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the art of sitting

Salomone teamed up with Michael Nelson of Santa Fe’s EcoScapes, and together they began to transform the area into an urban oasis, landscaping with gravel and building a new seating area that essentially extended the house to the outdoors, where it is now comfortably nestled among the pines. The deck, which is itself made of pine, hovers mere inches off the ground. At night, soft recessed rope lighting beneath the deck creates a feeling of floating. Beams beneath the overhang, which are extensions of the home’s interior beams, informed the style of the roof, which is half pergola and half solid. The resulting effect is one of being at once apart from and connected to the main structure. In the evening, looking up through the pergola with her canine companion Angel on her lap, Salomone has a clear view to open, starry skies. A comparatively sunny spot on the side of the main house provides another sitting area. Here the relative lack of pine canopy allows a golden bamboo garden to thrive—a lovely counterpoint to the cut bamboo fence running the perimeter of the backyard, composed of panels shipped in from Cali Bamboo in San Diego and framed in redwood by Nelson’s carpenter.

A copse of live bamboo appears to thrive in the backyard where other plants once struggled in the acidic soil.

“Being forced to focus on hardscape rather than landscape, the sparse and minimal design of Zen was really a natural solution.” —Mary Ann Salomone

The pine deck, suspended mere inches from the ground, is softly illuminated from underneath by rope lighting. “I put as many Japanese influences in as I could,” says Salomone of her renovated Stamm. 62

S U C A S A S U M M E R 2014

Su Casa Northern New Mexico Summer 2014 Digital Edition  

Su Casa Northern New Mexico Summer 2014 Digital Edition

Su Casa Northern New Mexico Summer 2014 Digital Edition  

Su Casa Northern New Mexico Summer 2014 Digital Edition