunately, my parents did not share my belief in the peaceful coexistence of two such diametrically opposed worlds. One night, I came home drunk, and the following morning, I was woken by two burly male nurses. […] The situation I found myself in was so strange, so extreme, that it brought with it something unprecedented: total freedom. All my family’s efforts to make me the same as everyone else had exactly the opposite result: I was now completely different from all the other young men of my own age. When I came out of hospital for the third time […] I was nearly twenty and had become accustomed to that rhythm of events. This time, however, something had changed. Although I again got into ‘bad company’, my parents were growing reluctant to have me readmitted to a mental hospital. Unbeknown to me, they were by then convinced that I was a hopeless case, and preferred to keep me with them and to support me for the rest of my life. My behaviour went from bad to worse, I became more aggressive, but still there was no mention of hospital. I experienced a period of great joy as I tried to exercise my

1996


15

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

so-called freedom, in order, finally, to live the ‘artist’s life’. […] For one long year, I did exactly as I pleased; but then the theatre group was broken up by the political police, the bars became infiltrated by spies, my stories were rejected by every publisher I sent them to, and none of the girls I knew wanted to go out with me - because I was a young man without a future, with no real career, and who had never even been to university. So, one day, I decided to trash my bedroom. It was a way of saying, without words: ‘You see, I can’t live in the real world. I can’t get a job, I can’t realise my dream. I think you’re absolutely right: I am mad, and I want to go back to the mental hospital!’ Fate can be so ironic. When I had finished wrecking my room, I was relieved to see that my parents were phoning the psychiatric hospital. However, the doctor who usually dealt with me was on holiday. The nurses arrived with a junior doctor in tow. He saw me sitting there surrounded by torn-up books, broken records, ripped curtains, and asked my family and the nurses to leave the room. ‘What’s going on?’ he asked. I didn’t reply. A madman should always behave like someone not of this world. ‘Stop playing around,’ he said. ‘I’ve been reading your case history. You’re not mad at all, and I won’t admit you to the hospital.’ He left the room, wrote a prescription for some tranquillisers and (so I found out later) told my parents that I was suffering from ‘admission syndrome’. Normal people who, at some point, find themselves in an abnormal situation - such as depression, panic, etc. - occasionally use illness as an alternative to life. That is, they choose to be ill, because being ‘normal’ is too much like hard work. My parents listened to his advice and never again had me admitted into a mental institution. […]

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

In 1997, after an exhausting promotional tour across three continents, I began to notice a very odd phenomenon: what I had wanted on that day when I trashed my bedroom seemed to be something a lot of other people wanted too. People preferred to live in a huge asylum, religiously following rules written by who knows who, rather than fighting for the right to be different. [...] Between normality and madness, which are basically the same thing, there exists an intermediary stage: it is called ‘being different’. And people were becoming more and more afraid of ‘being different’. I decided to write a book based on my own experiences. I wrote Veronika Decides to Die, in the third person and using my feminine ego, because I knew that the important subject to be addressed was not what I personally had experienced in mental institutions, but, rather, the risks we run by being different and yet our horror of being the same. [...] Veronika Decides to Die came out in Brazil in August 1998. By September, I had received more than 1,200 e-mails and letters relating similar experiences. In October, some of the themes touched on in the book - depression, panic attacks, suicide - were discussed in a seminar that had national repercussions.

Paulo Coelho

2013


16

Eleven Minutes «Meetings are planned by the souls long before the bodies see each other.» Eleven Minutes

1980

1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

NEW EDITION COMING SOON!

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

During my lifetime , my experience of sex has been both various and contradictory. I was born into a conservative age, where virginity was the defining characteristic of any good, decent, proper woman. I witnessed the arrival of the contraception pill and the antibiotic, both indispensable ingredients of the sexual revolution that followed. I participated fully and intensely in the whole hippy period, when we went to the opposite extreme, even practising free love at rock concerts. I have ended up back in a semi-conservative, semiliberal age haunted by a new illness resistant to antibiotics, an age in which no one knows quite where we are heading […] It is part of a writer’s job to reflect on his own life, which is why a book about sexuality came to be a priority for me. At first, I thought I would write about an ideal relationship between two people and I made several attempts at writing that, all of which came to nothing. It wasn’t until I met the prostitute who was to become the narrative thread in my book that I understood why the story wasn’t working: because in order to speak about sublime sex, you have to start from the point where we all begin: the fear that everything will turn out badly.

Eleven Minutes commemorative edition designed by Marcos Borges

1996


17

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

Eleven Minutes is not intended as a manual or a treatise on men and women confronting the still unknown world of sexual relationships. It is an analysis of my own journey, but not a judgement on my own experiences. It took me a long while to realise that the physical coming together of two bodies is more than just a response to certain physical stimuli or to the drive to perpetuate the species. In fact, it carries with it all the cultural baggage of humankind. Sex is one of the areas in our life where it is considered normal to lie. We lie in order to give pleasure to our partner, not realising that the lie can – and will – infect everything else that matters to us. We forget that sex is a manifestation of a spiritual energy called love. […] However, none of this can be learned from a book, which really only describes its author’s own experiences or views. Sex means, above all, having the courage to live with your paradoxes, your individuality, your desire to give yourself. That’s why I wrote Eleven Minutes: to see if, at that particular stage in my life, at the age of 55, I was brave enough to learn everything that life has tried to teach me about sex.

