Page 1

Southwestern homes

inspiration ideas resources

kitchens

for every taste

stylish backyard essentials

outdoor living at its best

Vol.18 no. 3 SUMMER 2012 SuCasaMagazine.com


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Southwestern homes

Amadeus Leitner

inspiration ideas resources

56

southwestern

homes

36 Foothills fabulous

An Albuquerque family remodels and adds on to their Pueblo Revival home, blending new and old beautifully.

44 natural beauty

Clean lines and modern minimalism help showcase nature’s beauty in this home on Santa Fe’s north side.

52 kitchens for every taste Traditional or trendy, cozy or expansive, there’s a kitchen that meets your cooking, entertaining, and decorating needs. Here are six to get you inspired.

44 Su Casa (ISSN 1084-4562) is published four times a year (March, June, September, and December) by Bella Media LLC, 215 West San Francisco, Suite 300, Santa Fe, NM 87501 for $9.95 for 4 issues, or $15.95 for 8 issues. Periodicals postage paid at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Denver, Colorado. POSTMASTER: Please send changes to Su Casa Magazine, 4100 Wolcott Ave. NE, Suite B, Albuquerque, NM 87109.


14 in every issue 12 Inside Su Casa 14 Life+Style Southwest:

Outdoor Living Special

Stylish backyard essentials, contemporary patio furniture by Damian Velasquez, speakers tough enough to live outside, and more.

26 Design Studio

Explore New Mexico’s woodworking tradition with Mike and Doreen Godwin of Ernest Thompson Southwest Spanish Craftsmen.

32 Su Cocina

Expert tips on creating the perfect outdoor kitchen, and Cheryl Alters Jamison and Bill Jamison share their recipe for romesco sauce.

62 Su Libro

New books on decorating with mirrors, green remodeling, and planting beautiful cactus gardens.

80 Dream On

32

Douglas Merriam

Making an entrance in Las Campanas.

Cover: A kitchen remodel and expansion by Diego Handcrafted Homes provides additional seating areas and breathtaking views of the Sandia Mountains. Photograph by Mark William Photography.

Visit SuCasaMagazine.com


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Southwestern homes

inspiration ideas resources

Published by Bella Media, LLC Publisher

Bruce Adams Creative Director

B. Y. Cooper Editor in Chief

Dianna Delling Executive Editor

Amy Hegarty Senior Editor

Alicia Kellogg Assistant Editor

Samantha Schwirck Contributors

Kathleen McCloud, John Vollertsen Graphic Designer

Sybil Watson Contributing Designer

Michelle Odom Photography

Amadeus Leitner, Mark William Photography, Douglas Merriam Advertising Sales

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SuCasaMagazine.com For subscriptions, call (800) 770-6326

Su Casa (ISSN 1084-4562) is published four times a year (March, June, September, and December) by Bella Media, LLC, 215 W San Francisco, Suite 300, Santa Fe, NM 87501 for $9.95 for 4 issues or $15.95 for 8 issues. Periodicals postage paid at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Denver, Colorado. POSTMASTER: Please send changes to Su Casa Magazine, 4100 Wolcott Ave. NE, Suite B, Albuquerque, NM 87109.


Southwestern homes

®

inspiration ideas resources

H om e Bu il de rs Asso c ia tio n o f C e nt r a l Ne w M e xic o Boa r d o f D ire c to rs

President: Mike Cecchini First Vice President: Rob Hughes Second Vice President: David Newell Immediate Past President: Garret Price Associate Vice President: Stephanie Peterson Secretary/Treasurer: Ron Sisneros Associate Member at Large: Carla Wersonick Custom Builders Council, Chair: Otley Smith Green Build Council, Chair: Lora Vassar Home Builders Care, Chair: Bain Cochran Membership and Parade Committee, Chair: Diana Lucero Leading Builders Council, Chair: Bret Bailey Remodelers Council, Chair: Debra Speck H om e Bu il de rs Asso c ia tio n o f C e nt r a l Ne w M e xic o S ta f f

Executive Vice President: Jim Folkman Vice President of Operations: Lana McClure Events Specialist: Kimberly Johnson Receptionist/Clerical Assistant: Carmela Martinez

presidential award

Copyright © 2012 by Bella Media, LLC. Bella Media, LLC 215 W San Francisco, Suite 300 Santa Fe, NM 87501 505-983-1444 sucasamagazine.com Please direct editorial queries to ddelling@santafean.com. Su Casa’s cover and text are printed by American Web in Denver, Colorado, on SFI-certified paper. The papers used contain fiber from well-managed forests, meeting EPA guidelines that recommend a minimum 10% post-consumer recovered fiber for coated papers. Inks used contain a percentage of soy base. Our printer meets or exceeds all federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) standards and is a certified member of the Forest Stewardship Council.


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Inside Su Casa

anything is possible

A

Publisher

The local landscape plays a key role—both inside and out— at this northside Santa Fe home, Read about it on page 44.

12

S U C A S A S U M M E R 2012

Amadeus Leitner

Bruce Adams

DAVID ROBIN

s the beautiful kitchen on the cover of this issue illustrates, Southwesterners love to bring the outdoors into their homes. While we often do it literally, with flowers and plants from the surrounding countryside, we also do it visually, by having expansive windows that allow views of the mountains and high desert to flood into our living spaces, for example. New Mexico’s landscape is like no other, and the views remind us that we’re lucky to live here. Read the story about this cover kitchen, and you’ll see that the homeowners remodeled it to suit their family’s needs. I grew up in a home that, in my opinion, had a kitchen in the worst possible location. The kitchen was functional, but it was inconveniently separated from the main living areas of the home, and the only views it offered were of a brick wall. Even as a kid, I saw the drawbacks of the layout. Fast-forward 40 years and I’m faced with the reality that someday I will own my childhood home—and my opinion about the kitchen hasn’t changed. While visiting similar homes in the neighborhood, however, I stumbled upon several that once had that same floor plan but had been remodeled in order to open up the kitchen. Seeing them made me realize how easily the issues in my family home could be resolved. Not only had these homeowners remodeled their 50-year-old kitchens into something appropriate for this century (and for their cooking ambitions), but they had also transformed other parts of their homes by integrating their kitchens with their living areas. As you enjoy this issue of Su Casa, with its focus on kitchens and outdoor living, I hope you find inspiration. If your kitchen isn’t just how you want it, you can change it. Lost and confused and without an idea for a solution? No worries—have one of Northern New Mexico’s fine kitchen remodelers (many of whom are included in this issue) take a look. They’ll offer you excellent and creative ways to transform your kitchen as well as other areas of your home. May this issue help you realize that anything is possible when it comes to making your home perfect for you and your family.


Come for the golf. Stay for the green. There’s a green secret in Albuquerque. The alluring, year-round alpine environment of the East Mountains that is home to Paa-Ko. From the great green outdoors, to the custom-designed golf greens, to the gated green living of the Casita Community on the fairways. Green. It’s why some choose Paa-Ko. Others are just green with envy.

