Issuu on Google+

THE OFFICIAL 2010 SANTA FE VISITORS GUIDE


Buf falo T hunde r Re sor t & Ca sino...

Santa Fe's Playground!

Under a canopy of stars, an ancient rhythm rises with the moon, stirs the heart, and the dance begins. Discover the allure of Native American culture, culinary delights, celebrity entertainment, and the thrill of gaming in Las Vegas style. 505.455.5555 | 877.THUNDER gaming

| hotel | fine dining | spa | golf | nightclub

B u f f a l oT h u n d e r R e s o r t . c o m

W I N U P TO $ 2 5 0 I N F R E E S L OT P L AY G UA R A N T E E D ! Join our Lightning Rewards Player’s Club Today! Must be 21 years of age.

Located 15 minutes north of the Santa Fe Plaza on Highway 84/285


Santa Feâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only Native American Owned Hotel. 9\PNaRQ V[ Q\d[a\d[ @N[aN 3R V[ aUR URN_a \S aUR [Rd 4bNQNYb]R ?NVYfN_Q 1V`a_VPa \b_ b[]N_NYYRYRQ ]R_`\[NY `R_cVPR dN_ZaU N[Q U\`]VaNYVaf ZNXR f\b SRRY Na U\ZR 3\_ aUR bYaVZNaR ]NZ]R_V[T N[Q Ybeb_f `aNf V[ \b_ 5NPVR[QN ´ dVaU ¾_R]YNPR` V[ RNPU _\\Z N[Q \[PNYY ObaYR_` a\ SbY¾YY f\b_ Z\`a ReNPaV[T _R^bR`a` <b_ [Rd `]N N[Q ¾a[R`` PR[aR_ V` aUR ]R_SRPa ]YNPR a\ Y\`R f\b_`RYS V[ N ;NaVcR .ZR_VPN[ V[`]V_RQ a_RNaZR[a aUNa Q_Nd` \[ N[PVR[a URNYV[T aRPU[V^bR` ""&% %&! %#! dddU\aRY`N[aNSRP\Z

The Secret of Great Santa Fe Hospitality is out.

Your Unforgettable Welcome to The Historic City

3\_ aU\`R `RRXV[T N[ RYRTN[a fRa NSS\_QNOYR NYaR_[NaVcR a\ @N[aN 3R¸` b]`PNYR SbYY`R_cVPR U\aRY` Y\\X [\ Sb_aUR_ aUN[9N` =NY\ZN` <b_ PUN_ZV[T V[[ \SSR_` N U\`a \S `abQV\ N[Q \[RORQ_\\Z NPP\ZZ\QNaV\[` ]R_SRPaYf QR`VT[RQ S\_ P\b]YR` N[Q SNZVYVR` NYVXR

.[ V[cVaV[T UNcR[ \S a_NQVaV\[NY @\baUdR`aR_[ U\`]VaNYVaf NdNVa` f\b Na aUR 6[[ \[ aUR =N`R\ @\]UV`aVPNaRQ PVaf PUN_Z N[Q YNVQONPX P\b[a_f YVcV[T P_RNaR aUR ]R_SRPa `RaaV[T S\_ f\b_ _\ZN[aVP TRaNdNf

%$$&%""# dddYN`]NY\ZN`P\Z

%!"$&!" dddV[[\[aUR]N`R\P\Z


6

Masthead

9

Letter from the Mayor

11

Map of Northern New Mexico

12

Map of Downtown Santa Fe

DOUGLAS MERRIAM

13

Map of Greater Santa Fe

CHRIS CORRIE

14

City at a Glance Getting acquainted with Santa Fe

19

Ways to Explore Themed lists of ideas help you do more of what you like best

20

Beyond the City Day trips with history, culture, and natural beauty

26

Visual Arts Santa Fe—the biggest little art city in the world

32

Distinctive Cuisine Dining out in the City Deliciously Different

37

City of Culture Homegrown talent and world-renowned performers share Santa Fe spotlights

41

Mind and Body Santa Fe’s best ways to relax and rejuvenate

46

The City Creative How Santa Fe is designing its future

ANN MURDY

48

Santa Famous Santa Fe’s legacies of cinema and star power

DIANNE STROMBERG

50

Traveling to Santa Fe

52

Visitors Directory

55

Events Calendar

59

Lodging Guide

63

Attractions & Resources 2010 santa fe visitors guide 3


Luna Moruna Productions Presents

Juan Siddi

Flamenco Theatre Company 2010

SUMMER

SEASON

Photos: Morgan Smith, Scott Sutton

“...this tightly knit company distills centuries of tradition into an unforgettable couple of hours. +++++” — Bill Dunning, New Mexico Free Press, 2009

J U N E 2 5 - A U G U S T 1 5 T U E S D AYS T H R O U G H S U N D AYS 8 : 3 0 P. M . M a r i a B e n i t e z T h e at r e / T h e L o d ge at S a n t a Fe / 7 5 0 N o r t h St . Fr a n c i s D r i ve T i c ke t s ava i l a b l e at t h e L e n s i c Box O f f i c e 5 0 5 . 9 8 8 .1 2 3 4 o r p u r c h a s e o n l i n e at w w w. J u a n S i d d i F l a m e n c o . c o m


THE OFFICIAL 2010 SANTA FE VISITORS GUIDE

The Official 2010 Santa Fe Visitors Guide is provided as a service by the city of santa fe convention & visitors bureau 201 W Marcy Street Santa Fe, NM 87501 800-777-2489 www.santafe.org mayor David Coss city manager Galen Buller city council Patti J. Bushee, Chris Calvert, Miguel Chavez Carmichael Dominguez, Matthew Ortiz Rosemary Romero, Ronald Trujillo Rebecca Wurzburger, Mayor Pro Tem occupancy tax advisory board Miguel Castillo, Jon Hendry, Paul Margetson, Mary Bomey, Kim Klinkrodt convention & visitors bureau Keith Toler, Executive Director Mary Pat Kloenne, Director of Sales Mara Saubers, Sales Manager Shirley Spencer, Sales and Marketing Assistant Cyndi Catanach, CVB Project Manager Eva “Reggie” Cox, Information Specialist Patricia Baros, Information Specialist Marissa Romero, Information Specialist Phyllis Archuleta, Administrative Marketing Assistant Joe Lovato, Administrative Assistant Bernard Valdez, Mailroom/Information Specialist Lead Worker Sam Montoya, Mail/Duplicating Technician Ray Romero, Mail/Duplicating Technician Darlene Griego, Convention Center Business Manager William Trujillo, Operations Manager Rosalina Grace, Convention Services Supervisor Melanie Moore, Convention Services Manager The Official 2010 Santa Fe Visitors Guide is published by Santa Fean magazine for the City of Santa Fe Convention & Visitors Bureau publisher Bruce Adams editor in chief Devon Jackson senior editor Dianna Delling art director Demitri Fregosi account executives Anne Mulvaney, Emilie McIntyre, Robbie O’Neill Santa Fean 215 W San Francisco Street, Suite 202A Santa Fe, NM 87501 505-983-1444, fax 505-983-1555 Copyright 2010 by the City of Santa Fe Convention & Visitors Bureau. Santa Fean magazine and the Santa Fe Convention & Visitors Bureau have made every effort to maintain the accuracy of information presented in this directory, but assume no responsibility for errors, changes, or omissions. Santa Fean and the SFCVB in no way warrant or assume liability for the products and services offered. Inclusion in this publication does not imply endorsement by Santa Fean or the SFCVB.

www.santafe.org

6 Santafe.org


From your kitchen counter to your pocket... and everything in between!

Santa Fe Stoneworks Studio & Gallery 3790 Cerrillos Road Santa Fe, NM 87507 xäxU{Ç£UΙxÎÊÊÊÊÊÊÊnääUÓxÇUÇÈÓxÊ santafestoneworks.com

Cutlery of Santa Fe £äÇÊ"`Ê->˜Ì>ÊiÊ/À>ˆÊ­JÊ>Êœ˜`>ÊœÌi® ->˜Ì>Êi]Ê ÊnÇxä£ xäxU™nÓUÎÓÈÓÊVÕ̏iÀޜvÃ>˜Ì>vi°Vœ“


It’s my pleasure to welcome you to Santa Fe, America’s oldest capital city. Creativity and inspiration are part of Santa Fe’s identity—from architecture and design to world-class dining and galleries, to views of serene mountains and endless skies. Santa Fe is a city that takes great pride in its past while also looking toward the future. The historic Plaza is among our most popular attractions, but I hope you will also visit our new, green, state-of-the-art Santa Fe Community Convention Center and the recently redeveloped 50-acre Railyard Park and Plaza. Hiking, biking, and skiing top the list of outdoor activities to enjoy, depending on the season. And, of course, no visit to Santa Fe is complete without a taste of our spicy Northern New Mexican cuisine. Finally, I hope you’ll see that Santa Fe is not only a wonderful place to visit; it’s also a great place to live. Santa Fe is proud to be a national leader in the Living Wage movement and affordable housing—both progressive and meaningful efforts that enable our families to live, not just work, in Santa Fe. We are promoting local businesses, well-paying jobs, and workforce development, while also striving to make Santa Fe the alternative-energy capital of the country and supporting our premier arts community. As you take in the sights, sounds, and tastes of our 400-year-old community, you will see why Santa Fe frequently tops lists of the country’s healthiest cities, best places to live, and top travel destinations.

DOUGLAS MERRIAM

dear visitors,

Warmest regards,

david coss, mayor

B_\[_iX[jj[hm_j^ W=h[WjH[Y_f[ If_Y[kfoekhl_i_jm_j^_dYh[Z_Xb[Yeea_d]YbWii[i WdZZ[YWZ[djh[ijWkhWdjmWba_d]jekhi$Ehij[f_dje ekhCWha[jWdZjWa[^ec[j^[Ód[ijD[mC[n_YWd \eeZi"Y^_b["^[hXi"iWbiWiWdZYeeaXeeai$

9[b[XhWj_d]j^[jhWZ_j_edWb\eeZi e\D[mC[n_Ye\eh(&o[Whi$ mmm$iWdjW\[iY^eebe\Yeea_d]$Yec +&+#/.)#*+'''',M$IWd<hWdY_iYeIj$

2010 santa fe visitors guide 9


GO GOLD FISHING

Play at the Cities of Gold Casino and we guarantee youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll win ... no fish tale. See promotions booth for complete details. Good people, good food, bowling lanes, and hot games are waiting for you.

CASINO s DINING s HOTEL s BOWLING s 505.455.3313 s CITIESOFGOLD.COM L O C AT E D 1 5 M I L E S N O R T H O F T H E S A N TA F E P L A Z A O N H W Y 8 4 / 2 8 5


TO PAGOSA SPRINGS Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad

NORTHERN NEW MEXICO

CHAMA TIERRA AMARILLA

Heron Lake

TO COLORADO

TRES PIEDRAS

Red River Ski Area

64

QUESTA Rio Grande

84

285

150

Rio Chama

Eagle Nest Lake

Echo Amphitheater

Rio Grande Gorge Bridge TAOS JUNCTION

Ghost Ranch Living Museum

285 Georgia O’Keeffe House

ABIQUIÚ

84

LOS ALAMOS

San 502 Ildefonso Pueblo

Jemez Springs Bandelier National Monument Cochiti Lake

550

RANCHOS DE TAOS 68

Cochiti Pueblo

Rail Runner Express Route

LEGEND

POJOAQUE Pojoaque Pueblo

Santa Fe Opera Santa Fe Airport

475 Hyde Memorial State Park

SANTA FE

SANTA FE

Pecos National Historic LAMY Park

40

TO LAS VEGAS

LAS VEGAS

ALBUQUERQUE

TUCUMCARI

40

285

25

ROSWELL

TRUTH OR CONSEQUENCES

CERRILLOS MADRID

GALISTEO

285 10

Sandia Ski Area 536

ALBUQUERQUE

PECOS

25

14

25

AREA OF DETAIL GALLUP

Rail Runner Express Route

Coronado State Monument and Park

Taos and the High Road Abuquiu and Ghost Ranch The Eight Northern Pueblos The Jemez Mountain Trail and Los Alamos The Turquoise Trail and Madrid Pecos National Historic Park and the Pecos Wilderness

Santa Fe Ski Basin

599

Rio Grande

Kasha-Kutane Tent Rock National Monument

518 Picuris Pueblo

Nambé Pueblo

Tesuque Pueblo 84 Tesuque 285 Flea Market

4

4

Angel Fire Ski Area

570

503

Santa Clara 30 Pueblo

Pajarto Ski Area

64

75 DIXON 518 LAS TRAMPAS 76 Sipapu Ski Area Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan) Pueblo TRUCHAS TO LAS VEGAS CHIMAYÓ

ESPANOLA

Valles Caldera National Preserve

Taos Pueblo

TAOS

567

OJO CALIENTE EMBUDO STATION

Abiquiú Lake

Jemez Pueblo

Enchanted Forest Ski Area EAGLE NEST

Taos Ski Valley

522

64

RED RIVER

38

LAS CRUCES

41 EL PASO, TX

40

CLINES CORNERS

2010 santa fe visitors guide 11


ge

Cerr illo

3

Railway Gardens

d

Me

ce qu ia

mo rial

Garcia

X

Visitor Information

Alcaldesa

hw ay)

30 V 26

Hig

yo nR

E De Vargas St

M adre

Public Parks

H

Hospital

S

ter ( Ve s s pa By

Rd er Sil

ards

Rich

Ave

Dr rano Zafa

29 9 34 X

X

5

EXIT 278 CERRILLOS RD Turquoise Trail

Richards Ave

os

Bataan Museum 32 Santa Fe Community Convention Center Bataan Memorial 33 Santa Fe Country Club 599 Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi 34 Santa Fe Place Mall Center for Contemporary Arts 35 Santa Fe Southern Railway/New Mexico RailRunner Chamber of Commerce/Santa Fe Outlets 36 Santuario de Guadalupe Children’s Museum 37 SITE Santa Fe Christo Rey Church 38 St. John’s College Christus St. Vincent’s Hospital 39 State Capitol City Bus Station To Marty Sanchez City Hall Links de Santa Fe College of Santa Fe Golf Course Cross of the Martyrs De Vargas Center Mall Dog Park Farmers Market Federal Courthouse Federal Post Office Fort Marcy Complex Airport Rd Genoveva Chavez Community Center Georgia O’Keeffe Museum 33 Museum of Contemporary Native Arts SANTA FE Lensic Performing Arts Center AIRPORT Loretto Chapel e Rd Museum Hill – Indian Arts & Culture, tag n s o o P L r in Folk Art, Spanish Colonial Art, Wheelwright Museum F To El Rancho New Mexico Museum of Art de las Golondrinas 14 New Mexico Department of Tourism Palace of the Governors/New Mexico History Museum To Albuquerque Public Library Rodeo Grounds San Miguel Mission Santa Fe Community College

d

V

P St

sR

Public Restrooms

Guadalupe

P

Fe

Webber St

spar Av e Don G a X

Farmers Market Chili Line Lane

P

St

STATE CAPITOL

SITE X P Santa Fe

s Rd

P

lo

City of Santa Fe Parking

ace A ve

Camino de la Familia

ril

P

ALTA Galiste o St

z Rd

Go me

Public Parking

23

X

P

an s

P P

Camino de la Familia

St

Ce r

P

S

Ot ero St

Linc oln A ve Was hing ton Ave

EW ater St

arcy

Sa n ta

X

THE RAILYARD

A

O RILL CER

RD

E Pal

PLAZA21

DOWNTOWN SANTA FE 12

2

X

X

DE PER

Bi sh

Old

Sa nd ov al S t

Gal iste oS t

Gua dalu pe S t

P

EM

28 X

Trail nta Fe Old Sa

X

25 26 27 28 29 30 31

X

Mont ezum a Ave

PASEO

37

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

X

39

15

P

W Sa lace 27 n Fra Ave nc22 isco St

Al am eda St

See Inset at Right

LEGEND

Grant Ave

Park A ve

X

9 P W Pa25

d

n Ca

P

THE 35 RAILYARD

ral P 16 PX l

X

V

st R

a alt er eP od se Pa

P

Fed e

Pl ral Cathed

X

20

St

Ar ti

PAS EO D P E PEP RAL 17 T

32 10 Johnson

36 a St a Fri Agu

od ’sL p o

A

W

Alto St

t nS iffi Gr

ron St Cat

Rd

wy

pe alu

Rosario Blvd

St

13

Taos H

ad Gu X

P 18

31


To Taos, Santa Fe Opera 84 and Flea Market 285

N

Fort Marcy Ball Park

par A ve Don Gas

ge ho Bis Del gad o St

Pec os T rail

r

To Dale Ball Trails

38 24

ta Fe Tra

il

Old H 8

Old San

Old

Rey

anas Camp

rail os T Pec

r l os o Ca

e Las

Yucca Rd

Camin

ida d Aven

Botulph Rd

Pacheco St

Siringo Rd

Cam ino Lejo

abra Camino C

Rd

d

General Franklin E Miles Park

Mo Monica Lucero Park

St Francis Dr

St

Ave

ez

St Michaels D r

San Mateo Rd

nte Sol Mo del

ge

Ma 11

nta Fe Tr 1 ail 4 6 Cor d ova Rd

Camino

lo

Patrick Smith Park

St

ril

Alta Vista St

nd co Se

Osa

St

r Ce

d sR

Salvador Perez Park

ia rc

Frenchy’s Field Park & Commons

ria aF u Ag

Paseo de Pera lta

Ga

er Riv

EA lam ed Can yon a Rd Acequ ia M adre 7

Old S a

Fe nta a S

Railyard Station

St Baca

W

t ria S aF u Ag St Hickox

475 To Ski Santa Fe and Dale Ball Trails

Hospital D

re Ali no mi Ca

St da e m Ala

Bicentennial Park

Park Rd de y H Artist Rd /

eo de Pe ral ta Pas

Gali steo St

t da S lame A W

See Inset at Left

St Francis Dr

Santa Fe Depot

Ave

X

St

a zum nte Mo

Manhattan Ave

P Market

Old Ta os H w

Alamo

Don Diego Ave

Ortiz (Doggie) Park

P

19

Cr u as cit

14

t eS lup ada Gu

m i no d e Las Ca

CITY OF SANTA FE

p’s Lo d

y

599

Rd

Dr is c an Fr St

Ragle Park

Rodeo Rd

s ga Ve as dL Ol

EXIT 282 ST FRANCIS DR

EXIT 284 OLD PECOS TRAIL

y wa gh Hi

84 285 To Las Vegas, NM and Eldorado

2010 santa fe visitors guide 13


PHOTO BY SETH ROFFMAN; COURTESY SANTA FE CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

ANN MURDY

JULIEN MCROBERTS

DOUGLAS MERRIAM

14 Santafe.org

CHRIS CORRIE


CHRIS CORRIE

MARK KANE

getting acquainted with Santa Fe

Adobe Architecture Santa Fe’s most popular nickname, the City Different, is a proud representation of its residents’ belief in distinguishing themselves by thinking outside the box while also honoring their roots. Nowhere is this more apparent than in Santa Fe’s distinctive adobe buildings—genuine representations of the city’s history as a confluence of Spanish and Native American cultures, among many others. Adobe, a durable material used for centuries to construct the area’s pueblos, is produced by combining sand, clay, water, and fibrous organic matter like sticks or straw. Adobe buildings were traditionally made by shaping the mud-based substance into bricks, with supports provided by large logs, called vigas. One of Santa Fe’s oldest examples is the Palace of the Governors. These days, the word adobe is commonly used to refer to Santa Fe’s dominant architectural style, which incorporates design elements of both Pueblo and Pueblo-influenced Spanish adobe constructions into buildings made with modern materials. This “faux-dobe” style includes Spanish Pueblo Revival architecture, championed by early-20th-century Santa Fe architects John Gaw Meem and Carlos Vierra. One of the fi rst (and best known) such buildings constructed in Santa Fe is the New Mexico Museum of Art.

Climate and Geography As a high-desert town situated at the foothills of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains (the southern end of the Rockies), Santa Fe has a mild climate with four distinct seasons and an annual rainfall of about 14 inches. Snow is typical in winter, with an annual average of 32 inches, although snowfall is erratic and most days are sunny. Spring and summer are also sunny, with typically warm and windy conditions leading into near-daily afternoon thunderstorms by midJuly. Lasting through early September, this stormy period is called “monsoon season” by locals, and can be dangerous due to flash floods and lightning. During fall, the aspen and cottonwood trees in the surrounding areas turn bright gold as the air cools down. But with an average of 300 days of sunshine each year, there’s no off-season for being outdoors in Santa Fe. Santa Fe is a high-altitude city, sitting at 7,000 feet above sea level (with nearby mountains reaching above 12,000 feet), so adapting to the thinner air generally takes several days. Don’t be surprised if you fi nd yourself out of breath. Doctors recommend being relatively sedentary for the fi rst few days and drinking extra water to stay hydrated. Also be aware that the altitude may amplify the effects of alcohol, and due to our proximity to the sun, sunburn is a risk at any time of year.

Nearby Nature Santa Fe’s longest park lies along portions of the 46-mile-long Santa Fe River, an intermittently flowing tributary of the Rio Grande that runs across town through the River Canyon from east to west: along Upper Canyon Road, between Alameda Street and Canyon Road through

NORMAL SANTA FE HIGH/LOW TEMPERATURES January 47/13°F 8/-10°C February 49/19°F 10/-7°C March 55/23°F 13/-5°C April 64/30°F 18/-1°C May 72/38°F 22/3°C June 82/47°F 28/9°C July 85/53°F 30/12°C August 82/51°F 28/11°C September 76/44°F 24/7°C October 68/34°F 20/1°C November 55/24°F 13/-5°C December 48/16°F 9/-9°C Source: accuweather.com 2010 santa fe visitors guide 15


downtown, and then between Alameda and Agua Fria Street to the edge of the city. Reduced to a trickle after decades of neglect and insufficient flow—it has been dammed upstream of town, for drinking water, since 1881—the river is now receiving attention through Mayor David Coss’s broad-reaching revitalization plan, begun in 2007. Besides extensive habitat restoration, this includes linking existing greenbelts to create an unbroken riverside path spanning the width of Santa Fe. Two popular riverside parks are Patrick Smith Park, on East Alameda, and Bicentennial Park, on West Alameda, both of which contain large fields, playground equipment, and picnic tables. Nature trails and preserves abound at the northern and eastern edges of town: On Upper Canyon Road, the Randall Davey Audubon Center and the Nature Conservancy’s Santa Fe Canyon Preserve together comprise 325 acres rising through four eco-zones, ranging from brushy cottonwood and willow to Ponderosa pine forest. The walking trails are popular among birdwatchers, with some 140 species nesting on the land. Farther east, the Dale Ball trail system offers more challenging routes up into the Sangre de Cristo range, as does the trail to Atalaya Mountain. Easily accessible from the parking lot at St. John’s College, the seven-mile-round-trip route leads hikers from a sandy arroyo to a rocky ridgetop with expansive views. Hyde Memorial State Park, about ten miles north of downtown toward the Santa Fe Ski Basin, affords more dayhiking opportunities with its extensive network of roadside trails, as well as campgrounds for both tent and RV camping. The city’s new Railyard Park & Plaza, which celebrated its grand opening in September 2008, is a showcase of environmentally friendly design. Located in the newly revitalized Railyard district and within walking distance of downtown, this park has become a lively, casual community meeting place, much like the original Plaza. While dogs must be leashed in most public spaces in Santa Fe, the Frank Ortiz Park Off-Leash Area is the exception. Referred to by locals as the “dog park,” it spans 134 acres off Camino de las Crucitas, in a residential neighborhood just west of downtown. With a large open area leading to a network of natural trails that wind into arroyos and along a hilltop ridge (providing some of the best vistas within city limits), the dog park is a people’s playground as much as it is a free-roaming pets’ paradise.