Paulo Coelho

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

«In order to speak about

2012

sublime sex, you have to start from the point where we all begin: the fear that everything will turn out badly.» 444

2013


18

Manuscript Found in Accra «Love is only a word, until someone arrives to give it meaning.» Manuscript Found in Accra

1980

1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

Manuscript Found in Accra

is the first book by Paulo Coelho to embrace the new digital culture. The author already has a huge online community, and the new novel has connected directly with that audience, having a real impact on those who follow Coelho on social networks. Even though the novel has been published in book form, it has met with enormous success digitally too. People have taken the words and shared them in their profiles, and that’s because the text is written in a way that allows for fragmentation, a fact that could define how we communicate and read nowadays. Chief scientist at C.E.S.A.R., Silvio Meira, analyzed Coelho’s work: ‘What’s most interesting

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

about his approach is not only what he says, but what he suggests about how texts should be read. In this iPod shuffle worldview, anything and everything can be read selectively.’ Readers find in the book the perfect way to communicate: they convert quotes and extracts into something personal they want to share with friends and relatives. Quotations from the new novel have reached millions of readers and reinforced the author’s presence in a new and rapidly changing world. Indeed, according to Meira, Manuscript Found in Accra perfectly exemplifies how we now read and interact, and is a great example of what texts will be like in the near future.

1996


19

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

«For me, the incredible

thing about Manuscript Found in Accra is that Paulo has not simply created a synthesis of all his previous ideas, it isn’t a mere distillation of his thinking, but a completely new departure.» 444

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

Manuscript Found in Accra

leaves us with a sense of having pondered some of the questions we would inevitably have asked on our journey through life and that Paulo has helped us to formulate those questions and find a certain serenity in the answers. The most impressive thing about the book is that it isn’t merely a collection of thought-provoking quotations. The message spelled out by the book’s protagonist is more than just a lot of sound advice; what matters is the way he constructs his answers. Paulo places a key chapter in the very centre of the book. ‘Your words are beautiful,’ one young man disagreed, ‘but the truth is that we never have much choice. Life and our community have already taken charge of planning our fate.’ It is one of the most beautiful chapters I have ever read. It teaches us how to look at the world as if for the first time. For me, the incredible thing about Manuscript Found in Accra is that Paulo has not simply created a synthesis of all his previous ideas, it isn’t a mere distillation of his thinking, but a completely new departure. Cristóbal Pera Editorial Director of Random House Mexico

2013


© Catalina Estrada

20

Paulo Coelho’s Sharing Day Planner 2014 A beautiful and colorful edition illustrated by Catalina Estrada. Arranged in sections, the 2014 edition is a wonderful journey through the year with a selection of Paulo Coelho’s best quotes. 264 pages to explore the feelings, thoughts and ideas found in the author’s writings.


© Joong Hwan Hwangm

21

Paulo Coelho’s Magical Moment Tweetbook This book, originally published in Korea, is a collection of wise sayings that have fascinated Coelho fans around the world. Its 288 beautiful pages are illustrated by Joong Hwan Hwangm. If you love Paulo Coelho’s tweets, you’ll love this book.


22

Paulo Coelho’s Digital World «Feedback is also possible through my blogs. I check the messages every day, and I’m genuinely moved by the beautiful words of wisdom that my readers share with me. In a way the Internet means that a writer can be less alone, can debate ideas, share information and be inspired by his readers.» Paulo Coelho


23

New App Get access to my daily quotes, enter my page on Facebook, follow my tweets, read my posts on the blog or watch my videos and interviews on YouTube. You will be the first to know about any new books and be able to download some of my signed photographs. My whole world is just one click away. I hope you enjoy it! Paulo Coelho


Paulo Coelho’s Books Novels

ANTHOLOGIES / Essays

Manuscript Found in Accra Aleph The Winner Stands Alone The Witch of Portobello The Zahir Eleven Minutes The Devil and Miss Prym Veronika Decides to Die Manual of the Warrior of Light The Fifth Mountain By the River Piedra I Sat Down and Wept The Valkyries Brida The Alchemist The Pilgrimage

Inspirations Like the Flowing River Love Letters from a Prophet Maktub O Dom Supremo: The Greatest Gift The Way of the Bow The Book of Manuals

Gift books / Stationery Tweetbook Day Planner Love Life

Contact Passeig Garcia i Faria, 73-75, Torre A, 7º 5º 08019 Barcelona, Spain Phone +34 93 224 01 07 Fax + 34 93 356 26 96 mail@santjordi-asociados.com www.santjordi-asociados.com

More on the author www.paulocoelho.com www.paulocoelhoblog.com www.facebook.com/paulocoelho www.twitter.com/paulocoelho


Paulo Coelho 'The Alchemist' 25th Anniversary