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renovation roundup from kitchens to outdoor spaces

Northern New Mexico

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inspiration ideas resources

marvelous makeovers

two Albuquerque homes show off fresh new looks

work from home

in style

financing

your next remodeling project VOL. 24 NO. 1 WINTER 2018

SuCasaMagazine.com


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Northern New Mexico

ÂŽ

Chris Corrie

inspiration ideas resources

44 homes 44

hitting the right notes

Vision and teamwork guide the redesign of an Albuquerque musician’s home.

52

oh, them bones

A midcentury gem with strong Wrightian influences is updated by and for its next caretakers.

SPECIAL SECTION

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38

renovation roundup

A quartet of reimagined spaces, from kitchens and baths to outdoor living areas.

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Lou Novick

southwestern


AN INSPIRING MARRIAGE of FRENCH-DOOR DESIGN & AMERICAN CRAFTSMANSHIP Monogram’s new French-door wall oven combines the sophisticated style of first-class restaurant kitchens with distinctive details like hand-polished edges and exceptional interior lighting. The result is a new standard in impeccable workmanship and modern refinement.

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Chris Corrie

52 in every issue

12 Inside Su Casa

14 Life+Style Southwest Financing options available for home renovations and remodels; a roundup of fresh farmhouse finds; Steve Thomas bundles up for winter building.

On the cover: The complete transformation of a Southweststyle home in Albuquerque includes a sleek, sexy kitchen and architecturally intriguing details. Read all about this amazing remodel on page 44. Photograph by Chris Corrie.

Visit SuCasaMagazine.com

31 Design Studio ShowHouse Santa Fe goes beyond monochrome; how to design a home office that’s as aesthetically pleasing as it is functional.

42 Enchanted Spaces

From tassels to tufting, nobody gets the “decadent details” better than Moll Anderson.

60 Su Cocina

Take the chill off winter with a James Selby–recommended malbec.

62 Vida Buena 70 Su Libro

Three new books on creative work space design, the fascinating art of collecting, and the Danish concept of hygge.

76 What’s Happening? Live performances, festivals, and events happening around Northern New Mexico this winter.

80 Just Winging Through Tom Smylie looks and listens for woodpeckers, frequent winter visitors to backyard feeders. 6

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66

Noël Sutherland for Santa Fe Clay

A getaway to Seattle, Washington, offers something for everyone; hands-on classes and workshops to keep you busy this season.


Northern New Mexico

inspiration ideas resources

Published by Bella Media, LLC

Publisher Bruce Adams

Managing Editor Amy Gross

Contribuing Editor Amanda N. Pitman

Contributors Moll Anderson, Jessa Cast Ben Ikenson, Keiko Ohnuma James Selby, Tom Smylie Steve Thomas

Art/Production Director B.Y. Cooper

Graphic Designers Allie Salazar Sonja Berthrong

Photography Chris Corrie

Advertising Manager Cheryl Mitchell

Advertising Sales Executive Melissa Salazar For advertising information contact: 505-344-1783

SuCasaMagazine.com For subscriptions, call 818-286-3162

Su Casa Northern New Mexico (ISSN 1094-4562 & USPS # 2-3618) Volume 24, Number 1, Winter 2018. Su Casa Northern New Mexico is published quarterly in March, June, September, and December by Bella Media, LLC at Pacheco Park, 1512 Pacheco St, Ste D-105, Santa Fe, NM 87505, USA, Phone (505) 983-1444. Š Copyright 2018 by Bella Media, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is strictly prohibited. Basic annual subscription rate is $9.95, Canada & Mexico is $23.95, Other international countries is $27.95. U.S. single-copy price is $5.95. Back issues are $6.95 each. Periodicals postage paid at Albuquerque, NM, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send all UAA to CFS. NON-POSTAL AND MILITARY FACILITIES: send address corrections to Su Casa Northern New Mexico P.O. Box 16925, North Hollywood, CA 91615-6925 Subscription Customer Service: Su Casa Northern New Mexico P.O. Box 16925, North Hollywood, CA 91615-6925 Phone (818) 286-3162, Fax (800) 869-0040, ssacs@magserv.com, sucasamagazine.com


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H om e Bu il de rs Asso c ia tio n o f C e nt r a l Ne w M e xic o Boa r d o f D ire c to rs

President: Scott Ashcraft First Vice President: Mike Fietz Second Vice President: Kevin Patton Immediate Past President: Jamie Rayne Associate Vice President: Connor Payne Secretary/Treasurer: Joe Rogillio Associate-at-Large: Brooke Nutting Education Committee, Chair: Diana Lucero Green Build Council, Chair: Antionete Whittaker Home Builders Care, Chair: Doug Keaty Membership Committee, Chair: Rita Stump Parade Committee, Chair: Ron Sisneros Production Builders Council, Chair: Lou Gibney Remodelers Council/Custom Builders Council, Chair: Norm Schreifels Sales & Marketing Council, Chair: Jason Balthrop Builder at Large: Greg Hotaling Honorary Members: Bruce Adams, Dr. Susan Bogus Halter H om e Bu il de rs Asso c ia tio n o f C e nt r a l Ne w M e xic o S ta f f

Executive Vice President: John Garcia Vice President of Operations: Lana McClure Communication & Membership Specialist: Bridgette Madrid Events & Education Specialist: Jill Martinez

presidential award

Copyright Š 2018 by Bella Media, LLC. Bella Media, LLC Pacheco Park 1512 Pacheco St, Ste D-105 Santa Fe, NM 87505 505-983-1444 sucasamagazine.com Please direct editorial queries to amygross@sucasamagazine.com. Su Casa’s cover and text are printed by Publication Printers in Denver, Colorado, on SFI-certified paper. The papers used contain fiber from well-managed forests, meeting EPA guidelines that recommend a minimum 10% post-consumer recovered fiber for coated papers. Inks used contain a percentage of soy base. Our printer meets or exceeds all federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) standards and is a certified member of the Forest Stewardship Council.


resolutions “I will be more green this year.”

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Inside Su Casa

your home, reimagined

O

Publisher

Right: Lovely wrought iron scrollwork speaks to the origins of a 1950s-built home in Albuquerque. Read more about the thoughtful renovation of this wonderful home and its gardens on page 52.

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SU C A S A W I NTER 2018

Chris Corrie

Bruce Adams

DAVID ROBIN

ne of the main reasons Su Casa Northern New Mexico magazine exists is to motivate and inspire. We have done our job when a reader decides to either build or remodel in order to create a home that best fits their needs, design preferences, and lifestyle. It’s true that many of the projects we present in this exercise in fantasy fulfillment are not inexpensive, but that’s what high quality and professional expertise deliver. We can’t all afford every idea presented, but often we can find—and fund—a great project from these pages. Among many other topics featured, this issue of Su Casa provides solutions to improving our homes and finding ways to pay for it. One of the most helpful articles ever in this magazine is the fascinating story about financing and loan options specifically for remodels and renovations. You might be surprised at how very attainable your remodeling dreams can be. Also within these pages is a wonderful selection of different types of space renovations, all done here in New Mexico. Because we are looking at several different projects, you’ll appreciate how each individual homeowner had their particular desires satisfied and how their renovations dramatically improved the enjoyment of their homes. You might even understand your own home’s potential better by seeing how each of these remodels were created and influenced from the original design. Lastly, we delve deep into two magnificent feature homes that underwent comprehensive renovations both inside and out. In one case, the home was basically brought down to the foundation and rebuilt. While this may seem a bit drastic, sometimes it’s more feasible than buying or building an entirely new home in a less desirable location. New to this issue is our Su Casa Spotlight series, where we present a more focused look at some of the firms that can bring magic to your home. Projects work best when the relationship with your professional is open and honest. Spotlights offer you a more in-depth look at each company’s style and personality so that you can determine the best fit for you and your home. Creating your happy home is an artistic and creative process. It’s a new year, and you may find you are considering and rethinking your home. Throughout it all, have fun. This issue is a great place to start that process, so dream big and be smart. 2018 could be the year you make your home even better.


Windows with a Greener Outlook.

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Life+Style Southwest

carpe chroma

Chris Corrie

When Sheila Walth finally took the plunge and purchased a small townhome in Santa Fe, the city she’d visited and loved for over 30 years, her new pied-à-terre was crying out for updating, architectural reimagining, and most importantly, color. A full renovation of the compact spaces ensued, with Walth enlisting the expertise of Santa Fe interior designer/architect Gloria Devan. All traces of the townhome’s neutral palette were eliminated, replaced with fun, feminine hues. Tropical pinks, oranges, limes, and turquoises now suffuse every room, including the kitchen, where a cheerful and eye-catching Talavera tile backsplash is wrought into a checkerboard pattern. “No matter how dreary the day is,” says Walth, “the kitchen never feels dreary!” Read more about renovation of this wonderful townhome on page 79. Interior Designer/Architect: Gloria Devan, Wiseman & Gale & Duncan Interiors Tile: Statements In Tile/Lighting/Kitchens/Flooring, statementsinsantafe.com

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Wide-open Spaces Meets Connected Living Just 25 minutes north of Albuquerque, you’ll discover Mariposa— a community surrounded by thousands of acres of preserved and protected lands. 2,200 acre Mariposa Preserve NW Loop Rd

LEED-certified Community Center Fitness Center & Movement Studio Indoor & Outdoor Pools Community Parks, Sport Fields, Playground, Ramadas & Picnic Areas Nearby freeways, top-rated schools, accessible medical & shopping

Unser Blvd

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Multiple Builders & Custom Home Neighborhoods Homes from the $240s

Stay connected, visit liveinmariposa.com © Mariposa 2017. All rights reserved. The information contained herein is not intended to constitute an offering in violation of the law of any jurisdiction. Obtain any required disclosures or other documents for the property required by federal, state law or local law, and read before signing anything. No federal or state agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this project. Although Mariposa East, LP and its affiliates have made reasonable efforts to ensure the accuracy of the above information neither Mariposa East, LP nor its affiliates guarantee the above information, and information should be independently verified.


Life+Style Southwest

by Ben Ikenson

home sweeter home local financing options for remodeling and renovation projects

Home improvement and remodeling projects require imagination, planning, and financing.

N

ext to a home purchase, renovations and improvements often represent the second biggest investments that homeowners make. While these projects add comfort, style, efficiency, and even raw market value to their initial investment, they can add up. Fortunately, many lending institutions and credit unions offer a variety of financing options that can make the decision to remodel a bit less daunting. From fixed-rate second mortgage home equity loans, to smaller home improvement and solar installation loans, there are plenty of ways to make home sweet home even sweeter. One increasingly popular financing option is via the FHA’s 203k program, which offers a low-interest, tax-deductible, single-close loan to borrowers who qualify for an FHA loan—some 80 percent of Americans—while eliminating their need to qualify for a second loan. Through the program, homeowners can obtain considerable financing to address almost type of home improvement: kitchen and bath remodels, handicap accessibility components, an array of energy efficiency upgrades, and more. Other, broader financing options, such as those offered by Peoples Bank, soon to be called Hillcrest Bank (bankingunusual.com), can also help homeowners considering remodeling. “We offer loans for remodel and construction, with terms that can go out to 12 months with interest payments only for those first 12 months before they convert to terms of a permanent loan for 15 or 30 years,” says Vice President Michael Padilla. If you’re a veteran, there’s a suite of options available to you through the VA. “Veterans can get great loan options for minor renovations and re16

SU C A S A W I NTER 2018

models with a VA renovation loan,” says Lisa Cummings, a loan originator for Fairway Independent Mortgage Corporation (fairwayindependentmc.com). “For more comprehensive projects that might entail gutting and rehabbing an entire house or building a new home, a VA one-time close loan allows them to combine a construction loan with their permanent loan and still have the great features of a VA loan.” There is also, of course, the option of leveraging existing equity to address remodeling and renovation projects, a worthy consideration given the recent rise in area home values. A home equity loan may be a good option for large, one-time expenses, according to Lorri Clifton, a mortgage loan officer and home equity portfolio supervisor for U.S. Eagle Federal Credit Union (useagle.org). “A home equity loan allows a homeowner to borrow against the equity in their home to use for those large, one-time expenses,” she explains. “With a home equity loan, you receive one lump sum and make fixed monthly payments over a 15-year term.” Alternately, a home equity line of credit (HELOC) can provide access to credit up front without accruing interest until the funds are actually used. With a HELOC, says Clifton, “During the five-year draw period, your payments are based on a 15-year term. Should a final draw on the 60th month be taken, the balance will be amortized over a new 15-year term, keeping the payments at a minimum.” According to Clifton, since interest is paid on the amount borrowed rather than on the full credit line, this is a great option for homeowners wanting to do several renovation projects over a course of time. continued on page 22


