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going green at the modern adobe For the structures Michael added to the home, he used advanced framing techniques with airtight sheathing and sealing. He increased the insulation levels in the home with blown-in cellulose insulation made from recycled newspaper, spray-on insulation, and rigid exterior insulation applied over the framing. Michael replaced the home’s existing single-pane windows with new models, including high-performance doublepane windows that have a suspended film in the center for increased insulation. A 95 percent efficient UltimateAir RecoupAerator heat recovery ventilator provides clean air quality for the house without the dust or energy loss from opening windows. It also provides radon mitigation—something the original 1930s house didn’t have. The home is prepiped for solar thermal panels to heat the home’s water. (Michael and Julia are planning to add the panels this year.) A passive solar sunroom with mechanical ventilation distributes heat to the home office. Solatube tubular skylights provide natural daylighting. A gravity-powered gray water system with a three-way turnoff valve directs water from the master tub and shower to landscaping outside. The valve allows the couple to send the water to the city septic system during the winter. A 1,750-gallon rainwater collection tank holds water harvested from the roof and supplies irrigation to plants. Cold-frame planters will allow Michael and Julia to grow vegetables year-round. An insulating material shields the beds.

Modern touches fill the home’s master suite. Incense-colored Oceanside Glasstile from Milestone covers a wall in the master bathroom. The tile is made with 70 percent recycled content.

in this fixer-upper into a unique blend of adobe aesthetics and modern style, classic remodel and innovative new construction, all assembled on a foundation of green design. In remodeling and adding onto the home, Michael concentrated on its shell, creating a new high-performance building envelope constructed with advanced framing techniques and airtight sheathing, blown-in cellulose insulation, and rigid insulation on the outside of the structure. A heat recovery ventilation system now supplies clean, healthy air, and the new sunroom provides passive solar heat. Unlike the adobe in its former life, this now approximately 2,700-square-foot remodel needs no air conditioner or swamp cooler. Confident and creative, with a homey atmosphere and a seemingly effortless sense of style, the house Michael and Julia occupy today has become quite an appealing place to call home.

outside the box

A contemporary entrance leads to the remodeled adobe and the home’s new master suite. 54

S U C A S A W i n t e r 2011

The big idea behind this home’s design was to pair the original house with an “authentic contemporary complement,” says Michael, who designed and built the remodel through his high-performance custom home design company, Percy Home Design. “The whole philosophy was we didn’t want to do a faux adobe addition to a real adobe, so we went to the opposite extreme and juxtaposed a modern contemporary style to the traditional,” Michael explains. This philosophy takes shape with the master suite addition atop

Su Casa Winter 2011  

Su Casa Winter 2011

Su Casa Winter 2011  

Su Casa Winter 2011