Shopping Santa Fe’s primary shopping districts range from the historic downtown area to Southside’s big-box bonanza, Zafarano Drive. Downtown’s many shops and boutiques are centered around the Plaza—including two shopping arcades, the Arcade on the Plaza, and, one block west, the Plaza Mercado—and deal primarily in luxury items such as jewelry, Native crafts, and high-end clothing. Some of these stores, like the Five & Dime (formerly Woolworth’s), on San Francisco Street, are long-standing institutions that were important meeting places in Santa Fe’s small-town days. Just southeast of downtown, Canyon Road is lined with more high-end options. The street is renowned for its art galleries, but is also home to dealers of fine leather goods, jewelry ranging from Southwestern to contemporary, and chic home furnishings. Also flanking downtown, the DeVargas Center at its north end and the Guadalupe Street district to the south (including Sanbusco Market Center, on Montezuma) are great places to fi nd souvenirs and gifts, as well as more conventional boutique fare such as designer apparel, fi ne cookware, and home décor. Guadalupe Street also abuts 16 Santafe.org

the burgeoning Railyard district, a hub for contemporary-art galleries and home to a new consumer complex anchored by outdoor-goods giant REI. One of the quirkiest shopping spots in the area is about six miles north of town on Highway 84/285: the Tesuque Pueblo Flea Market, where you can fi nd creative items, such as African imports and handmade clothing, in a charming and unpretentious setting. At the south end of town, there’s Jackalope, a sort of world flea market unto itself. And Zafarano Drive is lined with stores like Target and Best Buy, with Sam’s Club one block east, and the mall—Santa Fe Place—just across Rodeo Road.

Historic Landmarks Santa Fe’s Plaza has served as the city’s social nexus for four centuries. Now a casual, grassy park, it started as a central place around which Spanish officials built houses and barracks. The Palace of the Governors, constructed soon after the Plaza was established, still stands on the Plaza’s north side, and is the oldest continuously occupied public building in the U.S. Built around the time of Santa Fe’s founding, the Palace served as a seat of the viceroyalty of New Spain’s colonial government, then was home to Mexican and, even later, American territorial governors. Following Old Santa Fe Trail from the Plaza, fi nd the Barrio de Analco, a residential section of town, settled in 1620 along East DeVargas Street. The aptly dubbed Oldest House, built around 1612, is possibly the oldest structure in the nation, and it shares an alleyway with San Miguel Mission, billed as the country’s oldest church. Although this distinction is also uncertain, it is known that the mission was built sometime between 1600 and 1646, with parts of an abandoned Pueblo—dating back to 1100 and still existing on the site at the time of construction—incorporated into the church structure. Both are just down the street from the New Mexico State Capitol, the Roundhouse. Completed in 1966 and named for its unique circular shape, the building was designed to resemble the state’s Zia symbol when viewed from the sky. The 131-year-old Loretto Chapel, east of the Plaza on Old Santa Fe Trail, is known for its “miraculous staircase”—a spiral stairway built by a mysterious carpenter, with two 360-degree turns and no nails or screws (wooden pegs only) for support. Southwest of the Plaza on Guadalupe Street, the Santuario de Guadalupe was built in the late 18th century and recently became home to a 12-foot statue of Our Lady of Guadalupe, patron saint of New Mexico. And the stately Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi, on Cathedral Place, was built between 1869 and 1887 under the direction of Santa Fe’s first Roman Catholic bishop, Jean-Baptiste Lamy, of France. A mix of adobe, French-Romanesque, and modern architectural styles, the cathedral combines incredible stained glass from France with stone from Lamy, south of Santa Fe. It also honors the designation of Santa Fe as a diocese (in 1850) and then as an archdiocese (in 1875). In late 2008, its facade received a thorough scrubbing, and old stone and mortar were repaired. Covering a hill at downtown’s north end, the National Cemetery memorializes more than 40,000 U.S. veterans. Thousands of small white gravestones stretch across 79 acres. To the east, closer to downtown, the Cross of the Martyrs looms over Santa Fe, honoring Franciscan priests who died during the Pueblo Revolt of 1680, a rebellion of the Pueblo people against Spanish colonization of New Mexico. To reach the cross, climb a few dozen steps from an entrance on Paseo de Peralta, near Marcy Street. At sunset, the views of the city and Jemez mountains to the west are magical.


A BRIEF HISTORY 10,000 B.C.: Nomadic Paleo-Indians begin to move into the region, making regular stops in the Santa Fe area. 400 A.D.: Agriculture is introduced, supplementing hunting and gathering. 1000–1400: Agriculture takes hold and several permanent pueblos are built. 1400–1600: Some 5,000 people live in pueblos within Santa Fe’s current city limits. 1540: Francisco Vasquez de Coronado leads a Spanish expedition across what is now New Mexico, in search of the fabled, gold-rich Seven Cities of Cíbola. 1598: Conquistador Don Juan de Oñate establishes the first Spanish settlement in Northern New Mexico, at San Juan (Ohkay Owingeh) Pueblo, and becomes the first colonial governor of New Spain’s province of Nuevo Mexico. 1609–1610: With the official name of La Villa Real de la Santa Fé de San Francisco de Asís, Santa Fe is established as the capital of Nuevo Mexico. Although this was previously credited to Nuevo Mexico’s third governor, Don Pedro de Peralta, new evidence points to its second governor, Juan Martinez de Montoya, as the city’s true founder. 1680: Ohkay Owingeh medicine man Popé leads the Pueblo Revolt, expelling the Spanish from Nuevo Mexico in the only successful indigenous rebellion in the history of North America. 1692: Don Diego de Vargas leads a bloodless reconquest of Nuevo Mexico. ANN MURDY

Events for One or Many Whether you’re seeking a quiet walk or hosting a boisterous reunion, Santa Fe has expert help available. With sweeping sunsets and temperate weather, the many venues for events, celebrations, and weddings are ideal. Try Bishop’s Lodge Ranch Resort & Spa, the Eldorado Hotel, or Inn of the Five Graces, among other venues, for more intimate gatherings, or the Santa Fe Community Convention Center for much larger affairs. Sunrise Springs Resort offers the Moon House, an intimate locale for gatherings smaller than 100 guests, as well as larger venues. Or for a traditional approach to a wedding, Loretto Chapel has a breathtaking sanctuary with the option of music from an organist, harpist, or classical guitarist. To see the sights with a knowledgeable guide, take the “original walking tour” through downtown and learn the city’s history, led by Access Santa Fe. For variety, Destination 505 offers options like Native American cultural tours, providing entrance to places generally closed to outsiders. And art lovers can take tours of the gallery-lined Canyon Road, as well as other culture-heavy areas, with Historic Walks of Santa Fe.

History in the Making New Mexico’s brand new History Museum, located just off the Santa Fe Plaza at 120 Lincoln Avenue, features 96,000 square feet of interactive exhibition space, including audio stations, short videos, photo albums, and interpretive stations. “There are so many different ways to tell history, and we’re trying to use a very creative approach in presenting artifacts, maps, personal effects, and diaries, but not be didactic,” says museum curator Dr. Frances Levine. That translates into a variety of approaches, leaving it up to visitors to chart their own paths through an exploration of thousands of years of New Mexico’s rich history.

1700–1750: Residents of Santa Fe erect adobe buildings with large portales opening onto the Plaza, and construct the first homes along Canyon Road. 1821: Mexico wins independence from Spain. In the same year, the Santa Fe Trail opens, stretching from the Missouri River to Santa Fe. 1824: Under Mexico’s new constitution, the former Spanish province becomes the Territory of Nuevo Mexico, with Santa Fe still its capital. 1846: The Mexican-American War begins; the U.S. claims possession of New Mexico. 1848: In the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, Mexico cedes to the U.S. nearly all of present-day California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico. 1869–1887: Bishop Jean-Baptiste Lamy oversees construction of the Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of Asissi, commonly known as St. Francis Cathedral. 1878: The Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad brings rail travel to New Mexico, but never actually arrives in Santa Fe, instead bypassing the town about 17 miles to the south, in Lamy. 1912: Congress admits New Mexico to the Union as its 47th state. 1943: Santa Fe’s secret field office is the gateway for scientists, such as world-famous physicists Richard Feynman and Neils Bohr, heading to an equally secret facility in nearby Los Alamos for the Manhattan Project, to build the first atomic bomb. 1957: Santa Fe passes the Historic Styles Ordinance, protecting the traditional appearance of its oldest neighborhoods. That same summer, conductor John Crosby founds the Santa Fe Opera. 1962: The city designates Canyon Road as a “Residential Arts & Crafts Zone.” 2009: The New Mexico History Museum, just off the Santa Fe Plaza, opens its doors to the public.


Jody McAlister President, Ladies in Wading Fly Fishing Club

You’ll find plenty of ways to soak up the scenery and enliven your spirit in the beautiful San Juan Mountains of southwest Colorado. Few towns have as much character, or characters, as ours. Get to know us at www.visitpagosa.org or 866-439-0332.

- REFRESHI NGLY AUT HENT IC -


MARK KANE

From left: Cycling Santa Fe’s scenic byways; rafting the Rio Grande; the Santa Fe Southern before heading out to Lamy 2 LEFT PHOTOS BY CHRIS CORRIE; COURTESY SANTA FE CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

If your time in Santa Fe is limited, these themed lists of ideas will help you do more of what you like best FOR FAMILIES Santa Fe Children’s Museum Museum of International Folk Art Randall Davey Audubon Center & Sanctuary El Rancho de las Golondrinas Santa Fe Southern Railway The Geocaching Challenge Genoveva Chavez Community Center DeVargas and Franklin E. Miles skate parks The Frank Ortiz “Dog” Park

FOR CULTURE LOVERS Santa Fe Opera Museum of Indian Arts & Culture Museum of Spanish Colonial Art Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian Aspen Santa Fe Ballet Santa Fe Symphony & Chorus Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival

FOR HISTORY BUFFS Palace of the Governors/New Mexico History Museum San Miguel Mission Chapel and Loretto Chapel Cross of the Martyrs The Eight Northern Pueblos Bandelier National Monument Bataan Memorial Military Museum & Library

New Mexico Museum of Art Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Museum of International Folk Art Museum of Contemporary Native Arts Shidoni Foundry

and visit a museum of Spanish Colonial art, international folk art, or Native American art. In the evening, stroll the historic Santa Fe Plaza.

If you have THREE DAYS in Santa Fe... FOR FOODIES & OENOPHILES Santa Fe Farmers Market Santa Fe School of Cooking Las Cosas Kitchen Shoppe & Cooking School Santa Fe Vineyards Falcon Meadery & Winery

FOR ADVENTURERS Camping—Hyde Memorial State Park Hiking—Atalaya; Santa Fe National Forest Mountain Horseback riding—Bishop’s Lodge Ranch Resort & Spa Mountain biking—Dale Ball Trails Whitewater rafting—Kokopelli Rafting Adventures Fly-fishing—High Desert Angler Golf—Marty Sanchez Links de Santa Fe Rock Climbing—Santa Fe Climbing Center Alpine skiing/snowboarding—Ski Santa Fe; Taos Ski Valley Nordic skiing—Santa Fe National Forest

FOR ART LOVERS

TIME-SENSITIVE TRIPS If you have ONE DAY in Santa Fe...

Canyon Road The Santa Fe Railyard District and SITE Santa Fe West Palace Arts District

Day 1: Tour the Palace of the Governors and St. Francis Cathedral. Follow the Santa Fe River to Canyon Road. Drive to Museum Hill

Day 2: Drive the High Road to Taos, stopping at the Santuario de Chimayó. Tour Taos Pueblo. Shop at the historic Taos Plaza. Take the Low Road, through the Rio Grande Gorge, back to Santa Fe. Day 3: Browse contemporary-art galleries in the Railyard District, including the nonprofit art space SITE Santa Fe. Relax in the new Railyard Park & Plaza. Shop at the Santa Fe Farmers Market. Select a few options from adjacent lists. In the evening, catch a show at the Lensic Performing Arts Center.

If you have FIVE DAYS in Santa Fe... Day 4: Drive to Abiquiú: Tour Georgia O’Keeffe’s former home. See the red sandstone cliffs at Ghost Ranch. Swim in Lake Abiquiú. Or explore the Los Alamos area: Hike through ruins at Bandelier National Monument. Glimpse elk at Valles Caldera National Preserve. Visit the Bradbury Science Museum or the Los Alamos Historical Museum. Day 5: Ride one of the Santa Fe Southern Railway’s half-day train routes to Lamy. Select more options from adjacent lists. In the evening, savor the Santa Fe Opera. 2010 santa fe visitors guide 19


CHRIS CORRIE MARK KANE

PETER OGILVIE PETER OGILVIE

20 Santafe.org


Day trips with history, culture, and natural beauty One of the best ways to get a breath of fresh air and a heavy dose of culture while visiting Santa Fe is to explore the surrounding area. North and south, fun day trips abound in this land of varying landscapes and climates. In the 1.6-million-acre playground of Santa Fe National Forest alone, elevations range from 5,300 to 13,103 feet—which means dry, high desert can be just a 15-minute drive from thick forest. Be sure to pack water and wear layers: Santa Fe’s climate is temperate, but weather can change suddenly, with tremendous and sometimes dangerous (if short-lived) thunderstorms rolling in during the summer months. For more in-depth information about the region’s sights and activities, visit northcentralnm.com.

Taos and the High Road For more than a century, Taos has been a magnet for artists and art lovers. World-class museums and galleries, historic tours, and excellent restaurants make the small town a popular day trip for visitors. Seventy miles north of Santa Fe, at the foot of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, Taos is also a favorite among outdoor enthusiasts, with plenty of annual sunshine, excellent skiing, and mountain trails for hiking and biking. While there, be sure to stroll Taos Plaza. The historic center was established in the late 18th century and has since remained the heart of the community. Today, the Plaza boasts more than 40 galleries and boutiques, and several restaurants. The Ledoux Street gallery district, just behind the Plaza, is home to the Harwood Museum of Art. Operated by the University of New Mexico, it features permanent collections that include major works by decades of Taos artists. If you have time, explore the Millicent Rogers Museum, the Kit Carson Home and Museum, and the Taos Art Museum. The journey from Santa Fe to Taos can be an adventure in itself, with two possible routes, both about equal in distance. Locals call the most direct (yet still scenic) path, which follows the Rio Grande, the Low Road. But the snaking High Road to Taos is a stunning must-see. Heading north from Santa Fe, the High Road takes you along five different byways, passing through several small mountain villages, each rich in culture and history. The road goes east from Española and winds through beautiful Northern New Mexico. Top stops include the legendary Santuario de Chimayó church, where there is a posito, or well, from which visitors can take a handful of dirt believed to be blessed with miraculous qualities. Scenic Córdova is known for its wood-carving artists, and the old Spanish outpost of Truchas offers awesome views of the Rio Grande Valley. Tiny Las Trampas is home to San José de Gracia, a mission church dating back to 1760, with impressive Spanish Mission design elements.

Abiquiú and Ghost Ranch About 50 miles north of Santa Fe on Highway 84 lies the town of Abiquiú (pronounced AB-uh-cue). Seated within

stark and stunning sandstone mesas and overlooking the Chama River, the village and its surroundings were made famous by 20th-century artist Georgia O’Keeffe’s paintings. For more than five decades, beginning in 1934, O’Keeffe lived at least part of every year at Ghost Ranch—and spent much of that time at a second house in nearby Abiquiú—living alone in the landscape that inspired her most famous works. Today, visitors can take a guided tour of “O’Keeffe country,” which includes the artist’s adobe home in Abiquiú and the nearby Ghost Ranch Conference Center. The center, located 12.5 miles north, offers the tour from mid-March through mid-November. Other area attractions include the Ruth Hall Museum of Paleontology and the Florence Hawley Ellis Museum, both at Ghost Ranch, and Lake Abiquiú.

Ojo Caliente For a day of relaxation and rehabilitation, head to the ancient mineral springs at Ojo Caliente, about 50 miles north of Santa Fe on US285. Rich in lithium, iron, soda, and arsenic—which are said to benefit conditions from arthritis to poor digestion—the waters have been prized for their healing properties since Native Americans settled along their periphery thousands of years ago. Spanish explorers reported visiting the springs in the 15th century, and in 1868 Ojo Caliente was established as the fi rst natural health spa in the United States. Today visitors at Ojo Caliente Resort and Spa can soak for hours (when not exploring the town’s galleries and restaurants). Choose from ten public and three private outdoor pools, which offer a variety of mineral combinations and range in temperature from 80 to 109 degrees Fahrenheit. Then cover your body in detoxifying earth from the Mud Pool and let it dry as you bask in the New Mexico sunshine, or try a treatment at the spa, where deep-tissue and hot stone massages are among the many offerings. It’s only an hour’s drive back to Santa Fe, but many visitors choose to extend the healing experience by spending the night. A historic hotel, built in 1916, offers simple, charming rooms, while more contemporary suites and private cottages, some with private outdoor tubs for soaking, are more luxurious.

The Eight Northern Pueblos For a taste of Native American culture, head to one of New Mexico’s Eight Northern Pueblos: Nambé, Picuris, Pojoaque, San Ildefonso, Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan), Santa Clara, Taos, and Tesuque. There are 19 Pueblos in New Mexico; these eight lie north of Santa Fe but speak three languages— Keres, Tewa, and Tiwa. The Taos Pueblo, inhabited for more than 1,000 years, was designated a World Heritage Site in 1992. Visitors are welcome to explore parts of the Pueblo, the largest multistory Pueblo structure still standing in the country. Each Pueblo has a number of annual dances, events, and feast days, and the best way to fi nd out about current Pueblo events is to contact the Eight Northern Pueblos Council,

Clockwise from top left: the dwellings at Bandelier National Monument; a stream near Jemez Springs in the Jemez Mountains; one of the formations at the Bisti Wilderness, also known as the Bisti Badlands, near Farmington; going up one of the ladders at Bandelier. 2010 santa fe visitors guide 21


For an enlightening overview of the city’s past, stop at the Los Alamos Historical Museum. Its fascinating exhibits explain and interpret local geology, the Native American cultures that fi rst settled in the region, and, of course, the story of the Manhattan Project.

The Turquoise Trail and Madrid

One of the mesas near Abiquiú

located at Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo just north of the town of Española on Highway 68.

The Jemez Mountain Trail, Bandelier, and Los Alamos The 100-plus-mile Jemez Mountain Trail, a network of scenic byways that wind through the Jemez range, reaches from Los Alamos west to Cuba and south to San Ysidro. Three of its most intriguing—and accessible—attractions are concentrated in the northeast portion, beginning about 35 miles northwest of Santa Fe. Valles Caldera National Preserve, the most spectacular stop, is home to an ancient collapsed volcanic crater. Much of the land within the 89,000acre crater was a private ranch until 2000, when the preserve was opened to the public for wildlife viewing, seasonal elk hunting, trout fishing, and educational tours. Visitors can explore dozens of miles of hiking and biking trails, attend a fly-fishing clinic, or run the Caldera Marathon in June. About 20 miles to the east along Highway 4, Bandelier National Monument is home to excavated ruins of a thousand-year-old settlement of ancestral Pueblo people, offering visitors an opportunity to see some of the earliest dwellings in the area. See dwelling ruins built along cliff walls and on the canyon floor, some made of blocks of volcanic tuff. Ranger-guided tours explain the sites and their links between ancestral and modern Pueblo people. The areas surrounding Bandelier contain 70 miles of trails, most in wilderness areas. Day-trippers can opt for shorter hikes, such as the 5-mile Falls Trail loop, a 1.5-mile walk along the mesa at the ancient village of Tsankawi, or a 1.2-mile main loop trail through archaeological excavations on the Frijoles Canyon floor. North of Bandelier on Highway 501, the town of Los Alamos sits atop a broad mesa. Referred to as “the Hill” among locals, it is best known as the home of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The lab, which was established during WWII to develop the fi rst nuclear weapons, remains active today, employing some of the greatest minds in engineering and science. Connected with LANL is the Bradbury Science Museum, in downtown Los Alamos. Its three galleries appeal to all ages, with hands-on exhibits related to defense, history, and research at LANL—particularly its atomic legacy. 22 Santafe.org

The Turquoise Trail, named for ancient turquoise mines in the area, heads south out of Santa Fe toward Albuquerque. This 62-mile-long National Scenic Byway boasts expansive views of New Mexico’s sky. Missionaries, Confederate soldiers, and outlaws once roamed the area, and Native peoples were mining for turquoise long before Europeans arrived. It was down this trail, in 1863, that Kit Carson marched the Navajo people on their deadly 300-mile Long Walk toward incarceration at Fort Sumner. CHRIS CORRIE Three towns with vivid histories—Golden, Cerrillos, and Madrid—sit along the trail. While tiny Golden remains undeveloped, Cerrillos and Madrid are enjoying a renaissance of art, theater, museums, and dining. Colorful Madrid (pronounced MAD-rid) is an eccentric artists’ community. In addition to more than 20 shops, restaurants, and artist studios, the Mine Shaft Tavern, a summertime Wild West melodrama at the Engine House Theatre, and the Old Coal Mine Museum contribute to the town’s funky, fun character. For a scenic side trip when you’re heading north back to Santa Fe on NM14, take County Road 45 northwest through the once-turquoise-rich Cerrillos Hills to El Rancho de las Golondrinas (Spanish for, “Ranch of the Swallows”) in La Cienega. A working ranch in the 19th century, the 200-acre property is now a Spanish Colonial living history museum, hosting family-oriented festivals throughout the year that celebrate traditional arts and crafts, farming, and ways of life.

Pecos National History Park and the Pecos Wilderness Drive 25 miles north on I-25 from Santa Fe and you’ll fi nd 6,670-acre Pecos National Historic Park. The main area contains the ruins of Pecos Pueblo—a 900-year-old, 700room multilevel complex—and the remains of a 17th-century Spanish mission church, Nuestra Señora de los Angeles de Porciuncula de los Pecos. An easy, 1.25-mile, self-guided trail leads visitors through the main area of the park, beginning at the visitors center and making its way through the Pueblo ruins and the church remains. The other area includes several sites along the historic Santa Fe Trail, and Glorieta Battlefield, the site of the famous Civil War battle at Glorieta Pass, now part of the park and accessible via a guided tour. A trip through parts of the high Pecos Wilderness, flanked by the Rio Grande to the west and the Pecos River to the east, is also worth your while. At 233,333 acres, the area encompasses stunning landscapes of wide mesas, steep canyons, high mountain lakes, waterfalls, more than 150 miles of streams, heavily forested mountainsides, and rugged peaks that reach beyond timberline. With plenty of trout, bear, deer, elk, turkey, and bighorn sheep, the Wilderness and its surrounding lands are popular seasonal destinations for sportsmen, as well as hikers, horseback riders, and campers.


INTERIOR DESIGN BY KRIS LAJESKI

T

he idea that the spirit of peace is found not only in how you live, but where you lay your head. The irony of a place which is rich in both simplicity and complexity. The rejuvenation of mind, body and spirit. And the experience of staying in a place that is as steeped in tradition as it is in comfort.