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Life+Style Southwest

An elegant kiva fireplace and a family-sized banco are the focal point of this Paa-Ko home’s recently remodeled outdoor space. Refurbished stone and stucco, along with bright Southwestern accessories and expansive views of the Sandia mountains, make the patio even more inviting. Designer and builder: Vineyard Homes, 505-235-5225, vineyardhomesnm.com. Blankets and pillows: Rustic Home, 505-345-3669.

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S U C A S A S U M M E R 2012

Mark William Photography

fired up


Life+Style Southwest

by Samantha Schwirck

patio panache Damian Velasquez takes modernism outdoors Furniture designer and craftsman Damian Velasquez founded his eponymous company more than two decades ago, making household furnishings inspired by Italian pieces he saw while backpacking in Europe. “My thirst for knowledge and desire to create is what motivated me to seek out design and fabrication,” Velasquez says of his artistic and professional journey, which began at age 11, when he started making sterling silver jewelry. The Albuquerque native discovered furniture making in college and began

Modern design meets expanded metal in Velasquez’s newest work.

The O Table (above) and Chair No. 35 (below) from the Half 13 collection

selling simple, functional modern furniture­—all made by hand, from start to finish­­—in 1991. Now he’s added a specialty line, Half 13, a collection of sculptural outdoor furniture made with expanded metal­—metal with a grid-like design and diamond-shaped voids commonly found in mass-produced patio furniture. Half 13 was inspired by a chair created by acclaimed Japanese designer Shiro Kuramata in 1986. “I realized that, since then, no one had ever really done anything else with expanded metal on a level of high design,” Velasquez says. “We grew up with outdoor furniture that used expanded metal without modern elements. I was aiming to reinterpret the use of expanded metal.” The Half 13 collection includes two chairs, a loveseat, and two tables, all made of stainless steel and available in nine powder-coated colors, from cool turquoise to vivid tangerine. Pieces are priced from $900 to $4,000. Velasquez will show his Half 13 collection at the Dwell on Design (dod.dwell.com) show at the Los Angeles Convention Center June 22–June 24. He’ll also show at the Crested Butte Arts Festival (crestedbutteartsfestival.com), August 3–August 5 in Crested Butte, Colorado. Damian Velasquez can be reached at 505-884-5200 or through modernhandcrafted .com or half13.com. His work is also available in Albuquerque at The A Store (theastore.com) and in Santa Fe at Moss Outdoor (mossoutdoor.com).

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Life+Style Southwest

outdoor essentials

Whether you’re hosting a Fourth of July party or spending a peaceful evening on your patio, these summer-ready accessories will help you hang out in style. Le Versha Chair British designer David Le Versha created this swirlbacked, wrought-iron chair, available in orange, turquoise, plum, and red, each with a slightly different design. $248, Anthropologie, anthropologie.com

Zwilling J.A. Henckels Grilling Tools Made of stainless steel and durable PakkaWood, these barbecue tools are built to last. The set includes tongs, a turner, a basting brush, and a knife, all with extra-long handles to keep your hands away from the heat. $200, Williams-Sonoma, williams-sonoma.com

Tayrona Hammock Hang a hammock and settle in for some serious backyard lounging. This striped cotton model (available in red, blue, and neutral hues) is cozy and comfortable, with diamond-patterned fringe for flair. $98, Anthropologie, anthropologie.com

Taza Outdoor Plant Stand A rust-resistant base makes this tiletopped plant stand the perfect home for three of your favorite flowerpots. $180, Pier 1 Imports, pier1.com

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S U C A S A S U M M E R 2012


by Samantha Schwirck

Martha Stewart Collection Drink Dispenser Serve homemade lemonade, sun-brewed tea, or any other cold beverage in this old-timey dispenser. Made of lightweight acrylic, it holds up to two gallons of liquid and has a spigot for easy serving. $84, Macy’s, macys.com

Treasure Garden Starlight Collar Tilt Umbrella Keep cool during the day and light up your table at night with this nine-foot-tall, freestanding umbrella. The rib lighting is built-in and lasts up to 50,000 hours. $475, Patio and Hearth Co., patioandhearthco.com

Home Gardening Boots, Tools, and Gloves Keep your feet dry and hands pretty while gardening in style with pretty floral-patterned accessories. $20 each, Target, target.com

Solera Dishes and Table Linens + Dot Tumblers Liven things up with picnic-perfect melamine dishes, bright cotton napkins, and a matching table runner. $2–$13, Target, target.com

Chilewich Bold Stripe Mat This quick-drying, mold-resistant vinyl mat comes in three sizes, so you can choose one that best fits your space. $45–$140, Design Warehouse, designwarehousesantafe.com

19


Life+Style Southwest

Sonance Landscape Series 4” and 6” Two-Way Full-Range Satellite Speakers

Super durable and no more obtrusive than outdoor lights, these high-tech satellite speakers can be placed strategically to fill your entire yard with top-quality sound.

all-weather audio outdoor speakers to fill your yard with sound by Samantha Schwirck

U2 Water Resistant Controller

It’s simple, easy to use, and weather-resistant, but it can control the most complicated of systems and works up to 100 feet away from your music source.

If you already spend most of the warmer months outside, there’s nothing better than having your favorite music for company. Outdoor areas can be wired for sound just like indoor areas can, with speakers that deliver high-quality audio and stand up to just about anything Mother Nature throws at them. “I love outdoor audio components,” says landscape architect Susan Combs Bauer, president of Santa Fe’s BauerCombs and Associates. “Sound can be artwork, just like sculptures and fountains can. I like to say it adds ‘audio color.’” The newest systems are visually attractive too. You can choose speakers designed to blend right in with your backyard environment, and installers can bury wires and subwoofers neatly beneath your landscaping. Wireless controls mean you can manage your music selections while floating in your pool, or from your smartphone or tablet if you integrate your backyard audio system into your smart-home scheme. “Just as music enhances indoor spaces, it brings our outdoor spaces to life,” says Jason Suttle, president of Constellation Home Electronics. “It makes an otherwise quiet space feel like another room in the house.” Rockustics Pavarocci 8” Coaxial Rock Speaker

Weathered sedimentary rock or two-way, 70-watt speaker? The exterior on this look-alike is even built to age like natural stone. All items available at Constellation Home Electronics, constellationhomeelectronics.com

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S U C A S A S U M M E R 2012


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Life+Style Southwest

blue persuasion finding the perfect Northern New Mexico hue by Annie O’Carroll

Blue Bayou

A. Northern New Mexico’s vibrant blue doors and window frames are a tradition passed down from the early Spanish settlers, who believed the color would protect a house and its inhabitants from evil spirits. “Taos blue,” as it’s known, is actually a range of hues, from royal blue to sky blue. To find the perfect shade for your particular home, consider how it will interact with the colors that surround it—the brown tones of your stucco, for example, or the colors of nearby plantings. If your stucco color is warm, consider using Blue 22

S U C A S A S U M M E R 2012

Toile—or the deeper Bainbridge Blue—from Benjamin Moore. If you’re working with cooler stucco colors, including taupe tones, I like to use a cooler color from Dunn Edwards called Raging Tide. For something light and fresh, try Benjamin Moore’s Blue Bayou. Santa Fe–based interior designer Annie O’Carroll can be reached at Annie O’Carroll Interior Design, 505-983-7055, annieocarroll.com.