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Life+Style Southwest

by Steve Thomas

deal with it winter building has its challenges—no matter where you live

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e are currently building a small, elegant studio on an island in Maine. The island is accessible only by skiff, so all tools, materials, and supplies have to be brought over by small barge, unloaded on the beach, and then hauled up to the build site on the forks of a tractor. It’s challenging . . . and even more so as the wind picks up, daylight dwindles, and temperatures drop. Winter building—whether on an island in Maine or a mountainside in New Mexico—is not for the faint of heart. It requires preparation, persistence, the right clothing and equipment, and often a major attitude adjustment. A couple years ago, while renovating my little Victorian Shingle-style house in the Maine fishing village where I now live, I muscled up a stack of siding, a nail gun, a saw, extension cords, and an air hose to the top of the scaffolding. As I ascended the ladder with the last load, a piercing gust of wind sent the clapboards spiraling over the house and into the parking lot of the post office next door. It was about eight degrees, and with the wind chill well below zero, all I really wanted to do was just get in my truck and go someplace warm—like

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Winter building is not for the faint of heart. It requires preparation, persistence, the right clothing and equipment, and often a major attitude adjustment. Just the other day, while working on the island, the northwest wind kicked up to about 40 mph, turning the harbor into a mass of whitecaps and rolling swells. The temperature was dropping, too. Eyeing the sea and the NOAA weather forecast we worked a couple more hours then headed across the harbor. The sky darkened and the wind kicked up for another rollicking blast. “Oh brother,” I thought, as we tied up and unloaded the boat. “And it’s only November.” So why bother? Well, when you have a project to complete, you’re obliged to keep at it. But there’s also for me a certain pride in being able

Think your daily commute is a hassle? Be thankful you’re not Steve Thomas, for whom getting to a job site is a little more complicated than scraping ice off the windshield.

to do high-quality work in adverse conditions. To do this you have to bend to the forces of nature, and not fight them. Believe me, I’m no hero; there are some days I won’t cross the harbor. But ultimately it’s about the incredible beauty you can witness as a builder, outside in all the moods of winter. In New Mexico, where I did a winter project a half dozen years ago, I could look up from my saw or nail gun to see the wind ripping clouds of snow off of the high peaks of the Sangre de Cristos; here in Maine we catch the winking lights of the village, offshore fishing boats ghosting through the sea smoke, and the last of the rose sunset on Marshall Point Lighthouse. But I don’t always wax so poetical. The winter before last I was heading over to the island to work on another project when I was defeated— by the wind, the cold, and the ice in the harbor. At the town dock I complained to a fisherman shoveling snow out of his skiff. He looked out at me from under the hood of his Carhartts, his nose running into his beard. “It’s winter,” he growled. “Deal with it.” Steve Thomas is a home renovation expert. The former host of This Old House and Renovation Nation, he now heads up Steve Thomas Builders.

Steve Thomas

Steve Thomas

Douglas Merriam

Hawaii. Instead I climbed down, retrieved my clapboards, threw away the broken ones, and went back to work.


WO O DS

photography : © Wendy McEahern | Architectural Design and Construction : Woods Design Builders | Interior Design : Violante & Rochford Interiors

DE SIGN | BU I L DER S

CONSIS T E N T LY T H E BE S T Designing and building the finest homes in Santa Fe for over forty years WO O DS D E S I G N B U I LD E R S 302 Catron Street, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501

505.988.2413

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Life+Style Southwest

by Amanda N. Pitman

farmhouse fabulous country without the kitsch

Farmhouse style has always had its charms—warm, cozy, and homey, with furniture and décor that exude a quiet simplicity. We’ve rounded up a few farmhouse finds that add just the right amount of country chic.

Aimee LaCalle Seed Wallpaper Ja Soon Kim, a Santa Fe–based, award-winning photographer, is the mastermind behind this beautiful, subtle print from Aimee LaCalle’s Fall 2017 collection. Neutral with a touch of color, this wallpaper is pre-pasted for easy installation and is ideal for a bedroom, a nursery, or even the kitchen. $150 per 2 x 12' strip, Aimee LaCalle, aimeelacalle.com

Blake Armchair Sleek modern lines and farmhouse style come together flawlessly in the Blake Armchair. Comfortable upholstered seats in leather or fabric with a curved back rail add a touch of luxury to any dining area. $390 and up, Ethan Allen, ethanallen.com

Modern Farmhouse Industrial Bar Cart Cocktail hour is served with flair on this distressed wood and metal bar cart in a sharp dark gray. Small wheels and locking casters allow for easy relocation. Holds approximately eight stemmed wine glasses. $130, Bed Bath & Beyond, bedbathandbeyond.com

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Native Stone® Farmhouse Kitchen Sink Say goodbye to the dated farmhouse sink and hello to its stunning upgrade. This farmhousestyle sink is made modern with sustainable Native Stone® and a single-basin apron front, and is available in three luxe finishes. Shown here in Ash. Price upon request, Santa Fe By Design, santafebydesign.com


Magnolia Home by Joanna Gaines Parker Bench From her new line, Magnolia Home, Joanna Gaines ups the ante with this high back, pub-style bench in a chimney finish. A perfect statement piece for the entryway or anywhere you might need a little extra seating. See store for details, Furniture Superstore, furnituresuperstorenm.com

Metal 4-Tier Cart Perfect for indoor storage and styling or outdoor gardening, this multifunctional four-tiered cart comes with six small, separate bins, allowing for a variety of purposes. Casters make this fairly large piece easy to move and rearrange on a whim. $385, Vintage Market & Design, vintagemarketanddesign.com

Lexi Sideboard The Lexi Sideboard, shown here in a light gray wash, is a large, four-door, glass-paned display piece, leaning toward more traditional farmhouse in style. Handcrafted in Mexico and made from ponderosa pine, it can be painted in various colors to fit your home’s aesthetic. $795, El Paso Imports, elpasoimports.com

Sabine Hill Sevilla Tile Handmade, completely customizable, and part of the green building movement, ceramic tiles from Sabine Hill are stylish and unique. The Sevilla tile, shown here, is available in a variety of subtle hues to complement any farmhouse dĂŠcor. $33.75 per square foot, Statements In Tile/Lighting/ Kitchens/Flooring, statementsinsantafe.com SUCASAMAGAZINE.COM

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continued from page 16

from dream to reality Tired of that dated bathroom? Ready for a backyard worthy of entertaining? Talk to one of these experts about financing your home improvements. Academy Mortgage Corporation Academy Mortgage offers FHA 203k Renovation Loans, designed for those wanting to finance both the mortgage to purchase or refinance a fixer-upper and the funds needed to repair and remodel all in a single close loan, as well as FHA Streamline 203k Loans to address mainly cosmetic and minor home improvements ($0–$35,000 and no structural repairs). academymortgage.com Homewise Homewise offers fixed-rate home improvement loans and can help finance energy-efficient and water-saving home improvements, routine maintenance, and emergency repairs. homewise.org New Mexico Bank & Trust In addition to its various mortgage loans, New Mexico Bank & Trust offers fixed-rate Home Equity Loans (with no prepayment penalty) and Home Equity Line of Credit options to help fund ongoing renovation expenses. nmb-t.com Sandia Area Federal Credit Union Sandia Area Federal Credit Union offers fixedrate Home Equity Loans and Home Equity Line of Credit options with interest rates that are often lower than a standard credit card and generally tax-deductible. sandia.org

Metris Kitchen Faucet

Sandia Laboratory Federal Credit Union Sandia Laboratory Federal Credit Union’s Home Equity Credit Lines allow approved customers to borrow what they need, “pay it back, and borrow again without having to reapply.” Borrowers can take advantage of their available credit with payments recalculated after each draw and with terms up to 20 years. slfcu.org

B E S T. D E C I S I O N . E V E R . When it comes to your dream home – making sure it is perfect means tons of tough decisions. Let our knowledgeable product experts relieve the

State Employees Credit Union State Employees Credit Union offers Home Equity Loans and Home Equity Line of Credit options to provide affordable financing that can be accessed indefinitely for virtually any purpose. Once approved, there’s no need to reapply. Borrowers only pay dividends on what they borrow, and those dividends may be tax deductible. secunm.org

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Washington Federal Washington Federal offers an All-in-One Remodeling Loan based on the estimated value of a home after the remodel. After an appraisal is done, the entire project is underwritten at one time with a permanent, fixed interest rate that can be locked in before the work is started. washingtonfederal.com


OPENING DOORS for you!

Peggy Wheeler 505.450.5211 peggy.wheeler@comcast.net

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Special Advertising Section

spotlight to detail; she’s a stickler when it comes to getting it right. “I tell my guys, imagine this is your house. Now do it better!” Even in the middle of a project Kay can’t stop thinking about how to improve something. “Kay worked with us to get the most value for our money and help us stay on budget,” say the Jaegers, former Reliance Construction customers. “We had complete confidence in her ability, her honesty, and her ethics. We are very happy with our beautiful custom home and our experience with Kay Beason and Reliance Construction. We highly recommend her.” Of course building custom homes is a business and a career, but it’s Kay’s heart that drives her to produce a home that is a work of art. Vigas, corbels, and rough hewn timbers are a few of the elements that Kay likes to work with in her projects.

Darrell DeVantier

A

native New Mexican, Kay Beason comes from a family of builders, decorators, interior designers, and artists. When she established her company, Reliance Construction, over 30 years ago, Kay knew that her family would be a valuable asset to the company. Today her family works alongside her in every facet of the business. After working as a property damage insurance adjuster and a career in mortgage banking and real estate, Kay decided to try her hand at residential renovation. Initially she only planned to restore her Nob Hill rental properties, but the neighbors in the area were so impressed with her work that they asked her to renovate their homes. Before long Kay had restored 13 homes in Nob Hill. “Restoration takes time, patience, skill, and a lot of love,” she says. Her Southwestern roots run deep and feed her love of Southwest architecture. Vigas, latillas, corbels, carved wood, and brick are the elements that add just the right touch to a Southwestern home—which is Kay’s specialty. “It’s all about how it feels,” she explains with a smile. Reliance has built from Texas to Montana, but New Mexico is home to this company. Reliance has won Parade of Homes awards and has had homes featured in magazine and newspaper articles and even on HGTV, but Kay says nothing is as great as handing the keys to a client who is thrilled with their custom home. While her passion is for Southwest architecture Kay realizes that it’s necessary to answer a homeowner’s desires, and that might mean other styles that are trending. She works with each client one-on-one to establish just the right design and fit for them. The process can be lengthy but is always well worth it in the end, due in large part to Kay’s attention

A warm welcoming entrance utilizes the Southwest styling that Reliance Construction is known for.


© Darrell DeVantier

~ AWA R D -W I N N I N G B U I L D E R ~

~ Building energy efficient homes in New Mexico for over 30 years ~

KAY BEASON ~ 505.379.3877 ~ beasonka@icloud.com Albuquerque ~ Rio Rancho ~ Los Ranchos ~ Placitas ~ Santa Fe

Kay Beason

See our gated community in the heart of beautiful Los Ranchos de Albuquerque.

A CO M PA N Y O F C R A F T S M E N B U I L D I N G T O S U I T YO U R TA S T E


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spotlight

I

n exactly the way a house is built, Joe Boyden started from the ground up, working in the construction field from the age of 16. Today, after having defined and refined his homebuilding skills for over three decades, this extraordinary custom homebuilder has grown Homes by Joe Boyden into one of New Mexico’s premier residential design/build firms. “When your name is on the product you take it very seriously,” says Melinda Bowen, Director of Sales and Marketing for Homes by Joe Boyden. Indeed. Joe personally oversees, from start to finish, the construction of nearly 100 homes per year. It’s not unusual to see Joe around the construction site running the backhoe, operating a Bobcat, or wielding a hammer. Each project is as important as the next, and all of them have to be right. “A lot of builders forget to finish,” says Joe. “We are finishers!” Joe and his team firmly believe that because all families are unique, with different needs and personalities, every home should reflect that individuality inside and out—today, tomorrow, and for years to come. It’s that “people first” philosophy that has made Homes by Joe Boyden successful in building beautiful homes and lasting relationships over the years. With his skill in design and construction and his unfailing determination, this “good ol’ boy” has grown his business into the solid, reputable, and well-respected company that it is today, building locally and statewide in numerous communities. “Flexibility is the name of the game when designing and building,” says Joe, who works with each client to customize the perfect floor plan and believes sincerely that a custom home is within reach for everyone. Whether your budget is $200k or $2 million, Joe can make it a reality. This kitchen earned Homes by Joe Boyden a Best Kitchen award in the 2015 Homes of Enchantment Parade.


spotlight

A

merican Clay was founded by Croft Elsaesser (President and CEO) in 2002 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Tired of working with techniques and finishes with toxic impact, Croft began using natural plasters. He loved building with materials from history, particularly clay, but wanted to make the product he was using even better. In 2002, after two years of experimentation, American Clay, a natural earth interior plaster, became a viable, massproduced product. Today, the company is based out of Albuquerque, New Mexico, and continues to offer a healthy and creative solution for beautiful interiors. “Our mission at American Clay is to bring universal awareness to the value of environmentally conscious products in indoor spaces,” says Croft. “The gorgeous, sustainable clay plasters offer a nontoxic alternative to paint and other plasters for residential and commercial interiors.” One hundred percent natural and completely nontoxic, American Clay plasters eliminate the need to repaint year after year; resist dirt and grime; and are easy to install, repair, and clean up. The colors resist fading due to natural mineral pigments. The unique blend of clay and sand aggregates that make up the plasters are not only durable, they absorb odors, resist mold, and help to buffer humidity in an indoor space. The new Forté line of plasters is a fortified plaster option for those looking for added durability. American Clay walls can be found around the country and the world, in local businesses, and in numerous featured houses in the Albuquerque Parade of Homes. With products simply unparalleled in quality, health, beauty, and value, American Clay looks forward to being part of a more sustainable future.