Through simplicity and natural beauty, experience a complexity of emotions that relax the body and invigorate the mind. Hotel St. Francis, the most distinctive hotel in Santa Fe, awaits. For info on all Heritage Hotel and Resort locations visit www.hhandr.com or call 1-877-901-ROOM (7666). Hotel St. Francis

B

Esplendor Resort

Hotel Encanto de Las Cruces

B

B

B Nativo Lodge BHotel Plaza Real

Hotel Albuquerque

The Lodge at Santa Fe

Hotel St. Francis is a member of Historic Hotels of America

A Preferred Hotel Group速 Partner


-USEUMS ALAMOGORDO

.EW-EXICO-USEUM OF3PACE(ISTORY ALBUQUERQUE

.ATIONAL(ISPANIC #ULTURAL#ENTER .EW-EXICO-USEUM OF.ATURAL(ISTORY AND3CIENCE LAS CRUCES

.EW-EXICO&ARM AND2ANCH(ERITAGE -USEUM S A N TA F E

-USEUMOF)NDIAN !RTS#ULTURE -USEUMOF )NTERNATIONAL&OLK!RT

%IGHT-USEUMS 3IX-ONUMENTS /NE4ICKET *UST &ORONLY THE.EW-EXICO #ULTURE0ASSOPENSTHEDOORSTO EXCEPTIONALMUSEUMSANDHISTORIC MONUMENTS INCLUDINGTHEBRAND NEW STATE OF THE ART.EW-EXICO(ISTORY -USEUMIN3ANTA&E

NEWMEXICOCULTUREORGORBYVISITING ANYOFOURMUSEUMSANDMONUMENTS

.EW-EXICO -USEUMOF!RT

-ONUMENTS "OSQUE2EDONDO -EMORIALAT &ORT3UMNER #ORONADO 3TATE-ONUMENT %L#AMINO2EAL )NTERNATIONAL (ERITAGE#ENTER &ORT3ELDEN 3TATE-ONUMENT *mMEZ3TATE -ONUMENT ,INCOLN3TATE -ONUMENT

ALLPHOTOSCOURTESYDCAMNM

'ETYOUR#ULTURE0ASSONLINEAT

.EW-EXICO (ISTORY-USEUM 0ALACEOFTHE'OVERNORS


WE’RE HERE for you 24 ⁄ 7 he new 35,000 square ft. Emergency Department at CHRISTUS ST. VINCENT is open and operating 24/7 to serve you with specialized areas for trauma and heart care, state-of-the-art technology, and a caring staff. Our boardcertified Emergency Medicine physicians consistently receive superior marks from their patients.

T

The ED, together with a full-service hospital of 340 physicians, provides Northern New Mexico with access to services not generally available in communities our size. We hope you and your loved ones never suffer any medical emergencies. But if you do, we're here.

Emergency Services We’re Here. 4 5 5 S T. M I C H A E L ' S D R I V E

S A N TA F E , N M 8 7 5 0 5

Dr. Knox Kinlaw Emergency Medicine

505-913-3934 2010 santa fe visitors guide 25


26 Santafe.org


Santa Fe—the biggest little art city in the world AS OLD AS SANTA FE is—400 years and counting—it may come as a surprise that its reputation as one of the world’s foremost art destinations, as well as its longheld status as the country’s second-largest art market, dates back to less than half a century ago. Now boasting more than 200 galleries and several major museums, featuring all artistic mediums and genres, from centuries-old treasures to an exploding number of contemporary works, Santa Fe did not solidify its standing as an art-world mecca till the 1980s. Long a draw among painters and photographers, who’ve been descending on both northern New Mexico and Santa Fe since the late 1800s, Santa Fe’s art scene truly began to blossom in those early years of the 20th century, when European and East Coast artists and writers began to settle in—starting with Ernest Blumenschein and the founding of the Taos Society of Artists, and the establishment of the Santa Fe Art Colony, by painters Sheldon Parsons and Gerald Cassidy, among others, both in 1915. Enchanted by the region’s natural beauty and its

unique cultural offerings, these creative newcomers adapted to and adopted their new landscape and its variegated cultures— as did the many peoples and artists who’d been here centuries before them, doing their thing. The region’s art-centric ways go back to the object-making traditions of its Native peoples. Pueblo and other tribal artisans have produced beautiful utilitarian and ceremonial objects for thousands of years. Similarly, the equally rich Hispanic arts and crafts particular to northern New Mexico developed soon after the Spanish arrived 400 years ago. By the 1960s, Hispanic art had begun to reassert itself, Native artists had been busy bucking stereotypes, and an overall sense of daring and appreciation for art—and arts of all kinds and origins—had positioned the City Different as the City Artistic. There were artists galore, most of whom were working in the vein of their immediate environment: Western art, and art influenced by Native and Hispanic art, predominated. What was lacking were outlets. Slowly, at some point in the 1980s,

Facing page, clockwise from top left: Louisa McElwain’s Gaudium Vite, at EVOKE Contemporary; Annie Dover’s With Care, at Peterson-Cody Gallery; Journaling July, by Don Quade, represented at Winterowd Fine Art; Aurora, by Matthew Higginbotham, represented at Waxlander. Above, clockwise: Javier Marín’s Torso de Mujer O, at EVOKE Contemporary; Outside Abiquiu, by Roger Hayden Johnson, represented at Manitou Galleries; Rebecca DiDomenico’s Band of Familiars, at Eileen Braziel Fine Art 2010 santa fe visitors guide 27


galleries and curators began to capitalize on the popularity of Santa Fe’s art and artists; they especially seized on the newfound popularity of Western art. At the same time, more contemporary art and artists began to show up, too, as signified by the relocation here of such forward-looking artists as Bruce Naumann, Susan Rothenberg, and Judy Chicago. Nowadays, Western, Native American, and Hispanic art still comprise a significant chunk of Santa Fe’s fine-art market (as typified by the world’s largest gathering of Native artists at the annual Indian Market, in August), but the scope of the city’s artistic flavors runs the gamut—from internationally respected contemporary art, sculpture, and fine crafts in everything from marble to glass, as well as two centuries’ worth of top-notch photography. Santa Fe also now has its own major international biennial (produced by the nonprofit art space SITE Santa Fe), an annual contemporary-art fair (Art Santa Fe), and serves as the host of the SOFA (Sculpture Objects & Functional Art) expo, joining the ranks of long-standing host cities Chicago and New York. Uniquely situated in today’s global art market, given its artistic history and historic artworks, its Native arts and artists, and its vibrant arts community, Santa Fe continues to attract artists and art lovers from all over the world.

Canyon Road Designated a “residential arts and crafts zone” by the city in 1962, Canyon Road, Santa Fe’s most famous street—narrow and lined with authentic adobe former homes transformed into galleries—features a spectrum of art. Altermann Galleries features important American Modernist and Western painters and sculptors of the 19th and early 20th centuries. The Gerald Peters Gallery, around the corner on Paseo de Peralta, carries historic works as well as contemporary pieces ranging from finely detailed landscapes to abstract sculpture. Mixed in among these Canyon Road stalwarts one can also find Native American art, such as ancient pottery, 100-yearold jewelry, Hopi kachinas and basketry, and contemporary ceramics at Mark Sublette Medicine Man Gallery and Steve Elmore Indian Art, while McLarry Fine Art focuses on contemporary Southwestern painting and sculpture. Representational painting and sculpture, both traditional and contemporary, are additionally available from galleries with a non-Native focus, such as Greenberg Fine Art, Ventana, Waxlander, Winterowd, and Brandon Michael. Cutting-edge nonobjective, conceptual, installation, and contemporary realist art has been a growing presence on Canyon Road since the 1990s, with these kinds of works linking Santa Fe to an increasingly global art scene. Among such 28 Santafe.org

venues are Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art and GF Contemporary, as well as Hunter Kirkland and The Edge (and, over on nearby Delgado, just off Canyon, at InArt). On a more local level, Karan Ruhlen highlights New Mexico modernists and present-day contemporary painters and sculptors.

Downtown Just blocks from Canyon Road, the heart of historic Santa Fe is also a hub of fine-art activity, with scores of galleries on the Plaza and surrounding streets. LewAllen Contemporary, Manitou, and Peterson-Cody all offer contemporary representational painting and sculpture. Skotia and Evoke, too, offer plenty of fine contemporary paintings, photographs, collages, and sculptures. Lovers of minimalist or reductive art can find it at Charlotte Jackson Fine Art, one block away on Marcy Street. Monroe Gallery of Photography, just off the Plaza, shows historic and contemporary photographs, while Verve Fine Art, on Marcy Street, also focuses on innovative work that takes the photographic arts in new directions. Native American art takes center stage under the portal of the Palace of the Governors on the Plaza’s north side, where Native artists, mostly silversmiths, spread out their work on blankets and sell directly to the public. Nearby, Packards on the Plaza and Andrea Fisher Fine Pottery offer kachina carvings, jewelry, painting, sculpture, pottery, and even glass art; while Shiprock Trading, two stories above the Plaza’s east side, also has an array of Native pottery, jewelry, paintings, sculpture—as well as furniture. Many internationally known Native artists are represented in Lincoln Avenue galleries Blue Rain, Niman Fine Art, and Legends Santa Fe, and at the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, across the street from the St. Francis Cathedral. Inside the 93-year-old New Mexico Museum of Art, a magnificent Spanish Pueblo Revival building at one corner of the Plaza, resides a large permanent collection of works created in and related to New Mexico. Learn about the history of this region’s fine art at its comprehensive How the West Is One exhibit, on display throughout April. Two blocks away stands the 13year-old Georgia O’Keeffe Museum—dedicated both to the life and works of the great 20th-century modernist painter and her contemporaries, and where from May 28 to September 12 the Museum will feature the first comprehensive showing of her abstract works. Joe Wade Fine Art, on Water Street, features work that ranges from paintings and limited-edition bronzes to fine jewelry—all from emerging and established American artists. Nearby, Kiva specializes in Native American sculpture, pottery, rugs, and other artworks made between 1920 and 1950. Not


Facing page, left: Helmut Dorner’s Asparagus I, at James Kelly Contemporary; right: Nelson Boren’s Stars and Stripes Forever, at Altermann Galleries. This page, left: Dive, by Emmi Whitehorse, represented at Chiaroscuro Contemporary; right: Night Café, by Lori Snable, represented at Greenberg Fine Art

far down the block, art that’s thoroughly modern can be found at the Pop Gallery, which abounds in Pop Art-style creations in all media. For art that truly pushes the envelope, Eileen Braziel, just down from the O’Keeffe Museum, specializes in sitespecific and conceptual art, while just next door, the pieces at Klaudia Marr boast a bold contemporary representational look.

The Railyard District Santa Fe’s newest art district and community gathering spot had its grand opening in September 2008, but even before that, the 50-acre, city-owned Railyard site began defining itself as a mecca for contemporary art. SITE Santa Fe, a private, not-for-profit contemporary art space, hosts its biennial of growing international importance this year. Opening June 18 and running through January 2, 2011, the show, titled “The Dissolve,” is co-curated by Sarah Lewis and Daniel Belasco and will focus on the way various media relate to concepts in video. Nearby galleries, in clean-lined buildings that reflect a modern interpretation of adobe architecture, include venues such as James Kelly Contemporary, EVO, and Gebert Contemporary, all situated along Guadalupe Street. Each specializes in its own contemporaryart niche, from Gebert’s site-specific installations (in its 6,000-square-foot space) of sculpture, painting, photography, and video artwork to EVO’s contemporary art-world giants, including Pop Art painter Ed Ruscha and new-media pioneer Steina. Nearby, William Siegal juxtaposes a distinguished revolving collection of ancient art and artifacts with works most contemporary and modernist, while across Guadalupe Street, Zane Bennett Contemporary’s new twostory space houses abstract paintings and sculpture. Baca Street, which marks the Railyard District’s western end, has in recent years emerged as an arts hub where area artists can

set up shop in affordable spaces. An ever-changing warren of studio galleries, at its core is Elodie Holmes’s Liquid Light Glass hot shop.

Museum Hill Situated on Camino Lejo, a hillside street southeast of downtown, Museum Hill is made up of four distinct institutions representing art of the Southwest and the world. At opposite ends of the short drive are two first-rate private museums, the Museum of Spanish Colonial Art and the Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian. In between, perched on a rise with expansive mountain views, is Milner Plaza, which is bookended by a pair of outstanding Museum of New Mexico member institutions: The Museum of International Folk Art, which houses the world’s largest collection of traditional folk art from around the globe, and the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, which presents the diverse Native arts of the greater Southwest, with an eye to the ties between art and its historic and cultural contexts. About a mile away from Museum Hill, on Old Santa Fe Trail, is the Center for Contemporary Arts. Committed to promoting some of the best contemporary art to come out of this area, CCA also boasts one of the city’s best theaters. Aside from the many museums and galleries around town, there are also impromptu group showings, plus artists’ studios and specialty galleries: Dwight Hackett Projects, a warehouse space off industrial Siler Road, contains edgy contemporary fare; in Tesuque, about five miles north of downtown, the Shidoni Foundry showcases bronze sculpture cast on-site and offers weekly, open-to-the-public molten-bronze pours; and, at Warehouse 21 and Santa Fe Community College, there are impressive shows of new, young, and upcoming local artists. And don’t forget the wonderful art on display on the walls of the Capitol building and the Community Gallery at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center—two more solid galleries in their own right. 2010 santa fe visitors guide 29


InArt Santa Fe

The City of Santa Fe Arts Commission Community Gallery A gallery whose mission and vision is to feature the work of local artists and artisans who live and create their work in New Mexico, the Community Gallery represents the full breadth and depth of locally produced art. Themed exhibits include contemporary as well as traditional work in all media. 201 W Marcy (at Sheridan), 505-955-6705

Catering to hip collectors, designers, and art appreciators of all ages. InArt Santa Fe gallery offers visitors an elegant environment in which to discover many contemporary artistic media. Our artists range in age from a young 25 years old to an even younger 80 years old! You will be impressed by the depth and scope of our artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; creativity as well as the intent with which they carry out their passions. The artists we choose to represent have a common theme. They all create with a deeper meaning than what you see on the surface. Whether it is a sculpture or painting you are searching for, you can expect to experience the true heart and soul of the artist. 219 Delgado, just off Canyon, 505-983-6537, inartsantafe.com, lg@inartsantafe.com

Pippin Meikle Fine Art 236 Delgado, 505-992-0400 pippinmeiklefineart.com

Nedra Matteucci Galleries Nicolai Fechin (1881-1955), Mexican Boy, c. 1946, oil on canvas, 18 x 14" Nedra Matteucci Galleries specializes in 19th and 20th century American art, including the Taos Society of Artists, the Santa Fe art colony, artists of the American West, and masters of American Impressionism and Modernism. Also featured is a selection of Russian Realist paintings. Included in the collection are works by important contemporary painters and in our one-acre sculpture garden monumental sculptures by artists of international recognition. 1075 Paseo de Peralta, 505-982-4631 inquiry@matteucci.com, matteucci.com 30 Santafe.org

Jane Sauer Gallery Internationally and nationally known, Jane Sauer Gallery celebrates creativity and the exceptional in a broad variety of media. The gallery exhibits contemporary art in painting, drawing, bronze, mixed media, glass, fiber, wood, and ceramic. 652 Canyon, 505-995-8513, jsauergallery.com


Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian Ongoing exhibitions of contemporary and historic Native American art with an emphasis on the Southwest. Case Trading Post hosts special events by featured artists and sells an array of jewelry, baskets, folk art, pottery, and weavings. Open Monday–Saturday 10–5, Sunday 1–5. Free admission. Donations welcome. 704 Camino Lejo, Museum Hill, 505-982-4636, wheelwright.org

POP Gallery 133 W Water, 505-820-0788, popsantafe.com

Randall M. Hasson Gallery 225 Delgado St. (at Canyon Road) 505-990-2133; randallmhasson.com

GALLE RY

Located in the Railyard District, the hottest new epicenter for contemporary galleries in historic Santa Fe, Zane Bennett Contemporary Art carries the finest in contemporary art in all media including blue chip, established, and emerging artists. 435 S Guadalupe, 505-982-8111 zanebennettgallery.com

JOSHUA TOBEY, SCULPTOR

Zane Bennett Contemporary Art

NORI MCCAUNNEHHAY

portfolio

The Gallery at 822 Canyon Road 822 Canyon Rd, 505-989-1700 www.gallery822.com 2010 santa fe visitors guide 31


DOUGLAS MERRIAM

DOUGLAS MERRIAM DOUGLAS MERRIAM

32 Santafe.org

DOUGLAS MERRIAM


Dining out in the City Deliciously Different

S

anta Fe should really be called the City Deliciously Different. More than 200 restaurants in a town of 70,000 or so makes for a terrific eatery-to-customer ratio. That’s why our unique city has become such a culinary destination. Our proximity to Mexico, and the centuries-old Native American presence in this area, gives us a distinct food heritage that’s vastly different from Tex-Mex and California-Mex: two great food cultures coming together, relying on regional ingredients like chiles, corn, squash, and a host of other vegetables and meats.

New Mexico’s love of her most prized crop, chile, sets us apart from other Southwestern states. We love it so much we keep almost 80 percent of the annual harvest to enjoy right here. Whether you prefer the kick of the roasted green or the smoky depth of a ripened, dried red, try it poured over an enchilada, stuffed and batter fried, simmered into a piquant stew, or simply strewn across a hamburger. Practically every major ethnic cuisine and restaurant style is offered here, too, be it Thai, Chinese, Hawaiian, Japanese, French, Italian, Moroccan, Mexican, bistro, chophouse, or taco cart. Our celebrated Farmers Market, in its new home in the Railyard Park & Plaza, is a must-stop for locally grown foods. Plus, New Mexico’s thriving wine industry is gaining national attention. To learn to cook our local fare, try our two established cooking schools: Las Cosas Cooking School and Santa Fe School of Cooking. Then get ready to eat, drink, and live in our inimitable style.

Gourmet Greats A quartet of great restaurants forms the core of Santa Fe’s upscale dining scene. Geronimo, Coyote Café, and The Compound are each well-established eateries that garner nationwide attention, with Eric DiStefano handling the culinary magic at the fi rst two and Mark Kiffi n doing the same at The Compound—amd both keeping other Santa Fe chefs on their creative toes. Geronimo, with its soft leather banquettes and eclectic menu, regularly wins kudos for service and ambience; DiStefano returned there last year to become an owner—straddling his attentions with the Coyote, which has reclaimed its past glories, thanks to DiStefano’s revamping of its regional cuisine. The Compound’s Kiffin won a James Beard award for best chef in the Southwest in 2006, and the classic décor and clever use of foie gras and caviar make it a great place for a “dress-up” date. Restaurant Martín, the new high-end kid on the block, signals popular chef Martín Rios’s foray into owning his own restaurant—clearly he is inspired in his own kitchen. All four are must-visits.

Bed and... Dinner Forget the misconception that hotel food is dull. Santa Fe’s trendy hotels take their restaurants very seriously, with chefs who often become local celebs. Inn of the Anasazi’s British chef, Oliver Ridgeway, serves up a sprawling, proper English breakfast—and the dining room’s touches of indigenous de-

sign remind you that you are still in the Southwest. Inn at Loretto’s Brian Cooper has transformed Luminaria Restaurant, sitting in the shadows of the world-famous Loretto Chapel, into a clubby dining room. The dramatic renovations to the downtown Hotel St. Francis include a trendy bar, Secreto, and restaurant, Tabla de los Santos, which features the cuisine of former Café San Estevan chef Estevan Garcia. And Terra, at the re-envisioned Encantado Resort, with its modern desert feel, has excelled under the direction of chef Charles Dale.

Red or Green Where you choose to give in to the charms of New Mexico’s prized chiles doesn’t matter: Nu-Mex restaurants abound, and the chile’s good at all of them. Locals love Tomasita’s, at the Railyard, and La Choza, just off the tracks. At Maria’s New Mexican Kitchen, voted vendor of the Best Margarita in Santa Fean’s 2008 Chefs’ Picks, you can cool your taste buds with one of 100 kinds of tequila. Other celebrated options: Giada De Laurentiis, from the Food Network, got her chile fi x at Tia Sophia’s; The Shed, just off the Plaza, has a sublime red chile; and the fiery green sauce at the rambling roadhouse, Horseman’s Haven, is considered a must.

Locals Love ‘Em To get the true culinary flavor of a town, eat where the locals eat. For 28 years, Café Pasqual’s has been a hometown favorite by virtue of its eclectic “Equatorial” menu and big breakfasts. Tecolote Café and The Pantry are family favorites—laid back and cost conscious—while the historic Plaza Café, right on the Plaza and serving chow since 1918, serves up Nu-Mex favorites as well as Greek specialties and towering pies and cakes. In the Second Street neighborhood, Chocolate Maven offers a unique experience of dining in a working bakery. Pranzo Italian Grill and Andiamo!, both off Guadalupe Street, are straightforward Italian trattorias full of flavor but without the fuss. And Harry’s Roadhouse, on Old Las Vegas Highway, offers comfort food with a Southwestern twist.

Tapas Tango Santa Fe shows off its Spanish roots in a trio of hot spots for tapas: tasty, couple-of-bites appetizers that are perfect for sharing when you want variety. El Farol and El Mesón, both long established, plus the hot newcomer La Boca, all impress diners with their creative Spanish fare. The traditional ingredients—serrano ham, Manchego cheese, olives, and paella—often come with live music or flamenco.

Out of Town Gabriel’s, five minutes north of the Opera, offers great guacamole and cuisine of the Southwest and Old Mexico. The Lamy Station Café serves up its award-winning chiles in a re-

Clockwise from top left: lobster appetizers at the Coyote Café; dining out at 315; the preprandial look of La Boca; stuffed chile peppers 2010 santa fe visitors guide 33


the complete experience     

Luxury accommodations Award-winning SháNah Spa Fine dining with outdoor patio views Horseback riding, skeet & trap shooting Outdoor heated pool, tennis & croquet

Santa Fe’s luxury ranch resort since 1918.

Reservations 800.732.2240 1297 Bishop’s Lodge Rd. Santa Fe, NM bishopslodge.com

stored vintage dining car parked at the original Lamy train station. The Sugar Nymphs Bistro, in tiny Peñasco on the High Road to Taos, boasts freshly baked biscuits, scones, and breads to accompany its casual dishes. Burger lovers flock to Bobcat Bite, on Old Las Vegas Highway, often standing in line for one of the 26 seats and burgers so good Bon Appetit has heaped praise upon them.

Newcomers Galisteo Bistro hit the ground cooking with its tasty Mediterranean menu that includes a dash of New Orleans thrown in. Though Max’s has been open for two years, the arrival of chef Brian Rood has transformed the cozy restaurant into the newest serious foodie hangout. Brasserie Zuñiga, just off the Plaza, features a tasty Latin American menu. Ze French Bistro boasts the food of former O’Keeffe Café chef Laurent Rea, who is very French, in a relaxed setting with pocket-friendly prices. And Real Food Nation, on Old Las Vegas Highway, has become a casual-gourmet hot spot.

Asian Persuasian No food-loving town would be complete without Asian options. Mu Du Noodles, featuring healthy, organic ingredients, has received raves from The New York Times. Lan’s Vietnamese, on Cerrillos Road, thrills the town’s pho fans. And right downtown, fiery curries and scrumptious tandoori fi ll the lunch buffet at India Palace.

Best of the Rest The Flying Star Café offers fancy diner food in a stylish modern locale. Also near the Railyard, Ristra has classic French cuisine with a Southwestern twist. Downtown, Amavi gives Mediterranean flavors a modern feel, as in the much-lauded bouillabaisse; while Santacafé is famous for its calamari with lime-chile sauce. The Bull Ring has been grilling up prime steaks and other goodies in a classy chophouse setting since 1971. Near the state capitol, Torinos’ @Home serves up lunchtime pastas, Rio Chama offers enormous steaks and ribs and an upscale bar, and the Pink Adobe celebrates our history with slow-braised green chile and pork. At 315 Restaurant & Wine Bar, moules frite, duck confit, silken crème brûlée and an award-winning wine list keep regulars coming back. 34 Santafe.org


award-winning wine list. Full bar with Bar Menu. Lunch and dinner. Private parking.