Bainbridge Blue

Blue Toile

Courtesy Benjamin Moore

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S U C A S A S U M M E R 2012


Design Studio

Interview by Alicia Kellogg

built to last Classic wood furniture from Ernest Thompson Southwest Spanish Craftsmen

C

What is it about this style of furniture that people love? Mike: It’s authentic, and it’s got substance. The furniture is part of our heritage here. You look at the food and the culture and the artistry that is New Mexico, and furniture fits right in. It’s part of who we are. Doreen: It also has history. People can say, “I met the builder, and this is how it was made.” It’s a story you can tell, rather than, “Oh, I just ordered that out of a catalog.” And I

Couresty of Ernest Thompson Southwest Spanish Craftsmen

enturies-worth of New Mexico woodworking tradition lives on at Ernest Thompson Southwest Spanish Craftsmen, where a new generation of heirlooms and cabinetry is designed and made by hand at the company’s Albuquerque workshop. Since it opened in 1975, Ernest Thompson has expanded to include the Taos Furniture and Southwest Spanish Craftsmen brands, along with Sombraje twig shutters. We talked to co-owners Mike and Doreen Godwin about timeless design and the staying power of Southwestern style.

What do you think gives Southwestern style such lasting appeal? Mike: Furniture has been made in New Mexico for more than 400 years. The carpinteros from Spain incorporated elements from the Native Americans, and it evolved into this phenomenal style that has all these different influences. I think it’s humorous when people talk about whether Southwest furniture is in style. We’ve been making this furniture for hundreds of years. You look at some of the beautiful antique pieces and think, how could that ever go out of style in this part of the country?

Custom bathroom vanity in alder, from Ernest Thompson’s Taos Furniture line. 26

S U C A S A S U M M E R 2012


would say that our clientele is drawn by the quality of the furniture. What should we look for in a high-quality piece of furniture? Mike: It’s made of solid wood. Joinery is important. And you’ll hear the terms “mortise” and “tenon” used. It’s the classic way, and it goes back to the tools that were available. They would cut the tenon with a saw, and they’d chisel out the mortise—and we still do that. Through the years technology has been developed to build things faster, but we have yet to find a building technique that’s better than mortise and tenon construction. That’s why we continue to build in the old style. What does being handmade bring to a piece? Mike: Longevity. It’s going to last forever. The advantage of handmade furniture is that you can do whatever you want with it. You can have whatever size you want, whatever finish you want—that’s what you can’t achieve with mass-produced furniture.

Top to bottom: Southwest Spanish Craftsmen Flor Sylvestre bed and nighstands in mahogany; Southwest Spanish Craftsmen Zaragosa bath vanity and Flor Sylvestre mirror, both in alder.


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Custom-designed, hand-carved master bath vanity in alder with gold leaf accents.

point, the clients sign off on the drawing, and they have time to pick out a finish. That sounds like a straightforward process. Doreen: Probably the thing that people have the most difficulty with is that they don’t want to wait. But if you’ve been looking for something for two years, it’s OK to wait another three months to get exactly what you want.. Ernest Thompson Southwest Spanish Craftsmen, ernestthompson.com or southwestspanishcraftsmen.com, 505-344-1994 (Albuquerque showroom, ask for Susan “Redd” Shallenberger) or 505-988-1229 (Santa Fe showroom, ask for Lynne Kasselman).

Couresty of Ernest Thompson Southwest Spanish Craftsmen

So you work with clients to customize furniture? Doreen: People often come in looking for something specific. They have probably been searching for a long time, and that means it needs to be custom-made. We’ve had people come in and say, “I love this armoire my grandmother had, but it’s too small,” or ,“I love this chair, but I need five of them.” We’ll talk about what they are looking for and how they want to use the piece. We’ll sketch it out, and then we’ll give them a price. We will ask for a deposit, and then we’ll do a technical drawing that our builders actually build from. At that


Su Cocina

it’s what’s outside that counts By John Vollertsen

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Today’s outdoor kitchens may be outfitted with pizza ovens, smokers, and grills that convert from gas to wood to charcoal.

Douglas Merriam

C

all it global warming, climate change, or whatever you like, but as the planet heats up with longer, hotter summers, people are spending more time outdoors. In fact, many consumers have started to think of the backyard as another room of the house. The folks happiest heading outdoors to cook and entertain are the grillmeisters and BBQ enthusiasts of the world, and there are many. Gone are the days when the snow-rusted grill is dusted off and fired up with charcoal soaked in lighter fluid. Today, patiophiles turn to professionals to design multifaceted outdoor cooking areas with features that may include mood lighting and gurgling waterfalls. Nobody knows more about grilling than Santa Fe cookbook writer Cheryl Alters Jamison, who, with her husband, Bill, has written more than a dozen tomes to date, many featuring grilling tips and recipes. Having produced such books as Born to Grill; Smoke & Spice; Good Times, Good Grilling; and The Big Book of Outdoor Cooking & Entertaining, it’s no wonder that, in 2009, Jamison teamed up with designer Barbara Templeman to form an exterior design consulting group called insideOUTsantafe. “The downturn in the economy has created an interest in nesting and has led to the expanding of existing living space to include the out of doors,” says Templeman. “At insideOUTsantafe, we strive to create beautiful living environments outside.” With a greater focus on a home’s outdoor space, “much more is being done with outdoor cooking equipment,” Templeman says. “It’s amazing—there are pizza ovens, smokers, and grills that convert from gas to wood to charcoal through the use of removable drawers. Cooking and gathering is a wonderful way to entertain family and friends, and therefore requires more than a single old-school BBQ.” “The new news is ‘old’ news,” Jamison says. “People are cooking again with real logs in fireplaces and pizza ovens, and many features can be built right in. Gas grills can be hooked into natural gas lines instead of relying on propane, for example. The number-one grill accessory I always suggest opting for,” she adds, “is a rotisserie. It’s the way to get some of the best results with poultry and incredibly succulent pork roasts. An infrared sear station is another good option for getting a super-crisp surface on steaks and other meats. Kalamazoo Outdoor Gourmet sells the grills with differing fuel drawers, and Big Green Egg’s kamado smoker, which is a ceramic cooker modeled


“The number-one grill accessory I always suggest opting for is a rotisserie,” says James Beard Award–winning cookbook writer Cheryl Alters Jamison. Here, a rotating horizontal rod complements a gas grill by Ducane. SUCASAMAGAZINE.COM

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on ones from Asia, is a real cult fave.” Other popular features Templeman recommends include “big pot cookers for shrimp boils, beautiful stone garden sinks, outdoor sinks, refrigerators that don’t require electricity, grill hoods, and lighting that’s solar generated. Almost anything that’s available for an indoor kitchen is now available outdoors,” she says. “There’s a new outdoor tabletop light fixture that magnifies from one tea light to enough light to illuminate an entire outdoor room,” she adds, but the fun doesn’t stop there. “People are even adding outdoor showers and tubs to their yards.” When it comes to outfitting your outdoor space, Jamison suggests forgoing big-box stores and discount warehouses. “You get what you pay for,” she says. “[The items there] may look good but may not hold up well at all. And you get no service. InsideOUTsantafe also does hourly consultation, and an hour spent conferring with us can send the homeowner in the right direction. Our projects try to incorporate the four elements—water, fire, earth, wind—in the form of features that specifically speak to each of them. And, of course, we feel every outdoor space should incorporate areas for dining, cooking, relaxing, and entertaining.” I love the idea of soaking in a tub in full view of the grill with a glass of wine in hand. While you work on upgrading your outdoor living space, try this yummy recipe, compliments of Cheryl and Bill Jamison from their James Beard Award–winning The Big Book of

Douglas Merriam

Cheryl and Bill Jamison’s romesco sauce spices up a plate of grilled chicken and vegetables.