Shown here: Forté base; color: Seabrook; sponge compression. Right: Plaster: Porcelina™; color: Suglarloaf White; trowel compression.

zero-voc • non-toxic • absorbs odors • humidity buffering • easy repair & clean up • resists dirt, grime & mold

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Bring Your

Walls to Life

NeveR paint again

With 8 plaster finishes in a variety of textures and 239 faderesistant colors, American Clay plasters create a space of natural warmth and beauty incomparable to any other material.

americanclay.com | 1-866-404-1634


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spotlight

S

electing the right furniture and décor to create the home you have always wanted can be challenging without the help of an interior designer. Sukhmani Home, a local furniture and home décor store, grew from an idea to help others create Sukhmani—perfect bliss—in their own homes. Sukhmani Home is not your usual furniture and home décor store. From the paint and the lighting to the placement of the exquisite furnishings and décor, it feels like you have walked into another world. You will instantly appreciate the feeling of Sukhmani. Sat Gurumukh Singh Khalsa and Hari Mander Jot Singh Khalsa, brothers who own, Sukhmani Home, travel around the world to carefully select each beautifully crafted piece displayed in their Nob Hill location. “We want our furnishing or décor to be a loved centerpiece in your home,” says Hari Mander Jot. Indeed, you will find beautiful reclaimed furniture and architectural pieces, as well as art and textiles from across the world and throughout the ages. The furniture is from the past, but it has been transformed to fit any style of home. Every piece is an heirloom with an amazing story of its own. The craftsmanship of the furniture speaks for itself, and so does the customer service—it is truly one of a kind. “We believe our customers should have the perfect experience when buying from us,” says Sat Gurumukh. Sukhmani Home will even bring furniture or décor to your home to help with your decision. With 20 years of experience in the furniture and home décor business and 15 years in architectural design, Sat Gurumukh and Hari Mander Jot can help you turn your home into your sanctuary. Sukhmani Home is located in Nob Hill on Amherst Drive across the street from Sukhmani Jewelry. You will find their legacy of excellent customer service flows from one shop to the other. Come in and experience the joy of finding your perfect bliss.

Reclaimed furniture and textiles from around the world are the hallmarks of Sukhmani Home.


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spotlight

F

amily owned and operated since 2012, Stonewood Flooring is a far cry today from its humble beginnings. Joseph and Karen Atencio started their business in an empty warehouse with picnic tables for desks. Fast-forward five years, to a dedicated staff and an incredible flooring and design center built on a wealth of experience in the industry.  Stonewood Flooring designed their showroom to be a place where homeowners, custom homebuilders, contractors, interior designers, and house flippers could comfortably view the many product options available in sample form as well as installed, to help with visualization. They carry designer lines as well as value-oriented choices, in a showroom constantly changing in response to current trends.   Experienced design staff is always on hand to provide customers with knowledge-based assistance in selecting the right materials for their projects, products that include solid and engineered wood; porcelain, ceramic, glass, natural stone, and concrete tiles; and various carpet options. Everything needed to complete a well-executed and beautifully designed project can be found in one place. Stonewood recently expanded its knowledge base to large-scale commercial projects, which has added to the company’s strength and growth. Regardless of the type of project, however, what Stonewood is most proud of and works hard to maintain is the loyalty of their customers. “When you start something good, keep a good attitude, and do the right things, good things happen,” says Development Manager Matt Atencio. Everyone is welcome at Stonewood. “Come, bring your lunch, and hang out with us!” says Matt. If that doesn’t sound like your typical flooring company, it’s because Stonewood is anything but typical. The process of choosing just the right product can be stressful. Stonewood makes it fun.

What will you create?

Shown: Stardust™ Cosmos, Glam

Origami Vesper Twist in ivory, and Shinju Reef in Kumamoto by Lunada Bay Tile.

www.walkerzanger.com

3700 Rutledge Rd NE . Albuquerque . NM . 87109 505-938-3125 | stonewoodflooringllc.com


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spotlight

Y Get ready for Spring! Now is the time to get a head start on creating your perfect outdoor living space.

Custom Patios & Decorative Concrete

Fire Pits & Water Features

Outdoor Kitchens and BBQ’s & Living Areas

our home is your sanctuary, and Lifescapes of New Mexico is here to assist you in making the most of the place where you dwell. Lifescapes, a local, familyrun enterprise, creates custom outdoor spaces for living, relaxing, and entertaining, tailoring unique designs to your space, whether large or small. With a practiced eye and years of experience, the expert team at Lifescapes works with you each step from idea to completion to realize your vision, offering superior customer service at every stage. Their licensed contractor craftsmen do it all, from building gas and wood-burning fire pits and fireplaces to water features, accent walls, lighting, and hardscapes. In all of their custom projects, Lifescapes uses superlative materials, including Paverstone, concrete, brick, and New Mexico’s finest native flagstone. Whether you’re dreaming of a state-of-the-art outdoor kitchen, a charming walkway to a native plant garden, or an intimate arrangement of dramatically lit bancos where you can experience New Mexico’s sunsets and stars with good friends and fine wine, a landscape designed by Lifescapes is designed to accommodate the lifestyle you desire and deserve. Let Lifescapes show you—as they have with many satisfied customers—what they can do to beautify and add value to your home. Lifescapes’ competitive pricing, experience, and know-how places their work in the realm of the extraordinary.

Outdoor Lighting, Landscaping & Xeriscapes

LIFESCAPES Creative & Modern Landscaping

Contact Us For Your Free Consultation Today!

lifescapesnm.com • 505-350-6956

“I have absolutely the most respect for the work that Lifescapes did. And I am very picky. I especially appreciated the consideration given to my pet during demolition and construction. My home was built in the 1970s, and I learned it’s never too late to re-blossom.” —Deb Grasser, customer


Design Studio

photographs by Lou Novick

The Master Bedroom Jeff Fenton, Chris Martinez, Trish Spencer, and Amy Leary, Reside Home

ShowHouse Santa Fe mod + (mostly) monochrome

I The Study Patti Stivers and Virginia Smith, Stivers & Smith Interiors

n its fifth year, ShowHouse Santa Fe upped its game with a real challenge to the 30+ participating interior designers, artists, and landscape architects. A benefit for Dollars4Schools, the 2017 ShowHouse (the Sol y Luna residence, offered by Santa Fe Properties) embraced the theme “West of Contemporary: A Journey in Black and White.” Each design team was free to interpret the theme however they liked in their assigned space—within the vernacular of a 10,000-square-foot, classic Pueblo home complete with kiva fireplaces, vigas, and other Santa Fe–style finishes. The designers planned their spaces for months, furiously executed them in less than a week, and finally unveiled to the public for two weeks in October the wholly reimagined main residence of the estate. The results were nothing short of spectacular. From an art-filled grand dining room to a “black, white, and red all over” study, the finished indoor and outdoor spaces exuded a soft contemporary freshness without feeling at all chilly, the unifying neutrality of the suggested black and white palette punctuated by carefully considered color. In these stunning photographs, we look back at the impressive, imaginative 2017 ShowHouse Santa Fe.—Amy Gross SUCASAMAGAZINE.COM

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The Exploratorium/Guest Bedroom Matt and Heather French, French & French Interiors The High Bar Jessica Savage, Savage Designs

The finished spaces exuded a soft contemporary freshness, the unifying neutrality of the black and white palette punctuated in each room by carefully considered color.

The Living Room Megan Smith, Robin Smith, and Janen Korth Smith Design, LLC

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Building with Flow... Illuminating, Sustaining, Inspiring.

2017

F

Featured Builder

The meaning of flow...to move steadily and continuously in a current or stream. At Flow Homes we bring the use of air, light, water, energy, sound, matter and how you live in your home together into one fluid motion to create the home of your dreams. By using the “Flow� model your home will be in tune with you and the environment.

Call today to schedule your personal tour of our exquisite custom homes!

(505) 281-1082 | www.flowhomesnm.com


Design Studio

by Keiko Ohnuma

home office work-around

Wishing to create the feeling of “going” to work, a homeowner designed a highly functional home office into a casita renovation. Designed and built by Praxis Ltd Co, the workspace includes ample shelving and a rolling desk that can be repositioned. Also by Praxis, a small but highly efficient work space carved out of a corner (below, right).

Laurie Allegretti

knowing how you create is the key to deciding where to do it

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Laurie Allegretti

F

orty years ago, few American homes had them. Today, most need them. “We find that almost all clients want a work space in the home,” says architect Gabriel Browne, AIA, of Santa Fe’s Praxis Architects (praxisdesignbuild.com). “But what that means for everyone is really different.” Naturally, a musician needs a very different work space than a graphic designer, while an accountant’s office might have needs very different than those of a children’s book author. For the most part, though, the universal requirements of the home office are a flat work space, adequate task lighting, and as much storage as is available. You may have the luxury of an unused bedroom to convert, but in in many cases, there may be no more than a closet to spare, or part of a kitchen. “The most important thing is a comfortable place to sit down and work,” says interior designer Chandler Prewitt of Chandler Prewitt Design (chandlerprewitt.com) in Santa Fe. That may mean removing a couple of under-counter cabinets in a kitchen to create desk space. Keep back support in mind if you’re thinking about perching on a barstool, Prewitt adds, because if you’re not comfortable, you aren’t going to be productive. And don’t forget to add a hole somewhere to tuck that tangle of plugs and cords away from your feet. With lighting, says Browne, make sure it points from more than one direction, to prevent throwing shadows over your work. Another often-overlooked detail is dedicating at least one vertical surface to what Prewitt calls a working wall—a cork board, peg board, magnetic wallpaper, dry erase board, or chalkboard paint wall. “Without it, things end up


Above: Filled with personal touches such as artwork and décor, Mostly Home owner Carole Newsom’s home office also has space where she can spread out and her kids can do homework.

Amadeus Leitner

Robert Reck

An elegant and feminine home office space by Chandler Prewitt Design uses furniture, texture, and carefully chosen décor and artwork to create a feeling of beauty and peace.

prefers having her office integrated into her home, including a dining table and chairs where she can spread out projects or her kids can do homework. “I want it to feel like a home,” she says, “so I’ve added décor items like artwork, nice window coverings, family portraits.” This integrated style does not include putting an office in her bedroom, where, as she says, “work is staring you in the face.” Whether your goal is a sprawling room with bountiful storage and creativity-inspiring views or simply an efficient space carved from a closet, your home office should be comfortable enough to inspire working, but with enough functionality to get the job done.

Jim Gross

in different piles,” he says, “and I think people work better when they can get a snapshot view.” Storage space becomes more critical as your office space shrinks. Carole Newsom, a personal shopper who recently opened Mostly Home (mostlyhome.com) furnishings store in Albuquerque, believes storage is the single most important consideration in staying organized and productive. If you are a person who finds clutter distracting, look for a way to stash office supplies, printers, and reading materials out of sight. Built-in units are ideal, Newsom says, but boxes or baskets work, too; in her own home office she employs a lingerie chest that matches her home décor. Which leads to the most important consideration in designating a space for your office: Do you want it within the heart of your home, or completely separate? “It depends on how people work,” says Prewitt, who created a home office for himself and never used it, realizing he preferred to work in the kitchen or dining room, “where I’m comfortable already.” But for many people, physically separating home from work is essential, says Browne, who had one client put his office in a casita so he could make a daily “commute” into the yard. It’s a mindset thing. “Even if it’s a closet,” says Browne, “the idea of being able to close the door and keep it separate” can make a big difference in getting down to work and then leaving it behind. By contrast, Newsom

36

Above: The owner of this sleek, midcentury modern–style custom desk has an enviable view. With minimal clutter, it’s the perfect spot for creative thinking.