Cowgirl BBQ Bumble Bee’s Baja Grill 301 Jefferson, 505-820-2862; 3777 Cerrillos 505-988-3278; bumblebeesbajagrill.com Santa Fe’s freshest food - Baja-style! Including burritos, tacos, fresh salads, veggie specials, kid’s menu and salsa bar -- fast, fun, friendly and Bee-licious. Open daily at 11 am. Beer and wine served. Try our famous FISH Tacos, Voted best of Santa Fe!

319 S Guadalupe St., 505-982-2565 cowgirlsantafe.com Located just north of the railyard and just south of the plaza, Cowgirl BBQ features mesquite-smoked bbq specialties, New Mexican and regional American cusine and vegetarian choices. Also a Kids’ menu and play area, seasonal patio dining and late night dining. After dinner it’s a Texas roadhouse with great music, full bar & legendary frozen Margaritas!

India Palace 227 Don Gaspar, 505-986-5859, indiapalace.com Voted “Best Ethnic Restaurant” in Santa Fe. Located just one block from the Plaza, India Palace specializes in the dynamic, complex cuisine of Northern India using ayurvedic (the science of longevity) cooking principles. Homemade cheese, yogurt, ghee, and kulfi (pistachio ice cream), and tandoori-fired traditional breads complement the extensive menu, which includes chicken, lamb, seafood, and vegetarian dishes. Entrees may be ordered mild, medium, or hot. No artificial flavors or MSG. Open seven days a week. Lunch 11:30 AM–2:30 PM; dinner 5–10 PM.

La Casa Sena & La Casa Sena Cantina

The Bull Ring 150 Washington, 505-983-3328 Serving Santa Fe since 1971, the legendary Bull Ring is “the prime” steakhouse in Santa Fe. Voted “Best of Santa Fe” year after year, it also offers fresh seafood, chicken, chops, an extensive wine list, a saloon menu, and patio dining. Serving lunch Tuesday-Friday 1130am-230pm, dinner 7 nights 5-10pm. Serving the Bar Menu all day.

The Compound Restaurant 653 Canyon Road, 505-982-4353 compoundrestaurant.com James Beard Foundation’s “Best Chef of the Southwest,” chef/owner Mark Kiffin, pairs contemporary American cuisine with professional service in a timeless, elegant adobe building designed by famed architect Alexander Girard. Intimate garden patios. Private dining rooms accommodating 12 to 250 guests. Wine Spectator’s

El Mesón Restaurant & ¡Chispa! Tapas Bar 213 Washington, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com The soul of Spain in downtown Santa Fe. Offers classical Spanish cuisine, including tapas, paella, and exquisite wines. Full bar and live entertainment. Open 5–10 PM, Tue–Sat. Reservations recommended. Handicapped access.

Gabriel’s Restaurant Exit 176, Hwy 84/285, 505-455-7000 gabrielsrestaurante.com Zagat rated one of America’s best restuarants, renowned for guacamole made at your table. Housemade corn tortillas, red and green chile, sizzling fajitas, vegetarian plates. Mountain view patio dining, cozy adobe interior with kiva fireplaces showcasing local Southwest art from the Gabriel Gallery. Lunch and dinner daily; open from 11:30 AM.

Postcard Perfect - Every Season

125 E Palace, 505-988-9232 lacasasena.com La Casa Sena is located in the heart of old Santa Fe in the historic Sena Plaza. Featuring innovative American Southwest cuisine, an extensive wine list, and a spectacular outdoor patio, La Casa Sena is one of Santa Fe’s most popular restaurants. Recipient of the Award of Excellence from Wine Spectator. For a more casual dining experience, visit La Cantina. Lunch 11:30 AM–3 PM, Mon–Sat; dinner nightly 5:30–10 PM. Sunday brunch in a patio setting .11 AM–3 PM. Wine Shop adjacent to the restaurant features a large selection of fine wines, 11 AM–8 PM, Mon–Sat; noon–6 PM Sun.

La Choza 905 Alarid, 505-982-0909, lachozarestaurant.com La Choza Restaurant, “the locals’ choice for chile,” opened in 1983 to offer hospitality and cuisine typical of Northern New Mexico. Situated in an old adobe ranch house next to the historic Railyard Park, we are excited to now offer the most delicious margaritas concocted at our full bar.

Las Fuentes Restaurant & Bar at Bishop’s Lodge 1297 Bishop’s Lodge Road, 505-819-4035, 800-732-2240; www.bishopslodge.com Las Fuentes offers contemporary American cuisine with indigenous influences. Patio views span the Sangre de Cristo mountains and the warm ambiance echoes Santa Fe history, style and culture. Full bar, indoor and outdoor seating and the award-winning Sunday Champagne Brunch. Open daily, 7 am to 9:30 pm.

La Plazuela at La Fonda on the Plaza

1-866-232-5392 visitchama.com

100 E. San Francisco Street , 505-995-2334 www.lafondasantafe.com La Plazuela, in the heart of historic La Fonda on the Plaza, is a feast for the senses. Skylights flood the restaurant with natural light, a soothing fountain sits just below a dramatic wrought iron chandelier, and hand-painted windows encircle the room. Old favorites have been re-invented with tantalizing New World twists and our classic Northern New Mexico specialties are not to be missed. Our wine list is award-winning. Come make memories with us!

Max’s 403½ South Guadalupe, 505-984-9104 maxssantafe.com Max’s is an intimate fine dining restaurant in the 2010 santa fe visitors guide 35


Railyard district. We feature locally raised meats and organic produce whenever possible and have a frequently changing seasonal menu. Popular nights include our half-price wine Tuesday and a special localsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; night. Most nights find chef Brian Rood and owner Maria â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maxâ&#x20AC;? Renteria attending to their guests on the patio or in the dining room.

Mariaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 555 W Cordova, 505-983-7929 marias-santafe.com We wrote the book on margaritas. Literally! The Great Margarita Book. 165-plus margaritas, (priced from $6 to $48), over 100 tequilas, and great New Mexican food served in the same location since 1950. Full-service bar and a great list. Reservations suggested. 11 AMâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;10 PM, Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fri; 12â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10 PM, Sat and Sun. Closed Thanksgiving and Christmas. All major credit cards accepted.

The Old House Restaurant at Eldorado 309 W. San Francisco, 505-995-4530; 800-955-4455 oldhouserestaurant.com Memorable. Incomparable. Affordable. Santa Feâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most celebrated restaurant is the Old House. Here, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll enjoy expertly prepared cuisine and the service weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re famous for, which makes for a practical yet elegant dining choice any night of the week. Honored by Zagat and Wine Spectator.

Osteria Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Assisi 58 S Federal, 505-986-5858 osteriadassisi.net Located in historic downtown Santa Fe two blocks from the Plaza, next to the Convention Center. Osteria dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Assisi offers world-class service, authentic Italian cuisine, an extensive wine list, and cocktails. A native of Lake Como, owner Lino Pertusini proudly offers traditional dishes with an innovative flair. The menu features fresh seafood, locally raised beef, lamb, veal, and home-made pastas. Lunch 11 AMâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;3 PM, Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat; dinner 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10 PM nightly.

SantacafĂŠ

Santa Fe Santa Fe Courtyard Courtyard by by M Marriott arriott A Familiar Place In The City Different CASTLE RANCH STEAKHOUSE FEATURING RR RANCH BEEF HEATED INDOOR POOL & SPA FULL FITNESS CENTER FULL SANTA FE STYLE BREAKFAST BUFFET SPACIOUS GUEST ROOMS FEATURE REFRIGERATOR, COFFEE MAKER, HAIR DRYER, IRON & IRONING BOARD 36 Santafe.org

231 Washington Avenue, 505-984-1788; santacafe.com Frequented by the famous and infamous, the SantacafĂŠ has some of the best people-watching Santa Fe has to offer! During high season, our courtyard becomes one of the most coveted spots in Santa Fe. Located in Santa Feâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s downtown district, this charming Southwestern Bistro, situated in the historic Padre Gallegos House, offers the classic Santa Fe backdrop. Lunch from 9.50 / Dinner from 19.00 / Open Everyday! 1½ blocks north of the plaza tĂ&#x153;CMPDLTFBTUPGUIF$POWFOUJPO$FOUFS 8BTIJOHUPO"WFOVFt4BOUB'F /.  XXXTBOUBDBGFDPN

Vanessie of Santa Fe 434 W. San Francisco St., 505-982-9966 vanessiesantafe.com Vanessie serves delicious grilled entrees featuring sumptuous steaks, seafood, lamb, and elk. The piano bar features top-notch entertainment nightly. The food and entertainment are complemented by dramatic artwork, romantic fireplaces, and friendly service. Open seven nights a week; bar, 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11:30 pm; dining room, 5:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 pm.


ANN MURDY

MARK KANE

ROBERT RECK

Clockwise from left: The Lensic Performing Arts Center; a tightrope walker performing at the Renaissance Fair at El Rancho de las Golondrinas; dancers at las Golondrinas

Homegrown talent and world-renowned performers share Santa Fe spotlights

A

s small a city as Santa Fe is, it feels as big, as active, as influential as cities ten, twenty, fifty times its size. That’s because every night of the week one can find live music, dancing, performances, and entertainment of all kinds in Santa Fe or at the nearby casinos. Plus, the city has a world-renowned opera, a symphony orchestra, a world-class chamber-music group, ballet and contemporary dance companies, and an exceptional experimental theater group. Even more unique to the City Different, one’s as likely to spot a couple dressed to the nines at the Santa Fe Rodeo as see another pair in blue jeans and shorts at the Santa Fe Opera—and then run into all four of them afterward in one of the city’s bars or restaurants, doing the flamenco, listening to a jazz trio, or partaking of the latest Geeks Who Drink quiz craze. One of the city’s top one-size-fits-all venues is the nonprofit Lensic Performing Arts Center downtown. Built in 1931, the Spanish Renaissance–style auditorium hosted legends like Rita Hayworth and Judy Garland over the decades before falling into disrepair in the late 20th century. Restored and reopened in 2001, the Lensic now regularly hosts music, dance, literary, and theater programs and is home to seven local performance

organizations, from chamber-music group Santa Fe Pro Musica to music promoter Fan Man Productions, which brought in acts such as David Byrne and Pink Martini in 2008. During the winter, the Santa Fe Symphony Orchestra & Chorus and the Aspen Santa Fe Ballet move in with concerts (2010 shows include selections by Mozart and the music of Spain and Latin America) and brand-new contemporary ballet choreographies. From fall to spring the Lensic also hosts the Santa Fe Concert Association’s internationally touring vocalists and musicians and the Lannan Foundation’s Readings & Conversations series, which draws from the town’s highly literate demographic by inviting literary giants such as Don DeLillo and Arundhati Roy, who read and discuss their work. Check out Tickets Santa Fe to get full details and purchase tickets for a range of upcoming local events and performances, at 505-988-1234 or ticketssantafe.org.

Music Attracting star tenors and sopranos—and their fans—from Europe and New York’s Metropolitan Opera, the Santa Fe Op2010 santa fe visitors guide 37


JULIEN MCROBERTS

ROBERT GODWIN

Above left: One of the performers at the Renaissance Fair at El Rancho de las Golodrinas; right: under the big tent at the Santa Fe Opera

era features new works and classics from June through August (the 2010 season includes Madame Butterfly and The Magic Flute). Unlike most other opera houses, Santa Fe’s open-air design affords operagoers the unique opportunity of watching both the show onstage and the show beyond the stage: the sunsets, the rainstorms, the clouds, the nighttime sky. For six weeks during July and August there’s also the famous, 38-year-old Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival. Year-round, the Concordia de Santa Fe wind ensemble can be found at St. Francis Auditorium (full ensemble) or St. John’s United Methodist Church (chamber music). Santa Fe Pro Musica, a classical-music performance and education nonprofit organization, puts on dozens of intimate concerts for lovers of string-quartet music and more, at the New Mexico Museum of Art’s St. Francis Auditorium. And during the summer, and the winter as well, the Santa Fe Desert Chorale, a professional choral ensemble, performs at gorgeous venues around town, with the Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis topping its list. Aside from the big-ticket acts brought in to the Lensic, Fan Man books acts into other venues around town, and lesserknown but equally gifted performers, from director/musician Bruce Dunlap to neo-flamenco guitarist Ottmar Liebert, play at the chic GiG Performance Space, on Second Street. And for free live music, the Bandstand on the Plaza showcases local and regional talent Monday through Thursday evenings during July and August: Latin jazz, blues, rock, Andean music, or a fusion of genres. In that same free-and-live vein, there’s also Music on the Hill at St. John’s College—a family-friendly concert series where listeners lounge and picnic on the school’s athletic field most Wednesdays in June and July.

Theater Santa Fe Playhouse, founded in 1922 by writer Mary Austin, brings imaginative community theater to the stage, from the annual Benchwarmers one-act-play competition (every February) to productions of Shakespeare comedies. And it all happens in an historic adobe—the oldest continually running playhouse west of the Mississippi—in the 390-year-old Barrio de Analco neighborhood, off Old Santa Fe Trail. Another annually performing theatrical troupe is Theater Grottesco, an avant-garde company formed 26 years ago in Paris that likes to come up with new twists on old standards, and performs at the Santa Fe Opera and the Center for Contemporary Arts. Influenced by the same training as some Cirque du Soleil members, Grottesco’s performers meld acting with movement 38 Santafe.org

arts. Similarly, the physical-theater circus-arts group known as Wise Fool New Mexico, performs its annual Circus Luminous extravaganza at the Lensic, and can often be found at other venues performing its beloved puppet shows. When they’re not spicing up other venues in Germany, Los Angeles, or New York, the Juan Siddi Flamenco Theatre Company can be found at The Lodge between June and September.

Nightlife El Farol restaurant and cantina, still Canyon Road’s top nighttime entertainment destination, offers weekly tableside flamenco shows in the restaurant, as well as live music (often from the Cuban band, Savor, who also play at the Eldorado Hotel once a week). El Mesón, near the Plaza, also serves up monthly tableside flamenco shows, along with traditional Spanish cuisine and weekly tango nights. Downtown, the Cowgirl Bar & Grill, a Western-themed favorite, serves mesquitesmoked brisket, margaritas, and (almost) nightly music in a range of genres (indoors or on the patio), and offers up the town’s best people-watching. Just up the way, the Tin Star Saloon has blues jam nights; while over at Corazón, there’s always an eclectic mélange of funk, DJs, blues, reggae, and salsa, as well as the weekly Liberace dance party. Not far from the Plaza, DJ Automatic turns Saturday nights into his own Twisted Audio dance show at Fusion. La Fiesta Lounge, inside the La Fonda hotel, serves up live country and folk music. For a bite of Big Apple flavor, try Vanessie, a continental grill and piano bar, where resident pianists Doug Montgomery and Charles Tichenor tickle out everything from cabaret to pop standards, or La Casa Sena Cantina, where the gourmet dinner includes waiters belting out Broadway tunes twice a night amid vines and fountains. Other nighttime entertainment spots include Plaza Real, the Second Street Brewery (at the Railyard), the Ore House’s porch (overlooking the Plaza), and the Mine Shaft Tavern (in nearby Madrid). There’s also music and dancing at Tiny’s, jazz at La Posada, and Native American music at Amaya. For touring indie and Americana bands, or folksy musicians—from the English Beat to Cracker—head out to the Santa Fe Brewing Company. It’s New Mexico’s oldest microbrewery and boasts a sizeable stage and surprisingly good acoustics. And don’t forget The Matador, downtown, where, on weeknights, DJ Prairie Dog and others regularly heat up the turntables. The Silver Starlight Lounge at RainbowVision, a GLBT-friendly retirement community at the south end of


town on Rodeo Road, hosts DJ Oona’s Trash Disco dance parties (with ’70sinspired music and sequins galore) as well as drag shows and cabarets. The showrooms of both Tesuque Pueblo’s Camel Rock Casino, about 15 miles north of town on Highway 84/285, and Pojoaque Pueblo’s brandnew Buffalo Thunder Resort & Casino, nearby on Buffalo Thunder Trail, bring in notable acts and performers as well—from the Beach Boys to redneck comedian Ron White.

Cinema Santa Fe is a city of cinephiles. In addition to the 26 commercial screens at its three theater complexes, the City Filmic also has two of the finer arthouse theaters in the state: the Center for Contemporary Arts Cinematheque, on Old Santa Fe Trail, seats 140 and shows documentaries and international films, and The Screen, on the campus of the College of Santa Fe, plays the latest art films on a big, beautiful screen with an impressive sound system. Other films, particularly revivals and premieres, can also be found at the Lensic and in the New Mexico Film Museum. And in October, the Santa Fe Film Festival, now in its 11th year, will be showcasing more than 100 films from across the globe at theaters throughout the city.

Eldorado Hotel & Spa puts you at the center of the Santa Fe experience. What will you treasure most? 1.800.955.4455 | 309 W. San Francisco | EldoradoHotel.com Nidah Spa | The Old House Restaurant

Where Santa Fe begins.

Festivals One of the mainstays of Santa Fe’s entertainment scene is its festivals. In June, the Santa Fe Dance Festival features three consecutive weekends of contemporary choreographies performed by Moving People Dance Theatre’s classically trained, ultramodern dancers. Besides the long-running Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival, every July, the New Mexico Jazz Festival, typically held in the same month, boasts two solid weeks of saxophone and trombone solos—and more—on the Plaza and at the Lensic, as well as at venues in Albuquerque. In June, the Thirsty Ear Festival takes over the Eaves Movie Ranch, site of many a Western about ten miles south of Santa Fe, off Highway 14. This three-day roots-music bonanza includes camping, a saloon offering microbrews, and in festivals past, headline artists have included Keb’ Mo’ and Indigenous. And close to Labor Day, there’s the 36th annual Santa Fe Bluegrass & Old Time Music Festival (August 28-29), at the Santa Fe County Fairgrounds.

FAIRCHILD & CO. EXCELLENCE IN FINE JEWELRY SINCE 1976 110 West San Francisco Street • Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501

505.984.1419 • 800.773.8123 • fairchildjewelry@aol.com • fairchildjewelers.com 2010 santa fe visitors guide 39


CENTURIES OF HISTORY, BRILLIANTLY DISGUISED AS FUN. Nestled beneath the majestic Sandia Mountains, near Santa Fe, there’s a place where old legends meet modern luxury. On the banks of the Rio Grande within the ancient lands of the Native American Pueblo of Santa Ana, this golf and spa resort offers luxurious amenities and beautiful natural surroundings with an ideal year-round climate. Just 20 minutes from Albuquerque and 40 minutes from historic Santa Fe. A place where guests are tantalized by the smell of fresh bread baking in Pueblo ovens. A place where 800-year-old archeological sites embrace a nationally ranked championship golf club, and worries evaporate in a ceremonial-style kiva pool or a colorful hot-air balloon. A place where natural ingredients of the earth nurture your mind and body at a full-service world-class spa. This place is called Tamaya. Feel the Hyatt Touch.® To learn more about Hyatt Resorts’ Sunshine on Sale® free night offer, or to make a reservation, call 800 55 HYATT or visit tamaya.hyatt.com.


DOUGLAS MERRIAM

PETER OGILVIE

Santa Fe’s best ways to relax and rejuvenate

T

he fresh, clear air and sunshine-fi lled days of Santa Fe are always invigorating. But the city has even more to offer those seeking mind-body wellness and total rejuvenation. Thanks in part to the influences of the region’s rich Native American cultures, Santa Fe has long been a center for traditional, non-Western healing practices. Three major alternative-healing institutions—New Mexico Academy of Healing Arts, the Scherer Institute, and Southwest Acupuncture College—not only educate students from around the world but offer residents and visitors access to cuttingedge therapies, from deep-tissue massage to reflexology and polarity therapy, at surprisingly affordable prices. A one-hour massage session with a student at the New Mexico Academy of Healing Arts, for example, runs just $30; graduate students at the academy, who have more experience, will work on your muscles for just $50 an hour.

Soak Away Your Stress Ten Thousand Waves, a peaceful, Japanese-style spa in the mountains just minutes from downtown, is the perfect place to soothe sore muscles after a day of skiing, relax after a tough week at work, or just treat yourself to some pampering. Try the budget-friendly communal hot tub or reserve one of the luxurious private tubs, each secluded by rustic walls and shady trees—you’ll feel as if you’re miles away from reality. The spa also offers a range of bodywork and treatment options, from Indo-Asian hot-oil massages to salt wraps and custom facials. About 50 miles north of Santa Fe, Ojo Caliente Resort and Spa—one of the oldest natural health resorts in the country—features ten natural geothermal pools that have been prized for their healing benefits for thousands of years. Ranging in temperature from 80 to 109 degrees Fahrenheit, the mineral-rich waters at Ojo Caliente are

filled with lithium, iron, soda, and arsenic, which are believed to help conditions ranging from depression to digestive issues. The refreshing mud pool, open from May to October, is touted as a great way to detoxify your skin. Slather yourself with mud, let it dry in the warm New Mexico sun, and leave, the resort promises, feeling cleansed and refreshed.

Get Moving Yoga seems to get more and more popular in Santa Fe each year—and the city has studios to serve practitioners of every variety and skill level. Body of Santa Fe, with classes in Ashtanga, Hatha, Vinyasa, and restorative yoga, was voted “Best Yoga Studio” in the Santa Fe Reporter’s 2008 and 2009 reader surveys. Other favorite studios—all of which accept drop-ins—include Yoga Source (Iyengar and Ashtanga), Yoga Moves (yoga and creative movement), the nonprofit Community Yoga Center, and Bikram’s Yoga Santa Fe (Hatha postures practiced in a room heated to 105 degrees Fahrenheit, for increased flexibility). For an energizing workout that combines healing arts, martial arts, and dance, try a Nia class at StudioNia Santa Fe, with 1,800 feet of sprung dance-floor space. You’ll find classes in ballet, jazz, modern dance, and more at Moving People Dance Theatre (look for performances by their outstanding professional company around town throughout the year). Drop in for a Latin dance lesson at Salsa Suave, which hosts weekly salsa classes at the Aspen Santa Fe Ballet studio. If belly dancing’s your thing, check out the Middle East–inspired classes at Pomegranate Studios. For African dancing, head for the Railyard Performance Space, which offers weekly sessions, plus classes in other dance forms. Finally, you’ll fi nd a variety of movement and fitness class-

Above left: Taking it all in at Ten Thousand Waves; right: model Zoe Muse contemplates her next yoga move 2010 santa fe visitors guide 41


Las Brisas de Santa Fe Only an 8-block walk to the Plaza Affordable and comfortable homes for the whole family. All condos have: private walled patios wood-burning fireplaces standard size kitchens washers/dryers in condo free parking

Remember, picking a vacation home is like any other real estate transaction.

It’s all about the location!