Outdoor Cooking & Entertaining. What a great way to celebrate the season. insideOUTsantafe, insideoutsantafe.com, 505-820-2994

Romesco Sauce Serve this summery Spanish sauce with simply grilled shrimp or skewered shrimp and chorizo chunks. Dollop it over grilled chicken, clams, or white fish; slather it over grilled garlic bread; use it as a dip for grilled green onions; smear it over smoked or grilled New Mexico lamb slices piled on a crusty roll. Or just eat it from the bowl with a spoon!

makes about 2 cups 4-ounce jar piquillo peppers with their juice (available at The Spanish Table in Santa Fe) or a 4-ounce jar pimientos, preferably fire-roasted, with their juice plus ¼ to ½ teaspoon dried hot red chile flakes 1 red-ripe plum tomato 1 slice chewy country bread, about 1 ounce, toasted or grilled, torn in several pieces /3 cup slivered salted almonds (Marcona, if available) 1

1 tablespoon hot paprika, preferably Spanish 2 plump garlic cloves 2 teaspoons red wine vinegar

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6 to 8 tablespoons flavorful olive oil Into the food processor, plop the piquillos and juice, tomato, bread, almonds, paprika, garlic, vinegars, and salt, plus 1 tablespoon warm water. Process mixture until a thick purée forms. With the motor running, pour in enough oil to process until smooth and sauce is easily spoon-able. Let the sauce sit at room temperature for at least 1 hour or cover and refrigerate for up to several weeks. ©2006 Cheryl Alters Jamison and Bill Jamison from The Big Book of Outdoor Cooking & Entertaining (HarperCollins).

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By Alicia Kellogg Photographs by Mark William Photography

W

foothills fabulous remodeling a Pueblo Revival residence to maximize views and functionality

hen Chris and Nicole Wascoe Bauman moved into their home near the Sandia Mountains with their young daughter, Grace, in the fall of 2010, they loved the 1978 adobe’s unique organic form but knew a remodel was in their future. “While this house had all sorts of character, it didn’t have the functionality,” Nicole says. Perched in the foothills with dramatic views up to the mountains and down into Albuquerque, the home is an adobe expression of textures and curves rendered in a rustic Spanish Pueblo Revival style. Originally built by Ralph Roybal, “the house itself feels hand-molded,” says Nicole. Walking through the main hall, she points out a tile accent and a stripe of painted trim along the bottom of a kiva fireplace. “I like new homes, too,” she says, “but this one had a lot of details.” For all its charm, though, some aspects of the design were not exactly conducive to a family in 2012. The kitchen had been updated over the years, but by today’s standards it was a rather claustrophobic space with poor lighting. The room also failed to take full advantage of the sweeping views of the Sandia Mountains out the back door. “I could see the tram while I was doing dishes, and that was a selling point for me,” Nicole says. “But the windows were shorter, so you couldn’t see the top of the mountain unless you leaned down.” Enter designer and builder Diego M. Ruiz of Diego Handcrafted Homes. Ruiz expanded the kitchen and added a higher ceiling and expansive six-foot-byeight-foot windows. The new space “creates a panoramic view of the Sandias and draws you into the mountain,” he explains. Enlarging the kitchen created room for a dining area, where the family can enjoy the scenery, as well as two islands that provide ample workspace, plenty of cabinets, seating, and storage for everything from dishes to the family’s pasta and bread makers. An Apple computer mounted on the wall near the refrigerator allows Nicole to play music or pull up recipes on Epicurious. Toward the living room, Ruiz and interior designer Laura Myers of Laura Myers Interiors created a banquette seating area overlooking the original kiva fireplace nearby. A storage area under the banquette Diego Handcrafted Homes can be reached at 505-573-8888 or at diegohandcraftedhomes.com.

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The remodeled and expanded kitchen space allows for “a panoramic view of the Sandias and draws you into the mountains,”says builder Diego Ruiz.

This page and opposite: Designer/builder Diego M. Ruiz of Diego Handcrafted Homes expanded the home’s kitchen, raised the ceiling, added oversized windows from Sierra Pacific Windows, and created room for a dining area, two islands, and additional seating and storage. Cabinets by Davis Kitchens. 38

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cushion provides a place for 4-year-old Grace’s Play-Doh and art supplies. Before the remodel, bringing in groceries from the lower-level garage involved walking up the stairs, past the front door, and down the hall into the kitchen. Now, Nicole gives a kitchen bookcase a light push and it slides forward to reveal a hidden pantry and a passage to the home’s front door area. The new pathway provides a shortcut to the kitchen and easy access to a remodeled powder room via a small vestibule accessible from the home’s front entry. Ruiz updated the powder room with new flooring, a custom-fitted vanity, and a rectangular Talavera sink, but the biggest change goes back to function. Located near the front door—down the hall from the kitchen, living room, and bedrooms—the powder room originally housed the laundry room. Ruiz relocated the washer and dryer to the master suite in the center of the home with convenient access to the master closet, the guest room, and Grace’s bedroom. “It’s just much more functional and efficient,” Nicole says. The master bedroom itself retains its original personality but gained some practical features. When Chris, a radiologist, and Nicole, who has a background in marketing and currently stays home with Grace, bought their house, the master bathtub and shower were open to the rest of the bedroom and across the room from the sink area. “My husband had to get up early in the morning, and he would go shower in the guest bathroom because otherwise he’d wake me up,” Nicole says. Ruiz moved the master bath into one enclosed space with two sinks, a glass-walled shower, and a tub with a mountain view. They kept the bedroom’s original kiva fireplace, but Ruiz extended the built-in banco and reconfigured the old bank of closets. “We created a new curved wall that complements the original adobe wall—a serpentine shape that gave us the opportunity to create a hisand-hers closet there and still not take up too much space,” he says. Throughout the remodel, Ruiz looked for ways to blend the new with the old. “We tried to keep the architectural integrity of the original style throughout the addition and remodel so it looked like it was always part of the original home,” Ruiz says. The kitchen now has light-colored chiseledSUCASAMAGAZINE.COM

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“Now we have this great new space,but we have all the quirks of the old space too,” says homeowner Nicole Wascoe Bauman.