SU C A S A W I NTER 2018


by Jessa Cast

Design Studio

renovation roundup four spaces, four makeovers

M

ost people have that one room in their house they’d love to change—the kitchen, where the appliances are in all the wrong places. The master bath that barely fits one person. Or closets that are too small and narrow to store anything. Whatever the eyesore or deficiency, remodeling even one space can make all the difference in the value and enjoyment of a home. Read on to see how four remodeling pros upgraded their clients’ homes—and happiness.

before

Phil Madrid

After a successful bathroom remodel, Ric Rutherford’s clients brought him back to tackle their dark, outdated kitchen—but this Rutherford Design renovation was more than cosmetic. To improve the floorplan, Rutherford knocked out a wall, moved the oven stack and the refrigerator, and installed an island with seating. The tile floor was replaced with engineered wood flooring. White cabinets, under-cabinet lighting, and pendants now brighten the room, while a custom butcher block counter serves as a centerpiece and warm focal point. His clients loved the dramatic change. “This is a new look for the house,” Rutherford notes. “Now they can easily access everything.” Contractor: Rutherford Design & Construction; Lighting: Ferguson Bath, Kitchen & Lighting Gallery, ferguson.com; Hard surface countertops: Villanueva Granite; Cabinetry: Sunset Cabinets; Tile: Arizona Tile; Flooring: Artistic Concepts; Appliances: Builders Source Appliance Gallery

Ric Rutherford

let there be light

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Above: Raised beds laid a foundation around which all landscaping could be added. Flagstone adds a natural feel to the space, lushly filled with xeric and pollinator-friendly plants.

Above: Lightening all finishes and surfaces and replacing black appliances with sparkling stainless steel transformed this kitchen from dark to light. A slight change of footprint angling the double ovens created better flow.

paint it green Their new home built, a Santa Fe couple reached out to Phil Madrid of Desert Rose Landscape & Maintenance and asked him to landscape a barren courtyard. For the creative Madrid, the bare dirt yard was a canvas. The clients requested a low-maintenance space they could sit in, with a flagstone patio and raised planters. The rest was up to him. “They wanted to enjoy a cup of coffee, get that morning sun,” says Madrid. Respecting the desert, he selected low-water flora. Using fragrant xeric and pollinator-friendly plants, he created a three-dimensional garden retreat that may look lush, but is a snap to maintain. Landscape design: Desert Rose Landscape & Maintenance; Flagstone and moss rock: New Mexico Stone; Plants: Agua Fria Nursery, Plants of the Southwest, Payne’s Nursery


505.890.5000

DESIGN

BUILD

A R C H I T E C T U R E UNDER ONE ROOF

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bathing beauty How does one reconcile a modern sense of style in an old Santa Fe home? This bathroom cried out for an updated, clean look and more storage. Erica Ortiz Berke of Neubleu Interiors opted for bold yellow subway tile in the shower for a modernized look, and Tabarka tile in the recessed shelf and on the backsplash for a rustic, Southwestern feel. To bridge the two styles, Ortiz Berke selected functional walnut cabinets, a floating vanity, and preserved the original Saltillo floor tile. Same space, better utilized. “It’s got character, charm, and still feels updated,” she says. Interior design: Neubleu Interiors; Contractor: Building Adventures Unlimited; Tile & Lighting: Statements In Tile/Lighting/Kitchens/ Flooring, statementsinsantafe.com; Cabinetry: Wood Design; Plumbing fixtures: Santa Fe By Design; Countertops: Captain Marble

Kate Russell

Right: Gorgeous new cabinetry, dark countertops, and an undermount sink instantly modernized this Santa Fe bathroom. The shower’s rich gold subway tile (visible in the mirror) pays homage to the classic Southwestern style of the home.

before

Douglas Maahs

now they’re cooking

Above: A colorful patterned backsplash, bright red countertops, glass-front cabinetry, and a cool retro dining bar add pizzazz to a formerly neutral kitchen.

before 40

SU C A S A W I NTER 2018

Douglas Maahs’s clients hated their dated kitchen. Passé tile and unreachable cabinet doors were vexing, to say the least. The owners wanted to freshen up their kitchen with a more contemporary look, but it needed to mesh with their home’s Santa Fe style. Award-winning D Maahs Construction redesigned the kitchen with textured melamine cabinets, colorful tile, and hot red countertops that updated the room and blended perfectly with the home’s Southwestern flair. Hardware on the overhead light was nickel-plated to match the fixtures. “I enjoyed combining the elements of metal, color, and texture with the Santa Fe style,” says Maahs. “The kitchen is now very multifaceted.” Contractor & Cabinetry: D Maahs Construction; Tile: Statements In Tile/Lighting/Kitchens/Flooring, statementsinsantafe.com; Appliances: Builders Source Appliance Gallery; Countertops: Counter Intelligence; Lighting: Form + Function


STATEMENTS SUCASAMAGAZINE.COM

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Enchanted Spaces

by Moll Anderson

P

Beall + Thomas Photography

Beall + Thomas Photography

finishing touches make all the difference

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Hit the ceiling. If you’re going for a very clean and tonal look consider painting your ceiling a color that might add a bit of pizazz to your room. For the room above I wanted to lead the eye upward to the beauty of the chandelier. I also wanted to add a little jewelry to the chandelier, so this medallion (left) was the perfect choice—a bit of paint, 14-karat gold leaf, and voilà!

Get plastered! Find yourself a plaster master and then create a deeply layered effect with metallic paints and plaster in rich, seductive tones that will make you swoon every time you enter your room. Plaster works in any style home, from old world to modern, depending on the technique.

Beall + Thomas Photography

it’s all in the decadent details

eople always want to know why my homes and the homes I’ve done for clients have that little something extra special. They can’t put their finger on it. All they know is that when they walk into the front door, the home speaks to them, even if it isn’t their style. That’s the greatest compliment to me as a life stylist. My goal is always to help people create and live their best possible lives. When you’re thinking of remodeling your space, the key to transforming your house into a home is to have the courage to make a change. Create a picture in your mind of each space. Imagine how you want the room to function, then how you want the room to feel, and most important, how the room and your home will reflect who you are and how you want to live. Within each space lie endless possibilities. I am able to visualize a finished space from the moment I walk into a room. I didn’t realize at first that this was not something everyone can do, but now I understand that what may be natural for me may take a little more inspiration for others. Each person is unique, each home is unique, and finding the inspiration to make your home uniquely yours is a gift. When planning a remodel or decorating project the focus is often on the big picture. But don’t lose sight of the details that will take your home and your space from now to wow!—the walls, floors, counters, paint, furnishing, fabrics, and trims. It’s the difference between a well-designed space and one that seems not quite finished, like something is missing. Think of the details as the exclamation point to the BAM!


Beall + Thomas Photography

Pillow talk. If you want people to talk about your pillows, you gotta give them something to talk about! When I design a pillow for a room I pull all the fabric colors with the textures that will create the mood I want to present. The five separate pieces of this moss green and salmon velvet pillow (above) give a lush, rich look when put together. I layered two different tassel fringe trims to create a more regal feel.

A story behind every door.

Michael Gomez Photography

We build custom doors, gates and furniture — by hand — using reclaimed wood and architectural antiques from around the world.

lapuertaoriginals.com

Extradinary N  L A W D • B

Moll Anderson

Homes & Remodels

©corrie photography

Life stylist, inspirational interior designer, and philanthropist Moll Anderson is an Emmy Award–winning television personality and the New York Times best-selling author of five books, including Change Your Home, Change Your Life™ with Color: What’s Your Color Story?

D M. R | .. DiegoHandcraftedHomes.com

Su Casa Ad May 2015 1/6pg.indd 1

5/14/15 3:28 43PM SUCASAMAGAZINE.COM


hitting the right notes

vision and teamwork guide the redesign of an Albuquerque musician’s home

Nary a trace of Wendy Beach’s former Southwestern-style home remains following a lengthy and transformative remodel. Now open, light, and decidedly modern, the home embraces contemporary finishes and architecturally interesting design. A dramatic, wood and steel staircase leads to the newly added second floor. 44

SU C A S A W I NTER 2018


by Keiko Ohnuma

photographs by Chris Corrie

R

arely will a musical ensemble get it right in just one take; there’s always a little tweaking to the score before the tracks are finally laid down. Following her divorce, jazz and blues musician Wendy Beach bought herself an older home in Albuquerque’s Altura Park neighborhood in August of 2015, with plans to remodel it a few months later. No one imagined then—not Chris Hanks, the designer friend she called for advice; Matt Mullet, the builder he introduced her to; nor Beach herself—that the project would swell into a complete transformation that would last 16 months, leaving nothing original but the foundation and outside walls.

No one imagined that Wendy Beach’s remodel would swell into a complete transformation that would last 16 months, leaving nothing original but the foundation and outside walls. “It took longer than anyone thought,” Beach admits with a wry smile, displaying the friendly ease that set the tone for the design trio, one that

The homeowner worked closely with Susan Chiasson of Architectural Surfaces, Inc. on tile and stone selection. A central column in the living room (above) is clad in a textural, bamboo-like tile from floor to ceiling. SUCASAMAGAZINE.COM

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Beach is still considering the living room arrangement (above) and how to best use it for entertaining and gatherings. The sleek home bar is handily situated for both. An artist friend painted murals on both sides of the massive sliding barn doors separating the living room from the music room.

Above: The same sliding door as seen from the music room. On this side, the appropriately themed, hand-painted artwork serves as creative inspiration for Beach and her friends during jam sessions and other musical get-togethers. 46

SU C A S A W I NTER 2018

grew tighter with each new round of thinking about what the house could be. Years before, Beach and her then-husband had built a custom home in the North Valley, a process she remembers enjoying. This time, it’s fair to say the process was a bit more nerve-racking. She spent hours online poring over tiles, flooring, doors, fixtures. “I probably put too much thought into things,” she says. “Wendy definitely has a vision for everything, and knows what she likes,” confirms Mullet, owner of Mateo Builders. “She was very involved in the design and building and all the finishes.” The team completely redesigned the single-story home, which had been built in the 1970s and renovated in the 1990s into a warren of small, cave-like rooms. Now a spacious and open contemporary building filled with light and finished in modern material, it’s unrecognizable as that dark, closed-in original iteration. The garage was pulled forward and dropped a story to bring sunlight into the main floor (it also allowed for a larger, landscaped backyard and an extra-wide lap pool), and the for-


merly one-story residence grew an upstairs suite. As she, Mullet, and Hanks brainstormed how to open up the dark south side of the house into a flowing kitchen/dining/living space, the team kept mentally shrinking the hallway walls—until the walls disappeared entirely. And then Hanks came up with the idea for a partial wall that would double as a bar. “Neither Matt nor I knew what he was talking about until it was built,” Beach admits. The bar, a striking feature that loosely divides the living room from the kitchen and dining areas, is very much in keeping with the modern design of the home. And so it went with nearly all of the house’s defining features: The team talked, tried, and modified as they went along. The homeowner was even able to capitalize on a bit of extra space in the floor plan to request a musician’s dream: an elevator. “I have a bad knee, and don’t like hauling equipment up from the garage,” notes Beach, who performs regularly and rehearses with her band in a music room on the main floor. Below: The dramatic open staircase leads to the master suite and conservatory. When Beach doesn’t feel like navigating the stairs, she uses the elevator.

Above: Beach loves her sleek, unfussy kitchen, with its smooth, light-colored custom cabinetry and recessed overhead hood. Some of the appliances are shown to artistic effect; others, like the fridge, are camouflaged.

Above: The entry and dining area have a decidedly midcentury modern feel, with plenty of natural light and a courtyard-facing view. Guests can relax in the blue chairs and chat with the homeowner while she’s cooking. SUCASAMAGAZINE.COM

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The walnut and steel staircase and custom wet bar (above) subtly divide the mostly open downstairs living areas, which were designed for easy and comfortable flow when guests and musician friends are visiting.

Climbing onto the roof to discuss what to do about some leaks, the trio was stunned to discover panoramic views of the Sandia Mountains rising over the treetops of the leafy neighborhood, which includes architect Bart Prince’s Cigar House one block over. Beach knew instantly she wanted her master suite up here, a major decision that led to the creation of the dramatic open staircase. Being introduced to Susan Chiasson of Architectural Surfaces Inc. may have been a bit of a mixed blessing. On the one hand, Chiasson’s a veritable tile guru, and the two had a blast choosing materials and patterns. But then Beach started falling in love with stones and tiles before knowing where they would go—a case of too many options and not enough spaces. The sleek, slate and gray glass subway tile in the kitchen repeats in long stacked rods climbing up a post by the staircase— just because Beach wanted more of it. Eventually it was extended all the way to the top floor. The bathrooms all feature distinctive tiling laid in sometimes unexpected directions. Some patterns work; others Beach is still noodling on and may reconfigure. As you might expect, Beach’s music room was a labor of love. Wallpaper makes a big statement there, a large floral pattern in fuzzy linen that she fell in love with. When a friend, the wife of an artist, brought over paintings to hang for the Spring Homes of Enchantment Parade, she noticed the massive rolling barn door that closes off the music room from the living room. “He could paint right on this, and carve into it,” the artist’s wife pointed out to Beach. Both sides of the door now feature huge carved paintings—almost murals—that are focal points depending on which room you’re in.