Resort and Day Spas

624 Galisteo St • 1-800-449-6231 www.lasbrisasdesantafe.com

Santa Fe arguably offers more world-class spa experiences than any other American city of its size, with treatments influenced by cultures near and far. At Absolute Nirvana, a heavenly little spa tucked into the Madeleine Inn, a downtown bed and breakfast, Indonesian spa treatments are the specialty. The Nidah Spa, at the Eldorado Hotel, offers a range of blissful treatments based on the healing properties of local ingredients, from desert clay to sage and juniper. At the RockResorts Spa at La Posada, exotic offerings are inf luenced by local Native cultures. The Spa at the Hotel Santa Fe combines Native and Asian inf luences: Try a Sacred Ground Body a, a blend of bluegreen algae and French green clay. The Spa at Loretto has a menu of treatments ref lecting the five elements (earth, air, fire, water, and spirit) and emphasizes indigenous New Mexico herbs and minerals. The Downtown Day Spa, a convenient, restorative wellness center in the heart of downtown, serves up therapies from hot-stone massage to Shiatsu, while the f lotation tanks at Tranquility Flotation, Massage, and Healing Center offer 60 to 90 minutes of gravity-defying relaxation like you’ve never experienced before. North of town, the luxurious Spa at Encantado mixes Eastern, Western, and Native healing philosophies with purification rituals, aromatherapy, and specialty treatments for women, men, and couples. The stunning SháNah Spa at Bishop’s Lodge includes, along with a range of exotic treatments, a Watsu pool and an authentic Native American tepee, all at the base of the Sangre de Cristos. Meanwhile, south of Santa Fe, in La Cienega valley, the Spa at Sunrise Springs provides massage, reiki, ref lexology, and sound-healing therapies in a tranquil, rustic setting.

The Santa Fe Opera 2 0 1 0 F E S T I VA L S E A S O N J U LY 2 – A U G U S T 28

MADAME BUTTERFLY

PUCCINI

THE TALES OF HOFFMANN

OFFENBACH

ALBERT HERRING

BRITTEN

TICKETS START AT JUST $26

42 Santafe.org

es—from spinning to step aerobics—at two municipal fitness facilities: Fort Marcy Complex, on the north side, and the Genoveva Chavez Community Center, a state-of-the-art 170,000foot fitness center on the south side of town. These facilities also have workout equipment, basketball courts, and heated indoor pools for year-round enjoyment—and the Chavez Center offers an indoor ice rink.

THE MAGIC FLUTE

MOZART

LIFE IS A DREAM World Premiere

LEWIS SPRATLAN

www.santafeopera.org

800-280-4654


After your Rail Runner ride*, hop on THE SANTA FE PICK-UP, our FREE shuttle, and see the sights P downtown City of Santa Fe Parking Division

505/955-6581 *If you choose to drive around downtown Santa Fe, park at any city lot or garage, give this ad to the parking lot attendant and get a half-hour of free parking! One ad per visit, not redeemable for cash.

Enjoying the Rail Runner Express? Or take a Route 2 or â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mâ&#x20AC;? Santa Fe Trails bus and see the REST of Santa Fe!

505/955-2001

Ă&#x2020;6XdbVEjZWad^hi]ZdaYZhi Xdci^cjdjhan^c]VW^iZYXdbbjc^in ^ci]ZJH6#Ă&#x2021;JH6ID96N

9-*24308ÂŤ (473*7 )TS,FXUFW GQTHPXXTZYMTKYMJ5QF_F 8FSYF+J32 Â&#x2C6;YMJRTSPXHTWSJWHTR .SXUNWFYNTSFQ,NKYXKWTR &WTZSIYMJ<TWQI 5WTHJJIX8ZUUTWYYMJ(MWNXYNS YMJ)JXJWY2TSFXYJW^&GNVZNZ 2010 santa fe visitors guide 43


SHOPPING HOURS Monday to Saturday 10 am-7 pm Sundays 11 am-6 pm (Hours subject to change)

NOW OPEN! GYMBOREE OUTLET TOMMY HILFIGER COMPANY STORES

FASHION OUTLETS OF SANTA FE I-25 Exit 278 8380 Cerrillos Road Santa Fe, New Mexico 87507 T.505.474.4000 www.fashionoutlets.com

DISCOVER GENUINE SANTA FE If you haven’t experienced this vibrant, historic city in northern New Mexico, there’s never been a better time to visit. The Inn and Spa at Loretto welcomes you with our beautifully renovated guest rooms, relaxing spa and Luminaria Restaurant & Patio serving contemporary cuisine designed to ignite your senses. Come explore winding streets, shop the latest fashions and galleries, and then relax in the Living Room Lounge while you enjoy one of our signature drinks and live entertainment. Be sure to join the Loretto Legacy Club on our website to receive exclusive specials and offers.

Intimate

Compelling

Unforgettable Join us for our 38th Season July 18 – August 23, 2010

Marc Neikrug, Artistic Director

211 Old Santa Fe Trail 866.611.8014 | lorettoexperience.com

44 Santafe.org

For tickets and information: 505.982.1890 Toll-Free 888.221.9836 santafechambermusic.com


GOLF SANTA FE’S GOLF COURSE OF CHOICE

Experience a Hyatt® designed around you.

®

Welcome to Hyatt Place Santa Fe. Hyatt Place combines style and innovation to create a completely new hotel experience. The spacious guestrooms are stylishly furnished with a plush Hyatt Grand Bed™, Cozy Corner oversized sofa-sleeper, 42-inch flat-panel HDTV and an in-room refrigerator. You’ll also enjoy an indoor pool and heated spa, free Wi-Fi, flexible meeting space, complimentary continental breakfast, freshly prepared food served 24/7, and complimentary shuttle service.

• 18 championship holes • 9 hole executive course • full-service amenities • 360 degree mountain views

888.735.4657 linksdesantafe.com

888 HYATT HP (888 492 8847) HyattPlace.com Hyatt Place Santa Fe 4350 Cerrillos Rd • Santa Fe, NM 87507 OPENING SPRING 2010 The trademark HYATT and related marks are trademarks of Hyatt Corporation. © 2009 Hyatt Corporation. All rights reserved.

205 Caja del Rio Santa Fe, NM 87505

2 Fit 2

2 Quality 2 2 Style 2

Located just two blocks from the Historic Plaza, Otra Vez is steps away from dining, shopping and art galleries. We have eighteen unique and luxurios condos.

h 800.536.6488 505.988.2244 www.OtraVezenSantaFe.com

203 West Water St 2 Santa fe, NM 87501 505.820.1883 2 800.871.1883 2 lucchese.com 2010 santa fe visitors guide 45


DIANNE STROMBERG JULIEN MCROBERTS

DOUGLAS MERRIAM

Clockwise from left: The Farmers Market in the Railyard; buyers and sellers at the Market; interior of the club house at Zocalo, a condominium development north of Santa Fe

How Santa Fe is designing its future

T

he painters, sculptors, jewelers, photographers, and other fine artists who’ve helped establish Santa Fe as the country’s second-largest art market aren’t the only creative types living in and around the City Different. There are oodles of other artists here, too: designers of fashion and furniture, of landscapes and home interiors, plus architects and builders, as well as the many innovators in the fields of science, sustainability, the healing arts, and water conservation. Part of that creative spirit Santa Feans get from the area’s indigenous communities, most of whom have always recognized the interconnectedness between themselves and the world around them. And as old as the city is, and as dedicated as it has been to preserving its history, its heritage, its traditions and cultures, Santa Fe has also been a nexus for people wanting to push its citizens and its environment forward—whether that’s in the forefront of smart growth, green building, or civic harmony. In 2004, for example, in recognition of the city’s can-do creativity, the United Nations named Santa Fe the country’s first member of the United Nations Creative Cities Network, joining Nagoya, Japan, and Montreal,

46 Santafe.org

Canada. The designation underscored the city government’s efforts to bring creativity, design, and sustainability into the core of its economic-development plan. Santa Fe took its urban-creativity agenda even further in 2008 when the city council approved the Sustainable Santa Fe plan—an all-encompassing strategy calling for local policies based on such tenets as environmental stewardship, economic health, and social justice. Its goals were simple if ambitious: A reduction in urban sprawl, the promotion of energy-efficient, carbon-neutral development, alternatives to automobiles, restoration of the watersheds, the building of more parks and open spaces, and a revitalization of the Santa Fe River. As fantastical as those ideals may appear, Santa Fe has already put into place several mechanisms needed to achieve some of them: the Community College now uses biodiesel to power its facilities and most of the city’s traffic signals use energy-efficient LED lights. The Railyard Park, once one of downtown’s last holdout projects, is now a 50-acre mixed-use neighborhood, and serves as a park, a retail destination, and a transportation


hub. Now a community-friendly urban center, its 13 acres of open space complement an amphitheater, a pedestrian thoroughfare, and several kid-friendly playgrounds; a galleryheavy retail area; nonprofits such as the youth-oriented Warehouse 21 arts center and the Hispanic cultural center, El Museo Cultural; and a permanent home for the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thriving Farmers Market, a weekly gathering of local growers that offers everything from fresh meat, produce, and cheeses to cooking demos by area chefs. The Railyardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s landscaping comes from smart water-conservation techniques such as designated water-harvesting areas and the use of droughttolerant plants. And the ArtYard, an eco-friendly live/work complex, with several units reserved as affordable housing for artists, is just a short walk away. Best of all, this onetime abandoned area along the Santa Fe Southern Rail line is anchored by the northernmost terminal of the New Mexico Rail Runner, the commuter rail service that now connects Santa Fe to Albuquerque and Belen. Another recent civic reconstruction project, which also presented the challenge of how to honor the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s traditional architecture style with 21st-century concerns of energy efficiency and sustainability, was the Santa Fe Community Convention Center. Finished in 2008 and just one block north of the Plaza, the 75,000square-foot, state-of-the-art facilityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; with 500-plus underground parking spacesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;fulfilled its dual missions in style, integrating high-tech green elements like cisterns and nontoxic materials into its roof terraces and zaguans (long entrance halls). Local private developers have also incorporated sustainable building practices into their work. The Marquez Lofts has become a magnet for design firms, along with Second Street Studios and the complex at Pacheco Park. Built in 2001, Pacheco Parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s four buildings headquarter house builders, interior designers, architects, and contemporary-home stores, while the live/work units of Second Street have attracted businesses in photography, sound, design, and art instruction. Other eco-sensitive developments include Oshara Village and Aldea, both on the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s outskirts and based on the principle of providing increased communal open spaces.

#VTJOFTT1MFBTVSF ATTHE2OSEWOOD)NNOFTHE!NASAZI

ROSEWOOD INN OF THE ANASAZI SANTA FE

New Mexicoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Premier Four Star Luxury Hotel Award Winning Anasazi Restaurant Conde Nast Travelers Top 50 Hotels in the U.S. Travel & Leisureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best Hotels

7ASHINGTON!VEsINNOFTHEANASAZICOMs  

Preferred Hotel of Incentive Planners

El Rey Inn

An authentic Southwestern favorite for over 70 years, El Rey offers comfort, value and hospitality. Five lush acres with walkways and patios, complimentary continental breakfast, whirlpool and in-season pool make El Rey a Santa Fe favorite! 1862 Cerrillos Road Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505 505 / 982-1931 800 / 521-1349

.

.

.

www elreyinnsantafe com 2010 santa fe visitors guide 47


Top, left: Taos as it appeared in 1969 in Easy Rider; bottom, left: Tommy Lee Jones in No Country for Old Men; above: Denzel Washington ponders a futuristic New Mexico in The Book of Eli, shot in and around Santa Fe.

Santa Fe’s legacies of cinema and star powers

I

f you have an eye for faces, there’s a good chance that on any given day here in Santa Fe you might spot a celebrity or two— from actors and designers (Gene Hackman and Tom Ford) to Nobel laureates and country music stars (Murray Gell-Mann and Randy Travis). Very few of these famous folks, however, are here to see and be seen. Most come, and more than a few stay, for the same reasons everyone else does—the beauty, the cultures, the events, the food, and the down-to-earth quality of its citizens. And as famous as they are out there, here in the City Different they live life pretty much the same as other Santa Feans: Here, they can just be. And more often than not, they make lasting civic contributions. Oscar-winning 1940s film star Greer Garson, who lived part-time at her Pecos ranch for many years, funded construction of new buildings and scholarships for the College of Santa Fe. Longtime residents Shirley MacLaine and Ali MacGraw have donated their time and energy to many causes around town, as have Wes Studi and Val Kilmer, and future part-time resident Robert Redford will soon be setting up his Sundance New Mexico film program just outside Española. Part of the city’s celebrity appeal stems from its longstanding relationship with Hollywood, a connection that has only deepened in the past 15 years. Building upon the generous filmmaking incentives first enacted by former governor Gary Johnson in 1995, Governor Bill Richardson has been even more generous to and solicitous of filmmakers since taking office in 2003—ranging from the hefty tax rebates to the no-interest loans. Add those perks to the aggressive training programs for residents and the state’s big skies and range of environments, and it’s no wonder more than 120 major film and TV projects have been shot here since 2003, pumping an estimated $2 billion into the state’s economy. Aside from past classics such as Easy Rider (1969) and The Milagro Beanfield War (1988), other films shot in and/or around Santa Fe include the 2008 Academy Award for best picture No 48 Santafe.org

Country for Old Men, Wild Hogs (2007), Georgia O’Keeffe (2009), and Appaloosa (2008); and more recently, The Book of Eli, starring Denzel Washington, filmed here, as was Did You Hear About the Morgans? All of which came here to take advantage of the area’s archetypal Western landscapes, the old world look of its historic adobe architecture, the gorgeous local vistas, and the fact that New Mexico can stand in for Wyoming (the Morgans), New York (O’Keeffe), or a post-apocalyptic future (Eli). As director Lawrence Kasdan, who filmed Silverado (1985) and Wyatt Earp (1994) in New Mexico, put it, filming here was incredible because “every day . . . the sky was putting on a show.” Still, it’s not just the celluloid stars who’ve fallen under Santa Fe’s spell. Influential 20th-century composer Igor Stravinsky maintained a long-running relationship with the Santa Fe Opera after directing a performance of his piece The Rake’s Progress and assisting throughout the opera’s 1957 opening season. “I think Stravinsky’s visit made us,” said Miranda Masocco Levy (a local opera supporter who first invited the maestro to town) in a 2006 interview. “Because of him, every newspaper and TV station from all over the world came.” Novelist Willa Cather wrote her 1927 Santa Fe classic, Death Comes for the Archbishop, during a stay at fellow writer Mary Austin’s home on Canyon Road; Lew Wallace, governor of New Mexico Territory from 1878 to 1881, wrote Ben Hur in his Palace of the Governors office while concurrently leading the effort to bring Billy the Kid to justice; and Santa Fe Institute habitué and sometime Santa Fean Cormac McCarthy has written a good deal of his novels here, including his 2007 Pulitzer winner, The Road. As loaded as Santa Fe is with the rich and the famous, though, chances are just as good that if it’s not Redford or Gell-Mann sitting right next to you in some café, or chomping on a guacamoleand-salsa-laden fajita on a park bench at the Plaza, it’s some other world-renowned superstar in their field, and you’ll never even know it. Which is almost as cool a notion as knowing it.


Nancy Brown Custom Jeweler presents the innovative Reversible Ring™ from award-winning artist Gloria Sawin.

• Locally owned since 1985 •

111 Old Santa Fe Trail Santa Fe, NM 87501 800-852-2993 • 505-982-2993 www.nancybrowncustomjeweler.com Open Daily. Call for our Catalogs.

Campanilla Compound – it’s what you imagined Santa Fe to be! - One & Two bedroom homes, 4 blocks from the Santa Fe Plaza - 334 Otero Santa Fe, NM – Call 1-800-828-9700 for reservations – www.campanillacompound.com

Fabulous selection of sterling silver buckles and fine leather belts.

 8]]fi[XYc\;fnekfneCf[^`e^  ;fnekfneJ_lkkc\J\im`Z\  È?\Xck_pJkXikÉ9i\Xb]Xjk  =i\\N`=`Xe[9lj`e\jj:\ek\i <o\iZ`j\=XZ`c`kp  CXle[ip=XZ`c`kp  ?Xc]9cfZb]ifdIX`cIlee\i;\gfk  J\XjfeXcFlk[ffiGffc  =Xd`cpXe[G\k=i`\e[cp Belts and Buckles at La Fonda Hotel - Santa Fe

www.tomtaylorbuckles.com

--

866.433.0335

www.SantaFeSageInn.com

725 Cerrillos Road Santa Fe, NM 87505

2010 santa fe visitors guide 49


PHOTO BY CHRIS CORRIE; COURTESY SANTA FE CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

AIRPORTS •Santa Fe Municipal Airport (505-955-2900), which now offers commercial service to Dallas and Los Angeles. Capital Aviation (505-4712700) and Santa Fe Air Center (505-471-2525) provide private and charter flights. Car rentals from Avis and Hertz are available on-site. •Albuquerque International Sunport (505-244-7700) is 65 miles, about a one-hour drive, south of Santa Fe. ABQ offers nonstop flights to 38 cities, including Dallas, Chicago, Los Angeles, and Chihuahua, Mexico, provided by nine major and two local carriers. Eight major car-rental agencies have offices at the Sunport, including Avis, Enterprise, and Hertz. There is a free shuttle bus connecting the airport to the New Mexico Rail Runner Express stations in downtown Albuquerque.

GROUND TRANSPORT •On weekdays, the New Mexico Rail Runner first leaves the Railyard station in Santa Fe at 6:03 AM, then arrives at the Downtown Albuquerque station at 7:34 AM; the latest departs Santa Fe at 9:30 PM, reaches Albuquerque at 11:00 PM. On Saturdays, this shifts to a departure at 8:10 AM, arriving at 9:46 AM, and a final departure at 10:00 PM, arriving at 11:31 AM. Other Santa Fe stations include South Capitol, on Cerrillos Road at Cordova Road, and South Santa Fe, where I-25 meets Highway 599; and the Zia/St. Francis stop, at the junction of Zia Road and St. Francis Drive, which should be open by the end of 2010. On Sundays, the train leaves Santa Fe at 11:25 AM, arrives in Albuquerque at 1:01 PM, and the last leaves Santa Fe at 6:30 PM and arrives in Albuquerque at 8:04 PM. Children under 10 ride free. $6/one way, $8/ round-trip, 866-795-7245, nmrailrunner.com. Schedules may change. •Rail Runner ticket holders need only show their Rail Runner ticket to a Santa Fe Trails or ABQ Ride bus driver to navigate Santa Fe and/or Albuquerque free of charge. Santa Fe Trails (505-955-2001, santafetrails@ santafenm.gov) connects all of Santa Fe along various routes, as does ABQ Ride (505-243-7433, cabq.gov/transit) for Albuquerque. •It is best to make reservations for shuttle services between Santa Fe and the Albuquerque Sunport. Shuttle providers are Sandia Shuttle Express (888-775-5696, sandiashuttle.com), Roadrunner Shuttle & Charter Services (505-424-3367), and Twin Hearts, which links Taos to Santa Fe (575-751-1201, taosexpress.com).

PARKING •Limited one- and two-hour-metered street parking is available downtown for $1/hour. Downtown pay parking lots are at the corner of Don Gaspar Avenue and Water Street, and at the Railyard Park and Plaza. Parking garages are located at 216 W San Francisco Street and at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center, at 201 W Marcy Street. Also visit santafe.org for more parking options.

VISITOR INFORMATION •Santa Fe Convention and Visitors Bureau offers state, county, and local tourist information at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center. 201 W Marcy Street, 505-955-6200, santafe.org, Mon–Fri, 8 AM–5 PM. •The Santa Fe Chamber of Commerce, located at Santa Fe Outlets, has information on businesses, relocation, and tourism. 8380 Cerrillos, Suite 302, 505-988-3279, santafechamber.com, Mon–Fri, 8 AM–5 PM. From May through October, the Chamber’s Plaza Visitor Center is open at First National Bank on the Plaza, at 62 Lincoln Avenue. •New Mexico Department of Tourism’s Santa Fe Visitor Information Center has state, county, and local tourist information. 491 Old Santa Fe Trail, 505-827-7400, newmexico.org, open daily, 8 AM–5 PM. The Department of Tourism’s La Bajada Welcome Center has the same information and is located on I-25 near mile marker 268, 17 miles south of Santa Fe. 505-424-0823, open daily, 8 AM–5 PM. •The Public Lands Information Center, in the Bureau of Land Management building, provides hunting and fishing licenses, maps, camping permits, and information about public-lands recreation. 1474 Rodeo Road, 505-438-7542, publiclands.org, Mon–Fri, 8 AM–5 PM.

MEDICAL CARE •The Amtrak Southwest Chief, which travels from Chicago to Los Angeles, stops in Lamy, about 17 miles south of Santa Fe. The Lamy Shuttle (505-982-8829) offers transport to the city by reservation. •Capital City Cab (505-438-0000) is on call 24 hours a day for door-todoor taxi service. During the summer and fall, scooters are available from iSCOOT (505-577-5048, iscootsantafe.com): $30 for 2 hours, $40/four hours, or $60/day. Santa Fe Pedicabs are also available (505-577-5056), for $1/minute, and are a fun and leisurely way to see the city up close. Dragonfly Express, in the Railyard, rents electric cars (505-820-9321). •Greyhound Lines operates out of the Santa Fe Bus Station, with two departures and two arrivals daily. 858 St. Michael’s Drive, 505-471-0008, greyhound.com. 50 Santafe.org

•Christus St. Vincent Regional Medical Center, 455 St. Michael’s, 505-983-3361 •OnCall Urgent Care, 431 St. Michael’s, 505-954-9949 •ultiMED Urgent Medical Care, 707 Paseo de Peralta, 505-989-8707 •Urgent Care Santa Fe, 2801 Rodeo, 505-474-0120 •Lovelace Health Systems, 440 St. Michael’s, 505-995-2413

PETS •Many hotels in animal-friendly Santa Fe welcome pets. However, pets must be on leashes in public places, except at the Frank Ortiz Park Off-Leash Area (160 Camino de las Crucitas). Owners must clean up after pets in all public areas. Pets are banned from Cathedral Park and the Plaza during special occasions. Stop by the Santa Fe Convention and Visitors Bureau to find doggie-daycare options.


FFI ad - Visitors Guide.eps

10/23/2008

10:03:12 AM

4150 Cerrillos Road Santa Fe, New Mexico 87507

Ĺ˝ Toll-Free: (800) 758-1128 Ĺ˝ Phone: (505) 474-4442 Ĺ˝ Fax: (505) 474-7569 Ĺ˝ www.marriott.com/saffi

Newly Remodeled !

The Original Fountain of Youth Our legendary waters have been soothing body, mind and spirit naturally for centuries. Experience Ojo Caliente.

Minutes from Historic Santa Fe Plaza

Ĺ˝ 32â&#x20AC;? HDTV Flat Panel LCDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in all Rooms Ĺ˝ Luxury Bedding with Pillow Top Mattresses Ĺ˝ Free Wireless and Wired High Speed Internet Ĺ˝ Complimentary Continental Breakfast Ĺ˝ Indoor Heated Pool

The Spanish Table food & cookware from Spain & Portugal Paella Pans Terracotta Cazuelas Hand Painted Ceramics Smoked Paprika Saffron, Valencian Rice Chorizo, Manchego Cheese Lemon Stuffed Olives Cookbooks & Music CDs

Resort lodging, full-service spa and restaurant. New wine bar & lounge. Visit our website for packages. Hot springs open daily 8am - 10pm.

800.222.9162 505.583.2233 ojospa.com

Celebrate local artistry by strolling to the nearby Gallery District, and feast your eyes on our new Gallery Collection of original paintings and sculpture by nationally acclaimed American artists, selected by La Posadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s art curator and featured throughout the hotel. Spend the day at the blissful RockResorts Spa,ÂŽ and the evening cuddling around an outdoor kiva. And, feast on the exceptional cuisine at the AAA Four Diamond Award-winning Fuego. At La Posada de Santa Fe, A RockResort, rustic luxury meets unique artistry.