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The home’s curved walls, vigas, nichos, and bancos reflect its original Spanish Pueblo Revival style. SUCASAMAGAZINE.COM

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edge travertine floors, but Ruiz created a brick perimeter to tie in the flooring with the rest of the house. New tongue-and-groove ceilings visually relate to the originals. For the kitchen’s addition, Ruiz used two-by-eight construction on some of the new frame walls to provide a thicker feeling that replicates the original adobe, as well as heavy skiptrowel plaster reminiscent of adobe construction. Meanwhile, green-building choices such as spray-foam insulation, energy-efficient windows, and HVAC systems help the owners save on utility bills and enhance their quality of life, Ruiz notes. “I’m a hands-on builder, and I’m meticulous about every detail in the home, from the energy efficiency to the aesthetics and the authenticity of the design and materials,” Ruiz says. “My building philosophy begins by approaching each home as if I were building it for my own family.” Outside, new brick pathways and landscaping tame the rugged terrain. The yard incorporates a ground-level hot tub to replace the former dilapidated deck and above-ground model, grassy spaces, and what Nicole describes as an infinity view overlooking the surrounding neighborhood. An enclosed deck on the roof of the garage gives the family space to grill, eat, and entertain right off the kitchen. The remodel was begun last August, and by April the family had settled into the completed space. “The time we’ve spent here so far has been great,” Nicole says. “When Chris’s family was here, we had six adults and three kids, and I put everybody to work. I had everybody making breakfast casseroles, and we were cooking dinner for that night. Everybody was in their own space and having a good time. We hope to do that at Thanksgiving also.” The updated home manages to retain the character that attracted Nicole and Chris while gaining the features that make it work for their family. “Now we have this great new space, but we have all the quirks of the old space too,” she says. 42

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Above and opposite: Ruiz changed the master-bathroom design (which originally had the tub and shower open onto the master bedroom) by moving the bath into one enlosed space and adding two sinks, a glass-walled shower, and a tub with a view of the mountains through a vintage window.


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naturally inspired Simple and contemporary, with views all around, this Santa Fe home is at one with the landscape

The home’s minimalist aesthetic carries into the backyard, where landscaping (by San Isidro Permaculture) incorporates boulders excavated during construction. 44

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By Kathleen McCloud

Photographs by Amadeus Leitner

hen Shelly Gore and John Van Drimmelen decided to build a house in Santa Fe, in 2009, they set aside style preferences and began at the source: the landscape that drew them to the Southwest. The couple had been living in Van Drimmelen’s native Amsterdam, but now that they had retired—Gore from her career as an IT specialist, Van Drimmelen from his post as CEO at a manufacturing company in Holland—they wanted a house that connected them to the natural world, one that would blend the domestic and the wild rather than separate the two. Before buying several acres above historic Bishop’s Lodge on Santa Fe’s north side, Gore and Van Drimmelen asked architect Jon Dick of Archaeo Architects to assess the site. Located up a steep road near a ridgeline, it had a solitude that attracted the couple, as well as nothing-short-of-spectacular views that stretched from the Jemez Mountains in the west to Colorado’s Antonito Peak in the north. For all its beauty, however, the site posed a few design challenges for Dick. “We had to capture the northwest view and figure out how to get natural light in,” Dick says. “Given the steep slope on the south, it wasn’t easy.” After patiently trying out every possible orientation for the single-story house, Dick and the couple came up with a design that followed the curve of the hillside. “I had to listen and take cues from the site,” he explains. “At the end of the day, we wanted the house to appear as if it ascended from the ground rather than imposed upon it.’’ While Gore’s aesthetic leans toward the idiosyncratic and handmade that defines Santa Fe, Van Drimmelen prefers clean lines and minimal embellishment. The 3,400-square-foot home Dick designed and Gianardi Construction built reflects both the gentleness of Pueblo vernacular and a more contemporary formalism. The house won the Grand Hacienda title in Santa Fe’s 2011 Parade of Homes, and it garnered “Best Design” and “Best Kitchen” awards as well. “We came up with an earthy house with a contemporary expression that showcases nature, not the house,” says Gore, as she Jon Dick and Archaeo Architects can be reached at 505-820-7200 or at archaeoarchitects.com. Frank Gonzales and Gianardi Construction can be reached at 505-603-5057. SUCASAMAGAZINE.COM

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A boardwalk leads visitors to the porch and pivoting front door of the 3,400-square-foot home. .

“We wanted the house to appear as if it ascended from the ground rather than imposed upon it,� says architect Jon Dick. 46

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walks along the shaded boardwalk that marks the transition between the piñon-covered hillside and the front entrance to the house. “I have a nature aesthetic, so I was militant about keeping the trees. We didn’t want to disturb the site any more than we had to.”

light and bright

Inside, the dialog with nature continues. A pivoting front door (by Santa Fe Door) opens into a luminous foyer, where a large square window immediately draws the eye outside again, to a rockscape created from boulders excavated during construction. Windows throughout the house and narrow, strategically placed skylights brighten the home’s neutral palette. The passing of time and seasonal cycles are revealed in shifting patterns of light and shadow on Venetian plaster walls and concrete floors. In the great room—“The heartbeat of the house,” Gore says—understated furnishings don’t distract from the centerpiece: a glass wall that frames the sweeping mountain views. In the corner is a striking columnar fireplace, its geometric lines softened by a metallic plaster finish. “We both have family that comes to visit—John’s family from Amsterdam comes for two weeks at a time,” says Gore, as she points out the band of treetops along Tesuque Creek to the north. “This house is where we all get together. It’s the community event place.” The living area’s concrete floor

The low-maintenance xeric landscape features rocks and native plants such as piñons. .

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extends outside, onto a large portal, and into the open kitchen, another popular spot for gathering. “Everyone is encouraged to participate in preparing meals; we use every inch of the kitchen,’’ says Gore, who clearly relishes the communal rather than territorial aspects of the space. A large work island with a green granite countertop invites food preparation and conversation; the warm red tones in the cabinets, from Hanks House, are also welcoming. Like all the cabinetry in the house, they’re made of Lyptus, a fast-growing Brazilian wood that meets sustainable forest certification standards. “We went out of our way to get the appliances we wanted, like the Miele steamer,” says Van Drimmelen, who also loves to cook. “They are very popular in Europe, but not so common here.” Outside the large kitchen window, to the right of a seating area, is a tidy kitchen garden where Gore and Van Drimmelen grow some of their own ingredients. “We’re new gardeners—we’re not sure what we’re doing, but we’re trying,’’ Gore says, noting that the wild strawberry, along with 48

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The clean-lined, open kitchen won a “Best Kitchen” award in Santa Fe’s 2011 Haciendas Parade of Homes. Granite countertops by Arizona Tile, cabinets by Hanks House, Miele appliances from Ferguson. Opposite: A wall of windows and a contemporary interpretation of a kiva fireplace are focal points in the great room. Concrete floors by Golden Siebert, Akrostucco Venetian plaster throughout the home by Fabu-WALL-ous Solutions.


The home reflects the gentleness of the Pueblo vernacular and a more contemporary formalism. Homeowner Shelly Gore describes it as both earthy and contemporary, with a design that “showcases nature.�

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This page and opposite: Simple finishes and light, creamy colors throughout the home give it an understated elegance and let the Santa Fe views—celebrated in countless windows—shine.