The steel and wood staircase (above) and the elevator converge on the second floor landing (left), where Beach’s houseplants enjoy the soft natural light. 48

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Tying together Beach’s eclectic, gotta-have selections of tile, wallpaper, and stone are sensible surfaces introduced for contiguous flow through the home. Natural materials help warm the contemporary design, such as the blond maple cabinetry used in the kitchen and all of the bathrooms, set off by the occasional dark walnut. The flooring in all the bedrooms is cork, and the same tile is carried from the downstairs utility room to a landing on the top floor that Beach calls her conservatory—a kind of comfort station where her many houseplants bathe in the light. Nearly a year later following the Parade, in which it won Best Remodel Over $500,000, the home remains a work in progress for Beach, who has found that the life she designed it around— musical parties, friends coming over to cook, revolving house guests—is still taking shape. A deck, a greenhouse, and more landscaping are still to come. Playfully moving furniture and rugs from one room to another in search of harmony, she anticipates many more rounds of including the right accompaniments to the new theme: Wendy, singing her own song.

Climbing onto the roof during the build proved to be fortuitous, as the design team discovered Beach’s house had the potential for incredible mountain views from that elevated vantage point. A second story was added, where picture windows in the sleek master bedroom (above) capture the stunning panorama.

Left: The spacious master bath is tucked behind a not-quiteceiling-height wall that allows light into the space. As with the kitchen, the finishes are clean and contemporary, with touches of wood and texture for warmth.

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A cleverly designed platform overlooking the pool offers a different seating perspective on the backyard. It also allowed for the addition of soothing fountains and a tile backsplash pattern that gives just the right amount of visual pop.

resources Builder/Remodeler Mateo Builders Interior Designers Chris Hanks & Wendy Beach A/V System VISA Systems Appliances Builders Source Appliance Gallery Beams RAKS Building Supply Cabinetry & Front Door Ernest Thompson Fireplaces Mountain West Sales mountainwestsales.net Granite United Stoneworks Interior Doors Moore Window & Door

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Pool Hermanson Construction hermansonpools.com Rugs American Home Serafian’s Sinks, Fixtures, Tubs & Lighting Ferguson Bath, Kitchen & Lighting Gallery ferguson.com Solar Experienced Solar Steel Fabrication/Stairwell & Gates CMY Inc. Tile Architectural Surfaces Inc. astileandstone.com Windows & Window Walls Sierra Pacific sierrapacificwindows.com Wood Flooring Benchmark Wood Floors

Above: Wendy Beach, beneath the steel awning of her newly renovated (and award-winning!) Altura Park home.


Long and relatively narrow, the backyard space naturally leant itself to a rectangular pool. There’s ample seating space beneath the covered patio, on the raised pool platform, and on the house’s second-story deck.

L.E.D. Lighting

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505-296-4393 • www.lightingfordesign.com SUCASAMAGAZINE.COM

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oh, them

bones

a Wright-influenced midcentury gem is updated by and for its next caretakers

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Renovating this midcentury rancher and its park-like setting has been a fouryear labor of love for its new owners. Distinctive details include slim bricking on the façade, a pitched, shingled roof, lovely filigree wrought iron work, and of course, stunning landscaping.

by Amy Gross photographs by Chris Corrie

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rchitect Bill Fanning and his wife Maggie have always admired the house they live in—even before they became its owners. Located in an older, close-in neighborhood, the 1953-built rancher is just a couple of skips away from a home they lived in for 13 years. The couple left the area for a time to live in High Desert, but when the “house across the street” in their old neighborhood went on the market, they hightailed it back into the city. “It had to do with lifestyle more than anything else,” says Bill. “We wanted to be back in a one-story house, and of course everything you could possibly want to get to is close by this area of town.” But the real draw was the house itself, a handsome singlestory with what Bill, an architect and founder of Fanning Bard Tatum Architects (now FBT Architects), calls “strong Wrightian influences.” “It has these wonderful, simple lines,” he marvels. “The windows are kind of long, and the roof eaves are low and long—very, very Frank Lloyd Wright– influenced. And that’s one of the striking things about the house: It’s quite simple, really. The bones of the house are so good!” Deep overhangs, slender SUCASAMAGAZINE.COM

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Warmly traditional with wood floors and comfortable furnishings, the updated living room now features a vaulted ceiling that adds volume and light. Recessed lighting showcases J.D. Wellborn’s paper art and two new built-in booksheves.

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Left: Bill inherited this gorgeous art deco radio from his grandmother. After having it fully restored, Bill can pick up European radio stations through farm bands. Above the radio is a print of a Paul Klee watercolor.

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“The house has these wonderful, simple lines. The bones are so good!” —Bill Fanning

brick on the façade, and lovely filigree grille work on the front porch and rear patio also mark the home as a midcentury treasure—a building Wright no doubt would have appreciated. Being of the ’50s, however, meant that the house had low ceilings and the interiors were also rather dark. With an architect owner at the helm, Bill and Maggie embarked upon a series of remodeling projects to bring the building and grounds back to their original glory—with just a touch of architectural finesse for the next generation. “We wanted to maintain the original character of the house; we just wanted to open it up, give it a little higher volume and more light,” says Bill, who deliberately opted to maintain the traditional feel of the home


Below: The dining room deftly mixes furnishings from several periods. “I love combining old and new,” says Bill. “It brings out contrasts and lets you see each element more sharply.”

The informal den incorporates the same clean lines and traditional feel as the rest of the house. Track lighting showcases special pieces of art.

despite his own modernist architectural leanings. He realized they could expand the living room upward and vault its ceiling simply by removing the ceiling joists. Working with veteran contractor John Blueher of Blueher Abodes, Bill ripped out the ceiling in the living room to reveal a sloping roof above it, and then reframed back half of the ceiling. “It really changed the entire feel of that house,” says Blueher of the vaulted ceiling and its new recessed lighting. “It’s so much more comfortable now.” Next the team pushed the kitchen out a bit to include a cozy breakfast nook—also vaulted, to echo the living room’s SUCASAMAGAZINE.COM

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Above: Crisp white cabinetry with tons of useful storage helps keep Maggie’s kitchen neat and tidy. She and Bill replaced the tile floor with wood to warm the space and return it to a more traditional look.

new architecture—with a huge picture window that offers the best view in town: the Fannings’ stunning backyard. “It’s probably the strongest reason we bought the property,” says Bill of the yard. “Maggie’s a superb gardener, and this yard is very large and had wonderful potential for gardening. This house has always had the feeling that you’re in kind of an oasis in the middle of the city.” The original owner of the house, a world traveler who was very influenced by Japanese landscaping, planted ginkgo biloba trees, a weeping mulberry, a dwarf peach, tons of roses, and the yard’s crowning glory, a deodar cedar. “We have a photo of it when it was six feet tall,” says Bill. “Now it’s over 75 feet!” Towering over the single-story house, the tree is a mixed blessing—messy as all get-out, but ideal for keeping the house shaded and cool in the summer. The yard had grown tired by the time the Fannings purchased the house, so revitalizing it became one of the most important renovation projects. With Aspen Leaf as the primary landscaper, they rebuilt the yard walls, reshaped the yard, pulled up the old irrigation system, and put in new turf, reshaping it into 56

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One renovation project involved pushing out the kitchen to create a sunny, vaulted ceiling breakfast nook (above), with a spectacular view of the landscaped backyard and its magnificent deodar cedar tree.


Above: “Deodar cedar trees live 200 to 250 years, so we’re probably this one’s third or fourth caretaker,” says Bill. “Depending on how long this house is here, a lot of people are going to have to take care of that baby!” Right: Decorative iron grille work on the front and rear porches is a charming reminder of this home’s midcentury beginnings.

smaller areas to minimize water consumption. New raised beds allow for yearround flower and vegetable gardening; a crop of lettuce thrived well into March last season, tucked into a quiet spot behind Bill’s new studio. Like the living room, the studio is light-filled and the high ceiling vaulted—a far cry from its original iteration as a windowless garage. Naturally Bill designed the studio himself. Though retired from FBT, he always has several projects going, typically small, residential remodeling projects for friends and acquaintances. A few commercial projects, too. In his sunny, contemporary studio, he’ll crank up the jazz on the amazing sound system and work on these niche projects a few hours a day, hand-drafting his designs. The space also doubles as an art studio; some of Bill’s own work hangs on the walls. In the main house, the walls are SUCASAMAGAZINE.COM

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“I’ve always loved being an architect, and I’ve always loved drawing,” says Bill. Left: Art materials for sketches, drawings, and paintings.

Right: Blueprints for the small residential and commercial projects Bill still takes on for friends and acquaintances. “These projects are the perfect outlet for me,” he says. “I can work on them for three or four hours a day in this studio and be perfectly happy.”

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Above and right: In his new, light-filled studio, architect Bill Fanning works on designs for an upcoming project. When not being used for architectural matters, the studio doubles as a space to create art (that’s Bill’s own work on the wall behind him) and a de facto jazz concert hall, thanks to a killer sound system and Bill’s huge collection of jazz recordings.

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adorned with art he and Maggie have collected over 40 years. “Most of it is New Mexico art,” says Bill, noting the ninepiece set by artist (and personal friend) J.D. Wellborn in its place of honor in the living room between two new built-in bookcases; the painting of Taos Gorge above the living room fireplace by Edward Norton Ward; and the R.C. Gorman prints Bill took in trade for architectural services years ago when he designed a new studio for Western Graphics, the print shop that did Gorman’s work. Having worked on renovation projects for over four years now, Bill and Maggie are taking a well-deserved breather and simply enjoing the comfortable, livable spaces they have created. As the new stewards and caretakers of a 60-somethingyear-old deodar cedar and an equally aged architectural gem, the Fannings have designed an oasis they’ll be able to enjoy— inside and out—for years to come.


resources Architect William Fanning Builder/Remodeler Blueher Abodes Structural Engineer Walla Engineering Barbecue Grill Hood Builders Source Appliance Gallery Brick Pavers Kinney Brick Granite Fireplace Surround Rocky Mountain Stone rmstone.com Kitchen Backsplash Tile Architectural Surfaces, Inc. astileandstone.com Landscaping Aspen Leaf Paint Benjamin Moore Plants & Flowers Alameda Greenhouse Rehm’s Nursery Recessed Lighting Bright Ideas, dba The Lamp Shop lightingfordesign.com Window Blinds All About Blinds & Shutters Windows Piùon Window & Door pinonwindow.com Wood Flooring (Kitchen) Benchmark Wood Floors

Above: The covered rear patio extends from one end of the very long house to the other. The overhang was too deep and dark, says Bill, so they added columns, replaced the concrete with decorative brick pavers, and narrowed the overhang. Most importantly, they added skylights in the overhang and split it into two sections, opening the patio more organically into the backyard.

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¡Salud!

by James Selby

don’t cry for Malbec Argentina’s star red is an American fan favorite

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Under the Bramare label, Viña Cobos Winery produces two malbecs. The one from the Luján de Cuyo district (above) is aromatic and complex.

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Above: Rich and fruit-forward, Malbec pairs well with a variety of foods, including berries, big cheeses, and charcuterie.

Left: Produced in Mendoza’s Valle de Uco, Doña Paula’s Estate Malbec is fruity, spicy, and intense.

Trinchero Family Estates

Elixir Wine Group

Paul Hobbs Imports

hile there’s no end in sight for pleasurable, everyday malbec, Argentina’s progressive winemakers are producing distinctive, terroir-driven versions of the popular grape to equal the great red wines of California or Europe, and at relative bargains. Ironically, malbec is not a star in its native France, where it serves as a minor blending grape in fine Bordeaux, and prominently in table wines of Cahors. First planted by ex-pat French growers, malbec has become the Cinderella grape of Argentina, where soil compositions, high elevations, and hot days and cold nights produce grapes with acidity, backbone, and complexity. The way that Napa and Sonoma Valleys, Burgundy, and Piedmont are divided into sub-regions, each with unique influences on vines, Argentina’s Mendoza region is defining its premier viticultural areas. Valle de Uco and Luján de Cuyo stand out. Hervé Fabre emigrated to Luján de Cuyo from his native Bordeaux in the early ’90s and purchased ancient-vine vineyards. European in style, his Fabre Montmayou Malbec Reserva is impeccably structured and lean ($20). In the cooler Valle de Uco, with its magnificent scenery at the foot of the Andes Mountains, Doña Paula’s Estate Malbec forwards fresh notes of graphite, minerals, and violets ($15). Paul Hobbs, the iconic Napa Valley winemaker, consultant, and importer of South American wines, is a founding partner of Viña Cobos Winery in Mendoza, a leader in the movement of regional and single vineyard classifications. They make two malbecs from different districts under their Bramare label ($45), using the same cellar techniques, types of oak barrels, and aging practices. Tasting the two wines side-by-side is an astonishing lesson in terroir. The Valle de Uco malbec has a seductive silky elegance, while the Luján du Cuyo offers power and ripeness. “Don’t keep your distance,” Evita sings. With so many delicious malbecs on offer, who would want to?