:/>=A/2/23A/<B/431=;j&$$!!@=19%$ # ASPEN, CO BEAVER CREEK, CO BRECKENRIDGE, CO VAIL, CO JACKSON HOLE, WY SANTA FE, NM MIAMI, FL RODNEY BAY, ST. LUCIA LAS TERRENAS, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

109 N Guadalupe St Santa Fe M on-Sat 10 am - 6 pm ; Sun 11 am - 5 pm w w w .spanishtable.com Seattle, W A; Berkeley & M ill Valley, CA

2010 santa fe visitors guide 51


CLASSES Valdes Art Workshops

ACCOMMODATIONS

AIRPORT TRANSPORTATION

Eldorado Hotel & Spa

Star Limo LLC

309 W San Francisco, 505-988-4455, 800-955-4455 eldoradohotel.com Eldorado is where Santa Fe begins. Our fourdiamond hotel features the intimate Old House Restaurant and the rejuvenating Nidah Spa. We’re just off the historic Santa Fe Plaza and its unforgettable galleries and shops. What will you treasure most?

4220 Laramie NW, Albuquerque, 505-848-9999 505starlimo.com, info@505starlimo.com Convention event? Why fight the traffic? Let Star Limousine take you. Star Limousine LLC specializes in corporate transportation for today’s business. Your transportation is professionally handled with a fleet of Town Car sedans, limousines, vans, SUVs, stretch SUVs, luxury limo buses, and mini coaches. On-site greeter facilitates airport multi-flight group arrival coordination. Deanna Ballard, director of client services, corporate/retail. Open 24/7.

Ghost Ranch in Abiquiú and in Santa Fe Abiquiú: 505-685-4333, fax 505-685-4519 Santa Fe: 505-982-8539, fax 505-986-1917 ghostranch.org, info@ghostranch.org Center of the Presbyterian Church USA. Both locations offer B&B, reunion, and full conference facilities year-round. The Santa Fe location is three blocks from the Plaza, near museums, galleries, and restaurants. The 21,000-acre ranch offers accommodations or campground, hiking, museums, library, the Georgia O’Keeffe landscape tour, and breathtaking scenery.

Inn on the Alameda 303 E Alameda, 888-984-2124, 505-984-2121 innonthealameda.com Relax in tranquil courtyards tucked behind adobe walls, nestled between the historic Plaza and Canyon Road. Fireplaces, balconies, and patios available. Exercise room, on-call massage, and open-air hot tubs. Free WiFi, parking, and local calls. Lavish continental breakfast and afternoon wine reception included.

ATTRACTIONS Broken Saddle Riding Company PO Box 286, Cerrillos, 505-424-7774, brokensaddle.com Well-trained and conditioned, smooth-riding Tennessee walkers and Missouri fox trotters. Ride the beautiful High Desert Ranch. Silver and turquoise mines. Walk, trot, canter, or gallop. Small groups/private rides. Call anytime. Open year-round.

Ghost Ranch in Abiquiú and in Santa Fe Abiquiu: 505-685-4333, fax 505-685-4519 Santa Fe: 505-982-8539, fax 505-986-1917 ghostranch.org, info@ghostranch.org Center of the Presbyterian Church USA. Both locations offer B&B, reunion, and full conference facilities year-round. The Santa Fe location is three blocks from the Plaza, near museums, galleries, and restaurants. The 21,000-acre ranch offers accommodations or campground, hiking, museums, library, the Georgia O’Keeffe landscape tour, and breathtaking scenery.

La Posada de Santa Fe 330 E. Palace Ave, 866-331-ROCK, 505-986-0000 www.laposada.rockresorts.com Santa Fe’s natural beauty and the luxury of a fourdiamond resort with highly acclaimed restaurants come together on 6 acres of secluded grounds. Spend time at the RockResorts Spa®. Stroll to shopping and galleries. An ideal spot for getaways, meetings and weddings.

4BOUB$MBSBO)PUFMt$BTJOP 464 N Riverside Dr, Hotel: 505-367-4900 Casino: 505-367-4500, santaclaran.com Located in the heart of Española, just 20 miles north of Santa Fe, the Santa Claran Hotel & Casino features a fine boutique hotel and a casino with 800 slot machines plus table games. The property also offers a 24-lane bowling facility and three full-service restaurants (including a steakhouse, banquet/hospitality facilities, lounge), and shopping.

Ten Thousand Waves Japanese Spa & Resort 3 1/2 miles up Hyde Park Rd, 505-992-5003 tenthousandwaves.com Japan recreated at a spa in the foothills above Santa Fe with hot baths, massage, and spa services. Thirteen guest suites, most with fireplaces and either a deck or courtyard. Some have full kitchens and/or separate bedrooms. Pets welcome. Ten minutes from downtown. Truly transformative! 52 Santafe.org

Private Balloon Flights 8311 Golf Course Rd. NW, 505-550-2677, 888-5502677, privateballoonflights.com Enjoy a breathtaking flight from one of our private baskets—just your party and the pilot! No other guests in your basket. We also welcome families of three to six per basket. Large, corporate, and tour groupls welcome. Call 24 hours.

BED & BREAKFASTS The Bobcat Inn 422 Old Las Vegas Hwy, 505-988-9239 fax 505-988-2680, nm-inn.com, res@nm-inn.com Winner of “Best of the Southwest 2007” from bedandbreakfast.com. Breakfast with a view! Nature lovers’ dream with old-world ambience. Located in the foothills of Santa Fe. Beautiful gardens, koi pond, walking trails, stunning views of the mesa, gourmet breakfast, comfortable rooms, each appointed with a different theme. Reasonable rates. Wireless internet. The hacienda beckons you. Rated three diamonds by AAA.

1006 Marquez Place, 505-982-0017 valdesartworkshops.com Three- to five-day summer workshops featuring nationally acclaimed art instructors in drawing, pastel, watercolor, and oil. Workshops run weekly from June until September. Once-a-week art classes run mid-September through May. Centrally located in historic Santa Fe.

CONSIGNMENT ACT 2 839A Paseo de Peralta, 505-983-8585 fax 505-983-0532 A downtown treasure trove of upscale used fashion finds, ACT 2 has been one of Santa Fe’s favorites since 1978! Just two blocks east of the Plaza between Alameda and Palace and only one block north of Canyon Road, look for our lovely mannequins on the sidewalk, find plenty of free parking in the rear. Open 11 AM–5 PM every day.

MISCELLANEOUS Santa Fe P.S. 505-690-2700, santafeps.net A contemporary gift collection with a connection to Santa Fe, Santa Fe P.S. is an online gift catalog featuring Alexander Girard pillows, Patrick McFarlin and Robb Rael prints, glass by Elodie Holmes, goldleaf frames by Marty Horowitz, and much more.

MUSEUMS Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral Pl, 505-983-8900, 505-983-1666 (store), 888-922-IAIA, iaiamuseum.org The Museum of Contemporary Native Arts is the only museum in the world dedicated solely to advancing the scholarship, discourse and understanding of contemporary Native arts. Home to the National Collection of Contemporary Native American Art, the museum’s collected works document the Native American art movement. As the global leader in the acquisition, presentation, and study of contemporary Native arts, the museum challenges the preconceived notions of contemporary Native arts.

MUSIC—LIVE AND DJ Absolute Entertainment 505-986-5882, musicsantafe.com, www.soulsticesantafe.com; ae@musicsantafe.com Absolute Entertainment is your one-stop resource for the finest in New Mexico’s live and DJ music for weddings, corporate events, and private parties. Featuring the outstanding dance band Soulstice. Recommended by event professionals, serving New Mexico for over a decade.

Guadalupe Inn

SPA/MASSAGE

604 Agua Fria, 505-989-7422, guadalupeinn.com office@ guadalupeinn.com Enjoy a “truly Santa Fe” experience with traditional native Santa Fe family hospitality. Quiet comfort within walking distance of the historic Plaza. Awarded Best Breakfast in the Southwest 2005 and Best of Santa Fe Bed and Breakfasts 2008 & 2009.

Ten Thousand Waves Japanese Spa & Resort 3 1/2 miles up Hyde Park Rd, 505-982-9304 tenthousandwaves.com Indoor and outdoor hot baths, world-class massage and spa treatments, lodging with a Japanese twist. Specialties include deep-stone massage,


Nightingale facials, master massage, Yasuragi head-and-neck treatment. Ten minutes from downtownâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and half a world from the ordinary.

TOURIST TRAP Tin Nee Ann Trading Co. 923 Cerrillos, at St. Francis, 505-988-1630 Santa Feâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s world-famous tourist trap has been serving locals and guests alike for more than 35 years. We specialize in Southwest arts and crafts, sterling silver jewelry, T-shirts, moccasins, pottery, rugs, sand paintings, souvenirs, Southwest fashions, and toys. Open Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat, 9:30 AMâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30 PM. Worldwide shipping. City maps, tourist information.

3FMBY

TOURS A Well-Born Guide/Have Ph.D., Will Travel PO Box 1601, 505-988-8022, swguides.com info@swguides.com Want a unique, entertaining learning experience with a local, professional historian? Regularly scheduled walks, hikes, or step-on services. Walks: Artists and Acequias, Bars and Brothels, Jewish Legacy, Ghost, Garden, Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s History. Specializing in experiential, custom programs. Stefanie Beninato, owner.

Destination Southwest 20 First Plaza Galeria NW, Suite 212, Albuquerque 505-766-9068, 800-999-3109, fax 505-766-9065 destinationsouthwest.com tours@destinationsouthwest.com For detailed conference planning, ingenious incentive programs, unforgettable tours, spectacular themed events, seamless transportationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;we are your fullservice destination management company. As a receptive tour operator, we offer unique customized over-the-road tours that highlight the scenic and cultural resources of New Mexico and the Southwest.

XXXJOOPOUIFBMBNFEBDPN 

*//0/5)& "-".&%" 4BOUBGF ON

Great Southwest Adventures PO Box 31151, Santa Fe, 505-455-2700 swadventures.com Sightseeing day tours to Bandelier, Taos, Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Keeffe country, and other great places. High-quality tours emphasize culture and natural history in our fully insured/permitted stand-up vans. Experience more with a quality tour. Twelve years of experience. We also charter transportation.

Historic Walks of Santa Fe, Inc. 608 E Palace, 505-986-8388, 505-988-3081 historicwalksofsantafe.com historicwalksofsf@earthlink.net Historic Walks of Santa Fe, an expert customized desination planning company, was featured on Good Morning America and chosen by tour companies Tauck World Discovery and Globus. Docent guides lead historic/cultural, art, ghost, and shopping tours and excursions. Daily tours at 9:45 AM and 1:15 PM from La Fonda; 10:15 AM and 1:45 PM from Hilton Santa Fe; El Dorado at 9:30 AM and 1:30 PM.

Kokopelli Rafting Adventures 1103 Cerrillos, 505-983-3734, 800-879-9035 kokopellirafting.com New Mexicoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premier rafting outfitter, Kokopelli Rafting Adventures was founded in 1990. Since

 Over 20 shops capturing the diverse essence of Santa Fe Charlotte + Tipit ~ Indian Native Spirits ~ Shalako Indian Store ~ Golden Eagle Indian Jewelry and Pottery ~ Mayan Art ~ Native Jackets EspaĂąa Y MĂĄs ~ Passionate Eye Gallery ~ Desires ~ Zachanee ~ Silver Concepts ~ Oxygen Bar ~ Subway ~ Espresso Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Arte ~ Feathers of Heaven Guatamaya Imports ~ Fistful of Dollars ~ Historic Walks of Santa Fe

Fine Jewelry, Unique Clothing Collections, Art and Sculpture Galleries, Native Crafts, Imports, Collectibles, Pottery, Historic Tours and Casual Dining Open daily Santa Feâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oldest and still the best shopping center on the plaza. Plaza Galeria 66-70 E. San Francisco Street and 115 W. Water Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501 505-983-6504

2010 santa fe visitors guide 53


then, our goal has been to provide a quality recreational experience to people of all ages. Kokopelli guests can expect customer trips, great food, personalized service, and an exceptional guiding staff.

Passport PO Box 1001, Santa Fe, 800-587-7967, 505-9822642, passportdmc.com Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going global. Formerly Passport New Mexico, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re changing our name but not our dedication to our client-partners. A full-service destination management company since 1996, we specialize in customized tours, comprehensive planning and memorable events. Catch our contagious enthusiasm.

Santa Fe Balloons

Southwest Hospitotally (DBA Hospitotally at the Hyatt) 1300 Tuyuna Tr, Santa Ana Pueblo, 505-771-6052 southwesthospitotally.com Your exclusive in-house destination management company at the beautiful Hyatt Regency Tamaya Resort & Spa. Specializing in corporate incentive and adventure tours, team building, transportation, conference and hospitality staffing, airport meet and greets, airport transfers, arrival and departure manifest management, theme planning, and organization.

Southwest Safaris PO Box 945, Santa Fe 87504, 505-988-4246 800-842-4246, fax 505-983-6061 southwestsafaris.com, swsafaris@qwest.net

Exciting scenic air/land expeditions reveal Santa Fe; Northern New Mexico; and the Great American Southwest! Skytours explore mountains, mesas, deserts, canyons, and volcanoes. Extended airtreks discover Grand Canyon, Monument Valley, Canyon de Chelly, Mesa Verde, Arches/Canyonlands. FAA approved.

VACATION RENTALS Granada Vacation Rentals 635 Granada St, 505-986-0006 granadavacationrentals.com Great Rentals. Great Location. Great Prices. Santa Fe style vacation rentals within six blocks of the Plaza. Fully furnished and equipped with outdoor patios, A/C, WiFi, and free, reserved off-street parking.

505-699-7555, santafeballoons.com Take a one-hour flight in a hot air balloon through the canyons, known as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Badlands.â&#x20AC;? We furnish local hotel pickup, a light champagne brunch and first-flight certificates. Please allow four hours for the whole adventure.

Santa Fe Mountain Adventures 310 Read St, 505-988-4000, 800-965-4010 santafemountainadventures.com Exhilarating custom adventures and full destination management for groups and families. Bandelier and Tent Rocks adventures, guided hiking, geocaching, rafting, fly fishing, snowshoeing, and other outdoor activites. Programs also include team building, cooking classes, and cultural tours. Stay in luxurious partner hotels with rejuvenating spas.

*HWLQVWDQWUHZDUGV

*8$5$17(('

<RX¡OOJHW)5((VORWSOD\DQG WDEOHJDPHVPDWFKSOD\ZKHQ\RXMRLQWKH

3HDN5HZDUGV3OD\HU¶VFOXE,W¶V)UHH , 7UDPZD\_$OEXTXHUTXH10__ ZZZVDQGLDUHVRUWFRP Gambling problem? Call 1-800-572-1142. © 2009 Sandia Resort & Casino, Albuquerque, NM

54 Santafe.org

&ORVH &OR &ORVHWR+RPH)DUIURP2UGLQDU\ VH H WR WR +RP +RPH H )DUU IUR IU P 2UGL IU 2UGL UGLQDU GLQD QDU D U\ DU


JANUARY January 1 Three Kings Day Celebration. Dances in honor of new tribal officers take place at all of the Eight Northern Pueblos. Call before visiting. 505-747-1593, espanolaonline.com/pueblos January 17 Vienna with Love. The Santa Fe Symphony and Chorus plays pieces by Strauss, Schubert, and more. 4 PM, $18–$65, the Lensic, 211 W San Francisco, 505-983-1414, santafesymphony.org or 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org January 28 Mozart’s Birthday. Santa Fe Pro Musica Chamber Orchestra performs Mozart’s Symphony in C Major, K. 551 “Jupiter,” and more. 7:30 PM, $15–$60, the Lensic, 211 W San Francisco, 505-988-4640, santafepromusica.com or 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.com January 30 Souper Bowl XLVI. Chefs from Santa Fe’s top restaurants serve soup and compete for awards, to benefit The Food Depot food bank. Santa Fe Community Convention Center, 201 W Marcy St., 505-471-1633, thefooddepot.org FEBRUARY February 13–14 Death and the Maiden. Santa Fe Pro Musica Chamber Orchestra performs Schubert’s Death and the Maiden and more. Saturday 6 PM, Sunday 3 PM, $15–$60, St. Francis Auditorium, 107 W Palace, 505-988-4640, santafepromusica.com or 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.com February 26–28 ARTfeast Santa Fe. The 13th annual event includes special dining events ranging from brunches to the Edible Art Tour, where more than 30 galleries share space with food from top chefs. Various venues, 505-603-4643, artfeast.com

music, elaborate dance, and ornate costumes combine to create a stunning show. 7:30 PM, $20–$60, the Lensic, 211 W San Francisco, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.com

up with music, kids’ activities, food, entertainment, and representatives from local nonprofit groups, who explain what they do to help the community. Santa Fe Plaza, santafenm.gov

March 28 Sounds Like Mozart. The Santa Fe Symphony and Chorus performs works by Salieri, Kraus, and Mozart. 4 PM, $18–$65, the Lensic, 211 W San Francisco, 505-983-1414, santafesymphony.org or 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org

May 16 Santa Fe Century Ride. The 25th annual 100-mile-long bicycling event through the scenic Turquoise Trail. 25-, 50-, and 75-mile routes also available. santafecentury.com

APRIL April 1–18 Dead Man’s Cell Phone. The Santa Fe Playhouse presents a comedy by MacArthur Genius Grant recipient Sarah Ruhl. Thursday–Saturday 8 PM, Sunday 2 PM, $15, Santa Fe Playhouse, 142 E DeVargas, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org April 5 Ski Santa Fe Season Ends. 505-983-9155, skisantafe.com April 15–Aug 1 Art on the Edge 2010. The second FOCA (Friends of Contemporary Art) biennial juried exhibition opens, featuring five to seven groundbreaking artists. New Mexico Museum of Art, 107 W Palace, 505-476-5072, mfasantafe.org April 24–25 The Four Seasons. Santa Fe Pro Musica Chamber Orchestra presents Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons and more. $15–$60, St. Francis Auditorium, 107 W Palace, 505-988-4640, santafepromusica.com or 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.com MAY May–Sept Pequeño Home and Garden Tours. The Santa Fe Garden Club invites small groups of visitors to tour three beautiful homes and high-desert gardens. By reservation; group size limited to 24. Santa Fe Garden Club, 505-984-0022

May 22–23 Arts & Crafts Fair–Santa Fe Council for the Arts. Booth fees in this juried art fair benefit the Santa Fe Council for the Arts. Cathedral Park, 505-424-1878 artscounsf@aol.com May 22–23 Native Treasures Indian Arts Festival. More than 180 Native American artists sell their museum-quality work. $5–$15, Santa Fe Community Convention Center, 201 W Marcy, 505476-1250, nativetreasuressantafe.org May 23–May 15, 2011 Ernest Thompson Seton: An American Pioneer. An exhibition on the life of Seton, naturalist, conservationist, and founder of the Boy Scouts. New Mexico History Museum, 113 Lincoln, 505-476-5200, nmhistorymuseum.org May 28–Sept 12 Georgia O’Keeffe: Abstraction. Focusing on O’Keeffe’s abstractions; organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art, Phillips Collection, and Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, 217 Johnson, 505-946-1000, okeeffemuseum.org May 29–31 Arts & Crafts–Northern New Mexico Fine Arts and Crafts Guild. Booth fees in this juried art fair benefit the Northern New Mexico Fine Arts and Crafts Guild. Cathedral Park, 505-4735590, artsandcraftsguild.org

May 1 Baile de Mayo. The 2010 Don Diego DeVargas and La Reina are announced at this music and dance event, hosted by the Santa Fe Fiesta Council. Santa Fe Community Convention Center, 201 W Marcy, 505-988-7575, santafefiesta.org

JUNE June 5–6 Spring Festival and Animal Fair. Welcome spring with costumed villagers who demonstrate what life was like on a Spanish Colonial ranch. 10 AM–4 PM, El Rancho de las Golondrinas, 505-471-2261 golondrinas.org

May 1–2 Civil War Weekend. Reenactments of the battles of Glorieta Pass and Apache Canyon are among the highlights of this two-day festival. 10 AM–4 PM, El Rancho de las Golondrinas, 505-4712261, golondrinas.org

June 11–12 Santa Fe Dance Festival. Moving People Dance hosts guest choreographers and dancers in several weekends of performances around town. Details: movingpeopledance.org. Tickets: 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org

MARCH March 4 Sarah Chang. Internationally acclaimed violinist Sarah Chang performs Brahms, Franck, and Theofanidis. 7:30 PM, $24–$72, the Lensic, 211 W San Francisco, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org or santafeconcerts.org

May 8 IAIA Spring Homecoming Powwow. Students from the Institute of American Indian Arts join community members, professional musicians, and dancers in an all-day celebration. IAIA campus, 83 Avan Nu Po, 505-424-2339, iaia.edu

June 11–13 Thirsty Ear Music Festival. The city’s biggest roots-music event—now in its 13th year— hosts local and national acts for three days of tunes, microbrews, and relaxing in the sun. Eaves Movie Ranch, 505-988-1234, thirstyearfestival.com

March 12–13 Santa Fe Japanese Cultural Festival. A celebration of traditional Japanese martial arts, food, music, arts and crafts, and more. 10 AM–5 PM, Santa Fe Community Convention Center, 201 W Marcy, 505-471-9022, santafejin.org

May 8-9 Home and Remodeling Show. Featuring vendors from throughout Northern New Mexico, presented by the Santa Fe Area Home Builders Association. Santa Fe Community Convention Center, 201 W Marcy, 505-982-1774, sfahba.com

June 19–20 Arts & Crafts Fair–Challenge New Mexico. Booth fees in this juried art fair benefit the nonprofit group Challenge New Mexico. Santa Fe Plaza, 505-988-7621, challengenewmexico.com

March 18 Ballet Folklorico de Mexico. Traditional

May 15 Santa Fe Community Days. The Plaza fills

February 28 Santa Fe Wedding Fair 2010. Local vendors exhibit services they can offer brides and grooms planning a wedding here. 1–4 PM, Santa Fe Community Convention Center, 201 W Marcy, 505-471-1067, huttonbroadcasting.com February 28–March 6 Restaurant Week NM: Savor the Flavor, Relish the Price. Santa Fe restaurants and hotels showcase their culinary delights, offering three-course, prix-fixe dinners for just $25. 505-847-3333, restaurantweeknm.com

June 23–26 Rodeo de Santa Fe. Professional cowboys and cowgirls compete in the

LISTINGS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. PLEASE CHECK WITH EVENT ORGANIZERS TO CONFIRM TIMES AND DATES. FOR MORE GREAT THINGS TO DO IN SANTA FE—INCLUDING NIGHTLIFE, GALLERY, AND MUSEUM EVENTS—VISIT SANTAFEANCALENDAR.COM OR SANTAFE.ORG.