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“We both have family that comes to visit,” says Gore. “This house is where we all get together. It’s the community event place.” mint and chamomile, has made it through the winter. The garden enjoys a perfect microclimate, sitting in the narrow yard on the home’s south side. The area is bordered by a retaining wall and the boulder-strewn slope above it— an example of what architect Dick describes as “massaging the topography” that creates transition spaces between the natural and manmade.

waking up in paradise

Sliding doors separate great-room activity from the sanctuary of the master suite, which has stunning views of northwest Santa Fe and the Jemez. Minimally furnished, the blond wood furniture and white bedding are supporting characters—the real stars are the coyotes, rabbits, and the occasional bobcat passing by the glass wall that opens onto a portal. “Every morning when I wake up and look out the window I say to myself, This is it, this is where I want to be,’’ says Van Drimmelen. While he considered an outdoor shower off the master bathroom, Van Drimmelen instead opted for a very open indoor one—which is continued on page 74


a kitchen for every taste Traditional or trendy, cozy or expansive, there’s a kitchen to fulfill your cooking, entertaining, and decorating dreams. Here are six of our local favorites.

With zones for prep work, baking, serving, and more, this remodeled and expanded Los Ranchos kitchen is efficient and eye-pleasing. Bright cherry-wood cabinets from Hanks House and a variety of countertop materials from United Stoneworks add additional character.

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Before

Paul Kohlman

functional flow Having already renovated other parts of their home, the owners of this Los Ranchos de Albuquerque residence wanted to bring their kitchen in line with the changes that had been made elsewhere, as well as create more space and have better flow with the kitchen’s adjoining rooms, says builder Dominic Padilla of There’s No Place Like Home. Padilla relocated the kitchen and turned its original space into a seating area with a custom masonry fireplace, adding 400 square feet in the process. “The large kitchen is now set up in zones—prep, cooking, baking, refrigeration, pantry, serving, coffee and espresso, and clean up,” Padilla says. Among the many standout new features are a multipurpose butcher block in the prep zone (“Crafted out of walnut and maple squares, it incorporates slots for knife storage, a compartment for individual cutting-board storage, and a custom pewter sink,” Padilla says) and, in the cooking zone, a “handforged steel hood from Southwest Metal with hammered pewter straps and brass rivets that services the completely refurbished vintage Wolf six-burner double oven as well as the new electric Wolf two-burner cooktop.” (There’s an additional two-burner gas cooktop and a single Wolf oven in the baking zone.) Soapstone countertops and marble backsplash from United Stoneworks; cherry-wood cabinets from Hanks House; variance plaster wall finishes from B.W. Earp Stucco, Lath & Plaster; hand-scraped, ten-inch-plank oak hardwood floors; and Jeld-Wen windows round out the new kitchen and allow the room to blend seamlessly with the rest of the home. Builder: Dominic Padilla, There’s No Place Like Home, 505-401-9324, theresnoplacelikehomellc.com SUCASAMAGAZINE.COM

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a kitchen for every taste

Stainless steel appliances, a bold Caesarstone island, shiny glass tile, and richly hued cherry cabinets from Hanks House work together in this ultra-contemporary kitchen.

Above: The back kitchen has ample storage and counter space for prep and cleanup. Right: Glass tile backsplashes appear in both kitchen areas, providing continuity.

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The homeowners were looking for “a strong focus on aesthetics and symmetry.”

avant-garde arrangement Wristen Paschich and his clients wanted to break the mold when they built this home in Albuquerque’s Four Hills area. So Paschich, of Paschich Design Group, created a kitchen the homeowners would move around instead of within. “We wanted a new navigation,” Paschich says of the unconventional layout, which is anchored by a rectangular cooking and storage module. On its front side, which faces a Caesarstone-covered kitchen island (with sink) and the living room beyond, are cabinets, a stove top, a stainless steel refrigerator, and a separate freezer. On the back side, which faces a wall of storage, is another sink, the oven, additional cabinets, and more countertop space. Hanging lights from YLighting are the only elements here that reach up to the ceiling—the oven hood is vented through the floor—so the kitchen looks as if it could be picked up and moved at any time. Husband-and-wife homeowners Jarrod Collins and Jade Ferrell like the layout because, with a kitchen so close and open to the living room, they appreciate having a more private “back kitchen” in which to hide pans and prep items. They also like the kitchen’s cool, clean look. “We wanted a strong focus on aesthetics and symmetry, without losing functionality and while also maintaining an open floor plan,” says Ferrell. Builder: Wristen Paschich, Paschich Design Group, paschichdesigngroup.com, 505-250-1887

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a kitchen for every taste

Kitchen designer Craig Sowers used dark walnut for the lower cabinets and opted for painted white cabinets above, a trick that helps expand the kitchen space visually.

When designing a kitchen, says Craig Sowers of Kitchens by Craig, “you want a look that is as timeless as possible. You don’t want to get tired of it or have it look dated down the road.” He followed his own advice when he remodeled the 1970s-era kitchen in his Los Ranchos home, aiming for “elegant simplicity.” He also did what he could to make the kitchen feel bigger. While most of the cabinetry is rich, dark walnut, Sowers chose white for the upper cabinets—a trick that “makes the space feel less confined,” he says—and installed glass pass-through doors to let light in and open the area visually. Light-colored granite countertops and stainless steel cabinet hardware (to match the appliances) tie the look together. What you can’t see: The refrigerator, dishwasher, and bins for trash and recycling that hide behind doors that match the walnut cabinets. Builder: Craig Sowers, Kitchens by Craig, 505-343-1309, kitchensbycraig.com

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Mark William Photography

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Builder: Rob Hughes, RMH General Contractor, Inc., 505-620-1287, rmhgeneralcontractor.com Architect: Jeff Chiavetta, DailyDesign, 505-980-0389, dailydesign.net

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This sleek, modern kitchen, designed by architect Jeff Chiavetta at DailyDesign, was part of a whole-house remodel by RMH General Contractor, Inc., that “opened up the home’s common areas and cramped, smaller rooms” by rearranging the interior space, says RMH President Rob Hughes. To create the new kitchen’s bright, open plan, Hughes knocked down walls and relocated windows; he also raised the ceiling and then “dovetailed it with an elaborate skylight that pierces through the pitched roof cavity, bridging the kitchen, dining, and living areas,” he says. Standout features that create the kitchen’s contemporary, clean-lined look include “Naranja Cool” Silestone countertops from United Stoneworks (with a mitered waterfall design used on the island); a custom-blended Hakatai glass tile mosaic backsplash installed by Wes Parshall at Corrales Tile and a “Veranda” porcelain tile floor from Daltile, both provided by Anita McDonough at Flooring Direct; custom maple cabinetry by Horizon Custom Cabinets, drywall finishes by Elite Dri-Wall; and Jenn-Air appliances from Ferguson. “Creating a space that can be enjoyed for years to come,” Hughes says, “is what makes projects like this one so gratifying.”