Left: Bordeaux native Hervé Fabre produces European-style malbecs in the Luján de Cuyo district of Argentina.

James Selby James Selby has directed wine programs in New York, Portland, and Santa Fe, where he lives and works as a wine consultant and writer.


505.710.5187

505.615.9229

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Vida Buena

by Amanda N. Pitman

spectacular Seattle the Emerald City offers something for every traveler

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Visit Seattle/Alabastro Photography

The Seattle Great Wheel extends over Elliot Bay, offering breathtaking views of the activity on the water and sights of the city. The wheel operates daily until 10 pm or later, perfect for seeing the city lights.

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Visit Seattle/Alabastro Photography

Pike Place Market is a one-stop shop for locals and visitors alike. Various companies offer tours of the market, many with an emphasis on food and drinks.

eattle, Washington—the birthplace of grunge music and a little company called Starbucks. An association with Boeing has earned Seattle the nickname the Jet City, but thanks to the area’s legendary daily rainfall keeping the landscape green and lush, it’s more popularly known as the Emerald City. There’s certainly that funky, hipster vibe and abundance of craft breweries you’ve no doubt heard about, but what makes Seattle a fantastic travel destination is the sheer variety of things to do and see for every type of traveler. This gem of the Pacific Northwest stands above in its ability to wow visitors, from foodies and active types to history buffs and culture hounds. In downtown Seattle, museums, art, and antiques shops abound, as well as great dining, brewpubs, and coffeehouses. Many visitors start at bustling Pike Place Market, famous for its fish-throwing spectacle. When a customer purchases a fish, the fishmongers grab it and toss it through the air over knowing—and unknowing—customers, to be filleted and packaged for the purchaser. Pike Place Market has operated continuously since 1907, and its farmers and flower markets are also iconic, charming, and colorful. Vendors of all stripes set up shop daily in more than 200 stalls. You could easily spend an entire day shopping, tasting sweet and savory foods (some clam chowder is a must), and reveling in the bustling scene. Another draw to the touristy area of downtown is the 175-foot-tall Seattle Great Wheel located on Pier 57, which offers stunning views of the city, Elliot Bay, and, if you can catch a ride on a sunny day, the Olympic Mountains. Within walking distance of Pike Place Market, the Seattle Aquarium, Seattle Art Museum, Seattle Antiques Market, and the historic Moore Theater are all worth a visit. A bit further away, the Space Needle is arguably the defining structure of downtown Seattle and is a must, especially for Frasier fans. Seattle’s other well-known districts offer their own attractions for young and old. Belltown boasts the Chihuly Garden and Glass and Olympic Sculpture Park. In Capitol Hill, the Seattle Asian Art Museum and Starbucks Reserve Roastery and Tasting Room, and various distilleries and breweries make for a full day of exploring. Rent a sailboat, rowboat, or canoe for a few hours at the Center for Wooden Boats and visit their new museum in South Lake Union. If a historical lesson is more your style, Bill Speidel’s Underground Tour delivers a history of Pioneer Square, which was built atop the remnants of The Great Seattle Fire of 1889.


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Last but not least, the University District is home to the University of Washington, the Henry Art Gallery, the Burke Museum, and a variety of eateries and funky, fun shops. To really get the most out of a one- or two-day trip, hop on a ferry and visit San Juan Island and go glamping at Lakedale Resort, kayak in the ocean with Discovery Sea Kayaks, or try the renowned San Juan Island Distillery. Other nearby islands, like Bainbridge, offer a completely different spin on things to do, see, eat, and enjoy. The Bainbridge Museum of Art and Bainbridge Island Historical Museum offer a dose of art and history, while multiple breweries and wineries give visitors a chance to sit, relax, and enjoy the scenery.

Left: Fishing on the Humptulips River during the run of Chinook salmon is an angler’s dream. Chartering a boat and guide service makes it easy; all you do is show up, fish for a day, and take (or ship) home the spoils of your labor.

Visit Seattle, visitseattle.org

Above: A landmark of Pinoeer Square, this impressive Tlingit totem has an interesting history. Erected in 1940, it is an exact replica carved by the descendants of the original totem that once stood here. The original totem that was unveiled in 1899 was stolen from Fort Tongass, Alaska, and damaged by an arsonist in 1938.

Amanda N. Pitman 64

Visit Seattle/Alabastro Photography

For active types and outdoors enthusiasts, the variety of activities available in town and within a few hours of the city is a huge draw. In the warmer months there’s hiking, fishing, camping, biking, kayaking, paddle boarding, and zip lining; in winter, skiing, snowshoeing, and in some parts, dog sledding. Within a relatively short drive of the city, Mount Rainier National Park, Snoqualmie Pass, Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument, The North Cascades National Park, the Olympic National Forest, and the Hoh Rain Forest all fit the bill for outdoor lovers. If you’re looking for a getaway that’s sure to accommodate every traveler’s taste, it might be time to check out the Seattle scene. With Alaska Airlines offering nonstop flights to Seattle from Albuquerque it’s almost impossible to say no.

Amanda N. Pitman

For foodies, outdoor enthusiasts, and history and culture buffs, this gem of the great Pacific Northwest stands above in its ability to wow visitors.

Left: In no part of Seattle is an umbrella ever fashionable. Braving the daily rain sans cover is a badge of honor for locals, but four-legged friends are often dressed to the nines in raingear. SU C A S A W I NTER 2018


Visit Seattle/Alabastro Photography

Above: The Space Needle features an observation deck at the 520-foot level with 360-degree views of the Seattle skyline, Puget Sound, the Cascade Mountains, and the Olympic Mountains. Below: Hungry (or perhaps just curious) patrons eye the abundant fish and seafood options at Pure Food Fish Market at Pike Place Market.

Passport Amanda N. Pitman

INTRODUCING

SPECIAL SAVINGS GOING ON NOW

ALBUQUERQUE 12521 MONTGOMERY BOULEVARD NE AT TRAMWAY 505.291.9494 Ask a designer or visit ethanallen.com for details. Sale going on for a limited time. ©2017 Ethan Allen Global, Inc. SUCASAMAGAZINE.COM

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Vida Buena

by Keiko Ohnuma

a little learnin’

Noël Sutherland for Santa Fe Clay

Courtesy Canvas & Coffee

hands-on classes are the cure for the winter blues

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Scott Stone

hen the holidays are over, you’re all skied out, and the prospect of staring into a roaring fire for the rest of the winter is less than inspiring, it might be time to put your brain and hands to work learning a new skill or hobby. From cooking and crocheting to pottery making and beer brewing, there’s a class for every creative yen and an instructor eager to share their passion and expertise. You don’t need courage in a wine glass to enjoy date night with an empty canvas, according to Terry DeWitt, owner of Canvas & Coffee (abqcanvasandcoffee. com) painting studio in the North Valley. A hot drink and a treat are offered with her class fee ($18–$35), as well as the head start of a pattern already transferred to your canvas. Follow along with Terry, and you will still end up with a painting that is uniquely your own. Whether for kids’ birthdays, corporate team-building events, date nights, or “Mommy and me” outings, Terry’s instruction is the same: “Relax— it’s fun art, not fine art.” Santa Fe’s take on the celebrity chef who’s as fun to watch as learn from, Chef Johnny Vee has been winning repeat fans at Las Cosas Cooking School (lascosascooking.com) for 20 years, describing his groupies as “fun and enthusiastic foodies.” From making tacos, curries, and salsas to holiday entertaining and scores of other topics, Chef gives the rundown on history and technique, then sets everyone to cooking. Of course students feast on the results of

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Las Cosas Cooking School Chef Johnny Vee and his students sample the savory fruits of their labor (here and left) in the “Chile Relleno Master Class.”


Above: At a team building event at Canvas & Coffee in Los Ranchos, participants paint a piece of art called Penguin Wishes together, but at their own pace. Opposite: A student at a Santa Fe Clay workshop adds detail to a clay bowl prior to firing.

Scott Stone

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get crafty Here are a few more Albuquerque and Santa Fe classes and workshops to inspire your creative side and keep those hands busy! Albuquerque Herbalism (ABQ) Besides her popular six-week classes in herbalism, Dara Saville offers half-day workshops in making herbal gifts, kitchen cosmetics, or cold remedies. albuquerqueherbalism.com Cacao (Santa Fe) This artisanal maker of fine coffee and chocolate in Santa Fe offers workshops in chocolate tasting, the history of chocolate, coffee cupping, and the like. A two-hour “chocolate immersion?” Yes, please! www.cacaosantafe.com Hip Stitch (ABQ) Not your grandma’s sewing store, this quilting supply shop offers two- to four-hour classes in beginning sewing and various quilting, dyeing, and sewing techniques, plus drop-in events for crafters, quilters, and “sewists.” hipstitchabq.com

Joliesse Chocolates (ABQ) This chocolate shop offers a two-hour trufflemaking class, all supplies included. Take home 20 delicious truffles. lajoliesse.com Kelly Jo Designs by Wine (ABQ) Sign up alone or with friends for an evening of wine (or other bevy) and follow-along instruction on how to paint a specific scene, usually on canvas but occasionally on pottery. kellyjodesignsbywine.com Liquid Light Glass (SF) Try your hand at glassblowing in guided, one-onone instruction making a paperweight, cup, or original artwork. liquidlightglass.com Tandy® Leather (ABQ & Santa Fe) Half-day, full-day, and multi-day follow-along workshops on making specific leather items or mastering a technique. tandyleather.com/en/leathercraft-classes The Specialty Shop (ABQ) This bakery supply store offers a regular schedule of classes, from demo classes to five-week, hands-on training in cake and candy making. the-specialty-shop.myshopify.com The Yarn Store at Nob Hill (ABQ) A favorite hangout for fiber fanatics, The Yarn Store offers classes in beginning to advanced knitting and crochet, plus techniques like felting, dyeing, and tatting. theyarnstoreatnobhill.com Victor’s Home Brew (ABQ) New Mexico’s oldest homebrew supply store offers monthly classes on beginning beer brewing and winemaking. victorshomebrew.com

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Linda Boyes

Hot Flash Glass (ABQ) One- and two-day classes in beginning stained glass, fused jewelry, and various fusing and slumping techniques are offered at this glasssupply shop, as well as sessions for groups and kids. hotflashglassnm.com Above: An array of colorful fused glass plates created by students at Linda Boyes Fused Glass in Albuquerque. The studio offers classes ranging from one half day to two and three days in length.

their labors. Classes run two to three hours on a weeknight or Saturday ($90–$95) every week of the year, and often focus on the foods of New Mexico. A resource for clay artists for more than four decades, Santa Fe Clay (santafeclay .com) is the place for would-be potters to get their hands wet, learning wheel throwing, hand building, glazing, firing, and all other aspects of clay art, from beginning to advanced. According to Chief Creative Officer Mark Grischke, seven-week classes are offered evenings and weekends year round ($260), and include free studio time; intensive summer workshops with prominent artists are geared for more advanced students. Starting in January, a menu of shorter classes will be offered, including drop-in classes, but groups large and small are always invited to put together any kind of class they desire.

From crocheting to beer brewing, there’s a class for every creative yen and an instructor eager to share their passion and expertise. At Linda Boyes Fused Glassworks (lindaboyesglass.com), you can begin crafting beautiful fused-glass jewelry, dinnerware, mosaics, and home décor without investing thousands in equipment and supplies. Beginning ($195) and advanced ($245) two- to three-day classes give you time to cut and assemble, load the kiln, and return to admire your results. Occasional half-day workshops ($95) produce ornaments and small dishes. Once a month, students can rent studio time and kiln firings to continue flirting with the medium until they’re ready to take the plunge, as Linda Boyes did after a 34-year career in nursing.


The Spring 2018 NM Home Remodeling Show IS GROWING BY LEAPS and BOUNDS! This Unique Event Now Includes SOME of Our Best Friends — OUR PETS!! We are Now: The N.M. Home Remodeling and Pet Expo!!! From the front door to the backyard, and beyond, you’ll find it all! Hundreds of booths full of the bestproducts, services andentertainment for all those wholove pets and there homes. The Home and Pet Expo is proud to announce oursupport for our main event partner - Animal Humane New Mexico.We will give $1 to ANIMAL HUMANE NEW MEXICO for every ticket sold to the event!