61st annual Santa Fe rodeo. Santa Fe Rodeo Grounds, 3237 Rodeo, 505-471-4300, rodeodesantafe.org June TBA CCA Photo Auction. Internationally renowned photographers donate works to benefit the Center for Contemporary Arts, a nonprofit art space. Center for Contemporary Arts, 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 505-982-1338, ccasantafe.org JULY July 2–Aug 28 Santa Fe Opera Festival. This year’s offerings include Puccini’s Madame Butterfly, Mozart’s The Magic Flute, and more. Santa Fe Opera, exit 168, Highway 84/285, 505-986-5900 or 800-280-4654, santafeopera.org July 3–4 Santa Fe Wine Festival. Sample and purchase varietals from New Mexican wineries. 10 AM–6 PM, El Rancho de las Golondrinas, 505-4712261, golondrinas.org, santafewinefestival.com July 4 Fourth of July Fireworks. Santa Fe’s skies light up with the annual fireworks display, sponsored by the Santa Fe Boys and Girls Club. 6 PM–10 PM, Santa Fe High School, 2100 Yucca, 505-983-6632 July 4 Fourth of July on the Plaza. Santa Fe celebrates with the annual Pancakes on the Plaza breakfast (7 AM–noon), car show (7 AM–1 PM), live entertainment (7 AM–3 PM) and an arts fair (7 AM– 5 PM). Santa Fe Plaza, 505-982-2002, uwsfc.org July 8–11 SOFA West. The Sculpture Objects and Functional Art expo comes to Santa Fe, melding design with decorative and fine arts for four days. Santa Fe Community Convention Center, 201 W Marcy, 800-563-7632, sofaexpo.com July 10–11 Santa Fe International Folk Art Market. This annual market showcases works by more than 100 artisans from 40 countries. Museum Hill, 710 Camino Lejo, 505-476-1197, folkartmarket.org July 15–18 Art Santa Fe. The annual boutique contemporary-art fair features a diverse array of today’s art from galleries worldwide. Santa Fe Community Convention Center, 201 W Marcy, 505988-8883, artsantafe.com July 17–18 Arts & Crafts–Northern New Mexico Fine Arts and Crafts Guild. Booth fees in this juried art fair benefit the Northern New Mexico Fine Arts and Crafts Guild. Cathedral Park, 505-4735590, artsandcraftsguild.org July 18–Aug 23 Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival. Works by the greatest composers are performed at the six-week Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival. Various venues. 505-983-2075, sfcmf.org July 20 and 27 Behind Adobe Walls Home and Garden Tours. Four different private residences and gardens are seen each week on the 65th annual bus-hosted tour. For reservations, call the Santa Fe Garden Club, 505-984-0022 or Westwind Travel, 505-984-0022, westwindtravel.net July 24–25 Contemporary Hispanic Market. Contemporary art by Hispanic artists and craftspeople

living in New Mexico is on exhibit and for sale. Santa Fe Plaza, 505-438-4367 July 24–25 Traditional Spanish Market. Local artists sell bultos, retablos, tinwork, and other New Mexican crafts reaching back to Spanish Colonial days in this 59th annual event. Santa Fe Plaza, 505982-2226, spanishmarket.org July 31–Aug 1 Arts & Crafts–Santa Fe Council for the Arts. Booth fees in this juried art fair benefit the Santa Fe Council for the Arts. Cathedral Park, 505-424-1878, artscounsf@aol.com July TBA New Mexico Jazz Festival. Both local talent and jazz legends hit the stage in celebration of the genre. Various venues, dates to be announced, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org AUGUST August 1 Arts & Crafts–Santa Fe Council for the Arts. Booth fees in this juried art fair benefit the Santa Fe Council for the Arts. Cathedral Park, 505424-1878 artscounsf@aol.com August 7–8 Girls, Inc. Arts & Crafts Fair. Booth fees in this juried art fair benefit local nonprofit Girls, Inc. Santa Fe Plaza, 505-982-2042 August 7–8 Summer Festival, Frontier Days, and Horses of the West. Experience life in the historic Old West at this two-day festival. 10 AM– 4 PM, El Rancho de las Golondrinas, 505-471-2261, golondrinas.org August 13–15 and 19–22 Haciendas Parade of Homes Tour. A self-guided tour of nearly three dozen new and remodeled homes showcases the range of Santa Fe’s design talent. 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org August 21–22 Native Cinema Showcase. During Indian Market weekend, NCS screens Native-made and -directed films dealing with issues of indigenous life and identity. CCA Cinematheque, 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 505-982-1338, ccasantafe.org August 21–22 Santa Fe Indian Market. SWAIA’s 88-year-old market draws roughly 100,000 people annually to buy work by top Native American artists. Santa Fe Plaza, 505-983-5220, swaia.org

September 10–12 Fiestas de Santa Fe. Nearly 300 years old, Santa Fe’s biggest celebration is a ten-day series of bailes, processions, parades, and musical performances. Various venues, 505-9887575, santafefiesta.org September 11 Gran Baile. A Fiestas celebration sponsored by the Santa Fe Fiesta Council, with tickets available to the public. Santa Fe Community Convention Center, 201 W Marcy, 505-988-7575, santafefiesta.org September 18 Barkin’ Ball. A themed party with live music, dancing, and food, benefitting the Santa Fe Animal Shelter & Humane Society. Santa Fe Community Convention Center, 201 W Marcy, 505983-4309, sfhumanesociety.org September 18–19 Santa Fe Renaissance Fair. Jousting, food, music, dance, and more recreate Renaissance times. 10 AM–6 PM, El Rancho de las Golondrinas, 505-471-2261, golondrinas.org September 18–19 and 25–26 High Road to Taos Art Tour. For two weekends, visitors drive through golden aspens to see studios between Santa Fe and Taos. 866-343-5381, highroadnewmexico.com September 22–26 Santa Fe Wine and Chile Fiesta. Chefs from Santa Fe’s most celebrated restaurants pair food with wines from this region and beyond. Santa Fe Opera, exit 168, Highway 84/285, 505-438-8060, santafewineandchile.org September 25 New Mexico Women Authors Book Festival. The only festival in New Mexico to spotlight the state’s remarkably talented female writers is held at Milner Plaza on Museum Hill. 877567-7380, newmexicocreates.org September 25–26 Arts & Crafts–Northern New Mexico Fine Arts and Crafts Guild. Booth fees in this juried art fair benefit the Northern New Mexico Fine Arts and Crafts Guild. Cathedral Park, 505-4735590, artsandcraftsguild.org OCTOBER October 2–10 Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta. Hundreds of balloons fill the sky at dawn and dusk for nine days, with races, night flights, and more. Balloon Fiesta Park, Albuquerque, 888-422-7277, balloonfiesta.com

August 27–29 Annual Bluegrass Festival. Local and national acts on three stages—plus a barn dance and other events—are featured in this 36th annual event. Santa Fe County Fair Grounds, southwestpickers.org

October 2–3 Arts & Crafts–Santa Fe Council for the Arts. Booth fees in this juried art fair benefit the Santa Fe Council for the Arts. Cathedral Park, 505-424-1878, artscounsf@aol.com

SEPTEMBER September 4–6 Arts & Crafts Fair–Santa Fe Fiesta Council. Booth fees in this juried art fair benefit the Santa Fe Fiesta Council. Santa Fe Plaza, 505-988-7575, santafefiesta.org

October 2–3 Harvest Festival. A family-friendly weekend includes dances, demonstrations, and hands-on activities from stringing ristras to pressing apples for cider. El Rancho de las Golondrinas, 505-471-2261, golondrinas.org

September 9 Burning of Zozobra. The torching of 50-foot-tall Old Man Gloom, a puppet stuffed with thousands of scraps of paper bearing the citizenry’s sad thoughts, is a highlight of Fiesta time and now in its 86th year. $5–$10, Fort Marcy Park, 505-6601965, zozobra.com

October 8–10 Green Building Expo. Open to the public, featuring the latest in green technology, sponsored by the Santa Fe Area Home Builders Association. Santa Fe Community Convention Center, 201 W Marcy, 505-982-1774, sfahba.com

LISTINGS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. PLEASE CHECK WITH EVENT ORGANIZERS TO CONFIRM TIMES AND DATES. FOR MORE GREAT THINGS TO DO IN SANTA FE—INCLUDING NIGHTLIFE, GALLERY, AND MUSEUM EVENTS—VISIT SANTAFEANCALENDAR.COM.


October 13–17 Santa Fe Film Festival. In its eleventh year, this four-day film buff’s dream screens independent films from around the globe and hosts awards ceremonies and festivities. Various venues, 505-989-1495, santafefilmfestival.com October 15–17 Santa Fe Arts Festival. A threeday fall celebration of Santa Fe’s vibrant creative scene, including visual and performing arts. santafeartsfestival.com. October 16 Historic Canyon Road Paint-Out and Festival. Artists hit the streets of Santa Fe, painting outside and giving art lovers a chance to meet and watch them work. historiccanyonroad.com October 24 Dia de los Muertos Activities. Art shows and altar displays honor the Day of the Dead, a Mexican holiday. Museum of International Folk Art, 505-476-1200, moifa.org; El Museo Cultural, 505-992-0591, elmuseocultural.org October TBA Santa Fe Farmer’s Market Fall Fiesta. Celebrate local food and community with a fresh farm meal prepared by local chefs, music, silent and live auctions, and more. Farmers Market Building Pavilion, 1607 Paseo de Peralta in the Railyard, 505-983-7726, santafefarmersmarket.com NOVEMBER November 13 Santa Fe Art Auction. The annual event is the Southwest’s largest auction of classic Western art. 1–5 PM, Santa Fe Community Convention Center, 201 W Marcy, 505-954-5858, santafeartauction.com November 26 Lighting of Christmas Decorations on the Plaza. Live entertainment is featured at this beautiful annual event. Entertainment starts at dusk, with the lighting at around 6:30 PM. Santa Fe Plaza. November 26–28 Circus Luminous. Wise Fool New Mexico’s extravaganza of dance, acrobatics, and music. The Lensic, 211 W San Francisco, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.com November 27–28 Winter Indian Market. Featuring traditional Native American art from some of the country’s most talented artists. Santa Fe Community Convention Center, 201 W Marcy, 505-983-5220, swaia.org

Museum of International Folk Art, 505-476-1200, internationalfolkart.org December TBA Las Posadas. The traditional outdoor play reenacts part of the Biblical Christmas story. Palace of the Governors on the Santa Fe Plaza, 505-476-5100, palaceofthegovernors.org December TBA Christmas at the Palace. This annual celebration features traditions from the Hispanic, Anglo, and Native American cultures. Palace of the Governors, 505-476-5100, palaceofthegovernors.org December TBA The Nutcracker. Aspen Santa Fe Ballet comes home from touring to perform Tchaikovsky’s beloved Christmas tale in its signa-

ture classical-meets-contemporary dance style. For ticket prices, plus dates and times, contact the Lensic, 211 W San Francisco, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org December 24 Canyon Road Farolito Walk. For Santa Fe’s annual Christmas Eve community gathering, Canyon Road is lined with glowing farolitos and sparkling lights while carolers sing and the street fills with strolling families. Dress warmly. Begins at dusk. December 31 A Gala New Year’s Eve. Santa Fe Concert Association presents a popular end-of-theyear concert, with its orchestra joined by visiting soloists. The Lensic, 211 W San Francisco, 505988-1234, ticketssantafe.org

Your Home…

in the Heart of Santa Fe.

The perfect retreat steps from the Plaza and close to Canyon Road. Richly appointed rooms, complimentary “Mountain Sunrise” breakfast. Casual dining from 11:30 a.m. to midnight at Del Charro, “Santa Fe’s watering hole.” reservations

1-800-693-3359

www.innofthegovernors.com

101 w. alameda, santa fe, nm 87501 505-982-4333 s fax: 505-989-9149

November TBA Recycle Santa Fe Arts Festival. Area artists who rely on reusables offer everything from license-plate lamps to typewriter-key jewelry. El Museo Cultural, 505-603-0558, recyclesantafe.org November TBA Ski Santa Fe Season Opens. 505-983-9155, skisantafe.com DECEMBER December 4–5 Winter Spanish Market. Featuring traditional Hispanic arts from some of the country’s most talented artists. Santa Fe Community Convention Center, 201 W Marcy, 505-982-2226 spanishcolonial.org December 5 Winter Celebration. Welcome the season with events and activities for all ages. 2010 santa fe visitors guide 57


     

     AzuL, A Water St. Gallery - Belle & Dorje Tibet Emporium - Blue Corn CafĂŠ - Blue Chip Contemporary Carol Kucera Gallery - Chicoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s - Dancing Sun - D. Rothermel Fine Art â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Earthfire Gems & Minerals Eternity - Galerie Zuger - Goddess Salon & Spa - Guatemala Unique - Heavenly Boutique Kristinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s - Luna Felix Goldsmith - Moon Rabbit Toys - The Matador - Namaste - POP Gallery Norma Sharon - Sanctuary - SantA Fe School Of Cooking - Santa Fe Fine Arts Brokerage SF Impressions - Silk Road Collections - Sleeping Dog Tavern - Talulah - Tutto - Whimsy

Discover a world of shopping with 30 galleries, shops and restaurants just 1.5 blocks off the Plaza

Entrances at Water St, San Francisco St, Galisteo & corner of Galisteo & Water St 112 West San Francisco St . Santa Fe, NM 87501 Leased and managed by South West Asset Management ph 505.988.5792 email philswami@aol.com

&URNISHING.EW-EXICOS"EAUTIFUL(OMES3INCE $INING2OOM s"EDROOM s,IGHTING 4RASTEROS s2OPEROS s#REDENZAS

3!.4!&%#/5.429&52.)452% 58

!IRPORT2OADs s#ORNEROF#ENTER$RIVE!IRPORT #ERRILLOS2OADs s#ORNEROFND#ERRILLOS Santafe.org -ONDAY 3ATURDAYs s#LOSED3UNDAYS


hotelsantafe.com 1501 Paseo de Peralta 505-982-1200, 800-825-9876 Hotel St. Francis

hotelstfrancis.com 210 Don Gaspar Avenue 505-983-5700, 800-529-5700 Inn and Spa at Loretto

innatloretto.com 211 Old Santa Fe Trail 505-988-5531, 800-727-5531 Inn of the Anasazi

innoftheanasazi.com 113 Washington Avenue 505-988-3030, 800-688-8100 Inn of the Five Graces

fivegraces.com 150 E DeVargas Street 505-992-0957, 866-992-0957 Inn of the Governors

innofthegovernors.com 101 W Alameda Street 505-982-4333, 800-234-4534 Inn on the Alameda

innonthealameda.com 303 E Alameda Street 505-984-2121, 800-289-2122 La Fonda Hotel

lafondasantafe.com 100 E San Francisco Street 505-982-5511, 800-523-5002 La Posada Resort and Spa

laposada.rockresorts.com 330 E Palace Avenue 505-986-0000, 866-331-7625 The Old Santa Fe Inn

oldsantafeinn.com 320 Galisteo Street 505-995-0800, 888-653-7346 Sage Inn

santafesageinn.com 725 Cerrillos Road 505-982-5952, 866-433-0335 Santa Fe Motel and Inn

santafemotel.com 510 Cerrillos Road 505-982-1039, 800-930-5002 Santa Fe Plaza TraveLodge

travelodge.com 646 Cerrillos Road 505-982-3551, 800-578-7878 Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best Value Lamplighter Inn

abvilamplighter.com 2405 Cerrillos Road 505-471-8000, 800-767-5267 Best Western Inn of Santa Fe

bestwestern.com 3650 Cerrillos Road 505-438-3822, 800-528-1234 Comfort Inn Santa Fe

choicehotels.com/hotel/nm068 4312 Cerrillos Road 505-474-7330, 800-653-3396 Comfort Suites

comfortsuites.com 3348 Cerrillos Road 505-473-9004, 800-228-5150 Courtyard by Marriott

santafecourtyard.com 3347 Cerrillos Road 505-473-2800, 800-777-3347 Days Inn Santa Fe

daysinn.com 2900 Cerrillos Road 505-424-3297, 800-329-7466 Econo Lodge

econolodge.com 3470 Cerrillos Road 505-471-4000, 877-424-6423 El Rey Inn

elreyinnsantafe.com 1862 Cerrillos Road 505-982-1931, 800-521-1349 Fairfield Inn Santa Fe by Marriott

marriott.com 4150 Cerrillos Road 505-474-4442, 800-758-1128 Hampton Inn

hamptoninn.com 3625 Cerrillos Road 505-474-3900, 800-426-7866 Holiday Inn Express

hiexpress.com/santafe 3450 Cerrillos Road 505-474-7570, 800-465-4329 Holiday Inn Santa Fe

holidayinn.com/santafenm 4048 Cerrillos Road 505-473-4646 Hyatt Place Santa Fe: Opening Spring 2010

hyattplace.com

4350 Cerrillos Road 888-492-8847

Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rest Court

1452 Cerrillos Road 505-983-8879 La Quinta Inn Santa Fe

laquinta.com 4298 Cerrillos Road 505-471-1142, 800-753-3757













t

-

t

t 

t

t

 :&4  t

t

t

t

t



t

-

t

  t

t 

 :&4  





t



t

t

'



t  t

t

 :&4  t







t



t

-

t



t 

158 YES 7000 t

t

t

t

t



t

'

t

t  t

t

 :&4 



t

t

t





t

'

t

t 





 :&4  t

t

t

t

t



t

-

t





t

t 

 :&4  t

t



t





t

-

t





t

t 

 :&4  t

t

t



t



t

-

t

t  t

t 

 :&4  t

t

t







t

'

t

  t

t 

 :&4  t

t

t

t





t

-

t

t  t

t

 :&4  t

t

t



t



t

-

t

  t

t 

 :&4 



t



t





t

-

t

  t

t 

 :&4  t

t

t

t

t



t

'

t

t  t

t 

 :&4  t

t

t

t

t



t

'

t

  t

t 

 :&4 













t

'

t





t

t 

 /0 









t



t

-

t







t 

 /0 













t

-

t

t 



t 

 /0 









t



t

-

t







t

 :&4 







t



t

t

-



t 

t

 :&4 







t



t

t

-

t

 



t

 :&4 







t



t

t

'

t







t

 :&4 







t



t

t

'







 :&4  t

t



t



t

t

'







t



 /0  t







t



t

-

t







t

 /0 







t



t

t

'

t







t

 :&4 







t

t



t

-



t 

t

t 

 :&4 











t

t

'









t 

 :&4 







t



t

t

' t







t

 :&4 









t



t

'

t







t

 :&4  t

t



t

t

t

t

'

t









 :&4 







t



t

t

'

t







t 

 /0 













t

-







 :&4 









t



t -

t







t

  /0 



t

See Ad on Page

Green

Hotel Santa Fe & Hacienda

Concierge

hhandr.com 125 Washington Avenue 505-988-4900, 877-901-7666

Rates (High Season)

Hotel Plaza Real

Kitchens

hilton.com 100 Sandoval Street 505-988-2811, 800-445-8667

Pets

Hilton Santa Fe Historic Plaza

Accessibility (Full or Limited)

garrettsdesertinn.com 311 Old Santa Fe Trail 505-982-1851, 800-888-2145

Smoke-Free Rooms

Garrettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Desert Inn

Indoor Pool

fortmarcy.com 321 Kearny Avenue 505-988-2800, 888-667-2775

Outdoor Pool

Fort Marcy Hotel Suites

Sauna, Spa, Hot Tub, or Jacuzzi

eldoradohotel.com 309 W San Francisco Street 505-988-4455, 800-955-4455

Entertainment On-Site

Eldorado Hotel & Spa

Cocktail Lounge

casadeestrellas.com 300 E Marcy Street 505-795-0278

Restaurant

Casa De Estrellas Luxury Inn

Banquet & Meeting Capacity

Rates Key: $=up to $75 $$=$76â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$150 $$$=Above $150

Suites

t:PVSIPUFMNBZBTLZPVUPQBSUJDJQBUFJOXBUFSDPOTFSWBUJPONFBTVSFT

HOTELS

Total Rooms

DOWNTOWN GREATER SANTA FE SANTA FE COUNTY t3BUFTBSFCBTFEPOBWFSBHFSPPNSBUFBOEBSFSFMBUJWFUPPUIFSMPEHJOHTJO4BOUB'F.BOZ establishments offer significantly reduced rates in off-season, as well as a range of prices.





2010 santa fe visitors guide 59


Cocktail Lounge

Entertainment On-Site

Sauna, Spa, Hot Tub, or Jacuzzi

Outdoor Pool

Indoor Pool

Smoke-Free Rooms

Accessibility (Full or Limited)

Pets

Kitchens

Rates (High Season)

Concierge

Green

t



t

'

t





t

t 

 :&4   





t

t



t

-

t







t

 /0 









t



t

'

t







t

 /0 









t



t

-

t





 :&4  





t

t



t

-

t







 :&4 

t







t



t

'

t

t 

t

t

 :&4  t

t



t

t



t

'

t

t 



t

 /0   





t

t



t

'

t



 :&4 







t

t



t

'

t

t 



t

 :&4   











t

'

t

t 





 /0   











t

-

t

t



t

  :&4   











t





t 

 :&4   











t

'

t





t



 /0   











t

-







t

 /0   











t

-



t



t

 :&4  t

t

t

t

t



t

-

t

t  t

t 

t CVGGBMPUIVOEFSSFTPSUDPN#VGGBMP5IVOEFS5SBJM 1PKPBRVF   :&4 

t

t

t

t

t

t

'

t

  t

t IFC

t

t







t

-

t



t 

 :&4  t

t

t

t

t



t

'

t

  t

t

IBDJFOEBEFMDFSF[PDPN$BNJOPEFM$FSF[P 5FTVRVF   :&4  t



t

t

t



t

' 

  t

t

UIFMPEHFBUTBOUBGFDPN/4U'SBODJT%SJWF  Luxury Inn

TBOUBGFMVYVSZJOODPN$FSSJMMPT3PBE Motel 6

NPUFMDPN$FSSJMMPT3PBE  Motel 6

NPUFMDPN$FSSJMMPT3PBE .05&- Park Inn

QBSLJOODPNTBOUBGFON$FSSJMMPT3PBE  Pecos Trail Inn

UIFQFDPTUSBJMJOODPN0ME1FDPT5SBJM Quality Inn

RVBMJUZJOOTBOUBGFDPN$FSSJMMPT3PBE  Red Roof Inn

SFESPPGDPN$FSSJMMPT3PBE Residence Inn

NBSSJPUUDPNTBGON(BMJTUFP4USFFU  Santa Fe Suites

UIFTBOUBGFTVJUFTDPN44U'SBODJT%SJWF Silver Saddle Motel at Jackalope

TJMWFSTBEEMFNPUFMMMDDPN$FSSJMMPT3PBE Stage Coach Motor Inn

$FSSJMMPT3PBE Super 8 Motel

TVQFSDPN$FSSJMMPT3PBE  Thunderbird Inn

$FSSJMMPT3PBE Western Scene Motel

$FSSJMMPT3PBE Bishopâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lodge Ranch Resort and Spa

CJTIPQTMPEHFDPN#JTIPQT-PEHF3PBE  Buffalo Thunder Resort and Casino Cities of Gold Hotel

DJUJFTPGHPMEDPN"$JUJFTPG(PME3PBE 1PKPBRVF   :&4  t Encantado Resort & Spa

FODBOUBEPSFTPSUDPN4UBUF3PBE 5FTVRVF Hacienda del Cerezo

Houses of the Moon at Ten Thousand Waves

UFOUIPVTBOEXBWFTDPN)ZEF1BSL3PBE Inn at Santa Fe

JOOBUTBOUBGFDPN$FSSJMMPT3PBE  Sunrise Springs

TVOSJTFTQSJOHTDPN -PT1JOPT3PBE -B$JFOFHB 

See Ad on Page

Restaurant

t

The Lodge at Santa Fe

Banquet & Meeting Capacity

t

Rates Key: $=up to $75 $$=$76â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$150 $$$=Above $150

Suites

t

t:PVSIPUFMNBZBTLZPVUPQBSUJDJQBUFJOXBUFSDPOTFSWBUJPONFBTVSFT

Total Rooms

 :&4  t

DOWNTOWN GREATER SANTA FE SANTA FE COUNTY t3BUFTBSFCBTFEPOBWFSBHFSPPNSBUFBOEBSFSFMBUJWFUPPUIFSMPEHJOHTJO4BOUB'F.BOZ FTUBCMJTINFOUTPGGFSTJHOJGJDBOUMZSFEVDFESBUFTJOPGGTFBTPO BTXFMMBTBSBOHFPGQSJDFT









t

 :&4 







t





t

-



t 

t

t

 :&4 







t

t



t

'

t







t

 /0  t

t



t

t



t

'

t





t

t

  :&4 















-

t

t  t

t

  :&4 













t





t 



t

 :&4 













t

-



t 



t 

  :&4 













t

-

t

t 



t

  :&4 













t





t 



t

 :&4 







t

t







t

t  t

  :&4 













t

-



t 



t

  :&4 







t





t





t 



t

  :&4 







t





t

-

t

t 



t

 :&4 







t

t

t

t

-

t

t 





VACATION RENTALS Alexanderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Inn Bed & Breakfast

BMFYBOEFSTJOODPN&1BMBDF"WFOVF  Biscochito House

CJTDPDIJUPIPMJEBZDBTJUBDPN4UBBC4USFFU Campanilla Compound

DBNQBOJMMBDPNQPVOEDPN0UFSP4USFFU  Casa de Alma

DBTBEFBMNBDPN)JTUPSJD&BTUTJEF Casa de Ristras

BEPCFTUBSQSPQFSUJFTDPN.D,FO[JF4USFFU Casas de Santa Fe

DBTBTEFTBOUBGFDPN/(VBEBMVQF4USFFU  Downtown Santa Fe Rentals

EPXOUPXOTBOUBGFSFOUBMTDPN$BUSPO4USFFU  El Corazon de Santa Feâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;A Luxury Condominium

TGMVYVSZDPOEPDPN$BUSPO4USFFU PS Granada Casitas

HSBOBEBWBDBUJPOSFOUBMTDPN(SBOBEB4USFFU  Kokopelli Property Management

LPLPQSPQFSUZDPN0ME4BOUB'F5SBJM  60 Santafe.org




RVBJMSVOTBOUBGFDPN0ME1FDPT5SBJM  RainbowVision Properties

SBJOCPXWJTJPOQSPQDPN3PEFP3PBE 

  :&4 













t



t

t 



t

  :&4 













t





t  t



  :&4 













t





t  t

 :&4 







t





t

-

t

t  t

  :&4 















-

t

t





t

 :&4 







t

t



t

'



t 



t

 :&4  t

t



t



t

t

'

t

t 



t

 :&4 

t

t

t

t





t

'



t  t

t

  :&4 







t





t

-



t  t

t

 :&4 













t

-

t

t  t



  /0 







t





t



t

t  t

t

  :&4 







t





t

'

t

t 



t

 :&4 













t

-



t  t

t

  :&4 













t



t

t 





  :&4 













t





  t

t

 :&4 













t

-

t

t 



t

  :&4 







t





t





t  t

t

 /0 













t

'







t

t

 :&4 







t





t

-









  /0 







t





t

'

t

  t

t

 /0 













t

'

t

  t

t

 /0 













t

'





t

t

 :&4 







t





t

'

t

t  t

t

 :&4 













t

'



t 

t

t

  /0 







t





t

-





 t

t

 :&4 







t





t

'

t

  t

t

 /0 













t

-









t

  :&4 













t

-



t 



  :&4 













t

-



  t

t

  :&4 







t





t

-

t

t 

t

  /0 







t





t

-

t



See Ad on Page

Green

Quail Run Association, Inc.