Custom Builders Council

bright and open


contemporary charm The owners of this North Valley kitchen enlisted Tim Rizek, of Rizek Inc. Design & Remodeling, and architect Richard Schalk when they embarked on a kitchen and whole-house remodel in 2011. They wanted to preserve the kitchen’s adobe charm, while at the same time bringing it up-to-date and making it brighter—a challenge, as it had no exterior walls. “We had to come up with creative ideas to get as much natural light in as possible,” says Rizek. To lighten things up, he installed skylights in the kitchen and neighboring dining room, along with an entire wall of windows in the adjacent living room. The kitchen skylight is lined with iridescent glass tiles, which help bounce the sunshine throughout the room. To retain the kitchen’s New Mexico character, Rizek kept the redbrick floors, plaster walls, and kiva fireplace. But he updated other elements of the space, installing sophisticated cherry cabinets from Hanks House and Caesarstone and granite countertops from United Stoneworks. An appliance package by Sub Zero/Wolf—including a built-in wine cooler—polishes off the look. Builder: Tim Rizek, Rizek Inc. Design & Remodeling, rizekdesignremodeling.com, 505-897-8107

Alexander Vertikoff

Architect: Richard Schalk, richardschalk.com, 505-843-7227

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The new layout allows the homeowners to look into the living room—and outside through a large window— while cooking. Below, left: Refrigerated drawers provide extra storage. Below, right: The kitchen is illuminated with fixtures from Creative Lighting.

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Wendy McEahern

a kitchen for every taste

“The kitchen is open to the other spaces, but with a sense that it is its own room,� says builder Kurt Faust.


sophisticated drama Sophisticated curves and the dramatic use of polished black granite in a room filled with creamy neutral tones make this kitchen in Santa Fe’s Las Campanas community an elegant showstopper. “The kitchen was to be the center of the home, completely open to the other spaces, but with a sense that it is its own room,” says Kurt Faust of Tierra Concepts, the company that designed and built the home. The circular lines of the high ceiling are echoed in the counters below and in the oval-shaped island. Both are topped with polished black granite, which contrasts beautifully with the light maple cabinets (from Baglione Custom Woodworks) and travertine floor.

Builder: Tierra Concepts, 505-780-1157, tierraconceptssantafe.com

Above and opposite: Polished black granite, light maple cabinets, and elegant curves make this Las Campanas kitchen memorable.

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Su Libro

home and garden Photo-heavy, multipurpose books that cover both the indoors and out show us the inspiring history of style, the joys of region-specific plants, and the ease with which we can curb our carbon footprints.

Mirrors: Reflections of Style, by Paula Phipps, W. W. Norton & Company, hardcover, $45

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Courtesy W. W. Norton & Company

N

ot just a book on how one of the most commonplace household items can make a room look pretty, Mirrors: Reflections of Style, by Paula Phipps, an independent researcher and historian, is a resource for professional and amateur designers interested in the history of style, in recreating era-specific looks, and in using mirrors to their maximum decorative potential. In the book’s opening section, “Mirrors through the Ages,” Phipps notes that archaeologists have traced what’s believed to be the earliest mirrors to 6200 b.c., when obsidian slabs were used in Çatal Hüyük (present-day Turkey). “From that period on, the development and


Opposite, far left: A ca. 2009 artdeco-style dressing table offers a twist on a classic form. Opposite, left: A mirror becomes part of the furniture with this unusual art-nouveau settee. Left: Mirrors can make outdoor areas feel more spacious and enhance a natural setting.

“Cunningly placed, [mirrors] can transform limited space into impressive expanse, produce illusory halls, multiply doorways, even unfurl vistas outdoors.” —Paula Phipps in Mirrors: Reflections of Style

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refinement of mirrors have progressed in starts and stops around the world,” Phipps writes, pointing to the use of polished copper in Mesopotamia ca. 4000 b .c. and bronze mirrors in China around 2000 b.c . Often these ancient-world relics featured striking displays of artistry—from “a handle in the shape of a woman holding a duck” (Egypt, ca. 1570–1314 b.c.) to elaborate depictions of dragons on the back of a mirror (China, third century b.c.—and ancient Egyptians and Chinese buried them with their dead for use in the afterlife. But it was the development of glass mirrors that changed everything. (Although the origin of glass-making is unknown, artisans in Sidon [presentday Lebanon] ca. the twelfth century b . c . were known for their glassmaking skills, and the Romans’ glass industry was flourishing by the first century b.c .) Because of glass, Phipps writes, “[m]irrors evolved from small handheld objects used in the rituals of beauty to objects large and small. Today,” she adds, “mirrors contribute beauty, light, space, illusion, and sometimes even a sense of history.” Photo-driven with elaborate, 64

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Courtesy W. W. Norton & Company

A mirrored ceiling adds a dramatic flair to this dining room, reflecting light and providing a unique view of the table.


Let us orchestrate your dream. For the perfect products for your kitchen or bath, stop by a Ferguson showroom. It’s where you’ll find the largest range of quality brands, a symphony of ideas, and trained product experts to help orchestrate your dream. With showrooms from coast to coast, come see why Ferguson is recommended by professional contractors and designers everywhere.

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history-filled captions, Mirrors isn’t a practical, hands-on guide for how to dress up a room with mirrors. Instead, Phipps documents the history of mirrors by illustrating how they’ve been used over the centuries for aesthetic reasons—to “[change] our perception of ourselves and our surroundings and [give] us surprising views of things we never noticed outside the looking glass”—as well as for practical purposes, whether as design elements, as part of furniture, or as a means for enhancing an outdoor space. Through the images Phipps provides— Empress Josephine’s candle-armed bath mirrors, Marlene Dietrich’s elaborate dressing table, Coco Chanel’s mirror-lined staircase— it’s easy to get lost in fantasy, but it’s also possible to lay the groundwork for using mirrors to beautifully and powerfully transform your living space.—Amy Hegarty Right: Dressing tables, like the one shown here in the 18th-century Mompesson House in Salisbury, England, “became a standard form of furniture in every home,” Phipps writes.

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Cactus – The Gardener’s Guide to –

The 100 Best Paddles, Barrels, Columns, and Globes S C O T T C A L H O UN

The Gardener’s Guide to Cactus: The 100 Best Paddles, Barrels, Columns, and Globes, by Scott Calhoun, Timber Press, paperback, $24.95

In his preface to The Gardener’s Guide to Cactus, Scott Calhoun writes about the cactus’s sculptural shape and how it forms “the prickly heart of some of the most interesting gardens in the world.” He goes on to convince us that, despite popular belief, the cactus doesn’t only live in high-temperature or low-elevation deserts and it’s easy to incorporate into your garden. In fact, the succulent’s garden appeal is gaining momentum because it doesn’t need much water or care, it often flowers with surprisingly bright colors, and many species can be used in the kitchen. In his colorful, photo-heavy guide, Calhoun—monthly garden columnist at Sunset magazine and owner of a Tucsonbased landscape design company—outlines 100 cactus species in convenient shape-specific sections, so you can choose what best fits into your space— whether you have 30 acres or five square feet. Then he describes each plant’s key properties, such as native habitat, mature size, hardiness, flowering season, and cultivation.

MarkWlliamPhotography.com

“The cactus forms the prickly heart of some of the most interesting gardens in the world.” —Scott Calhoun in The Gardener’s Guide to Cactus If you’d like to add some color to the tiny area beside your bistro table, try a species from the “low and mounding cactus section,” like the Texas rainbow cactus. Despite its name, the plant—which reaches only 5–10 inches in size—and its striking yellow flowers, is actually native to New


Scott Calhouon

The Texas rainbow cactus (which is actually native to New Mexico) blooms with bright, yellow flowers; its spine alternates between white and red. Below, right: A tuxedo spine prickly pear cactus grows in a southern Arizona garden.