NM HOME AND PET EXPO

Supporting The Advancement Of Animal Care Interested in exhibiting? Call today! 505-269-6985

www.nmhomeandpetexpo.com

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Su Libro

home is where it happens new books on creating, collecting, and coziness

Leslie Woodward

A Your Creative Work Space: The Sweet Spot Style Guide to Home Office + Studio Decor, by Desha Peacock, Skyhorse Publishing, hardcover, $23

Contact us Today:

Build Green New Mexico Steve Hale, Program Director (505) 688-5335 bgnm@comcast.net www.BGNM.com

We don’t build Great Homes, We Certify Them Ask your builder if his homes are “Certified: Build Green NM”

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ward-winning TV show producer and lifestyle expert Desha Peacock isn’t a fan of the term office, as it implies that work must happen there. And although the author of Your Creative Work Space: The Sweet Spot Style Guide to Home Office + Studio Decor actually uses both the “w” and “o” words in her book title, she says that designing a space that encompasses both concepts should be more about where one creates. “The two most important factors to opening up channels for your creative work to flow through you are your mental space and your physical space,” says Peacock, founder of Sweet Spot Style. “One can greatly influence the other. In this book, we . . . primarily focus on how your physical space can enhance your creative work flow.” She refers to these physical spaces as “sacred nests,” and admits that she herself has several at home, depending on what type of work she’s doing—a bedroom office diffused with essential oils, or a front porch flooded with natural light. As Peacock notes, everyone works in a different way, and although the idea of working from home may sound like a recipe for hyper-productivity, the reality is that just as many distractions abound on the home front as in an office—pets, dishes, kids, laundry. Peacock employs what she calls “no-fail rituals” that keep her focused, from taking a hot bath and dressing in real clothes to cleaning her desk and turning off the ringer on her phone. The fact that her office is pretty to look at and fun to be in only improves her chance of success. And this is the heart of Peacock’s book. The author peeks into the creative work spaces and home offices of some three dozen fellow business owners—almost all of them women—and learns why each space works for its creator. Or doesn’t. Common challenges: insufficient storage, sharing a space with a significant other who also works from home, and having to constantly communicate to children that Mommy is at work and needs quiet time. Gorgeous color photographs of each guest’s office or work space punctuate their commentary on how those spaces came to be, how they are used, and tips for successfully mastering the art of work/life balance. Surprisingly few spaces are large or expertly designed. More than a few are simply desks that have found purchase in a corner or nook. But each is a private sanctuary, a sacred nest, where creativity has no limits.—Amy Gross


Tessa Neustadt

Justin Van Leeuwen

A “family control center” designed by John Donkin is tucked into a centrally located alcove. Chalkboard walls allow for easy calendaring, while a floating desk and simple shelving help maximize space.

Stylist, author, and Target spokesperson Emily Henderson calls her style “happy, eclectic, colorful, with a little bit of weird.” Her office (above) has a library, design areas, and a conference table. Every employee has their own desk setup. SUCASAMAGAZINE.COM

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Su Libro

T

hough it may appear to be a cool new interior design idea, there is nothing trendy about the time-honored Danish concept of hygge. Famously some of the happiest people in the world, the Danes are obsessed with hygge, and work at creating hygge moments and experiences in all areas of their lives—at home, at play, and even at work. Describing it as a feeling of coziness doesn’t entirely do the trick, though it’s a good starting point. Think hominess, comfort, and togetherness. First step: pronouncing hygge (“HOO-ga”). Fun, huh? After that, you’ll want to learn how to identify and experience moments that are hyggelig, and then figure out how to create hygge yourself. Meik Wiking, CEO of the Happiness Research Institute in Copenhagen and the author of The Little Book of Hygge, thoroughly (and wittily) explains the concept in his aptly named—and very fun to read—book. “We Danes throw the words hygge and hyggelig around so much that, to foreigners, it might appear excessive,” Wiking says. “We have to state how hyggelig everything is. All the time. And not just in the hygge moment itself. We talk about how hyggeligt it will be to get together on Friday, and on Monday we will remind each other of how hyggelig Friday was.”

Hygge has recently emerged as an interior design buzzword because it has a great deal to do with the home. Lighting a candle (or better, five!) creates instant hygge, as does turning on a Danish modern lamp to create soft ambience and atmosphere in a hyggekrog (hygge nook). Vintage décor, items made out of wood, blankets, cushions, fireplaces, and ceramics are all things that will help make your home more hyggelig. Beyond the home, hygge is about pleasure and pleasurable things—warm drinks, sweets, pastries. (Did you know Danes consume 33 percent more coffee per capita than Americans, and that they are apparently cake junkies? Coffee and cake are both very hyggelig.) Equality and togetherness are also part of the hygge manifesto, such as inviting friends over to cook a meal together and then share it. It’s the idea of “we over me,” says Wiking. “Tasks are shared, as well as the airtime.” Things that are not hyggelig: drama, politics, and ego. Hygge may be a Danish concept, but it’s one easily understood, embraced, and practiced by many other cultures; every part of the world has its own version, even if it doesn’t have as cool a word for it. American Southwest–style hygge might include a blazing kiva, a pot of piñon coffee, and a day of tamale-making with a few friends and family members. Hygge is home. Hygge is comfort. Hygge is shared experience. Hygge is happiness.—AG 72

SU C A S A W I NTER 2018

The Little Book of Hygge: Danish Secrets to Happy Living, by Meik Wiking, William Morrow/ Harper Collins, hardcover, $20 Scarves—for both men and women—are very hyggelig, according to Meik Wiking (below), CEO of the Happiness Research Institute in Denmark and author of The Little Book of Hygge.

Chris McAndrew

American Southwest–style hygge might include a blazing kiva, a pot of piñon coffee, and a day of tamale-making with a few friends and family members.


This Day in Collecting History, by Michael A. McLeod and Marla K. McLeod, Schiffer Publishing, paperback, $25

P

eople collect crazy things, from teapots found at yard sales to historic documents and sports jerseys that can only be acquired through auction. As the former editor of Southeastern Antiquing and Collecting Magazine, Michael A. McLeod reported on hundreds of stunning auction sales, a few of which he and his wife Marla K. McLeod have compiled into one very fun and readable book. In This Day in Collecting History, the authors spotlight a variety of auction items in a daily calendar format that cleverly connects the items themselves to specific historic events and individuals. A few calendar dates in the book (which includes at least one entry per day from January 1 through December 31) represent a significant auction. On May 2, 2012, for example, one of Edvard Munch’s four versions of The Scream was sold by Sotheby’s for well over $119 million. Most of the dates, however, are events from history. One of the oldest: September 28, 1066, the date William the Conquerer invaded England and became its first king. (In 2014, a William the Conquerer penny from the era sold at auction for almost $1.3 million.) The entries are short, easy to read, and include the sometimes staggering prices fetched at auction for collectibles, art, and memorabilia. In 2007, Sotheby’s auctioned off one of the 17 remaining Magna Cartas copied in 1297. The pricetag? $21,321,000. In 2012, the model of Luke Skywalker’s X-Wing fighter used in Star Wars sold for $221,400. (The entry appears under September 25, when in 1951 “a stirring in the Force” announced the birth of Mark Hamill.) This Day in Collecting History is a quick trip through history, including music, fashion, sports, pop culture, and the significant events that have shaped our world. It’s a blast to read, especially if you’re a dedicated collector in search of your next big score.—AG

Get the look of beautiful natural marble, industrial modern concrete, or solid contemporary colors. No maintenance required and extremely durable.

345-8518 | www.rmstone.com |

/rockymountainstone

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Brandon Harwell

on the market

FotoVan

High Desert

custom Craftsman

mountain trail

With its back to Bear Canyon open space, this exquisite 7,980-square-foot home in The Canyons at High Desert unveils unobstructed views of the Sandia Mountains to the east and Mount Taylor to the west. This Craftsman-inspired custom build by Tony Pisto sits on a little over half an acre at the end of a culde-sac, offering room and privacy. Gorgeous finishes and details throughout the home run from ceiling to floor and include wood truss ceilings, custom Weather Shield windows, and flagstone flooring. The five bedrooms and eight bathrooms allow plenty of space for family or friends, and the large professional kitchen is open so all may gather. Outdoors, the fabulous extras continue with a heated pool and spa, water features, a fire pit, and garden and entertaining areas.

modern

Stunning contemporary touches abound in this exceptionally modern, green-minded build located in the Mountain Highlands in High Desert. Sited on almost an acre, the open concept home fits seamlessly into its natural landscape. Throughout the 5,140-square-foot home, warm woods, light flooring and tile, glass doors, tall windows, and skylights open the spaces and bring the outdoors in. Incredible views and access to miles of hiking trails make for an adventure-lover’s dream. Indoors, the single-level floor plan boasts four bedrooms and four-plus bathrooms, a chef’s kitchen with 12-foot ceilings open to the living areas, and a formal dining space ideal for entertaining. As a bonus, a one-bedroom casita plus garage makes a perfect mother-in-law suite or extra room for visitors.

List price: $1.789 million, Sarah Black, Re/Max Select, 505-401-0705, remax.com

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Seth Beecher

FotoVan

FotoVan

Brandon Harwell

List price: $1.75 million, Missy Ashcraft, Keller Williams, 505-362-6823, kw.com


traditional

Bob Henderson

masterpiece

In the best of old New Mexico style, this adobe home in El Caballero Norte in Los Ranchos exudes charm and comfort. Throughout the home’s 3,507 square feet, exposed adobe walls, brick floors, beamed ceilings, and wood accents add warmth while bancos and kivas tie in traditional elements. The large living room connects to the dining area with views through a three-section bay window. Four bedrooms, two full bathrooms, and a gracious en suite master offer plenty of space and privacy. Outside, a unique courtyard greets visitors, and a lovely incorporated portal and sunroom off the back of the house invite the outdoors in. A pergola and a hot tub enhance the expansive backyard, and new solar panels make this beautiful home energy efficient. List price: $670,000, Lynn Martinez, Coldwell Banker Legacy, 505-263-6369, cblegacy.com

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Carol Rosegg

January through March

Rodgers + Hammerstein’s Cinderella

RODGERS + HAMMERSTEIN’S CINDERELLA January 4–7, performance times vary Popejoy Hall at UNM, ABQ $35–$90 Filled with surprising new twists, Rodgers + Hammerstein’s Cinderella incorporates all of the most memorable moments on this classic story but with a contemporary take. An incredible orchestra backs favorite songs such as “In My Own Little Corner,” “Impossible/It’s Possible,” and “Ten Minutes Ago.” popejoypresents.com

Taos Winter Wine Festival

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Courtesy Winter Wine Festival

SOUPER BOWL January 27, 11 am–2 pm 5840 Office Blvd NW, ABQ Early bird tickets; adults, $42; 11 and under, $10; under 4, free; day of event $45 at the door The Roadrunner Food Bank of New Mexico hosts the 25th annual Souper Bowl, a food tasting and charity event featuring over 40 restaurants and local chefs. There will be a variety of soups, appetizers, and desserts to taste, live music to enjoy, and opportunities to vote and win prizes. rrfb.org

RUSSIAN NATIONAL BALLET THEATRE: SWAN LAKE February 1, 7:30 pm Popejoy Hall at UNM, ABQ $20–$79 Swan Lake draws from the rich tradition of Russian ballet with a tale of dark magic and soaring love. This elegant ballet comes to life under the direction of Elena Radchenko, a former head dancer, and Tchaikovsky’s original score. popejoypresents.com FRIENDS & LOVERS BALLOON RALLY February 10–11, 7 am 5000 Balloon Fiesta Pkwy, ABQ Free Gather friends, family, and loved ones and enjoy some coffee or hot chocolate while over 135 balloons take off in mass ascension at sunrise the morning of the 10th and 11th. visitalbuquerque.org

NATIONAL FIERY FOODS & BARBECUE SHOW March 2–4, times TBA Sandia Resort & Casino, ABQ $5–$15; 6 and under, free For their 30th year, the National Fiery Foods & Barbecue Show invites visitors to indulge in their desires for flavor and spice. Sample food and drinks that are hot and spicy, or sweet with a kick. Non-food vendors will have items available as well. fieryfoodsshow.com ARTsmart Annual Dinner & Auction

Amanda Thomas

happening?