Concierge

EJBNPOESFTPSUTDPN(SJGGJO4USFFU 

Rates (High Season)

Villas de Santa Fe

Kitchens

WBDBUJPOSFOUBMTBOUBGFDPN10#PY

Pets

Vacation Rental Santa Fe

Accessibility (Full or Limited)

UXPDBTJUBTDPN%PVHMBT4USFFU 

Smoke-Free Rooms

Two Casitas Vacation Rentals

Indoor Pool

CJTDPDIJUPIPMJEBZDBTJUBDPN.D,FO[JF4USFFU

Outdoor Pool

Sunflower Casita Southwest

Sauna, Spa, Hot Tub, or Jacuzzi

CJTDPDIJUPIPMJEBZDBTJUBDPN1â &#x201E;4UBBC4USFFU

Entertainment On-Site

Sunflower Casita Northwest

Cocktail Lounge

BEPCFTUBSQSPQFSUJFTDPN.D,FO[JF4USFFU

Restaurant

Sage House

Banquet & Meeting Capacity

Rates Key: $=up to $75 $$=$76â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$150 $$$=Above $150

Suites

t:PVSIPUFMNBZBTLZPVUPQBSUJDJQBUFJOXBUFSDPOTFSWBUJPONFBTVSFT

Total Rooms

DOWNTOWN GREATER SANTA FE SANTA FE COUNTY t3BUFTBSFCBTFEPOBWFSBHFSPPNSBUFBOEBSFSFMBUJWFUPPUIFSMPEHJOHTJO4BOUB'F.BOZ FTUBCMJTINFOUTPGGFSTJHOJGJDBOUMZSFEVDFESBUFTJOPGGTFBTPO BTXFMMBTBSBOHFPGQSJDFT

BED & BREAKFASTS Adobe Abode

BEPCFBCPEFDPN$IBQFMMF4USFFU The AdobeStar Inn

BEPCFTUBSJOODPN.D,FO[JF4USFFU Casa de la Cuma Bed & Breakfast

DBTBDVNBDPN1BTFPEFMB$VNB Casa de Tres Lunas

DBTBEFUSFTMVOBTDPN1BTFPEF1FSBMUB  Casa del Toro

DBTBEFMUPSPDPN.D,FO[JF4USFFU  Casa Pacifica Bed & Breakfast

$BTB1BDJGJDB#O#DPN1BTFPEF1FSBMUB Don Gaspar Inn

EPOHBTQBSDPN%PO(BTQBS"WFOVF  Dunsheeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bed & Breakfast

EVOTIFFTDPN"DFRVJB.BESF El Farolito Bed & Breakfast Inn

GBSPMJUPDPN(BMJTUFP4USFFU  El Paradero Bed & Breakfast Inn

FMQBSBEFSPDPN8.BOIBUUBO"WFOVF  Four Kachinas Inn

GPVSLBDIJOBTDPN8FCCFS4USFFU  Ghost Ranch in Santa Fe & Abiquiu

HIPTUSBODIPSH0ME5BPT)JHIXBZ  Guadalupe Inn

HVBEBMVQFJOODPN"HVB'SJB4USFFU Hacienda Nicholas Bed & Breakfast

IBDJFOEBOJDIPMBTDPN&.BSDZ4USFFU  Inn of the Turquoise Bear

UVSRVPJTFCFBSDPN&#VFOB7JTUB4USFFU  Inn on the Paseo

JOOPOUIFQBTFPDPN1BTFPEF1FSBMUB  Las Palomas, Zona Rosa, La Tienda & Territorial Suites

MBTQBMPNBTDPN84BO'SBODJTDP4USFFU  Pueblo Bonito Bed & Breakfast Inn

QVFCMPCPOJUPJOODPN8.BOIBUUBO"WFOVF  The Madeleine Bed & Breakfast Inn

NBEFMFJOFJOODPN'BJUIXBZ4USFFU  Water Street Inn

XBUFSTUSFFUJOODPN88BUFS4USFFU  Upaya Zen Center

VQBZBPSH$FSSP(PSEP3PBE Aliento Bed and Breakfast

BMJFOUPCOCDPN#POBO[B$SFFL3PBE Bobcat Inn

ONJOODPN0ME-BT7FHBT)JHIXBZ Casa Escondida Bed & Breakfast

DBTBFTDPOEJEBDPN$PVOUZ3PBE ChimayĂł  Hacienda DoĂąa Andrea de Santa Fe

IEBTBOUBGFDPN7JTUBEFM0SP $FSSJMMPT



t



2010 santa fe visitors guide 61


Entertainment On-Site

Sauna, Spa, Hot Tub, or Jacuzzi

Outdoor Pool

Indoor Pool

Smoke-Free Rooms

Accessibility (Full or Limited)

Pets

Kitchens

Rates (High Season)

Concierge

Green



t











t

t









t

-

t



















t

-

t







highfeatherranch.com 29 High Feather Ranch, Cerrillos 505-424-1333, 800-757-4410   :&4 







t





t

-

t

  t

t

Java Junction Bed & Breakfast

java-junction.com 2855 Highway 14, Cerrillos 505-438-2772, 877-308-8884

  :&4 













t

-

t

t 



t

Rancho Manzana

  /0 







t





t

-







t

t

The Triangle Innâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Santa Fe

  :&4 







t





t

-

t

t 

t

t

 /0 













t

-









Cabins

Hot Showers

Laundry

Total Rooms

Hacienda Las Barrancas

haciendalasbarrancas.com 27 County Road 84D, Pojoaque 505-455-2197, 866-455-2197   :&4   Hacienda Rancho de ChimayĂł ranchodechimayo.com 297 Juan Medina Road, ChimayĂł 505-351-2222, 888-270-2320   /0  t Heartseed Guestrooms and Gallery

  /0 

heart-seed.com 63 Corazon de Oro, Cerrillos 505-471-7026 High Feather Ranch Bed & Breakfast

ranchomanzana.com 26 Camino de Mision, ChimayĂł 505-351-2227, 888-505-2227 triangleinn.com 14 Arroyo, Cuyamungue 505-455-3375, 877-733-7689

See Ad on Page

Cocktail Lounge



Restaurant

t

Rates Key: $=up to $75 $$=$76â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$150 $$$=Above $150

Banquet & Meeting Capacity



t:PVSIPUFMNBZBTLZPVUPQBSUJDJQBUFJOXBUFSDPOTFSWBUJPONFBTVSFT

Suites



DOWNTOWN GREATER SANTA FE SANTA FE COUNTY t3BUFTBSFCBTFEPOBWFSBHFSPPNSBUFBOEBSFSFMBUJWFUPPUIFSMPEHJOHTJO4BOUB'F.BOZ establishments offer significantly reduced rates in off-season, as well as a range of prices.

HOSTELS Hostel International de Santa Fe

Modem

No Hookups

Pool

Restrooms

Shelters

Tents

RV Hookups

Pets Allowed

santafehostel.com 1412 Cerrillos Road 505-988-1153

ChimayĂł Campground

 

t t







t





t

t

Hyde Memorial State Park

 







t



t

t

t

t

t

 







t



t



t

Los Alamos / 505-672-3861 ext. 534 / nps.com/band / open mid-April to late October north on NM 84/285 to Pojoaque, west on Route 502 to NM 4

 







t



t

t

t

Los Campos de Santa Fe RV Resort

3574 Cerrillos Road / 505-473-1949, 800-852-8160 / loscamposrv.com / south on I-25, exit 278 N

 t

t



t t





t

t

Rancheros de Santa Fe Campground

 t

t t

t



t t

t

t

t

t

934 Old Las Vegas Highway / 505-466-1419, 800-562-1514 / santafekoa.com open March 1 to November 1 / north on I-25, exit 290 or 294

 t

t t

t





t



t

t

t

Santa Fe National Forestâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Aspen Basin

 







t



t



t



t

Santa Fe National Forestâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Big Tesuque

 











t



t



t

 

t t

t





t





t

t

 

t t

t



t t





t

t

CAMPGROUNDS P.O. Box 460, ChimayĂł / 505-351-3566, 800-248-7859 / chimayoarts.com / 32 miles north on NM 76 740 Hyde Park Road / 505-983-7175 / nmparks.com / 8 miles northeast on NM 475 Bandelier National Monumentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Juniper Campground (small groups)

Los Alamos / 505-672-3861 ext. 517 / nps.com/band north on NM 84/285 to Pojoaque, west on Route 502 to NM 4

Bandelier National Monumentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Ponderosa Campground (large groups)

736 Old Las Vegas Highway / 505-466-3482, 800-426-9259 / rancheros.com / north on I-25, exit 290

t

Santa Fe KOA

Hyde Park Road / 505-438-7480 / fs.fed.us/r3/sfe / 12 miles north on Hyde Park Road Hyde Park Road / 505-438-7480 / fs.fed.us/r3/sfe / 11 miles north on Hyde Park Road Santa Fe Skies RV Park

14 Browncastle Ranch / 505-473-5946, 877-565-0451 / santafeskiesrvpark.com south on I-25, exit 276, at the end of NM 599 Trailer Ranch RV Resort and 55+ Community

3471 Cerrillos Road / 505-471-9970 / trailerranch.com / south on I-25, exit 278

In the Heart of Historic Santa Fe

111 Old Santa Fe Trail Santa Fe, NM 87501 800-852-2993 â&#x20AC;˘ 505-982-2993 www.nancybrowncustomjeweler.com Open Daily. Call for our Catalogs. 62 Santafe.org

â&#x20AC;˘ Locally owned since 1985 â&#x20AC;˘


Art Santa Fe 505-988-8883, artsantafe.com Aspen Santa Fe Ballet 505-983-5591, aspensantafeballet.com Atalaya Peak St. John’s College, Trail 174, 505-438-7840 Bandelier National Monument 15 Entrance Road, Los Alamos, 505-672-3861; $6; open daily; summer: 8 AM–6 PM; winter: 9 AM–4:30 PM, spring/fall 9 AM–5:30 PM; nps.gov/band Bataan Memorial Military Museum 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 505-474-1670; free; Tue–Fri 9 AM–4 PM, Sat 9 AM–1 PM

Franklin Miles skate park Camino Carlos Rey in Franklin Miles Park, sk8parklist.com

Museum of International Folk Art 706 Camino Lejo, 505-476-1200; $8; 10 AM–5 PM; closed Mon, Sep–May; internationalfolkart.org

Genoveva Chavez Community Center 3221 Rodeo, 505-955-4000, gccommunitycenter.com

Museum of Spanish Colonial Arts 750 Camino Lejo, 505-982-2226; $6; 10 AM–5 PM; closed Mon, Sep–May; spanishcolonial.org

Geocaching santafe.org/visiting_santa_fe/things_to_do/ geocaching_challenge/index.html, nmgeocaching.com Georgia O’Keeffe Museum 217 Johnson, 505-946-1000; $8; Sun–Thu 10 AM–5 PM; Fri 10 AM–8 PM; Sat 10 AM–5 PM; okeeffemuseum.org

Bent House and Museum 117A Bent, Taos, 575-758-2376; $3, 10 AM–5 PM daily

Ghost Ranch 401 Old Taos Highway, Abiquiú, 505-685-4333. Tours: $25, 1:30 PM Tue, Thu, Fri, and Sat, midMar–mid-Nov. Museums: by donation; Tue–Sat 9 AM–5 PM, Sun 1–5 PM; Jun–Aug; ghostranch.org

Bicentennial Park 1043 Alto, santafenm.gov

GiG Performance Space 1808H Second, 505-690-9408, gigsantafe.com

Bradbury Science Museum 15th and Central, Los Alamos, 505-667-4444; free; Tue–Sat 10 AM–5 PM, Sun–Mon 1–5 PM; lanl.gov/museum

Harwood Museum of Art 238 Ledoux, Taos, 575-758-9826; $8; Tue–Sat 10 AM–5 PM, Sun 12–5 PM; harwoodmuseum.org

Center for Contemporary Arts & CCA Cinematheque 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 505-982-1338, ccasantafe.org College of Santa Fe 1600 St. Michael’s, 505-473-6133, csf.edu Cross of the Martyrs Paseo de la Loma, historicsantafe.org Dale Ball trails 505-955-6977, santafenm.gov DeVargas Center 564 N Guadalupe, 505-982-2655, devargascenter.com DeVargas skate park Sandoval Street at DeVargas Street, sk8parklist.com Eight Northern Pueblos Council Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo, 505-852-4265 El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe 1615B Paseo de Peralta, 505-992-0591, elmuseocultural.org El Rancho de las Golondrinas 334 Los Pinos, 505-471-2261, $5; golondrinas.org El Zaguán 545 Canyon, historicsantafe.org Fort Marcy Complex 490 Washington, 505-955-2503 Frank S. Ortiz “Dog Park” Off-Leash Area 160 Camino de las Crucitas, santafenm.gov

Hyde Memorial State Park 740 Hyde Park Road, emnrd.state.nm.us Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral, 505-983-8900; $5; Mon–Sat 10 AM–5 PM, Sun 12–5 PM; closed Tue, Nov–May; iaia.edu The Jemez Mountain Trail 800-252-0191, jemezmountaintrail.org Kit Carson Home and Museum 113 Kit Carson, Taos, 575-758-4945; $5; 9 AM–5 PM daily; kitcarsonhome.com The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco, 505-988-7050, lensic.com Loretto Chapel 207 Old Santa Fe Trail, 505-982-0092, lorettochapel.com Madrid visitmadridnm.com Marty Sanchez Links de Santa Fe 205 Caja del Rio, 505-955-4400, linksdesantafe.com Millicent Rogers Museum 504 Millicent Rogers Road, Taos, 575-758-2462; $10; 10 AM–5 PM daily; closed Mon, Nov–Mar; millicentrogers.org Moving People Dance Santa Fe 2536 Camino Entrada, 505-438-9180, movingpeopledance.org Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/ Laboratory of Anthropology 710 Camino Lejo, 505-827-6344; $8; 10 AM–5 PM; closed Mon, Sep–May; indianartsandculture.org

Music on the Hill 1160 Camino Cruz Blanca, sjca.edu New Mexico History Museum 120 Lincoln, 505-476-5100, nmhistorymuseum.org New Mexico Jazz Festival 505-988-1234, newmexicojazzfestival.org New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace, 505-827-4455; $8; Mon–Sun 10 AM–5 PM, Fri 10 AM–8 PM; closed Mon, Sep–May; mfasantafe.org New Mexico State Capitol 490 Old Santa Fe Trail, 505-986-4589, nmlegis.gov The Oldest House 215 E De Vargas Palace of the Governors 105 W Palace, 505-476-5100; $8; Mon–Sun 10 AM–5 PM, Fri 10 AM–8 PM; closed Mon, Sep–May; palaceofthegovernors.org Patrick Smith Park 1001 Canyon, santafenm.gov Pecos National Historic Park 505-757-7200; $3; summer: 8 AM–6 PM; winter: 8 AM–5 PM; nps.gov/pecos Plaza Mercado 112 W San Francisco, plazamercado.com Railyard District S Guadalupe Street at Paseo de Peralta Railyard Performance Space 1611A Paseo de Peralta, 505-982-8309 Randall Davey Audubon Center 1800 Upper Canyon, 505-983-4609; $2 suggested donation St. Francis Cathedral 213 Cathedral, 505-982-4619, cbsfa.org St. John’s College 1160 Camino Cruz Blanca, 505-954-6000, sjca.edu Sanbusco Market Center 500 Montezuma, 505-989-9390, sanbusco.com Santa Fe Art Institute 1600 St. Michael’s, 505-424-5050, sfai.org Santa Fe Bandstand Santa Fe Plaza, outsideinproductions.org 2010 santa fe visitors guide 63


Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival 505-983-2075, santafechambermusic.org

Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E De Vargas, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org

Santa Fe Children’s Museum 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 505-989-8359; $8; Wed–Sat 10 AM–5 PM; Sun 12–5 PM; santafechildrensmuseum.org Santa Fe Community Convention Center 201 W Marcy, 505-955-6200, santafe.org

Santa Fe Pro Musica 1405 Luisa, 505-988-4640, santafepromusica.com Santa Fe Southern Railway 888-989-8600, 505-989-8600, thetrainsantafe.com Santa Fe Symphony and Chorus 505-983-3530, sf-symphony.org

Santa Fe Community Orchestra 505-466-4879, sfco.org

Taos Pueblo 575-758-1028; $10, 8 AM–4:30 PM daily (except during rituals), closed late winter to early spring; taospueblo.com Taos Ski Valley 866-968-7386, skitaos.org Tesuque Pueblo Flea Market Highway 84/285, 505-670-2599, tesuquepueblofleamarket.com Theater Grottesco 723 Don Diego, 505-474-8400, theatergrottesco.org

Santa Fe Desert Chorale 811 St. Michael’s, 505-988-2282, desertchorale.org

Santuario de Chimayó 94 Santuario, Chimayó, 505-351-4889; Oct–Apr 9 AM–4 PM, Jun–Sep 9 AM–5 PM

Santa Fe Farmers Market 1607A Paseo de Peralta, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com

The Screen at the College of Santa Fe 1600 St. Michael’s, 505-473-6494, thescreen.csf.edu

Santa Fe Film Center 1616 St. Michael’s, 505-988-7414, santafefilmfestival.com

SITE Santa Fe 1606 Paseo de Peralta, 505-989-1199; $10; Wed–Sat 10 AM–5 PM, Fri 10 AM–7 PM, Sun 12–5 PM; winter: closed Wed; sitesantafe.org

Warehouse 21 1614 Paseo de Peralta, 505-989-4423, warehouse21.org

Ski Santa Fe Ski Area Hyde Park Road, 505-983-9155, skisantafe.com

West Palace Arts District West Palace Avenue, westpalace.org

SOFA Expo Santa Fe Community Convention Center, 201 W Marcy, sofaexpo.com

Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian 704 Camino Lejo, 505-982-4636; free; Mon–Sat 10 AM–5 PM, Sun 1–5 PM; wheelwright.org

Santa Fe National Cemetery 501 N Guadalupe, 505-988-6400 Santa Fe National Forest 505-438-7840, fs.fed.us/r3/sfe The Santa Fe Opera Highway 84/285, 505-986-5900, santafeopera.com Santa Fe Place 4250 Cerrillos, 505-473-4253, shopsantafeplace.com

Taos Art Museum 227 Paseo del Pueblo Norte, Taos, 575-758-2690; $8, Tue–Sun, 10 AM–5 PM; taosartmuseum.org

Thirsty Ear Festival 505-473-5723, thirstyearfestival.com Valles Caldera National Preserve 18161 Highway 4, Jemez Springs, 866-382-5537; free–$35; vallescaldera.gov

Wise Fool New Mexico 2778 Agua Fria, 505-992-2588, wisefoolnewmexico.org

enchanted TREASURES

Douglas Magnus Studios Commemorating Santa Fe’s 400 Year Anniversary, this unique collection of medallions and jewelry is authentic hand crafted, designed, and made in Santa Fe by Douglas Magnus. Choices include all sterling, sterling and 14k, or solid 14k. www.douglasmagnus.com or call 505 983-6777

Rocki Gorman Rocki Gorman jewelry is found exclusively in her design Gallery in the Patio Shops on Galisteo. The friendly, courteous staff is ready to help you through out the year. Please stop in and see her complete collections, one of a kind designs and fabulous boutique clothing. 221 Galisteo, Santa Fe, NM 87501, 505 983 7833, www.rockigorman.com


One of the most significant artists of the 20th century, Georgia O’Keeffe (18871986) was devoted to creating imagery that expressed what she called “the wideness and wonder of the world as I live in it.” Come and enjoy the wonder of the largest and foremost collection of O’Keeffe’s art in any museum. Discover through exhibitions how O’Keeffe and other artists have influenced the development of art as we know it today — in the context of American Modernism (late nineteenthcentury – present).

Georgia O’Keeffe, Untitled (Purple Petunia), 1925. Oil on canvas, 7 1/4 x 7 1/4 in. Gift, The Burnett Foundation. © Georgia O’Keeffe Museum.

Welcome to O’Keeffe Country

Visit the Museum Daily: 10 AM – 5PM; Fridays: 10 AM – 8 PM FREE 5 – 8 PM 1st Friday of the Month 217 Johnson Street, Santa Fe, NM 505.946.1000

For More Information: W W W.OK E E F F E MU SEU M .O RG

PHOTO: ROBERT RECK

Georgia O’Keeffe Home & Studio: Call 505.685.4539 for tour dates and times


CityofSantaFe SantaFeConventionandVisitorsBureau P.O.Box909 SantaFe,NM87504-0909

prsrtstd u.s.postage paid santafe,nm permitno.233


Santa Fe Vacation Guide 2010