Mexico. If you want to enhance the rocky terrain of your high-elevation mountain home (and you have plenty of room), you might go for the grizzly bear prickly pear, known for its many strong, hairlike spikes and its tolerance to cold temperatures. It blooms with bright yellow or pink flowers and can grow to be up to six feet across and two feet tall. The Gardener’s Guide to Cactus is appealing because it is comprehensive—the guide has a little something for every garden—but it’s not overwhelming. You will find helpful resources toward the end (popular cactus pests, select nurseries), but the lists aren’t too long—they won’t bog you down. The typical gardener’s neglect of cacti, Calhoun writes, “makes them one of the most enticing plant families,” especially for those hoping to spruce up their space and veer “toward the sharp side of gardening.”—Samantha Schwirck SUCASAMAGAZINE.COM

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Su Libro

Going green is not a new concept— people have been recycling materials and fixing leaky faucets for decades. “There are dozens of small details and devices that can be helpful in converting a building to a greener version of itself,” writes Lucy D. Rosenfeld in Eco-House Renovations. But her new book focuses on much larger-scale home renovations, and it’s these “eco-conversions” that the author—who has written more than 30 books on art and architecture—thinks will change our world. Eco-House Renovations is a reference book, a how-to guide, and a coffee table hardback all rolled into one. The book is divided into two sections. In the first, Rosenfeld explains what to consider when eco-converting, such as using alternative energy sources for temperature control, electricity, and water supply; using space intelligently to avoid an excessive environmental footprint; and using proper ventilation and insulation for healthy and effective air circulation. New Mexico residents might be particularly interested in harnessing power from the sun, which the author discusses in chapter six. 68

S U C A S A S U M M E R 2012

Terra-cotta-style tiles with photovoltaic cells sealed within them are one of the newer options in the solar arena—they’re gaining popularity because they’re a bit less obvious than solar panels, and they fit right in with Southwestern decor. In chapter 12, Rosenfeld explains another favorable choice for desert residences: the Rain Chain, a Japanese tool that works to draw rainwater down from the roof. For ideas and inspiration, the second section of the book walks readers through the homes of 45 successful eco-conversion projects. Each entry is organized like a case study, complete with full-page before-and-after photography. In Kentucky, a home receives a thermal glass pane addition; in Maine, a coastal cottage is winterized; and on the streets of downtown Chicago, an old power station is transformed into an artist’s live/work site. Two New Mexico houses are included in this section for closeto-home inspiration. One residence in Taos is retrofitted with a new entrance, porch, and guest suite, as well as a glass-sided greenhouse hallway, which increases passive solar heating and ventilation. Another home, near Albuquerque, receives new metal roofing with heavy insulation and skylights, solar panels and a photovoltaic system for electricity and hot water, and radiant floor heating. The book’s success lies in its range of projects, helpful before-and-after photos, and clear descriptions. Every project is different, but each one nudges the reader (and possible renovator) toward a more sustainable lifestyle and home. —SS.

Courtesy Schiffer Publishing

Eco-House Renovations: 45 Green House Conversions, by Lucy D. Rosenfeld, Schiffer Publishing, hardcover, $49.99


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Opposite: An addition of high-performance glass provides passive light and heat to a Minnesota home. Above, top: Hot water and electricity is provided by a photovoltaic system and solar panels. Above, bottom: A New Mexico home’s “greenhouse hallway” brings in light and heat.

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The dining table, bench, and fire table are from Stone Forest’s Elemental Outdoor Room collection. 70

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welcome to the stone age Hand-carved stone furniture, all from Santa Fe’s Stone Forest, gives an outdoor space bold, organic appeal. Imagine dinner at the heavy rectangular table (it’s cut from basalt block then brushed to a smooth finish) followed by drinks around the natural-gasfueled “fire table,” a blue-gray granite slab atop a stainless steel base. A simple bench, also in basalt, is versatile enough to be used for seating at either table. Outdoor furnishings: Stone Forest, stoneforest.com, 505-986-8883 Contractor: Joel Muller, Tent Rock, tentrockinc.com, 505-474-9188 Designer: Cara Leigh, Interiors and Functional Design, www.interiordesignsantafe.com, 505-465-0127

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Outdoor Living

get grilling! From baking and slow cooking to warming and smoking, our favorite outdoor ranges can do it all. GE Monogram’s outdoor cooking centers can be customized—opt for built-in features like a stainless steel cabinet, a front-mounted thermometer, an acrylic cutting board, or a drop-in ceramic infrared rotisserie rod. Every model, ranging in size from 30" to 54", offers integrated lighting (so you can cook in the dark) and can stand alone or be built into your outdoor kitchen space. From $3,499, Baillio’s, baillios.com

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Talk about versatility: This outdoor electric smoker oven by Viking can be used for slow cooking, hot and cold smoking, baking, and roasting your vegetables, meats, cheeses, and fish. $2,999, Builders Source Appliance Gallery, builderssource.com

YOU’VE NEVER SEEN HE SUN LIKE THISTHIS BEFORE. YOU’VE NEVER SEEN TTHE SUN LIKE BEFORE.

Before

KitchenAid’s outdoor ranges feature adjustable interior warming racks, electric warming drawers, and a unique interactive LED system that tracks cooking fuel and allows users the option of an automatic turn-off after a set amount of time. From $799, Lowe’s, lowes.com

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continued from page 51

Shelly Gore and John Van Drimmelen

“Every morning, when I wake up and look out the window, I say to myself, This is where I want to be,� says Van Drimmelen.

74

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every bit as beautiful, but more practical. Garapa hardwood flooring, “bamboo” tiles (they’re actually ceramic) from Arizona Tile, and floor-to-ceiling glass walls on two sides make the shower feel like a tropical spa, a vacation destination in itself. The bathroom’s free-standing tub, designed by Philippe Starck for Duravit, is a piece of sculpture, punctuated by the only glaringly decorative object in the house: a bright-orange plastic koi fish that’s perched on its edge. On the opposite end of the house are Gore’s office and the guest wing, which the couple is still working on decorating. “We will be getting some rugs and art, but we are taking our time,” Gore says. In a hallway, a commissioned, sitespecific art installation—a glass ladder by Santa Fe glass artist Eric Garduño—is underway. “I like the way it just keeps the eye moving up and outside,” says Gore. For all practical purposes the ladder goes nowhere, but it carries the mystical possibilities of the ubiquitous kiva ladder— and serves as yet another reminder of our connection to the natural world.

The minimally furnished master bedroom has stunning views of northwest Santa Fe and the Jemez Mountains.

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We Listen We Care

“Where Building Is Art”

“The No Tears Contractor” Client Testimonial

See you at the 2012 Parade of Homes! An Award Winning Builder Providing The Quality and Peace of Mind You Deserve Custom New Homes – Design Build Historic Restoration- Remodels Santa Fe, NM 505-982-9699 www.fabuwallous.com


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Su Casa Magazine Summer 2012 Digital Edition  

Our Summer 2012 issue.

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