THE ALBUQUERQUE HOME REMODELING & LIFESTYLE SHOW February 24–25, Saturday 10 am–5 pm, Sunday 10 am–4 pm Expo New Mexico, ABQ $6 general admission; 11 and under, free Have a home project or remodel idea that you’re interested in undertaking? Check out The Albuquerque Home Remodeling & Lifestyle Show at the Expo New Mexico fairgrounds to see what options and solutions the 150+ vendors may be able to provide. abqhomeshows.com

The Peking Acrobats

Brittany App

what’s

TAOS WINTER WINE FESTIVAL January 31–February 4, event times vary Taos Ski Valley, Taos, various locations Prices for individual events vary; Grand and Reserve Tasting, $75 The 32nd annual Taos Winter Wine Festival is a four-day celebration of food and wine, with tastings, seminars, wine dinners, films, and more. All events are 21+ only and require electronic tickets purchased in advance. taoswinterwinefest.com

ARTSMART’S ANNUAL DINNER & AUCTION March 3, 5:30–9:30 pm La Fonda on the Plaza, Santa Fe $200 single ticket; $1,750 for table of 10 “You Will Be Served…Harvey Girls Style” is the theme for this year’s annual ARTsmart dinner and auction. Held at La Fonda on the Plaza, this event is highlighted by dinner, wine, and dessert; 2018 honorary chair and guest speaker Stephen Friend; and a live and silent auction. artsmartnm.org/events

THE PEKING ACROBATS February 11, 3 pm Popejoy Hall at UNM, ABQ $20–$59 Now in their 31st year of touring, The Peking Acrobats return to Popejoy with audience favorites, including human pyramids, contortions, spinning plates, and more. The company performs traditional and new acts set to live Chinese orchestra. popejoypresents.com

ARTSMART’S ART OF HOME TOUR March 3–4, noon–4 pm Santa Fe; locations vary, see website for map and details Free In conjunction with Keller Williams Realty, ARTsmart’s Art of Home Tour presents over a dozen homes filled with art from local galleries. The homes as well as the art are for sale, with 10 percent of the proceeds from the sale of art going to ARTsmart’s art programs for Santa Fe youth. artsmartnm.org/events


Rio Grande Arts & Crafts Festival

Courtesy Rio Grande Arts & Crafts Festival

Northern New Mexico

RIO GRANDE ARTS & CRAFTS FESTIVAL March 9–11, Friday and Saturday 10 am–5 pm, Sunday 10 am–4 pm Expo New Mexico, Lujan Exhibit Complex, ABQ Day pass, $7; festival pass, $10; 11 and under, free; $1 off coupon available for parking Artists at work, food sampling, complimentary Kids’ Creation Station™, and other entertainment round out the 30th annual spring Rio Grande Arts & Crafts Festival. Discover over 180 artists and craftsmen from all over the country during this juried indoor event. riograndefestivals.com

inspiration ideas resources

Download the NEW

Su Casa app! Tour open houses Share your projects Find a home building expert! Learn more at

Dean Strober

SuCasaMagazine.com

Southwest Chocolate & Coffee Fest

SOUTHWEST CHOCOLATE & COFFEE FEST March 17–18, 10 am–6 pm Expo New Mexico, Lujan Exhibit Complex, ABQ $3–$15; 3 and under, free; parking $5 Known as the nation’s largest consumer festival for chocolate, coffee, and gourmet foods, the Southwest Chocolate & Coffee Fest comes to town with food, drinks, culinary seminars, live music, and free games and fun activities. chocolateandcoffeefest.com

DESIGN/BUILD COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL \ 505.400.3752 \\ WCEDESIGNBUILD.COM \

NEW MEXICO HOME REMODELING & PET EXPO March 24–25, Saturday 10 am–5 pm, Sunday 10 am–4 pm Santa Ana Star Center, 3001 Civic Ctr Cir NE, Rio Rancho $8 general admission; $6 seniors and military; 11 and under, free; free parking Focusing on home remodeling and improvements, this event will donate a small portion of its proceeds to pets and the support of the advancement of animal care, with Animal Humane New Mexico as a new partner. Exhibitor categories include design/build firms, remodeling companies, poured concrete, marble/granite, and more. nmhomeandpetexpo.com

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a view to the future

ARCA partners with Diamond Tail Estates to help families build legacies

Winter 2018 Advertisers

Academy Mortgage................................................................................................................................8 Albuquerque Home & Garden Show............................................................................................77 Albuquerque Sound & Vac............................................................................................................... 79 American Clay...................................................................................................................................... 27 Architectural Surfaces Inc.................................................................................................................71 BSH Appliances...................................................................................................................................17 Build Green New Mexico................................................................................................................70 Bright Ideas, Inc. dba The Lamp Shop.......................................................................................... 51 Diamond Tail Ranch............................................................................................................................7 Diego Handcrafted Homes..............................................................................................................43 Enchantment Carpet..........................................................................................................................75 Ethan Allen Home Furnishings.......................................................................................................65 Fairway Independent Mortgage.......................................................................... inside back cover Ferguson Bath, Kitchen & Lighting Gallery............................................................................... 22 Flow Homes..........................................................................................................................................33 General Electric...................................................................................................................................... 5 Greater Albuquerque Association of Realtors............................................................................63 GRG Custom Homes by Management Systems Inc................................................................61 Hermanson Construction, Inc....................................................................................................... 10 Homes by Joe Boyden........................................................................................................................ 26 Ideal Mirror & Glass.......................................................................................................................... 79 Iron Anvil Design............................................................................................................................... 67 John Mark Custom Homes..............................................................................................................73 Joseph Custom Homes......................................................................................................................39 Keller Williams Realty.......................................................................................................................35 Kirtland Federal Credit Union.......................................................................................................... 3 La Puerta Originals.............................................................................................................................43 Lee-Sure Pools, Inc..............................................................................................................................61 Lifescapes of New Mexico............................................................................................................... 30 78

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Ruben Rivera & Lora Cunningham

I

n 1957, four Albuquerque families who had children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) came together with a shared dream. In founding ARCA, they envisioned innovative programs and community-based supports that would enable all children with IDD to realize hopes and dreams, opening doors into a world where they could leave their mark on the community. “ARCA began as a grassroots effort that grew to be a national model in lifelong supports,” says ARCA CEO Edward Kaul. “On any given day, we provide residential, employment, nursing and nutrition, literacy, and recreational supports to nearly 700 infants through seniors. Today, people with IDD live, work, and have meaningful relationships throughout our community—opportunities beyond even what our founding families imagined.” Recently, an individual who is familiar with ARCA’s work and goals wanted to give back to the organization, donating to ARCA six prime lots in the Placitas master-planned community of Diamond Tail Estates. Ranging in size from 1.2 to 2.8 acres, each lot captures breathtaking mountain views in a natural, rugged setting where wild horses roam and stars seem within arm’s reach on clear, cloudless evenings. Proceeds from the sale of these six home sites will go to ARCA. “The future is ours to build,” says Kaul. “With community partners like Diamond Tail Estates, that future holds unimaginable possibilities.”—Amy Gross

Learn more about ARCA at arcaopeningdoors.org. To inquire about the available ARCA lots at Diamond Tail Estates, contact Joe Maez at The Maez Group (themaezgroupnm.com). Contact Sandia Laboratory Federal Credit Union (slfcu.org) for available financing options.

Mariposa................................................................................................................................................. 15 Marvin Design Gallery.........................................................................................................................9 Mountain West Sales..........................................................................................................................39 New Mexico Home Remodeling & Pet Expo............................................................................69 Osuna Nursery.....................................................................................................................................75 Panorama Homes.................................................................................................................back cover Pella Windows and Doors................................................................................................................... 1 Peoples Bank.........................................................................................................................................63 Piñon Window and Door, Inc........................................................................................................ 67 Re/Max Select.........................................................................................................................................2 Realty One of New Mexico..............................................................................................................23 Reliance Construction...............................................................................................................24–25 Rocky Mountain Stone......................................................................................................................73 Sandia Area Federal Credit Union................................................................................................. 11 Sierra Pacific Windows...................................................................................................................... 13 Solamente Clay Walls.........................................................................................................................71 Southwest Chocolate & Coffee Fest.............................................................................................69 Statements In Tile/Lighting/Kitchens/Flooring........................................................................41 Stonewood Flooring LLC................................................................................................................ 29 Strahle Tile & Granite........................................................................................................................65 Sukhmani Home................................................................................................................................. 28 TC Building & Realty Inc.................................................................................................................41 U.S. Eagle.................................................................................................................. inside front cover Western Building Supply...................................................................................................................37 Wholesale Timber & Viga.................................................................................................................75 William Cervantes Enterprises, Inc...............................................................................................77 Woodlife Custom Craft....................................................................................................................70 Woods Design Builders.....................................................................................................................19


Your Home Source

continued from page 14

Chris Corrie

Ideal Mirror & Glass, Inc.

Above: In 1,100 square feet of space, every inch counts. A banco made more sense than a full dining set and allowed for a continuation of the vibrant color palette. An ornate Mexican tin mirror makes the space look bigger.

Walth and Devan weren’t looking to leave the Southwestern/Santa Fe look behind, but rather wanted improve upon it with more elegant and contemporary textile and finish choices. Despite the abundance of color, the carefully considered textiles are expertly layered, mixed, and matched across pillows, upholstery, and linens in a way that feels joyous and exuberant, not haphazard. Those vibrant hues and patterns earned Walth’s townhome the nickname “Casa Bohemia.” To complement and anchor the riot of color, Devan called on the artisan wood- and ironworking talents of Leonel Capparelli of Hands of America. Among other things, Capparelli built a stunning carved armoire for the living room that houses the TV, crafted the bathroom cabinetry, and made the delicate wrought iron staircase railing. Every custom piece enhances the exquisite perfection of Walth’s home away from home, her bohemian getaway.

Ideal Mirror & Glass has installed elegant mirrors and shower doors for over 34 years. Our gallery is one of the largest shower enclosure showrooms in the state. For your upcoming remodel or new build, come by and let us provide you with your next mirror and shower enclosure. 9930 Mcknight NE Albuquerque, NM 87112 505-294-0699 or 888-223-1847 IdealMirrorandGlass.com

Albuquerque Sound & Vac

Chris Corrie

Throughout the home, Gloria Devan’s custom-designed pillows are stunning, textural accents. The pillows below (on the orange and pink chairs) are made of vintage Guatemalan textiles.

For over 25 years Albuquerque Sound & Vac has been your low voltage contractor for Central Vacuum Systems, DIRECTV, Home Theater Solutions, Intercom Systems, Network and Structured Wiring and Security & Surveillance Systems. We offer many of the premier brands including Beam, Yamaha, SpeakerCraft and many others. Our professional experienced team is ready to work with you on your home or business. 5701 Carmel Ave NE, Suite A Albuquerque, NM 87113 505-883-6136 AbqSoundandVac.com SUCASAMAGAZINE.COM

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JustWinging Winging Through Through Just

by Tom Smylie

distant drummers stop, look, and listen for woodpeckers

Tom Smylie, from Edgewood, New Mexico, is a retired wildlife biologist affiliated with the World Center for Birds of Prey. 80

SU C A S A W I NTER 2018

Mark L. Watson

E

ven if you’re not an expert in identifying bird calls, I bet you can easily tell when a woodpecker is near. Their familiar drumming and jackhammering will guide you to them, but don’t blink! Woodpeckers move fast and are famous for being visible on a tree one second, ducked behind it the next. Of the 17 species of woodpeckers in the United States, 12 species are found in New Mexico. Two of the most commonly heard and seen are the downy and hairy woodpeckers. The two appear very similar with white breasts, bright scarlet patches on the head, black backs with a white medium strip, and white wing bars; however, they’re notably different in size, with the hairy being a third larger. The hairy’s outer tail feathers are entirely white compared to the downy’s dark bars and dots. They’re often found in woodlands and are frequent— and strikingly beautiful—visitors to backyard feeders, given the right enticement. Hint: They can’t resist suet! As with all woodpeckers, the downy and hairy species have hard, straight, pointed beaks that they use to chisel and hack away on the bark and wood of trees in search of food. They have four toes, two pointing backward for added grip and stability while drilling, ramrod-straight, into trees. As they dig, searching for insects and larvae, woodpeckers tap and listen for hollow tunnels in the wood made by insects, using their acute hearing to pinpoint bugs. Their extraordinarily long, sticky, barbed tongues are then used to impale insects. Although considered a beneficial species in keeping the forest healthy by controlling woodland pests, some species can cause problems by drilling into manmade structures. If you’re quiet in the forest, you’ll undoubtedly be treated to the rhythmic hammering of the downy or hairy woodpecker. Take a moment to admire their beauty—if you can. Remember, they move fast! The woodpecker’s drumming will shroud you in the enchantment of the wild and transfer you into a sense of well being with the world.

Though nearly identical to the downy, the hairy woodpecker (above) is a third larger and has a much longer bill almost the size of its head. To attract woodpeckers of all types to your backyard feeders, try putting out suet.

Mark L. Watson

Dan Williams, NM Dept. of Game & FIsh

While drilling into a tree trunk, a downy woodpecker (here and below) uses its stiff tail feathers and four strong toes (two in front and two in back) for support.


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OFFI C E: 505-8 8 4 -8600 • W W W.THECUMMINGSTE AM.CO M 82 1 2 LOU I S I ANA BLVD. NE , SUITE B • ALBUQ UE RQ UE , NM 87113 Copyright©2017 Fairway Independent Mortgage Corporation. NMLS#2289. 4801 S. Biltmore Lane, Madison, WI 53718, 1-877-699-0353. All rights reserved. This is not an offer to enter into an agreement. Not all customers will qualify. Information, rates and programs are subject to change without notice. All products are subject to credit and property approval. Other restrictions and limitations may apply. Equal Housing Lender.

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Su Casa Northern New Mexico Winter 2018 | Digital Edition  
Su Casa Northern New Mexico Winter 2018 | Digital Edition