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In Jon Dick, of Santa Fe–based Archaeo Architects, Raymond found a kindred, less-is-more spirit, and an architect up to the task of building on steep, high terrain. “Simpler is not easier; it’s quite the opposite,” says Dick, whose work is inspired as much by modernist sensibility as by traditional Southwestern design. He authored a Northern New Mexico–style home with a contemporary, Manhattan-loft-like interior; Raymond took charge of the finishes.

tradition, with a twist Perched high on the stunning property, at the end of a steep and winding driveway, Raymond and Deborah’s new house incorporates the elements that define our regional architecture: a pitched metal roof, a stucco exterior, and even a hacienda-style courtyard. “Some of the earliest houses excavated in this region had courtyards,” notes Dick, who regards this one as an interior focal point that counterbalances the commanding exterior views.

The largely white living room naturally calls for furniture in the same palette. The off-white leather set from Kroll International fits the bill, as does the white coffee table designed and fabricated by the homeowner; its highly polished lacquered wood and painted starfire glass top are clever foils to the room’s matte finishes.

Cool whites and grays extend from floor to ceiling in the expansive formal living room. Opposite, top: With a storm looming, pitched metal roofs on the main home and its “twin towers” stand ready to take on the elements.

“The weight of the doors gives the room power. It feels real from the moment you walk in.”—Raymond, homeowner

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Su Casa Northern New Mexico Summer 2014 Digital Edition  

Su Casa Northern New Mexico Summer 2014 Digital Edition

Su Casa Northern New Mexico Summer 2014 Digital Edition  

Su Casa Northern New Mexico Summer 2014 Digital Edition